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Sample records for integrating lys-n proteolysis

  1. Proteolysis regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integration

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ryuichi; Gunawan, Felix; Beisaw, Arica; Jimenez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Kostin, Sawa; Kawakami, Koichi; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue integrity is critical for organ formation and function. During heart development, cardiomyocytes differentiate and integrate to form a coherent tissue that contracts synchronously. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac tissue integrity are poorly understood. Here we show that proteolysis, via the E3 ubiquitin ligase ASB2, regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integrity. Cardiomyocytes in asb2b zebrafish mutants fail to terminally differentiate, resulting in reduced cardiac contractility and output. Mosaic analyses reveal a cell-autonomous requirement for Asb2b in cardiomyocytes for their integration as asb2b mutant cardiomyocytes are unable to meld into wild-type myocardial tissue. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that ASB2 negatively regulates TCF3, a bHLH transcription factor. TCF3 must be degraded for cardiomyocyte maturation, as TCF3 gain-of-function causes a number of phenotypes associated with cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Overall, our results show that proteolysis has an important role in cardiomyocyte maturation and the formation of a coherent myocardial tissue. PMID:28211472

  2. Sequencing Lys-N Proteolytic Peptides by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated.

  3. Proteolysis at a Specific Extracellular Residue Implicates Integral Membrane CLAG3 in Malaria Parasite Nutrient Channels

    PubMed Central

    Nguitragool, Wang; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2014-01-01

    The plasmodial surface anion channel mediates uptake of nutrients and other solutes into erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites. The clag3 genes of P. falciparum determine this channel’s activity in human malaria, but how the encoded proteins contribute to transport is unknown. Here, we used proteases to examine the channel’s composition and function. While proteases with distinct specificities all cleaved within an extracellular domain of CLAG3, they produced differing degrees of transport inhibition. Chymotrypsin-induced inhibition depended on parasite genotype, with channels induced by the HB3 parasite affected to a greater extent than those of the Dd2 clone. Inheritance of functional proteolysis in the HB3×Dd2 genetic cross, DNA transfection, and gene silencing experiments all pointed to the clag3 genes, providing independent evidence for a role of these genes. Protease protection assays with a Dd2-specific inhibitor and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a variant L1115F residue on a CLAG3 extracellular loop contributes to inhibitor binding and accounts for differences in functional proteolysis. These findings indicate that surface-exposed CLAG3 is the relevant pool of this protein for channel function. They also suggest structural models for how exposed CLAG3 domains contribute to pore formation and parasite nutrient uptake. PMID:24699906

  4. In silico analysis of protein Lys-N𝜀-acetylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Shyama Prasad; Thelen, Jay J.; Miernyk, Ján A.

    2014-01-01

    Among post-translational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N𝜀-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. The study of Lys-acetylation of plant proteins has lagged behind studies of mammalian and microbial cells; 1000s of acetylation sites have been identified in mammalian proteins compared with only hundreds of sites in plant proteins. While most previous emphasis was focused on post-translational modifications of histones, more recent studies have addressed metabolic regulation. Being directly coupled with cellular CoA/acetyl-CoA and NAD/NADH, reversible Lys-N𝜀-acetylation has the potential to control, or contribute to control, of primary metabolism, signaling, and growth and development. PMID:25136347

  5. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor: a functional integrator of extracellular proteolysis, cell adhesion, and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2013-06-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a cell surface receptor involved in a multitude of physiologic and pathologic processes. uPAR regulates simultaneously a branch of the plasminogen activator system and modulates cell adhesion and intracellular signaling by interacting with extracellular matrix components and signaling receptors. The multiple uPAR functions are deeply interconnected, and their integration determines the effects that uPAR expression triggers in different contexts. The proteolytic function of uPAR affects both the signaling and the adhesive functions of the receptor, whereas these latter two are closely interconnected. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that connect and mutually regulate the different uPAR functions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. [Proteolysis in digestive system regulation].

    PubMed

    Korot'ko, G F

    2013-01-01

    Signal enzymes with direct and indirect hormone releasing action are formed by means of proteolysis from exogenic and endogenic proteins. The proteolysis is the basis of hormone processing. The limited proteolysis forms hormones from pro-hormones, ligand proteolysis excludes or reduces their stimulated or inhibited effects. The existence of polipotent proteinaso-activated receptors with regulative and modulated role in norm and pathology was proved.

  7. In-depth quantitative cardiac proteomics combining electron transfer dissociation and the metalloendopeptidase Lys-N with the SILAC mouse.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Arjen; Mohammed, Shabaz; Low, Teck Y; Zanivan, Sara; van Veen, Toon A B; Delanghe, Bernard; Heck, Albert J R

    2011-10-01

    In quantitative proteomics stable isotope labeling has progressed from cultured cells toward the total incorporation of labeled atoms or amino acids into whole multicellular organisms. For instance, the recently introduced (13)C(6)-lysine labeled SILAC mouse allows accurate comparison of protein expression directly in tissue. In this model, only lysine, but not arginine, residues are isotope labeled, as the latter may cause complications to the quantification by in vivo conversion of arginine to proline. The sole labeling of lysines discourages the use of trypsin, as not all peptides will be quantifiable. Therefore, in the initial work Lys-C was used for digestion. Here, we demonstrate that the lysine-directed protease metalloendopeptidase Lys-N is an excellent alternative. As lysine directed peptides generally yield longer and higher charged peptides, alongside the more traditional collision induced dissociation we also implemented electron transfer dissociation in a quantitative stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture workflow for the first time. The utility of these two complementary approaches is highlighted by investigating the differences in protein expression between the left and right ventricle of a mouse heart. Using Lys-N and electron transfer dissociation yielded coverage to a depth of 3749 proteins, which is similar as earlier investigations into the murine heart proteome. In addition, this strategy yields quantitative information on ∼ 2000 proteins with a median coverage of four peptides per protein in a single strong cation exchange-liquid chromatography-MS experiment, revealing that the left and right ventricle proteomes are very similar qualitatively as well as quantitatively.

  8. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  9. Plastid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Zach

    2015-09-01

    Progress in the field of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in recent years has not surpassed plant biology. Nevertheless, reports on RIP in plants, and especially in chloroplasts, are still scarce. Of the four different families of intramembrane proteases, only two have been linked to chloroplasts so far, rhomboids and site-2 proteases (S2Ps). The lack of chloroplast-located rhomboid proteases was associated with reduced fertility and aberrations in flower morphology, probably due to perturbations in jasmonic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in chloroplasts. Mutations in homologues of S2P resulted in chlorophyll deficiency and impaired chloroplast development, through a yet unknown mechanism. To date, the only known substrate of RIP in chloroplasts is a PHD transcription factor, located in the envelope. Upon proteolytic cleavage by an unknown protease, the soluble N-terminal domain of this protein is released from the membrane and relocates to the nucleus, where it activates the transcription of the ABA response gene ABI4. Continuing studies on these proteases and substrates, as well as identification of the genes responsible for different chloroplast mutant phenotypes, are expected to shed more light on the roles of intramembrane proteases in chloroplast biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulated proteolysis in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Ute

    2005-10-01

    Photoreceptors regulate many aspects of development throughout the life cycle of a plant. Recent advances have demonstrated the importance of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in the control of development by light. Both some of the photoreceptors themselves and, in particular, transcription factors that are involved in transducing the light signal are subject to regulated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

  11. Proteolysis in the secretory pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.E.; Bienkowski, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Many secretory proteins are degraded intracellularly rather than secreted, however the location of this catabolic process is not known. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the degradation occurs in the organelles of the secretory pathway. Slices of rat liver were incubated with (/sup 14/C)leucine for 3 h and then incubated under chase conditions for 30 min. The tissue was homogenized and the Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER) and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated by ultracentrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient. The organelles were incubated in 0.3M sucrose-50 mM citrate (pH 4) for 8-12 h at 37 C; control samples were incubated at 4 C. Percent degradation was calculated as the amount of acid soluble radioactivity released relative to total radioactivity in the sample. Proteolysis in the organelles incubated at 37 C was as follows: Golgi: 15-25%; sER: 10-20%; rER: 10-20%. Proteolysis at 4 C was negligible in all cases. These results support the hypothesis that the compartments of the secretory pathway are capable of degrading newly synthesized secretory proteins.

  12. Efficient proteolysis strategies based on microchip bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2013-04-26

    In proteome research, proteolysis is an important procedure prior to the mass spectrometric identification of proteins. The typical time of conventional in-solution proteolysis is as long as several hours to half a day. To enhance proteolysis efficiency, a variety of microchip bioreactors have been developed for the rapid digestion and identification of proteins in the past decade. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of microchip bioreactors in protein digestion. The subjects covered include microchip proteolysis systems, the immobilization of proteases in microchannels, the applications of microchip bioreactors in highly efficient proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that microchip bioreactors will become powerful tools in protein analysis and will find a wide range of applications in high-throughput protein identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulated proteolysis in bacterial development

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Kroos, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use proteases to control three types of events temporally and spatially during processes of morphological development. These events are destruction of regulatory proteins, activation of regulatory proteins, and production of signals. While some of these events are entirely cytoplasmic, others involve intramembrane proteolysis of a substrate, trans-membrane signaling, or secretion. In some cases, multiple proteolytic events are organized into pathways, e.g., turnover of a regulatory protein activates a protease that generates a signal. We review well-studied and emerging examples, and identify recurring themes and important questions for future research. We focus primarily on paradigms learned from studies of model organisms, but we note connections to regulated proteolytic events that govern bacterial adaptation, biofilm formation and disassembly, and pathogenesis. PMID:24354618

  14. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  15. Hypothermic anesthesia attenuates postoperative proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D J; Brooks, D C; Pressler, V M; Hulton, N R; Colpoys, M F; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-01-01

    The catabolic response that commonly occurs after major operation is characterized by net skeletal muscle proteolysis and accelerated nitrogen excretion. This response was absent in patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures associated with the combination of cardiopulmonary bypass, narcotic anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade, and hypothermia. Forearm nitrogen release was 422 +/- 492 nmol/100 ml X min on the first postoperative day, approximately 25% of preoperative values (1677 +/- 411, p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and the degree of negative nitrogen balance were comparable to levels observed in nonstressed, fasting subjects. The potential role of hypothermia, high-dose fentanyl anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade in modifying the catabolic response to laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection was further evaluated in animal studies. Six hours after operation, amino acid nitrogen release from the hindquarter was 84% less than control values (p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and urea production were also reduced compared to normothermic controls. It is concluded that the combination of hypothermia, narcotic anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade attenuates the catabolic response to injury and thus may be useful in the care of critically ill surgical patients. PMID:3767477

  16. Protein dynamics and proteolysis in plant vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Müntz, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Plant cells cannot live without their vacuoles. The tissues and organs of a plant contain a wide variety of differentiated and specialized vacuoles -- even a single plant cell can possess two or more types of vacuoles. Vacuolar proteins are encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized in the cytoplasm. Their transport into the vacuolar compartment is under cytoplasmic control. Transcription seems to be a major control level for differential protein supply to the vacuoles. It is at this level that vacuole differentiation and functions are mainly integrated into cellular processes. Recycling amino acids generated by protein degradation is a major function of the vacuole. This is most evident when storage proteins are mobilized in storage tissues of generative or vegetative organs in order to nourish the embryo of germinating seeds or sprouting buds. When specific proteins are transferred to the vacuole for immediate degradation this compartment contributes to the adaptation of protein complexes in response to changes in developmental or environmental conditions. Vacuolar proteases are involved in protein degradation during reversible senescence and programmed cell death, which is also called irreversible senescence. Vacuoles contribute to defence against pathogens and herbivores by limited and unlimited proteolysis. Our present knowledge on functions and processes of vacuolar protein dynamics in plants is reviewed. Research perspectives are deduced.

  17. Squid neurofilaments. Phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in situ.

    PubMed

    Brown, A; Eagles, P A

    1986-10-01

    Three major polypeptides co-purify with neurofilaments from squid (Loligo forbesi) axoplasm: P60 (apparent Mr 60,000), P200 (apparent Mr 200,000) and Band 1 (apparent Mr 400,000). Anti-IFA, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope common to all classes of intermediate filaments, binds to P200 and P60. When axoplasm is incubated with [32P]Pi, the major phosphorylated polypeptides are P200 and Band 1. We have investigated Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of [32P]phosphorylated axoplasm in order to localize the major sites of phosphorylation and to probe the arrangement of the polypeptides in the filament. The proteinase preferentially cleaves P200 and Band 1, liberating the phosphorylated domains. Analysis of proteolysed filaments by electron microscopy and gel electrophoresis shows that most of P200 and Band 1 can be cleaved while still maintaining intact filaments. We suggest that P200 is initially cleaved within a single highly sensitive region, generating two major fragments called P100p (apparent Mr 100,000) and P110s (apparent Mr 110,000). P100p contains the Anti-IFA epitope and co-sediments with filaments, whereas P110s is highly phosphorylated and does not sediment with filaments. Band 1 is cleaved to produce a soluble high-Mr fragment that is phosphorylated and that represents a major portion of the undigested component, whereas P60 is relatively resistant to limited proteolysis. Thus proteolysis appears to define two major filament domains: a conserved core that forms the backbone of the filament, and a highly phosphorylated peripheral region that is not essential for filament integrity.

  18. DNA-Protein Crosslink Proteolysis Repair.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Bruno; Popovic, Marta; Ramadan, Kristijan

    2017-06-01

    Proteins that are covalently bound to DNA constitute a specific type of DNA lesion known as DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). DPCs represent physical obstacles to the progression of DNA replication. If not repaired, DPCs cause stalling of DNA replication forks that consequently leads to DNA double-strand breaks, the most cytotoxic DNA lesion. Although DPCs are common DNA lesions, the mechanism of DPC repair was unclear until now. Recent work unveiled that DPC repair is orchestrated by proteolysis performed by two distinct metalloproteases, SPARTAN in metazoans and Wss1 in yeast. This review summarizes recent discoveries on two proteases in DNA replication-coupled DPC repair and establishes DPC proteolysis repair as a separate DNA repair pathway for genome stability and protection from accelerated aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The discovery of ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    In early 1980, Irwin A. Rose, Avram Hershko, and Aaron Ciechanover published two papers in PNAS that reported the astounding observation that energy-dependent intracellular proteolysis was far more complicated than the previously accepted models of lysosomal proteolysis or the action of ATP-dependent proteases such as bacterial lon. In fact, it has turned out to be even more complicated than they could have suspected. The general model of covalently attaching a small protein as a targeting signal has proved to be every bit as important to eukaryotic cells as the better understood modifications such as phosphorylation or acetylation. The key player in this modification, a small protein called ubiquitin (APF-1 in these papers), is the founding member of a large family of proteins containing the β-grasp fold and is used as a posttranslational targeting signal to modify the structure, function, and/or localization of other proteins. The story of this discovery is a textbook example of the confluence of intellectual curiosity, unselfish collaboration, chance, luck, and preparation. PMID:16230621

  20. Highly Efficient Proteolysis Accelerated by Electromagnetic Waves for Peptide Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwen; Liu, Ting; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics will contribute greatly to the understanding of gene functions in the post-genomic era. In proteome research, protein digestion is a key procedure prior to mass spectrometry identification. During the past decade, a variety of electromagnetic waves have been employed to accelerate proteolysis. This review focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of these novel proteolysis approaches for digesting and identifying proteins. The subjects covered include microwave-accelerated protein digestion, infrared-assisted proteolysis, ultraviolet-enhanced protein digestion, laser-assisted proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that these novel proteolysis strategies accelerated by various electromagnetic waves will become powerful tools in proteome research and will find wide applications in high throughput protein digestion and identification. PMID:22379392

  1. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  2. Regulation of CIRL-1 proteolysis and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Deyev, Igor E; Petrenko, Alexander G

    2010-04-01

    Calcium-independent receptor of alpha-latrotoxin (CIRL-1) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor implicated in the regulation of exocytosis. CIRL-1 biosynthesis involves constitutive proteolytic processing that takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum, requires the receptor's GPS domain, and yields heterologous two-subunit receptor complexes. It was proposed that the GPS-directed cleavage is based on cis-autoproteolysis. In this study, we demonstrate that activators of protein kinase C - PMA and ionomycin, can inhibit the cleavage of CIRL-1 precursor in transfected cells. Both reagents also downregulate trafficking of CIRL-1 to the cell surface that results in accumulation of the uncleaved receptor precursor inside the cells. Experiments with a non-cleavable soluble mutant of CIRL-1 showed that the downregulation of the receptor trafficking is independent of its cleavage. Our data suggest that the GPS proteolysis of CIRL-1 is not a purely autocatalytic process and may involve auxiliary proteins or factors that become available in the course of CIRL-1 trafficking. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  4. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases.

  5. An Acrobatic Substrate Metamorphosis Reveals a Requirement for Substrate Conformational Dynamics in Trypsin Proteolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Pendlebury, Devon F.; ...

    2016-11-03

    The molecular basis of enzyme catalytic power and specificity derives from dynamic interactions between enzyme and substrate during catalysis. While considerable effort has been devoted to understanding how conformational dynamics within enzymes affect catalysis, the role of conformational dynamics within protein substrates has not been addressed. Here in this paper, we examine the importance of substrate dynamics in the cleavage of Kunitz-BPTI protease inhibitors by mesotrypsin, finding that the varied conformational dynamics of structurally similar substrates can profoundly impact the rate of catalysis. A 1.4 Å crystal structure of a mesotrypsin-product complex formed with a rapidly cleaved substrate reveals amore » dramatic conformational change in the substrate upon proteolysis. Using long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of acyl-enzyme intermediates with proteolysis rates spanning three orders of magnitude, we identify global and local dynamic features of substrates on the ns-μs timescale that correlate with enzymatic rates and explain differential susceptibility to proteolysis. By integrating multiple enhanced sampling methods for molecular dynamics, we model a viable conformational pathway between substratelike and product-like states, linking substrate dynamics on the ns-μs timescale with large collective substrate motions on the much slower timescale of catalysis. Our findings implicate substrate flexibility as a critical determinant of catalysis.« less

  6. An Acrobatic Substrate Metamorphosis Reveals a Requirement for Substrate Conformational Dynamics in Trypsin Proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kayode, Olumide; Wang, Ruiying; Pendlebury, Devon F.; Cohen, Itay; Henin, Rachel D.; Hockla, Alexandra; Soares, Alexei S.; Papo, Niv; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Radisky, Evette S.

    2016-11-03

    The molecular basis of enzyme catalytic power and specificity derives from dynamic interactions between enzyme and substrate during catalysis. While considerable effort has been devoted to understanding how conformational dynamics within enzymes affect catalysis, the role of conformational dynamics within protein substrates has not been addressed. Here in this paper, we examine the importance of substrate dynamics in the cleavage of Kunitz-BPTI protease inhibitors by mesotrypsin, finding that the varied conformational dynamics of structurally similar substrates can profoundly impact the rate of catalysis. A 1.4 Å crystal structure of a mesotrypsin-product complex formed with a rapidly cleaved substrate reveals a dramatic conformational change in the substrate upon proteolysis. Using long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of acyl-enzyme intermediates with proteolysis rates spanning three orders of magnitude, we identify global and local dynamic features of substrates on the ns-μs timescale that correlate with enzymatic rates and explain differential susceptibility to proteolysis. By integrating multiple enhanced sampling methods for molecular dynamics, we model a viable conformational pathway between substratelike and product-like states, linking substrate dynamics on the ns-μs timescale with large collective substrate motions on the much slower timescale of catalysis. Our findings implicate substrate flexibility as a critical determinant of catalysis.

  7. Suppression of interleukin-33 bioactivity through proteolysis by apoptotic caspases.

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Alexander U; Cullen, Sean P; McNeela, Edel A; Duriez, Patrick J; Afonina, Inna S; Sheridan, Clare; Brumatti, Gabriela; Taylor, Rebecca C; Kersse, Kristof; Vandenabeele, Peter; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2009-07-17

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the IL-1 family and is involved in polarization of T cells toward a T helper 2 (Th2) cell phenotype. IL-33 is thought to be activated via caspase-1-dependent proteolysis, similar to the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and IL-18, but this remains unproven. Here we showed that IL-33 was processed by caspases activated during apoptosis (caspase-3 and -7) but was not a physiological substrate for caspases associated with inflammation (caspase-1, -4, and -5). Furthermore, caspase-dependent processing of IL-33 was not required for ST2 receptor binding or ST2-dependent activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor. Indeed, caspase-dependent proteolysis of IL-33 dramatically attenuated IL-33 bioactivity in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that IL-33 does not require proteolysis for activation, but rather, that IL-33 bioactivity is diminished through caspase-dependent proteolysis within apoptotic cells. Thus, caspase-mediated proteolysis acts as a switch to dampen the proinflammatory properties of IL-33.

  8. Infrared-assisted tryptic proteolysis for peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Luyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-07-01

    In this report, infrared (IR) radiation was employed to enhance the efficiency of tryptic proteolysis for peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin in sealed transparent Eppendorf tubes were allowed to digest under an IR lamp at 37 degrees C. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of BSA and myoglobin (MYO) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with the sequence coverages of 69% (BSA) and 90% (MYO) that were much better than those obtained by conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The present IR-assisted proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  9. Temperature dependence of the thrombin-catalyzed proteolysis of prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2004-07-01

    Measurement of the temperature-dependence of thrombin-catalyzed cleavage of the Arg(155)-Ser(156) and Arg(284)-Thr(285) peptide bonds in prothrombin and prothrombin-derived substrates has yielded Arrhenius parameters that are far too large for classical mechanistic interpretation in terms of a simple hydrolytic reaction. Such a difference from the kinetic behavior exhibited in trypsin- and chymotrypsin-catalyzed proteolysis of peptide bonds is attributed to contributions by enzyme exosite interactions as well as enzyme conformational equilibria to the magnitudes of the experimentally determined Arrhenius parameters. Although the pre-exponential factor and the energy of activation deduced from the temperature-dependence of rate constants for proteolysis by thrombin cannot be accorded the usual mechanistic significance, their evaluation serves a valuable role by highlighting the existence of contributions other than those emanating from simple peptide hydrolysis to the kinetics of proteolysis by thrombin and presumably other enzymes of the blood coagulation system.

  10. Regulation by proteolysis: energy-dependent proteases and their targets.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, S; Maurizi, M R

    1992-01-01

    A number of critical regulatory proteins in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are subject to rapid, energy-dependent proteolysis. Rapid degradation combined with control over biosynthesis provides a mechanism by which the availability of a protein can be limited both temporally and spatially. Highly unstable regulatory proteins are involved in numerous biological functions, particularly at the commitment steps in developmental pathways and in emergency responses. The proteases involved in energy-dependent proteolysis are large proteins with the ability to use ATP to scan for appropriate targets and degrade complete proteins in a processive manner. These cytoplasmic proteases are also able to degrade many abnormal proteins in the cell. PMID:1480111

  11. Structural organization of mammalian prions as probed by limited proteolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The GPI- transgenic mouse model was used to study the structure of GPI- prions. We obtained valuable information about the structure of prions by performing limited proteolysis of the GPI- prions and analyzing the results by mass spectrometry and Western blot. This information coupled with previous ...

  12. A plasma proteolysis pathway comprising blood coagulation proteases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Li, Yun; Bhattacharya, Arup; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2016-07-05

    Coagulation factors are essential for hemostasis. Here, we show that these factors also team up to degrade plasma proteins that are unrelated to hemostasis. Prolidase, SRC and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42) are used as probes. Each probe, upon entering the blood circulation, binds and activates factor XII (FXII), triggering the intrinsic and common coagulation cascades, which in turn activate factor VII, a component of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. Activated factor VII (FVIIa) rapidly degrades the circulating probes. Therefore, FXII and FVIIa serve as the sensor/initiator and executioner, respectively, for the proteolysis pathway. Moreover, activation of this pathway by one probe leads to the degradation of all three probes. Significant activation of this pathway follows tissue injury and may also occur in other disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, of which Aβ1-42 is a key driver. However, enoxaparin, a clinically used anticoagulant, inhibits the proteolysis pathway and elevates plasma levels of the probes. Enoxaparin may also mitigate potential impact of activators of the proteolysis pathway on coagulation. Our results suggest that the proteolysis pathway is important for maintaining low levels of various plasma proteins. Our finding that enoxaparin inhibits this pathway provides a means to control it. Inhibition of this pathway may facilitate the development of disease biomarkers and protein therapeutics, e.g., plasma Aβ1-42 as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease or recombinant human prolidase as an antitumor agent.

  13. Proteolysis in Mozzarella cheeses manufactured by different industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Costabel, L; Pauletti, M S; Hynes, E

    2007-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of stretching temperature, fat content, and time of brining on proteolysis during ripening of Mozzarella cheeses. Seventeen cheese-making experiments (batches) were carried out on an industrial scale on successive days, following the standard procedure with some modifications. Fat content of cheese milk, temperature at the stretching step, and time of brining varied from one batch to another as required by the experimental design, outlined by a surface response model. Proteolysis was assessed during ripening of samples, which was prolonged for at least 3 mo, by means of electrophoresis, nitrogen fractions, and soluble peptide mapping. The amount of soluble nitrogen at pH 4.6 was not significantly different in cheeses obtained by diverse procedures, but it increased during ripening of all samples. This result was coincident with the breakdown of alpha(s1)- and beta-caseins evidenced by electrophoresis, which reached similar extents at late stages of ripening, regardless of the cheese-making process. Multivariate analysis on soluble peptide profiles obtained by liquid chromatography also detected sample grouping according to ripening time, but did not evidence any separation caused by the cheese-making technology. We concluded that the changes in the cheese-making process assayed in this work were insufficient to produce significant differences in proteolysis of the cheeses. Ripening time had more influence on proteolysis of Mozzarella cheeses than any other assayed variable.

  14. Effects of reduction and proteolysis on cashew allergens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Allergic reaction to cashew ingestion is frequently more severe than reaction to peanut ingestion, and food allergens are commonly resistant to digestive proteases. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of cashew proteins to proteolysis. Cashew protein extracts and purified c...

  15. Sarcomeric thick and thin filament overlap influences postmortem proteolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The interaction between sarcomere length (SL) and proteolysis on meat tenderness is not clear. Indeed, the extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of sarcomere le...

  16. Sarcomere Length Influences u-calpain Mediated Proteolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle shortening and postmortem proteolysis both influence beef tenderness, but their interacting effects on tenderness are relatively unknown. Inherent myofibril structure and the extent of overlap between myosin and actin filaments are hypothesized to affect the availability of substrates for deg...

  17. Sarcomere length influences postmortem proteolysis of excised bovine semitendinosus muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The interaction between sarcomere length and postmortem proteolysis as related to meat tenderness is not clear. The extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging-induced tenderization. The objective of this study was to determin...

  18. Biofilm recruitment of Vibrio cholerae by matrix proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-11-01

    The appearance of bacterial biofilms involves secretion of polysaccharides and proteins that form an extracellular matrix embedding the bacteria. Proteases have also been observed, but their role has remained unclear. Smith and co-workers have now found that proteolysis can contribute to further recruitment of bacteria to Vibrio cholerae biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanostructured microfluidic digestion system for rapid high-performance proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hao, Si-Jie; Yu, Xu; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-02-07

    A novel microfluidic protein digestion system with a nanostructured and bioactive inner surface was constructed by an easy biomimetic self-assembly strategy for rapid and effective proteolysis in 2 minutes, which is faster than the conventional overnight digestion methods. It is expected that this work would contribute to rapid online digestion in future high-throughput proteomics.

  20. Amelogenin “Nanorods” Formation During Proteolysis by Mmp-20

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiudong; Sun, Zhi; Ma, Ruiwen; Fan, Daming; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenin is cleaved by enamelysin (Mmp-20) soon after its secretion, and the cleavage products accumulate in specific locations during enamel formation, suggesting that parent amelogenin proteolysis is necessary for activating its functions. To investigate the precise roles of Mmp-20 and its influence on the assembly of amelogenin, an in vitro enzymatic digestion process mimicking the initial stages of amelogenin proteolysis was investigated at near-physiological conditions using recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) and enamelysin. Hierarchically organized nanorod structures formed during different digestion stages were detected by TEM. At the earliest stage, uniformly dispersed parent amelogenin spherical particles, mixed with some darker stained smaller spheres, and accompanying elongated chain-like nanostructures were observed. Cylindrical nanorods, which appeared to be the result of tight assembly of thin subunit cylindrical discs with thicknesses ranging from ~2.5 nm to ~6.0 nm, were formed after an hour of proteolysis. These subunit building blocks stacked to form nanorods with maximum length of ~100 nm. With the production of more cleavage products, additional morphologies spontaneously evolved from the cylindrical nanorods. Larger ball-like aggregates ultimately formed at the end of proteolysis. The uniform spherical particles, nanorods, morphological patterns evolved from nanorods, and globular aggregated microstructures were successively formed by means of co-assembly of amelogenin and its cleavage products during a comparatively slow proteolysis process. We propose that, following the C-terminal cleavage of amelogenin, co-assembly with its fragments leads to formation of nanorod structures whose properties eventually dictate the super-structural organization of enamel matrix, controlling the elongated growth of enamel apatite crystals. PMID:21840397

  1. Proteolysis of the proofreading subunit controls the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Cianchetta, Stefano; Reggiani, Luca; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2009-11-01

    The C-terminal region of the proofreading subunit (epsilon) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is shown here to be labile and to contain the residues (identified between F187 and R213) responsible for association with the polymerase subunit (alpha). We also identify two alpha-helices of the polymerase subunit (comprising the residues E311-M335 and G339-D353, respectively) as the determinants of binding to epsilon. The C-terminal region of epsilon is degraded by the ClpP protease assisted by the GroL molecular chaperone, while other factors control the overall concentration in vivo of epsilon. Among these factors, the chaperone DnaK is of primary importance for preserving the integrity of epsilon. Remarkably, inactivation of DnaK confers to Escherichia coli inviable phenotype at 42 degrees C, and viability can be restored over-expressing epsilon. Altogether, our observations indicate that the association between epsilon and alpha subunits of DNA polymerase III depends on small portions of both proteins, the association of which is controlled by proteolysis of epsilon. Accordingly, the factors catalysing (ClpP, GroL) or preventing (DnaK) this proteolysis exert a crucial checkpoint of the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III core.

  2. Isolation and purification of versican and analysis of versican proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Foulcer, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Apte, Suneel S

    2015-01-01

    Versican is a widely distributed chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that forms large complexes with the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA). As a consequence of HA binding to its receptor CD44 and interactions of the versican C-terminal globular (G3) domain with a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, versican is a key component of well-defined networks in pericellular matrix and extracellular matrix. It is crucial for several developmental processes in the embryo and there is increasing interest in its roles in cancer and inflammation. Versican proteolysis by ADAMTS proteases is highly regulated, occurs at specific peptide bonds, and is relevant to several physiological and disease mechanisms. In this chapter, methods are described for the isolation and detection of intact and cleaved versican in tissues using morphologic and biochemical techniques. These, together with the methodologies for purification and analysis of recombinant versican and a versican fragment provided here, are likely to facilitate further progress on the biology of versican and its proteolysis.

  3. The proteolysis of trypsin inhibitors in legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A

    1988-01-01

    The seeds of plants often contain large amounts of proteins, which are subjected to extensive proteolytic processing during seed development and subsequent germination. One class of legume seed proteins, the Bowman-Birk-type trypsin inhibitors, has proved especially useful as a subject in studying these events. Sequence studies of the trypsin inhibitors from a number of legume species suggest that many of the inhibitors undergo a limited shortening at the amino terminus during seed development. However, during germination, the inhibitors appear to function as storage proteins. As such, they are subjected to extensive proteolysis, ultimately leading to their destruction. This degradative process has been studied extensively in the mung bean (Vigna radiata [L.] Wilczek). Proteolysis of the mung bean trypsin inhibitor involves, at least initially, an ordered sequence of limited proteolytic cleavages. The two proteases involved in the initial phases of this degradation have been identified and partially characterized.

  4. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  5. Continuous proteolysis with a stabilized protease. II. Continuous experiments.

    PubMed

    Boudrant, J; Cheftel, C

    1976-12-01

    Batch proteolysis experiments were performed in order to choose a protein-protease system to prepare a correct hydrolysate suitable for the enrichment of soft-drinks. The system eventually studied was casein-Alcalase. Comparative batch and continuous proteolysis of casein by Alcalase showed that the reaction, which does not exactly follow first order kinetics with respect to the substrate concentration, is inhibited by the reaction products. Furthermore, experiments were done in order to determine the reaction conditions (pH8.8 in the reactor, casein concentration 5%, 40 degrees C). Determining the molecular weight of Alcalase (43,000) suggested the choice of ultrafiltration membrane PM 30. Sutdies of continuous proteolysis with the chemically stabilized enzyme retained by the ultrafiltration reactor showed that protease reuse for seven days at 40 degrees C is possible and that the growth of microorganisms is practically inhibited under these conditions. Gel chromatography showed the molecular weight.range of the peptides to be less than 2,000. Triangular taste tests showed that the threshold identification concentration of the dry hydrolysate in orange juice is about 0.65%.

  6. Functional significance of membrane associated proteolysis in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin against Colorado potato beetle.

    PubMed

    García-Robles, Inmaculada; Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Sánchez, Jorge; Contreras, Estefanía; Real, M Dolores; Rausell, Carolina

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are widely used as biocontrol agents in bioinsecticides and transgenic plants. In the three domain-Cry toxins, domain II has been identified as an important determinant of their highly specific activity against insects. In this work, we assessed the role in membrane associated proteolysis and toxicity in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) of a previously reported ADAM recognition motif present in Cry3Aa toxin domain II. We used site-directed mutagenesis to modify the Bacillus thuringiensis cry3A gene in amino acid residues 344, 346, 347, 351 and 353 of the ADAM recognition motif in Cry3Aa toxin. Cry3Aa toxin mutants displayed decreased toxicity when compared to the wild type toxin and impaired ability to compete CPB brush border membrane associated cleavage of an ADAM fluorogenic substrate. Although the proteolytic profile of Cry3Aa toxin mutants generated by brush border membrane associated proteases was similar to that of Cry3Aa toxin, the metalloprotease inhibitor 1,10-phenanthroline was less efficient on the proteolysis of mutants than on that of the wild type toxin. The relevance of the Cry3Aa-ADAM interaction through the predicted recognition sequence was further confirmed by analyzing the effect of membrane integrity disturbance on Cry3Aa toxin membrane associated proteolysis and CPB larvae toxicity. Data support that Cry3Aa proteolysis, as a result of the interaction with ADAM through the Cry3Aa recognition motif, is essential for Cry3Aa toxic action in CPB. Detailed knowledge of Cry3Aa interaction with CPB midgut membrane should facilitate the development of more effective Bt based products against this devastating pest and other Coleoptera. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Membrane Associated Matrix Proteolysis and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spinale, Francis G.; Janicki, Joseph S.; Zile, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex entity containing a large portfolio of structural proteins, signaling molecules, and proteases. Changes in the overall integrity and activational state of these ECM constituents can contribute to tissue structure and function, which is certainly true of the myocardium. Changes in the expression patterns and activational states of a family of ECM proteolytic enzymes, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been identified in all forms of LV remodeling and can be a contributory factor for the progression to heart failure. However, new clinical and basic research has identified some surprising and unpredicted changes in MMP profiles in LV remodeling processes, such as with pressure or volume overload, as well as with myocardial infarction. From these studies, it has become recognized that proteolytic processing of signaling molecules by certain MMP types, particularly the transmembrane MMPs, may actually facilitate ECM accumulation as well as modulate fibroblast transdifferentiation – both critical events in adverse LV remodeling. Based upon the ever increasing substrates and diversity of biological actions of MMPs, it is likely that continued research regarding the relationship of LV remodeling to this family of proteases will yield new insights into the ECM remodeling process itself as well as new therapeutic targets. PMID:23287455

  8. Sarcomere length influences postmortem proteolysis of excised bovine semitendinosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Weaver, A D; Bowker, B C; Gerrard, D E

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between sarcomere length and postmortem proteolysis as related to meat tenderness is not clear. The extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging-induced tenderization. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of sarcomere length on proteolytic degradation in beef. Strips from bovine semitendinosus were either stretched 40% and restrained or allowed to shorten unrestrained in an ice bath. After rigor completion, 0.6-cm cross sections were fabricated and were randomly assigned to 2, 4, 7, or 10 d of aging treatments. Myofibrils were isolated for sarcomere length determination. Samples were collected and frozen for shear force analysis, and muscle proteins were extracted for SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses to determine troponin T (TnT) proteolysis. Sarcomere length was greater (P < 0.01) in stretched muscle samples compared with shortened samples (2.57 vs. 1.43 microm, respectively). Correspondingly, shear force values were greater (P < 0.05) in shortened samples than stretched samples. Western blots revealed the presence of 3 major intact TnT bands that diminished with time postmortem and 4 bands (TnT degradation products) that accumulated during postmortem storage. Quantification of intact TnT showed increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis at 4 and 7 d postmortem in samples with long sarcomeres. By 10 d, only traces of the greatest molecular weight intact TnT band were evident in both shortened and stretched samples, suggesting this TnT band may be more susceptible to proteolysis than other intact TnT bands. Degradation products of TnT appeared earlier postmortem in samples with long sarcomeres. The 30-kDa TnT fragment appeared after 7 d of postmortem storage in samples with long sarcomeres but not until 10 d in muscle containing short sarcomeres. Collectively, these data show that postmortem TnT proteolysis is sarcomere length-dependent and suggest that thick

  9. Killing me softly: chlamydial use of proteolysis for evading host defenses.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guangming

    2009-10-01

    Chlamydial infections in humans cause severe health problems, including blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Although the involved pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, the ability to replicate and maintain long-term residence in the infected cells seems to significantly contribute to chlamydial pathogenicity. These obligate intracellular parasites maintain a delicate balance between exploiting and protecting their host: they occupy intracellular space and acquire nutrients from the infected cells, but at the same time they have to maintain the integrity of the host cells for the completion of their intracellular growth. For this purpose, chlamydiae hijack certain signaling pathways that prevent the host cells from undergoing apoptosis induced by intracellular stress and protect the infected cells from recognition and attack by host defenses. Interestingly, one of the strategies that chlamydiae use for these purposes is the induction of limited proteolysis of host proteins, which is the main focus of this article.

  10. Effect of processing on turkey meat quality and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Obanor, F; Morton, J D; Geesink, G H; Bickerstaffe, R

    2005-07-01

    Modern processing techniques for turkey involve rapid chilling to slow microbial growth and early deboning of the economically important breast meat. This paper shows that these 2 processes lead to significantly tougher meat with higher cooking losses. The toughening appears to be due to less extensive proteolysis and shortening of the sarcomeres. Calpains I and II and their inhibitor, calpastatin, were quantified in turkey breast. Calpain II was the more common isoform but showed no evidence of activation during aging. In contrast, calpain I and calpastatin activities declined rapidly and were no longer detected 24 h postslaughter. There was no evidence of an association between calpain activity and processing conditions.

  11. Effect of high-pressure treatment on hard cheese proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Luciana M; Bergamini, Carina; Vaudagna, Sergio R; Cuatrin, Alejandra L; Audero, Gabriela; Hynes, Erica

    2016-06-01

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment has been proposed to reduce the ripening time of cheese via modifications in the enzymatic activities or the substrate reactivity. Investigations on the effect of HHP on cheese proteolysis have been undertaken with either encouraging results or little effect according to the treatment conditions and the type of cheese, but information concerning the effect of HHP on the ripening of hard cooked cheese is still lacking. In this report, we describe the effect of HHP treatment on Reggianito cheese proteolysis. For that purpose, 1-d-old miniature cheeses (5.5-cm diameter and 6-cm height) were treated at 100 or 400MPa and 20°C for 5 or 10min, and control cheeses in the trial were not pressurized. All cheeses were ripened at 12°C during 90d. The HHP did not affect gross composition of the cheeses, but microbial load changed, especially because the starter culture count was significantly lower at the beginning of the ripening of the cheeses treated at 400MPa than in controls and cheeses treated at 100MPa. Cheeses treated at 400MPa for 10min had significantly higher plasmin activity than did the others; the residual coagulant activity was not affected by HHP. Proteolysis assessment showed that most severe treatments (400MPa) also resulted in cheeses with increased breakdown of αS1- and β-CN. In addition, nitrogen content in soluble fractions was significantly higher in cheeses treated at 400MPa, as well as soluble peptides and free AA production. Peptide profiles and individual and total content of free AA in 60-d-old treated cheese were as high as in fully ripened control cheeses (90d). Holding time had an effect only on pH-4.6-soluble nitrogen fraction and plasmin activity; cheese treated for 10min showed higher values than those treated for 5min, at both levels of pressure assayed. We concluded that HHP treatments at 400MPa applied 1d after cheesemaking increased the rate of proteolysis, leading to an

  12. Plant senescence and proteolysis: two processes with one destiny

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Santamaria, M. Estrella; González-Melendi, Pablo; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a complex and controlled process, essential for mobilization of nutrients from old or stressed tissues, mainly leaves, to growing or sink organs. Protein breakdown in senescing leaves involves many plastidial and nuclear proteases, regulators, different subcellular locations and dynamic protein traffic to ensure the complete transformation of proteins of high molecular weight into transportable and useful hydrolysed products. Protease activities are strictly regulated by specific inhibitors and through the activation of zymogens to develop their proteolytic activity at the right place and at the proper time. All these events associated with senescence have deep effects on the relocation of nutrients and as a consequence, on grain quality and crop yield. Thus, it can be considered that nutrient recycling is the common destiny of two processes, plant senescence and, proteolysis. This review article covers the most recent findings about leaf senescence features mediated by abiotic and biotic stresses as well as the participants and steps required in this physiological process, paying special attention to C1A cysteine proteases, their specific inhibitors, known as cystatins, and their potential targets, particularly the chloroplastic proteins as source for nitrogen recycling. PMID:27505308

  13. An adaptor hierarchy regulates proteolysis during a bacterial cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kamal Kishore; Bergé, Matthieu; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Viollier, Patrick Henri; Chien, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulated protein degradation is essential. The timed destruction of crucial proteins by the ClpXP protease drives cell-cycle progression in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Although ClpXP is active alone, additional factors are inexplicably required for cell-cycle dependent proteolysis. Here, we show that these factors constitute an adaptor hierarchy where different substrates are destroyed based on the degree of adaptor assembly. The hierarchy builds upon priming of ClpXP by the adaptor CpdR, which promotes degradation of one class of substrates and also recruits the adaptor RcdA to degrade a second class of substrates. Adding the PopA adaptor promotes destruction of a third class of substrates, while inhibiting degradation of the second class. We dissect RcdA to generate bespoke adaptors, identifying critical substrate elements needed for RcdA recognition and uncovering additional cell-cycle dependent ClpXP substrates. Our work reveals how hierarchical adaptors and primed proteases orchestrate regulated proteolysis during bacterial cell-cycle progression. PMID:26451486

  14. Methamphetamine-induced spectrin proteolysis in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Staszewski, Robert D; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2006-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant. Multiple high doses of METH cause long-term toxicity to dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) nerve terminals in the brain, as evidenced by decreases in DA and 5-HT content, decreases in tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylase activities, decreases in DA and 5-HT re-uptake sites, and nerve terminal degeneration. Multiple high doses of METH are known to elicit a rapid increase in DA release and hyperthermia. Although METH also produces a delayed and sustained rise in glutamate, no studies have shown whether METH produces structural evidence of excitotoxicity in striatum, or identified the receptors that mediate this toxicity directly, independent of alterations in METH-induced hyperthermia. These experiments investigated whether METH can cause excitotoxicity as evidenced by cytoskeletal protein breakdown in a glutamate receptor-dependent manner. METH increased calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis in the rat striatum 5 and 7 days after METH administration without affecting caspase 3-dependent spectrin breakdown. This effect was completely blocked with the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, GYKI 52466, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801. However, AMPA or NMDA receptor antagonism did not attenuate the METH-induced depletions of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Independent mechanisms involved in mediating spectrin proteolysis and DAT protein loss are discussed.

  15. Composition, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt cheese.

    PubMed

    Masotti, F; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Battelli, G; Vallone, L; De Noni, I

    2017-03-01

    Strachitunt, a blue-veined Italian cheese, received the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label in 2014. Its unique technological feature is represented by the dual-curd method of production. Strachitunt is produced from raw bovine milk with or without the inoculation of natural starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria, and the addition of secondary cultures of mold spores is not permitted by the product specification. Physico-chemical properties, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt were investigated in 10 cheese samples (ripened for 75 d) made throughout spring 2015 and provided by the main cheese maker. Overall, composition parameters showed a large variability among samples. Cheese was characterized by an acid paste (pH 5.46) and a lower extent of proteolysis compared with other blue-veined varieties. The main chemical groups of volatile organic compounds were alcohols and esters, whereas ketones represented only a minor component. The erratic adventitious contamination by mold spores of the cheese milk, the unique dual-curd method of cheese-making, and the large time variability between the piercing time and the end of ripening could be highlighted as the main causes of both the distinctive analytical fingerprint and the scarce standardization of this blue-veined cheese.

  16. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  17. Peptidomic Analysis of Rat Plasma: Proteolysis in Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Federico; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Santamaria, Marco H; DeLano, Frank A; Kistler, Erik B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Tedeschi, Gabriella

    2016-05-01

    It has been previously shown that intestinal proteases translocate into the circulation during hemorrhagic shock and contribute to proteolysis in distal organs. However, consequences of this phenomenon have not previously been investigated using high-throughput approaches. Here, a shotgun label-free quantitative proteomic approach was utilized to compare the peptidome of plasma samples from healthy and hemorrhagic shock rats to verify the possible role of uncontrolled proteolytic activity in shock. Plasma was collected from rats after hemorrhagic shock (HS) consisting of 2-h hypovolemia followed by 2-h reperfusion, and from healthy control (CTRL) rats. A new two-step enrichment method was applied to selectively extract peptides and low molecular weight proteins from plasma, and directly analyze these samples by tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred twenty-six circulating peptides were identified in CTRL and 295 in HS animals. Ninety-six peptides were present in both conditions; of these, 57 increased and 30 decreased in shock. In total, 256 peptides were increased or present only in HS confirming a general increase in proteolytic activity in shock. Analysis of the proteases that potentially generated the identified peptides suggests that the larger relative contribution to the proteolytic activity in shock is due to chymotryptic-like proteases. These results provide quantitative confirmation that extensive, system-wide proteolysis is part of the complex pathologic phenomena occurring in hemorrhagic shock.

  18. Peptidomic Analysis of Rat Plasma: Proteolysis in Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Aletti, Federico; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Santamaria, Marco H.; De Lano, Frank A.; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.; Tedeschi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously shown that intestinal proteases translocate into the circulation during hemorrhagic shock and contribute to proteolysis in distal organs. However, consequences of this phenomenon have not previously been investigated using high-throughput approaches. Here, a shotgun label-free quantitative proteomic approach was utilized to compare the peptidome of plasma samples from healthy and hemorrhagic shock rats to verify the possible role of uncontrolled proteolytic activity in shock. Plasma was collected from rats after hemorrhagic shock (HS) consisting of two-hour hypovolemia followed by two-hour reperfusion, and from healthy control (CTRL) rats. A new two-step enrichment method was applied to selectively extract peptides and low molecular weight proteins from plasma, and directly analyze these samples by tandem mass spectrometry. 126 circulating peptides were identified in CTRL and 295 in HS animals. 96 peptides were present in both conditions; of these, 57 increased and 30 decreased in shock. In total, 256 peptides were increased or present only in HS confirming a general increase in proteolytic activity in shock. Analysis of the proteases that potentially generated the identified peptides suggests that the larger relative contribution of to the proteolytic activity in shock is due to chymotryptic-like proteases. These results provide quantitative confirmation that extensive, system-wide proteolysis is part of the complex pathologic phenomena occurring in hemorrhagic shock. PMID:26863123

  19. Regulated specific proteolysis of the Cajal body marker protein coilin.

    PubMed

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Broome, Hanna J; Hebert, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    Cajal bodies (CB) are subnuclear domains that contain various proteins with diverse functions including the CB marker protein coilin. In this study, we investigate the proteolytic activity of calpain on coilin. Here, we report a 28-kDa cleaved coilin fragment detected by two coilin antibodies that is cell cycle regulated, with levels that are consistently reduced during mitosis. We further show that an in vitro calpain assay with full-length or C-terminal coilin recombinant protein releases the same size cleaved fragment. Furthermore, addition of exogenous RNA to purified coilin induces proteolysis by calpain. We also report that the relative levels of this cleaved coilin fragment are susceptible to changes induced by various cell stressors, and that coilin localization is affected by inhibition or knockdown of calpain both under normal and stressed conditions. Collectively, our data suggest that coilin is subjected to regulated specific proteolysis by calpain, and this processing may play a role in the regulation of coilin activity and CB formation.

  20. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) undergoes ectodomain shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP).

    PubMed

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates' ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP.

  1. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) Undergoes Ectodomain Shedding and Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP)

    PubMed Central

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates’ ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP. PMID:24015300

  2. Postmortem titin proteolysis is influenced by sarcomere length in bovine muscle.

    PubMed

    England, E M; Fisher, K D; Wells, S J; Mohrhauser, D A; Gerrard, D E; Weaver, A D

    2012-03-01

    The calpain protease system, in particular, μ-calpain is involved in the disassembly of specific myofibrillar proteins, resulting in tenderization of meat postmortem. Given the size, complexity, and integral nature of titin to the structure of the sarcomere, it is plausible that the length of a sarcomere may alter the susceptibility of various domains of titin to cleavage by the calpains. Therefore, we hypothesized titin degradation differs in a sarcomere-length-dependent manner in beef. After slaughter, beef carcasses were split and sides were either suspended by the Achilles tendon (normal suspension, NS) or by the aitchbone (hip suspension, HS). Immediately after suspension, samples were dissected from the LM, psoas major (PM), and semitendinosus (STN) muscles to serve as 0-d controls. After 24 h, 4 steaks were removed from each muscle and randomly assigned to 1-, 4-, 7-, or 10-d aging treatments. After the assigned aging period, myofibrils were purified for determination of sarcomere length. Warner-Bratzler shear force analysis was also performed to evaluate differences in tenderness. Muscle proteins were solubilized and subjected to SDS-VAGE (vertical agarose gel electrophoresis) to evaluate titin degradation. Sarcomere lengths differed (P < 0.0001) between contralateral muscles of NS and HS carcasses. Quantification of SDS-VAGE gels revealed less (P < 0.05) intact titin in the PM muscle of NS carcasses at each aging period compared with the PM of HS carcasses. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected in the disappearance of intact titin among suspension methods in the LM or STN. These data demonstrate that suspension method alters proteolysis of titin and suggest an increase in sarcomere length may contribute to the susceptibility of titin to postmortem proteolysis in beef.

  3. Is regulation of proteolysis associated with redox-state changes in rat skeletal muscle?

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, M E

    1980-01-01

    In isolated rat diaphragms, only those substrates that increased the tissue NADH/NAD+ ratio lowered the rate of proteolysis. However, direct inhibition of proteinase activity by leupeptin promoted oxidation of the NAD couple of the muscles. These results suggest that changes in muscle reduction-oxidation state may be important in the regulation of proteolysis. PMID:7236250

  4. A novel ELISA-based diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand disease with increased VWF proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Antoine; Caron, Claudine; Vincent, Flavien; Jeanpierre, Emmanuelle; Ternisien, Catherine; Boisseau, Pierre; Zawadzki, Christophe; Fressinaud, Edith; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Hermoire, Sylvie; Paris, Camille; Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Veyradier, Agnès; Ung, Alexandre; Vincentelli, André; van Belle, Eric; Lenting, Peter J; Goudemand, Jenny; Susen, Sophie

    2016-05-02

    Von Willebrand disease-type 2A (VWD-2A) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) due to aortic stenosis (AS) or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are associated with an increased proteolysis of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Analysis of VWF multimeric profile is the most sensitive way to assess such increased VWF-proteolysis. However, several technical aspects hamper a large diffusion among routine diagnosis laboratories. This makes early diagnosis and early appropriate care of increased proteolysis challenging. In this context of unmet medical need, we developed a new ELISA aiming a quick, easy and reliable assessment of VWF-proteolysis. This ELISA was assessed successively in a LVAD-model, healthy subjects (n=39), acquired TTP-patients (n=4), VWD-patients (including VWD-2A(IIA), n=22; VWD-2B, n=26; VWD-2A(IIE), n=21; and VWD-1C, n=8) and in AVWS-patients (AS, n=9; LVAD, n=9; and MGUS, n=8). A standard of VWF-proteolysis was specifically developed. Extent of VWF-proteolysis was expressed as relative percentage and as VWF proteolysis/VWF:Ag ratio. A speed-dependent increase in VWF-proteolysis was assessed in the LVAD model whereas no proteolysis was observed in TTP-patients. In VWD-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in VWD-2A(IIA) and VWD-2B and significantly decreased in VWD-2A(IIE) versus controls (p< 0.0001). In AVWS-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in AS- and LVAD-patients compared to controls (p< 0.0001) and not detectable in MGUS-patients. A significant increase in VWF-proteolysis was detected as soon as three hours after LVAD implantation (p< 0.01). In conclusion, we describe a new ELISA allowing a rapid and accurate diagnosis of VWF-proteolysis validated in three different clinical situations. This assay represents a helpful alternative to electrophoresis-based assay in the diagnosis and management of AVWS with increased VWF-proteolysis.

  5. The Degradome database: mammalian proteases and diseases of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Víctor; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Sánchez, Luis M; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The degradome is defined as the complete set of proteases present in an organism. The recent availability of whole genomic sequences from multiple organisms has led us to predict the contents of the degradomes of several mammalian species. To ensure the fidelity of these predictions, our methods have included manual curation of individual sequences and, when necessary, direct cloning and sequencing experiments. The results of these studies in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat have been incorporated into the Degradome database, which can be accessed through a web interface at http://degradome.uniovi.es. The annotations about each individual protease can be retrieved by browsing catalytic classes and families or by searching specific terms. This web site also provides detailed information about genetic diseases of proteolysis, a growing field of great importance for multiple users. Finally, the user can find additional information about protease structures, protease inhibitors, ancillary domains of proteases and differences between mammalian degradomes.

  6. [Threshold mechanism of the control of cascade proteolysis].

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, I G

    1998-05-01

    The immune lysis rate of erythrocytes vs. the concentration of particular complement components was studied. It was found that in the presence of component C1 (but not C3) and factors B and D, the cells undergo lysis after the concentration of these compounds exceeds a "threshold" value. The threshold molar concentrations of factors D and B exceeded 5- and 20-fold, respectively, that of component C1. The multiplicity and different capacities of the thresholds allow the fragmentary activation of cascade proteolysis at stretches between neighboring thresholds without the total realization of the final effect of the system (cell lysis, clot formation, etc.). The resulting peptideby-products (bypass peptides) may possess their own biological activity. It is the generation of various bioregulators that appears to be the main function of the cascade proteolytic systems functioning in the subthreshold regime.

  7. Pregabalin suppresses calcium-mediated proteolysis and improves stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Son, Tae Gen; Mughal, Mohamed R; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    Pregabalin, a Ca(2+) channel α(2)δ-subunit antagonist with analgesic and antiepileptic activity, reduced neuronal loss and improved functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke. Pregabalin administration (5-10mg/kg, i.p.) 30-90 min after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion reduced infarct volume, neuronal death in the ischemic penumbra and neurological deficits at 24h post-stroke. Pregabalin significantly decreased the amount of Ca(2+)/calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis in the cerebral cortex measured at 6h post-stroke. Together with the extensive clinical experience with pregabalin for other neurological indications, our findings suggest the potential for a therapeutic benefit of pregabalin in stroke patients.

  8. Ubiquitin signals proteolysis-independent stripping of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ndoja, Ada; Cohen, Robert E; Yao, Tingting

    2014-03-20

    Ubiquitination of transcription activators has been reported to regulate transcription via both proteolytic and nonproteolytic routes, yet the function of the ubiquitin (Ub) signal in the nonproteolytic process is poorly understood. By use of the heterologous transcription activator LexA-VP16 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that monoubiquitin fusion of the activator prevents stable interactions between the activator and DNA, leading to transcription inhibition without activator degradation. We identify the AAA(+) ATPase Cdc48 and its cofactors as the Ub receptor responsible for extracting the monoubiquitinated activator from DNA. Our results suggest that deubiquitination of the activator is critical for transcription activation. These findings with LexA-VP16 extend in both yeast and mammalian cells to native transcription activators Met4 and R-Smads, respectively, that are known to be oligo-ubiquitinated. The results illustrate a role for Ub and Cdc48 in transcriptional regulation and gene expression that is independent of proteolysis.

  9. Molecular signaling pathways regulating muscle proteolysis during atrophy.

    PubMed

    Franch, Harold A; Price, S Russ

    2005-05-01

    Although a variety of diverse stimuli induce muscle atrophy, there is a surprising number of similarities in the intracellular responses. One prominent response is an increase in muscle proteolysis resulting from stimulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Understanding the intracellular signaling pathways that regulate muscle mass should offer insights into the coordination of cellular responses. This review will discuss recent findings on the molecular signaling pathways regulating proteolysis during muscle atrophy. The expression of several muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases is consistently increased in conditions causing muscle atrophy. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 act through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway to suppress the expression of two of these enzymes, MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1. Efforts to identify targets of the muscle-specific E3 ligases are yielding interesting information. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 also attenuate wasting by inhibiting caspase-3, which cleaves actin to facilitate its destruction by the ubiqutin-proteasome system. Other signaling systems involved in the regulation of muscle mass include the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. The maintenance of muscle mass requires a delicate balance between catabolic factors and anabolic factors. These signals inversely modulate the activity of several key regulatory pathways including the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT and nuclear factor kappa B systems, which control the transcription of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway activity, the activity of caspase-3, and perhaps other proteolytic functions. When levels of insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 are insufficient or inflammatory cytokine production is increased, muscle atrophy ensues.

  10. A Greek Tragedy: The Growing Complexity of Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Robert J; Kellett, Katherine A B; Thinakaran, Gopal; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-09-09

    Proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) liberates various fragments including the proposed initiator of Alzheimer disease-associated dysfunctions, amyloid-β. However, recent evidence suggests that the accepted view of APP proteolysis by the canonical α-, β-, and γ-secretases is simplistic, with the discovery of a number of novel APP secretases (including δ- and η-secretases, alternative β-secretases) and additional metabolites, some of which may also cause synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, various proteins have been identified that interact with APP and modulate its cleavage by the secretases. Here, we give an overview of the increasingly complex picture of APP proteolysis.

  11. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Winter, Michael B; Salcedo, Eugenia C; Lohse, Matthew B; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R; Johnson, Alexander D; Craik, Charles S; Nobile, Clarissa J

    2016-09-13

    Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. Biofilm formation by the opportunistic fungal pathogen C. albicans is a major cause of life-threatening infections. This work provides a global characterization of secreted proteolytic activity produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms. We identify activity from the proteases Sap5 and Sap6 as highly upregulated during C. albicans biofilm formation and develop Sap-cleavable fluorogenic substrates that enable the detection of biofilms from C. albicans and also

  12. [Proteolysis of semax analogues with different N-terminal amino acids by aminopeptidases].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; V'iunova, T V; Nagaev, I Iu; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Iu; Miasoedov, N F

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro, Sem) and its analogues ([Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem, [Thr1]Sem, [Trp1]Sem) that are differ from semax in substitution of N-terminal Met residue were studied. It is shown that such replacement changes the rate of peptides degradation by N-aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.2, Sigma, Type VI, 9.2 units. Akt. / mg). [Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem and [Thr1]Sem semax analogues proved to be more stable to proteolysis than semax (Sem), and their initial product of proteolysis is His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-5). For triptophan analogue both Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-6) and Sem-5 product are formed in similar quantities. It is found that all investigated analogues can be used as inhibitors in Sem proteolysis.

  13. Proteolysis in model Portuguese cheeses: Effects of rennet and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cláudia I; Gomes, Eliza O; Gomes, Ana M P; Malcata, F Xavier

    2008-06-01

    To shed further light onto the mechanisms of proteolysis that prevail throughout ripening of Portuguese cheeses, model cheeses were manufactured from bovine milk, following as much as possible traditional manufacture practices - using either animal or plant rennet. The individual role upon proteolysis of two (wild) strains of lactic acid bacteria - viz. Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus brevis, which are normally found to high viable numbers in said cheeses, was also considered, either as single or mixed cultures. Our experimental results confirmed the influence of rennet on the proteolysis extent, but not on proteolysis depth. On the other hand, the aforementioned strains clearly improved release of medium- and small-sized peptides, and contributed as well to the free amino acid pool in cheese. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sarcomere length influences u-calpain mediated proteolysis of troponin-T

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Muscle shortening and postmortem proteolysis are well established as mechanisms controlling beef tenderness. Inherent myofibril structure and the extent of overlap between myosin and actin filaments are hypothesized to affect the availability of substrates for degradation by calpains. The objective ...

  15. Alternating current-assisted on-plate proteolysis for MALDI-TOF MS peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Wei, Bangguo; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    In this report, alternating current-assisted on-plate proteolysis has been developed for rapid peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin were allowed to digest directly on the spots of a stainless steel MALDI plate with the assistance of low-voltage alternating current electricity. Alternating current (AC) was allowed to pass through the protein solutions via the MALDI plate and a platinum disc electrode. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were investigated by the digestion of BSA and cytochrome c (Cyt-c). It was demonstrated that AC substantially enhanced the efficiency of proteolysis and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with sequence coverages of 42% (BSA) and 77% (Cyt-c) that were comparable to those obtained by using conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for MALDI-TOF MS peptide mapping.

  16. Nitrofurantoin-stimulated proteolysis in human erythrocytes: a novel index of toxic insult by nitroaromatics.

    PubMed

    Novak, R F; Kharasch, E D; Wendel, N K

    1988-11-01

    Nitrofurantoin is an antimicrobial agent that causes nonimmune hemolytic anemia in susceptible populations and produces oxidant stress and cellular damage by mechanisms that differ from those associated with oxidants such as phenylhydrazine, which has been shown to stimulate proteolysis in red cells (Goldberg and Boches, 1982). Thus a study of the effects of nitrofurantoin on proteolysis in normal human red cells and red cell hemolysate has been conducted. Nitrofurantoin produced greater than a 3- and an approximately 5-fold increase in the rate of tyrosine release from red cells at 100 and 800 microM, respectively, compared with untreated red cells. In hemolysates nitrofurantoin also effectively increased proteolysis with a 2.4- and 4.0-fold increase in the rate of tyrosine release monitored at 100 and 800 microM, respectively, relative to controls. Stimulation of proteolysis by nitrofurantoin occurred linearly with time and with hematocrit over the range 5-25%. The rate of nitrofurantoin-stimulated proteolysis varied with glucose concentration in the incubation medium with a 2-fold increase in activity monitored between 2 and 10 mM glucose. Inhibitors of flavoprotein activity (electron transport), such as 2'-AMP and NADP, decreased nitrofurantoin-enhanced proteolysis in red cells to control levels, whereas methylene blue provided only a slight increase in proteolysis and an anaerobic environment (N2) stimulated significantly the rate of tyrosine production. Although N-acetylcysteine protected against the stimulation of proteolysis produced by 10 microM nitrofurantoin, this protective effect was diminished at higher concentrations of drug.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-01-01

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis. PMID:10582239

  18. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-09-29

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis.

  19. Proteolysis of bovine alpha s2-casein by chymosin.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, P L; Olson, N F; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1994-12-01

    Proteolysis of bovine alpha s2-casein by chymosin (E. C. 3.4.23.4) in solution in 100 mM Na phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, at 30 degrees C was studied by reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC and urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Chymosin hydrolyzed alpha s2-casein in solution to eight peptides detectable by urea-PAGE. Peptides soluble in acetate buffer, pH 4.6, were isolated by RP-HPLC on a C18 column using an acetonitrile/water gradient and identified from their N-terminal amino acid sequence. The chymosin cleavage sites were at the bonds Phe88-Tyr89, Tyr95-Leu96, Gln97-Tyr98, Tyr98-Leu99, Phe163-Leu164, Phe174-Ala175 and Tyr179-Leu180. Chymosin cleavage sites were restricted to the hydrophobic regions of the molecule. The bond-type in alpha s2-casein cleaved by chymosin was in agreement with that found to be susceptible to chymosin in other caseins. The primary site of chymosin action on alpha s2-casein appeared to be at Phe88-Tyr89.

  20. Phosphorylation and proteolysis of HMGCoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.A.; Lanier, T.L.; Miller, S.J.; Gibson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    The phosphorylation of rat liver microsomal 97 kDa HMGCoA reductase (HMGR) was examined by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE using antibodies to 53 kDa HMGR. MgATP preincubation decreased expressed HMGR activity from 10.1 +/- 2.4 to 0.81 +/- 0.2 U/mg. Concomitant incorporation of TSP from el-TSP-ATP into 97 kDa HMGR protein was observed. Competitive antibody binding by affinity-purified 53 kDa HMGR showed that the 97 kDa TSP band was authentic HMGR. HMGR was reactivated and the TSP label was removed by protein phosphatase in a concentration-dependent manner: the increase in expressed/total activity ratio (E/T) correlated linearly with a decrease in 97 kDa TSP. Therefore, the E/T ratio provides a valid index of the phosphorylation state of microsomal 97 kDa HMGR. Protease cleavage patterns of HMGR mass and TSP were compared using calpain: a 52-56 kDa doublet of HMGR mass was observed in immunoblots under conditions in which only the 56 kDa band contained TSP. Further proteolysis decreased the TSP label as the 52 kDa mass product increased. The data suggest that the major phosphorylation site in 97 kDa HMGR lies between two main calpain cleavage sites in the linker region joining the cytoplasmic domain to the membrane-spanning domain of the native enzyme.

  1. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  2. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  3. Proteolysis of truncated hemolysin A yields a stable dimerization interface.

    PubMed

    Novak, Walter R P; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2017-03-01

    Wild-type and variant forms of HpmA265 (truncated hemolysin A) from Proteus mirabilis reveal a right-handed, parallel β-helix capped and flanked by segments of antiparallel β-strands. The low-salt crystal structures form a dimeric structure via the implementation of on-edge main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 243-263 of adjacent monomers. Surprisingly, in the high-salt structures of two variants, Y134A and Q125A-Y134A, a new dimeric interface is formed via main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 203-215 of adjacent monomers, and a previously unobserved tetramer is formed. In addition, an eight-stranded antiparallel β-sheet is formed from the flap regions of crystallographically related monomers in the high-salt structures. This new interface is possible owing to additional proteolysis of these variants after Tyr240. The interface formed in the high-salt crystal forms of hemolysin A variants may mimic the on-edge β-strand positioning used in template-assisted hemolytic activity.

  4. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael B.; Salcedo, Eugenia C.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. PMID:27624133

  5. Regulation of proteolysis in Bacillus subtilis: effects of calcium ions and energy poisons

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, M.B.; Hageman, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis cells carry out extensive intracellular proteolysis (k = 0.15-0.23/h) during sporulation. Protein degradation was measured in cells growing in chemically defined sporulation medium, by following the release of ( UC)-leucine from the cells during spore formation. Sodium arsenate, carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenyl hydrazone, and sodium azide strongly inhibited proteolysis without altering cell viability greatly, which suggested that bulk proteolysis in B. subtilis is energy dependent. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the energy requirement may be for pumping in CaS . When (CaS ) was < 1 x 10 W, rates of proteolysis in sporulating cells were reduced 4-8 times that in cells in calcium ion- sufficient medium. Further, omission of CaS from the medium prevented the increase in the activity of the major intracellular serine protease. However, the presence of energy poisons in the media at levels which inhibited proteolysis, had no detectable effect on the uptake of by cells (UVCa). The authors concluded that B. subtilis cells required both metabolic energy and calcium ions for normal proteolysis.

  6. Plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 proteolysis is increased in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helle, S I; Geisler, S; Aas, T; Paulsen, T; Holly, J M P; Lønning, P E

    2001-01-01

    Fasting blood samples were obtained before definitive surgery or biopsy in 128 patients referred to the department of surgery with suspected or manifest breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and free IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay, while IGFBP-3 proteolysis was evaluated by Western immunoblot. 12 patients had ductal carcinoma in situ benign conditions, while staging revealed metastatic disease in 15 of 16 patients with invasive cancers. IGFBP-3 proteolysis above the normal range was recorded in 19 patients with invasive cancers, but in none of the patients suffering from DCIS/benign conditions. Increased IGFBP-3 proteolysis was most frequently recorded in patients harbouring large tumours and metastatic disease (Stage I: 0/19, 0%; Stage II: 3/45, 7%, Stage III: 9/37, 24%, and Stage IV: 7/15, 47%). IGFBP-3 proteolysis was significantly higher in Stage III (P =0.01) and IV (P< 0.001) patients compared to the other stage groups (P = 0.001). IGF-I and IGF-II correlated negatively to IGFBP-3 proteolysis and age. Plasma levels of IGF-I and -II were significantly lower in patients with elevated IGFBP-3 proteolysis compared to those within the normal range. Our findings reveal alterations in the IGF-system among a substantial number of patients with large primary breast cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437405

  7. 11S Storage globulin from pumpkin seeds: regularities of proteolysis by papain.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, A S; Rudakov, S V; Kakhovskaya, I A; Shutov, A D

    2014-08-01

    Limited proteolysis of the α- and β-chains and deep cleavage of the αβ-subunits by the cooperative (one-by-one) mechanism was observed in the course of papain hydrolysis of cucurbitin, an 11S storage globulin from seeds of the pumpkin Cucurbita maxima. An independent analysis of the kinetics of the limited and cooperative proteolyses revealed that the reaction occurs in two successive steps. In the first step, limited proteolysis consisting of detachments of short terminal peptides from the α- and β-chains was observed. The cooperative proteolysis, which occurs as a pseudo-first order reaction, started at the second step. Therefore, the limited proteolysis at the first step plays a regulatory role, impacting the rate of deep degradation of cucurbitin molecules by the cooperative mechanism. Structural alterations of cucurbitin induced by limited proteolysis are suggested to generate its susceptibility to cooperative proteolysis. These alterations are tentatively discussed on the basis of the tertiary structure of the cucurbitin subunit pdb|2EVX in comparison with previously obtained data on features of degradation of soybean 11S globulin hydrolyzed by papain.

  8. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  9. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  10. Cotranslational proteolysis dominates glutathione homeostasis to support proper growth and development.

    PubMed

    Frottin, Frédéric; Espagne, Christelle; Traverso, José A; Mauve, Caroline; Valot, Benoît; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Zivy, Michel; Noctor, Graham; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2009-10-01

    The earliest proteolytic event affecting most proteins is the excision of the initiating Met (NME). This is an essential and ubiquitous cotranslational process tightly regulated in all eukaryotes. Currently, the effects of NME on unknown complex cellular networks and the ways in which its inhibition leads to developmental defects and cell growth arrest remain poorly understood. Here, we provide insight into the earliest molecular mechanisms associated with the inhibition of the NME process in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the developmental defects induced by NME inhibition are caused by an increase in cellular proteolytic activity, primarily induced by an increase in the number of proteins targeted for rapid degradation. This deregulation drives, through the increase of the free amino acids pool, a perturbation of the glutathione homeostasis, which corresponds to the earliest limiting, reversible step promoting the phenotype. We demonstrate that these effects are universally conserved and that the reestablishment of the appropriate glutathione status restores growth and proper development in various organisms. Finally, we describe a novel integrated model in which NME, protein N-alpha-acylation, proteolysis, and glutathione homeostasis operate in a sequentially regulated mechanism that directs both growth and development.

  11. Cotranslational Proteolysis Dominates Glutathione Homeostasis to Support Proper Growth and Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Frottin, Frédéric; Espagne, Christelle; Traverso, José A.; Mauve, Caroline; Valot, Benoît; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Zivy, Michel; Noctor, Graham; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2009-01-01

    The earliest proteolytic event affecting most proteins is the excision of the initiating Met (NME). This is an essential and ubiquitous cotranslational process tightly regulated in all eukaryotes. Currently, the effects of NME on unknown complex cellular networks and the ways in which its inhibition leads to developmental defects and cell growth arrest remain poorly understood. Here, we provide insight into the earliest molecular mechanisms associated with the inhibition of the NME process in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the developmental defects induced by NME inhibition are caused by an increase in cellular proteolytic activity, primarily induced by an increase in the number of proteins targeted for rapid degradation. This deregulation drives, through the increase of the free amino acids pool, a perturbation of the glutathione homeostasis, which corresponds to the earliest limiting, reversible step promoting the phenotype. We demonstrate that these effects are universally conserved and that the reestablishment of the appropriate glutathione status restores growth and proper development in various organisms. Finally, we describe a novel integrated model in which NME, protein N-α-acylation, proteolysis, and glutathione homeostasis operate in a sequentially regulated mechanism that directs both growth and development. PMID:19855051

  12. Regulated proteolysis as an element of ER stress and autophagy: Implications for intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Stephanie; Messner, Berith; Falk-Paulsen, Maren; Sommer, Nina; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2017-07-21

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy are tightly controlled cellular processes, which are responsible for maintaining protein homeostasis in a cell. Impairment of the interlinking pathways have been implicated in a number of human diseases, prominently in inflammatory bowel disease, where genetic variants in several independent autophagy and ER stress related loci have been associated to increased disease risk. Autophagy is a selective quality control process, which governs the integrity of the cell by removal of aged organelles and proteins via the lysosome, but recently has been shown to actively license the outcome of other signaling pathways by guiding the proteolytic removal of signaling protein complexes (adaptophagy). In this review, we summarize our knowledge on regulated proteolytic events involved in ER stress responses and autophagy, their interplay and potential regulatory effects with a particular focus on intestinal inflammation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracellular Matrix Proteolysis by MT1-MMP Contributes to Influenza-Related Tissue Damage and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Altboum, Zeev; Solomonov, Inna; Udi, Yael; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Klepfish, Mordehay; David, Eyal; Zhuravlev, Alina; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Winter, Deborah R; Gat-Viks, Irit; Mandelboim, Michal; Ziv, Tamar; Amit, Ido; Sagi, Irit

    2016-10-12

    Mounting an effective immune response, while also protecting tissue integrity, is critical for host survival. We used a combined genomic and proteomic approach to investigate the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteolysis in achieving this balance in the lung during influenza virus infection. We identified the membrane-tethered matrix metalloprotease MT1-MMP as a prominent host-ECM-remodeling collagenase in influenza infection. Selective inhibition of MT1-MMP protected the tissue from infection-related structural and compositional tissue damage. MT1-MMP inhibition did not significantly alter the immune response or cytokine expression. The available flu therapeutic Oseltamivir did not prevent lung ECM damage and was less effective than anti-MT1-MMP in influenza virus Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection paradigms. Combination therapy of Oseltamivir with anti-MT1-MMP showed a strong synergistic effect and resulted in complete recovery of infected mice. This study highlights the importance of tissue resilience in surviving infection and the potential of such host-pathogen therapy combinations for respiratory infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  15. Stringent factor and proteolysis control of sigma factor RpoS expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Philipp; Tutz, Sarah; Mutsam, Beatrice; Vorkapic, Dina; Heyne, Barbara; Grabner, Claudia; Kleewein, Katharina; Halscheidt, Anja; Schild, Stefan; Reidl, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae can colonize the gastrointestinal track of humans and cause the disease cholera. During colonization, the alternative sigma factor, RpoS, controls a process known as "mucosal escape response," defining a specific spatial and temporal response and effecting chemotaxis and motility. In this report, the expression and proteolytic control of RpoS in V. cholerae was characterized. To date, aspects of proteolysis control, the involved components, and proteolysis regulation have not been addressed for RpoS in V. cholerae. Similar to Escherichia coli, we find that the RpoS protein is subjected to regulated intracellular proteolysis, which is mediated by homologues of the proteolysis-targeting factor RssB and the protease complex ClpXP. As demonstrated, RpoS expression transiently peaks after cells are shifted from rich to minimal growth medium. This peak level is dependent on (p)ppGpp-activated rpoS transcription and controlled RpoS proteolysis. The RpoS peak level also correlates with induction of a chemotaxis gene, encoding a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, earlier identified to belong to the mucosal escape response pathway. These results suggest that the RpoS expression peak is linked to (p)ppGpp alarmone increase, leading to enhanced motility and chemotaxis, and possibly contributing to the mucosal escape response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  17. Infrared-assisted on-plate proteolysis for MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-07-15

    In this report, infrared (IR)-assisted on-plate proteolysis has been developed for rapid peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin were allowed to digest directly on the spots of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plates under IR radiation. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were investigated by the digestion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c (Cyt-c). It was demonstrated that IR radiation substantially enhanced the efficiency of proteolysis and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The digests were identified by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry with sequence coverages of 55 (BSA) and 75% (Cyt-c) that were comparable to those obtained by using conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The suitability of IR-assisted on-plate proteolysis to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum and casein extracted from commercially available milk sample. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  18. Molecular characterization of a proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Arulpandi, I; Geetha, A

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis-resistant lipases can be well exploited by industrial processes which employ both lipase and protease as biocatalysts. A proteolysis resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2 was isolated, purified and characterized earlier. The lipase was resistant to native and commercial proteases. In the present work, we have characterized the lip gene which encodes the proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2. The parameters and structural details of lipase were analysed. The lip gene consisted of 650 bp. The experimental molecular weight of SG2 lipase was nearly double that of its theoretical molecular weight, thus suggesting the existence of the functional lipase as a covalent dimer. The proteolytic cleavage sites of the lipase would have been made inaccessible by dimerisation, thus rendering the lipase resistant to protease.

  19. Pre-cure freezing affects proteolysis in dry-cured hams.

    PubMed

    Bañón, S; Cayuela, J M; Granados, M V; Garrido, M D

    1999-01-01

    Several parameters (sodium chloride, moisture, intramuscular fat, total nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen, white precipitates, free tyrosine, L* a* b* values and acceptability) related with proteolysis during the curing were compared in dry-cured hams manufactured from refrigerated and frozen/thawed raw material. Pre-cure freezing increased the proteolysis levels significantly (p<0.05) in the zones of the ham where water losses and absorption of salt is slowest. Frozen hams present a high incidence of white precipitates, formed mainly by tyrosine crystals. The colour and acceptability scores are similar in frozen and refrigerated hams. The previous freezing and thawing process accentuates the water losses, salt absorption and proteolysis of the cured meat, although it does not significantly affect the sensory quality of the dry-cured ham.

  20. Mass Spectrometry Guided In Situ Proteolysis to Obtain Crystals for X-ray Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization.

  1. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, April L.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Rebeck, G. William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  2. Molecular characterization of a proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2

    PubMed Central

    Sangeetha, R.; Arulpandi, I.; Geetha, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis-resistant lipases can be well exploited by industrial processes which employ both lipase and protease as biocatalysts. A proteolysis resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2 was isolated, purified and characterized earlier. The lipase was resistant to native and commercial proteases. In the present work, we have characterized the lip gene which encodes the proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2. The parameters and structural details of lipase were analysed. The lip gene consisted of 650 bp. The experimental molecular weight of SG2 lipase was nearly double that of its theoretical molecular weight, thus suggesting the existence of the functional lipase as a covalent dimer. The proteolytic cleavage sites of the lipase would have been made inaccessible by dimerisation, thus rendering the lipase resistant to protease. PMID:25242920

  3. Protein oxidation and proteolysis during storage and in vitro digestion of pork and beef patties.

    PubMed

    Rysman, Tine; Van Hecke, Thomas; Van Poucke, Christof; De Smet, Stefaan; Van Royen, Geert

    2016-10-15

    The effect of protein oxidation on proteolysis during meat digestion was investigated following storage and subsequent in vitro digestion of beef and pork patties. Protein oxidation was evaluated as thiol oxidation, total carbonylation, and specific carbonylation (α-amino adipic and γ-glutamic semialdehyde). Furthermore, 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, a hydroxylation product of phenylalanine, was identified and quantified as a new protein oxidation marker. After 7days of chilled illuminated storage (4°C), significant oxidative modifications were quantified and the oxidative degradation was continued during in vitro digestion. The observed effects were more abundant in beef patties. Protein oxidation before digestion resulted in impaired proteolysis during digestion.

  4. Far infrared-assisted encapsulation of filter paper strips in poly(methyl methacrylate) for proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiwen; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Filter paper strips were enclosed between two poly(methyl methacrylate) plates to fabricate paper-packed channel microchips under pressure in the presence of far infrared irradiation. After the enclosed paper strip was oxidized by periodate, trypsin was covalently immobilized in them to fabricate microfluidic proteolysis bioreactor. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by digesting BSA and lysozyme. The results were comparable to those of conventional in-solution proteolysis while the digestion time was significantly reduced to ∼18 s. The suitability of the microfluidic paper-based bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  5. Energy and calcium ion dependence of proteolysis during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, M.B.; Hageman, J.H. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have shown, with an optimized ({sup 14}C)leucine-labeling and chasing procedure, that intracellular protein degradation in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) is apparently energy dependent. Sodium arsenate, sodium azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrozone, and N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, at levels which did not induce appreciable lysis ({<=} 10%) over 10-h periods of sporulation, inhibited intracellular proteolysis by 13 to 93%. Exponentially growing cells acquired arsenate resistance. In contrast to earlier reports, the authors found that chloramphenicol strongly inhibited proteolysis even when added 6 h into the sporulation process. Restricting the calcium ion concentration in the medium had no effect on rates or extent of vegetative growth, strongly inhibited sporulation, and inhibited rates of proteolysis by 60% or more. Inhibitors of energy metabolism, at the same levels which inhibited proteolysis, did not affect the rate or degree of uptake of Ca{sup 2+} by cells. Restricting the Ca{sup 2+} concentration in the medium reduced by threefold of the specific activity in cells of the major intracellular serine proteinase after 12 h of sporulation. finally, cells of a mutant of B. subtilis bearing an insertionally inactivated gene for the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent intracellular proteinase-1 degraded protein in chemically defined sporulation medium at a rate indistinguishable from that of the wild-type cells for period of 8 h.

  6. Probing the structure of GPI-less PrPSc by limited proteolysis(Abstract)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited proteolysis is a very useful tool to pinpoint flexible regions within scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), but due to carbohydrate and glysosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moieties, and limitations of the analytical techniques, until now it was impossible to characterize accurately these regions. To...

  7. Effects of energy deficit, dietary protein, and feeding on intracellular regulators of skeletal muscle proteolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and associated gene expression in normal-23 weight adults consuming varying levels of dietary protein during short-term energy deficit. 24 Using a randomized-bock design, 32 men and 7 women were assigned to diets providing protein 25 at 0.8 (RDA), 1...

  8. Inflation bulb-driven microfluidic reactor for infrared-assisted proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Bao, Huimin; Chen, Gang

    2010-09-01

    In this report, an inflation bulb-driven microfluidic reactor was developed for IR-accelerated proteolysis. This novel proteolysis system mainly consisted of an inflation bulb-driving system, a simple cross-PMMA microchip, and a temperature-controllable IR radiation system. The gas pressure generated from an inflation bulb was employed to drive protein and trypsin solutions to flow into the main channel of the microchip via two capillaries and the injection channel. When the two solutions were mixed in the channel, the protein was rapidly digested by trypsin under IR radiations. The peptides in the digests accumulated in the product reservoir of the microchip were subsequently identified by MS. The feasibility and performance of this unique system were demonstrated by digesting hemoglobin and lysozyme. The results indicated that IR radiation could significantly enhance the on-chip proteolysis and the digestion time was substantially reduced to 5 min. The present proteolysis setup is simple and efficient and will find wide applications in high-throughput protein digestion.

  9. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  10. Inhibition of APC-mediated proteolysis by the meiosis-specific protein kinase Ime2

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Melanie; Steigemann, Patrick; Braus, Gerhard H.; Irniger, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Proteolysis triggered by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) is needed for sister chromatid separation and the exit from mitosis. APC is a ubiquitin ligase whose activity is tightly controlled during the cell cycle. To identify factors involved in the regulation of APC-mediated proteolysis, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL-cDNA library was screened for genes whose overexpression prevented degradation of an APC target protein, the mitotic cyclin Clb2. Genes encoding G1, S, and mitotic cyclins were identified, consistent with previous data showing that the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 associated with different cyclins is a key factor for inhibiting APCCdh1 activity from late-G1 phase until mitosis. In addition, the meiosis-specific protein kinase Ime2 was identified as a negative regulator of APC-mediated proteolysis. Ectopic expression of IME2 in G1 arrested cells inhibited the degradation of mitotic cyclins and of other APC substrates. IME2 expression resulted in the phosphorylation of Cdh1 in G1 cells, indicating that Ime2 and Cdk1 regulate APCCdh1 in a similar manner. The expression of IME2 in cycling cells inhibited bud formation and caused cells to arrest in mitosis. We show further that Ime2 itself is an unstable protein whose proteolysis occurs independently of the APC and SCF (Skp1/Cdc53/F-box) ubiquitin ligases. Our findings suggest that Ime2 represents an unstable, meiosis-specific regulator of APCCdh1. PMID:11917129

  11. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. INSIGHTS ON SCRAPIE PRION PROTEIN (PrPSc) STRUCTURE OBTAINED BY LIMITED PROTEOLYSIS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elucidation of the structure of PrPSc, essential to understand the molecular mechanism of prion transmission, continues to be one of the major challenges in prion research, and is hampered by the insolubility and polymeric character of PrPSc. Limited proteolysis is a useful tool to obtain insight on...

  13. A kinetic assessment of the C. elegans amyloid disaggregation activity enables uncoupling of disassembly and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bieschke, Jan; Cohen, Ehud; Murray, Amber; Dillin, Andrew; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2009-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a common feature of late onset neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In Alzheimer's disease, misassembly of the Abeta peptide is genetically linked to proteotoxicity associated with disease etiology. A reduction in Abeta proteotoxicity is accomplished, in part, by the previously reported Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities-under partial control of heat shock factor 1, a transcription factor regulating proteostasis in the cytosol and negatively regulated by insulin growth factor signaling. Herein, we report an improved in vitro assay to quantify recombinant fibrillar Abeta disaggregation kinetics accomplished by the exogenous application of C.elegans extracts. With this assay we demonstrate that the Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities of C.elegans are separable. The disaggregation activity found in C.elegans preparations is more heat resistant than the proteolytic activity. Abeta disaggregation in the absence of proteolysis was found to be a reversible process. Future discovery of the molecular basis of the disaggregation and proteolysis activities offers the promise of delaying the age-onset proteotoxicity that leads to neurodegeneration in a spectrum of maladies.

  14. Muscle type influences u-calpain mediated troponin-T proteolysis in bovine myofibrils in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of muscle type on postmortem proteolysis remains largely unexplored. Previous attempts to classify muscle tenderness based on ‘muscle type’ indicated differences in tenderness were due to variations in proteolytic enzyme levels, but failed to account for the influence of sarcomere leng...

  15. Proteolysis and microstructure of Piacentinu Ennese cheese made using different farm technologies.

    PubMed

    Fallico, V; Tuminello, L; Pediliggieri, C; Horne, J; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide the biochemical and structural characterization of Piacentinu Ennese cheese and to evaluate the impact of different farm technologies on cheese proteolysis and microstructure. Fifteen cheeses were manufactured according to traditional technology, i.e., from raw milk and farmhouse rennet in the absence of starter culture. Pasteurized milk, commercial rennet, and starter were used for production of 20 nontraditional cheeses. Proteolysis in Piacentinu Ennese cheese was monitored during a 2- to 10-mo ripening time. Low rates of overall proteolysis were observed in cheese, as percentages of total N soluble at pH 4.6 and in 12% trichloroacetic acid were about 11.40 and 8.10%, respectively, after 10 mo of age. Patterns of primary proteolysis by urea-PAGE showed that alpha(s)-caseins were degraded to a larger extent than were beta-caseins, although a considerable amount of both caseins was still intact after 10 mo. Reversed phase-HPLC analysis of the cheese peptide fractions showed a slow decrease in the levels of hydrophobic peptides coupled to increasing levels of hydrophilic compounds as the cheese aged. The structural characteristics of Piacentinu Ennese cheese were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy after 2, 4, and 6 mo of age. The micrographs showed a sponge-like structural network with a well-distributed system of empty spaces, originally occupied by whey and fat. The microstructure changed during cheese ripening to become more compact with cavities of smaller size. Farm technology significantly affected cheese proteolysis and microstructure. Nontraditional cheeses had higher levels of pH 4.6-soluble N and showed a larger hydrolysis of alpha(s)-casein fractions by urea-PAGE analysis than did traditional cheeses. Large differences between cheese-types also concerned the patterns of secondary proteolysis. Nontraditional cheeses had higher levels of 12% trichloroacetic acid-soluble N and showed larger proportions of free

  16. In situ proteolysis of the Vibrio cholerae matrix protein RbmA promotes biofilm recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel R.; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Lee, Gloria; Gerard, Harry; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine gram-negative rod and human diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae synthesizes a VPS exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm matrix that allows it to form a 3D structure on surfaces. Proteins associated with the matrix include, RbmA, RbmC, and Bap1. RbmA, a protein whose crystallographic structure suggests two binding surfaces, associates with cells by means of a VPS-dependent mechanism and promotes biofilm cohesiveness and recruitment of cells to the biofilm. Here, we show that RbmA undergoes limited proteolysis within the biofilm. This proteolysis, which is carried out by the hemagglutinin/protease and accessory proteases, yields the 22-kDa C-terminal polypeptide RbmA*. RbmA* remains biofilm-associated. Unlike full-length RbmA, the association of RbmA* with cells is no longer VPS-dependent, likely due to an electropositive surface revealed by proteolysis. We provide evidence that this proteolysis event plays a role in recruitment of VPS− cells to the biofilm surface. Based on our findings, we propose that association of RbmA with the matrix reinforces the biofilm structure and leads to limited proteolysis of RbmA to RbmA*. RbmA*, in turn, promotes recruitment of cells that have not yet initiated VPS synthesis to the biofilm surface. The assignment of two functions to RbmA, separated by a proteolytic event that depends on matrix association, dictates an iterative cycle in which reinforcement of recently added biofilm layers precedes the recruitment of new VPS− cells to the biofilm. PMID:26240338

  17. Effect of CO2 addition to raw milk on proteolysis and lipolysis at 4 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M; Santos, M

    2003-05-01

    Fresh raw milks, with low (3.1 x 10(4) cell/ml) and high (1.1 x 10(6) cells/ml) somatic cell count (SCC), were standardized to 3.25% fat, and from each a preserved (with 0.02% potassium dichromate) and an unpreserved portion were prepared. Subsamples of each portion were carbonated to contain 0 (control, pH 6.9) and 1500 (pH 6.2) ppm added CO2, and HCl acidified to pH 6.2 Milk pH was measured at 4 degrees C. For the preserved low- and high-SCC milks, two additional carbonation levels, 500 (pH 6.5) and 1000 (pH 6.3) ppm, were prepared. Milks were stored at 4 degrees C and analyzed on d 0, 7, 14, and 21 for microbial count, proteolysis, and lipolysis. The addition of 1500 ppm CO2, but not HCl, effectively delayed microbial growth at 4 degrees C. In general, in both the low- and high-SCC unpreserved milks, there was more proteolysis and lipolysis in control and HCl acidified milks than in milk with 1500 ppm added CO2. Higher levels of proteolysis and lipolysis in the unpreserved milks without added CO2 were related to higher bacteria counts in those milks. In preserved low- and high-SCC milks, microbial growth was inhibited, and proteolysis and lipolysis were caused by endogenous milk enzymes (e.g., plasmin and lipoprotein lipase). Compared with control, both milk with 1500 ppm added CO2 and milk with HCl acidification had less proteolysis. The effect of carbonation or acidification with HCl on proteolysis in preserved milks was more pronounced in the high SCC milk, probably due to its high endogenous protease activity. Plasmin is an alkaline protease and the reduction in milk pH by added CO2 or HCl explained the reduction in proteolysis. No effect of carbonation or acidification of milk on lipolysis was observed in the preserved low- and high-SCC milks. The CO2 addition to raw milk decreased proteolysis via at least two mechanisms: the reduction of microbial proteases due to a reduced microbial growth and the possible reduction of endogenous protease activity due to

  18. Suppression of intralysosomal proteolysis aggravates structural damage and functional impairment of liver lysosomes in rats with toxic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Korolenko, T.A.; Gavrilova, N.I.; Kurysheva, N.G.; Malygin, A.E.; Pupyshev, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of lowering protein catabolism in the lysosomes on structural and functional properties of the latter during liver damage. For comparison, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which is inert relative to intralysosomal proteolysis, and which also accumulates largely in lysosomes of the kupffer cells of the liver, was used. The uptake of labeled bovine serum albuman (C 14-BSA) by the liver is shown and the rate of intralysosomal proteolysis is given 24 hours after administration of suramin an CCl/sub 4/ to rats. It is suggested that it is risky to use drugs which inhibit intralysosomal proteolysis in the treatment of patients with acute hepatitis.

  19. Short communication: effect of kefir grains on proteolysis of major milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, I M P L V O; Pinho, O; Monteiro, D; Faria, S; Cruz, S; Perreira, A; Roque, A C; Tavares, P

    2010-01-01

    The effect of kefir grains on the proteolysis of major milk proteins in milk kefir and in a culture of kefir grains in pasteurized cheese whey was followed by reverse phase-HPLC analysis. The reduction of kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins (CN), alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) contents during 48 and 90 h of incubation of pasteurized milk (100mL) and respective cheese whey with kefir grains (6 and 12 g) at 20 degrees C was monitored. Significant proteolysis of alpha-LA and kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins was observed. The effect of kefir amount (6 and 12 g/100mL) was significant for alpha-LA and alpha- and beta-CN. alpha-Lactalbumin and beta-CN were more easily hydrolyzed than alpha-CN. No significant reduction was observed with respect to beta-LG concentration for 6 and 12 g of kefir in 100mL of milk over 48 h, indicating that no significant proteolysis was carried out. Similar results were observed when the experiment was conducted over 90 h. Regarding the cheese whey kefir samples, similar behavior was observed for the proteolysis of alpha-LA and beta-LG: alpha-LA was hydrolyzed between 60 and 90% after 12h (for 6 and 12 g of kefir) and no significant beta-LG proteolysis occurred. The proteolytic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in kefir community was evaluated. Kefir milk prepared under normal conditions contained peptides from proteolysis of alpha-LA and kappa-, alpha-, and beta-caseins. Hydrolysis is dependent on the kefir:milk ratio and incubation time. beta-Lactoglobulin is not hydrolyzed even when higher hydrolysis time is used. Kefir grains are not appropriate as adjunct cultures to increase beta-LG digestibility in whey-based or whey-containing foods. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein aggregation and amyloid fibril formation by an SH3 domain probed by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia; Taddei, Niccolò; Frare, Erica; Capanni, Cristina; Costantini, Silvia; Zurdo, Jesús; Chiti, Fabrizio; Dobson, Christopher M; Fontana, Angelo

    2003-11-14

    The SH3 domains are small protein modules of 60-85 amino acid residues that are found in many proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction. The SH3 domain of the p85alpha subunit of bovine phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-SH3) under acidic solution adopts a compact denatured state from which amyloid fibrils are readily formed. This aggregation process has been found to be modulated substantially by solution conditions. Here, we have analyzed the conformational features of the native and acid denatured states of PI3-SH3 by limited proteolysis experiments using proteinase K and pepsin, respectively. Moreover, we have analyzed the propensity of PI3-SH3 to be hydrolyzed by pepsin at different stages in the process of aggregation and amyloid formation at pH 1.2 and 2.0 and compared the sites of proteolysis under these conditions with the conformational features of both native and aggregated PI3-SH3. The results demonstrate that the denatured state of PI3-SH3 formed at low pH is relatively resistant to proteolysis, indicating that it is partially folded. The long loop connecting beta-strands b and c in the native protein is the region in this structure most susceptible to proteolysis. Remarkably, aggregates of PI3-SH3 that are formed initially from this denatured state in acid solution display enhanced susceptibility to proteolysis of the long loop, suggesting that the protein becomes more unfolded in the early stages of aggregation. By contrast, the more defined amyloid fibrils that are formed over longer periods of time are completely resistant to proteolysis. We suggest that the protein aggregates formed initially are relatively dynamic species that are able readily to reorganize their interactions to enable formation of very well ordered fibrillar structures. In addition, the disordered and non-native character of the polypeptide chains in the early aggregates could be important in determining the high cytotoxicity that has been revealed in previous

  1. Variation in proteolysis, sarcomere length, collagen content, and tenderness among major pork muscles.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M

    2000-04-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the extent of variation in proteolysis, sarcomere length, and collagen content among pork muscles and the association of those factors with tenderness variation among muscles at 1 d postmortem. Twenty-three white composite barrows were slaughtered and carcasses (66 kg) were chilled at 0 degrees C for 24 h. At 1 d postmortem, the longissimus lumborum, biceps femoris, semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and triceps brachii, long head were dissected from one side of each carcass and frozen. Trained sensory panelists evaluated tenderness, amount of connective tissue, juiciness, and pork flavor intensity of grilled (70 degrees C) chops on 8-point scales. Raw chops were used for total collagen content, sarcomere length, and the extent of desmin proteolysis. Tenderness ratings were highest (P < .05) for semitendinosus (7.2) and triceps brachii (7.1), followed by longissimus lumborum (6.4) and semimembranosus (5.7) and were lowest (P < .05) for biceps femorus (4.0). The simple correlations between longissimus lumborum tenderness and the tenderness of other muscles were .54 (semimembranosus), .34 (semitendinosus), .36 (triceps branchii), and .17 (biceps femorus). Total collagen was highest (P < .05) for biceps femorus (7.1 mg/g muscle), followed by triceps branchii (6.0 mg/g) and semitendinosus (5.3 mg/g), and lowest for semimembranosus (4.5 mg/g) and longissimus lumborum (4.1 mg/g). Sarcomere length was longest (P < .05) for semitendinosus (2.5 microm) and triceps branchii (2.4 microm), followed by semimembranosus (1.8 microm), longissimus lumborum (1.8 microm), and biceps femorus (1.7 microm). Proteolysis of desmin was greatest (P < .05) in longissimus lumborum (39.3%), followed by semimembranosus (21.0%) and biceps femoris (18.5%), then semitendinosus (.2%) and triceps brachii (.2%). Multiple linear regression using total collagen, sarcomere length, and proteolysis accounted for 57% of the variation in tenderness rating

  2. Calpain protease causes hypoxia-induced proteolysis in cultured human retina.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Mitsuyoshi; Hammond, Katherine B; Nakajima, Emi; Shearer, Thomas R

    2014-04-01

    Calpain proteases are known to be involved in retinal cell death in animal models. The purpose of the present study was to test for calpain activation in human retinas cultured under hypoxic conditions. Calpain activation was detected by immunoblotting for calpain substrates in human and monkey retinas cultured in gas generating pouches to reduce oxygen. Hypoxia caused activation of calpains as measured by accumulation of the calpain-specific 145 kDa α-spectrin breakdown product. Opsin-1 (photoreceptor marker) and vimentin (Müller cell marker) were degraded. Calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 ameliorated these changes. Results were similar to comparative data from cultured monkey retinas. In cultured human retina, hypoxia caused activation of calpain and subsequent proteolysis of critical substrates. The efficacy of SNJ-1945 in ameliorating these changes indicated that it might be useful to test as a drug for protecting against pathologic proteolysis of photoreceptor and Müller cells.

  3. Peptides Displayed as High Density Brush Polymers Resist Proteolysis and Retain Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for rendering peptides resistant to proteolysis by formulating them as high-density brush polymers. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by polymerizing well-established cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and showing that the resulting polymers are not only resistant to proteolysis but also maintain their ability to enter cells. The scope of this design concept is explored by studying the proteolytic resistance of brush polymers composed of peptides that are substrates for either thrombin or a metalloprotease. Finally, we demonstrate that the proteolytic susceptibility of peptide brush polymers can be tuned by adjusting the density of the polymer brush and offer in silico models to rationalize this finding. We contend that this strategy offers a plausible method of preparing peptides for in vivo use, where rapid digestion by proteases has traditionally restricted their utility. PMID:25314576

  4. Global Analysis of Cellular Proteolysis by Selective Enzymatic Labeling of Protein N-Termini

    PubMed Central

    Wiita, Arun P.; Seaman, Julia E.; Wells, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis is a critical modification leading to alteration of protein function with important outcomes in many biological processes. However, for the majority of proteases, we have an incomplete understanding of both cellular substrates and downstream effects. Here, we describe detailed protocols and applications for using the rationally engineered peptide ligase, subtiligase, to specifically label and capture protein N-termini generated by proteases either induced or added to complex biological samples. This method allows identification of the protein targets as well as their precise cleavage locations. This approach has revealed >8000 proteolytic sites in healthy and apoptotic cells including >1700 caspase cleavages. One can further determine substrate preferences through rate analysis with quantitative mass spectrometry, physiological substrate specificities, and even infer the identity of proteases operating in the cell. In this chapter, we also describe how this experimental method can be generalized to investigate proteolysis in any biological sample. PMID:24974296

  5. Actin proteolysis during ripening of dry fermented sausages at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Berardo, A; Devreese, B; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Van Royen, G; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2017-04-15

    In dry fermented sausages, myofibrillar proteins undergo intense proteolysis generating small peptides and free amino acids that play a role in flavour generation. This study aimed to identify small peptides arising from actin proteolysis, as influenced by the type of processing. Two acidification profiles were imposed, in order to mimic the pH normally obtained in southern-type and northern-type dry fermented sausages. The identification of peptides was done by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in a data-independent positive mode of acquisition (LC-MS(E)). During manufacturing of the dry fermented sausages, actin was highly proteolysed, especially in nine regions of the sequence. After fermentation, 52 and 42 actin-derived peptides were identified at high and low pH, respectively, which further increased to 66 and 144 peptides, respectively, at the end of ripening. Most peptides were released at the cleavage sites of cathepsins B and D, which thus play an important role.

  6. Immobilization of trypsin on miniature incandescent bulbs for infrared-assisted proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huimin; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2014-10-03

    A novel efficient proteolysis approach was developed based on trypsin-immobilized miniature incandescent bulbs and infrared (IR) radiation. Trypsin was covalently immobilized in the chitosan coating on the outer surface of miniature incandescent bulbs with the aid of glutaraldehyde. When an illuminated enzyme-immobilized bulb was immersed in protein solution, the emitted IR radiation could trigger and accelerate heterogeneous protein digestion. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of hemoglobin (HEM), cytochrome c (Cyt-c), lysozyme (LYS), and ovalbumin (OVA) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS with the sequence coverages of 91%, 77%, 80%, and 52% for HEM, Cyt-c, LYS, and OVA (200 ng μL(-1) each), respectively. The suitability of the prepared bulb bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Integrity].

    PubMed

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  8. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction.

  9. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    Calmodulin (CaM)-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM. Ten distinct proteins with molecular weights of 245, 225K, 175K, 150K, 90K, 82K(2), 60K and 41K(2) bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by both trifluoperazine and nonradiolabeled CaM. The 225K and 90K proteins were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase (MLCK); the 60K and one of the 82K proteins were identified as the CaM-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon. The remaining proteins have not yet been identified. Most of the CaM-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin or N-ethyl-maleimide which suggests that it was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, ADP, collagen and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores A23187 and ionomycin under conditions which promote platelet aggregation (i.e. stirring with extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/) also resulted in limited proteolysis of CaM-binding proteins including those labeled with anti-MLCK and the phosphatase. Many Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes have been shown to be irreversibly activated in vitro by limited proteolysis. Their data indicates that limited proteolysis also occurs in vivo; under certain conditions proteolysis may be an important physiological mechanism for irreversibly activating Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes.

  10. Proteolysis on Reggianito Argentino cheeses manufactured with natural whey cultures and selected strains of Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Hynes, E R; Bergamini, C V; Suárez, V B; Zalazar, C A

    2003-12-01

    Reggianito Argentino cheese is traditionally manufactured with whey starter cultures that provide typical and intense flavor but can cause poor quality standardization. In this study, the influence of natural and selected starters on Reggianito Argentino cheese proteolysis was investigated. Cheeses were manufactured with three strains of Lactobacillus helveticus (SF133, SF138 and SF209) cultured individually in sterile whey and used as single or mixed starters. Control cheeses were made with natural whey starter culture. Cheeses were analyzed to determine gross composition, as well as total thermophilic lactic flora. Proteolysis was assessed by N fractions, electrophoresis and liquid chromatography. Gross composition of the cheeses did not significantly differ, while viable starter cell counts were lower for cheeses made with strain SF209 alone or combined with other strains. Soluble N at pH 4.6 was the same for cheeses made with natural or selected starters, but soluble N in 12% trichloroacetic acid and 2.5% phosphotungstic acid was significantly higher in cheeses made with starters containing strain SF209. Nitrogen fractions results indicated that natural whey starter cultures could be replaced by several starters composed of the selected strains without significant changes to proteolysis patterns. Starter cultures prepared only with SF209 or with the three selected L. helveticus strains produced cheese products with significantly more proteolysis than control cheeses. Chromatographic profiles analyzed by principal components showed that three main peaks on chromatograms, presumptively identified as Tyr, Phe, and Trp, explained most of variability. Principal component scores indicated that cheese samples were grouped by ripening time, which was confirmed by linear discriminant analysis. On the contrary, samples did not cluster by Lactobacillus strain or type of starter.

  11. Proteolysis of microtubule associated protein 2 and sensitivity of pancreatic tumours to docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Veitia, R; David, S; Barbier, P; Vantard, M; Gounon, P; Bissery, M C; Fellous, A

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the state of microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas P03 and P02 (sensitive and refractory to docetaxel respectively) since they express the corresponding mRNA and MAP2-related peptides. Immunohistochemical localization showed that in tumour P03 the MAP2-related peptides are highly expressed and confined to the epithelial malignant cells while in P02 the intensity of the immunostaining is lower. However, anti α-tubulin staining followed a similar pattern suggesting that the net amount of macromolecular structures in the sensitive tumour is higher than in the refractory one. This may explain its higher sensitivity to docetaxel, because tubulin assembled into microtubules is the target of the drug. We found that protein extracts from both tumours differed in their proteolytic activity on rat brain MAP2. Since the proteolysis pattern obtained was similar to the one produced by Cathepsin D, we studied the effect of MAP2 proteolysed by this enzyme on microtubule formation in vitro. Proteolysis was found to increase the tendency of tubulin to assemble into macromolecular structures (microtubules and aggregates) in the presence of docetaxel. This suggests that in vivo proteolysis of MAP2 might increase microtubule alterations and potentiate the antitumour effect of docetaxel. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945505

  12. Alternative Surfactants for Improved Efficiency of In Situ Tryptic Proteolysis of Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ekta; Clench, Malcolm R.; West, Andy; Marshall, Peter S.; Marshall, Nathan; Francese, Simona

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements to in situ proteolysis strategies, a higher efficiency is still needed to increase both the number of peptides detected and the associated ion intensity, leading to a complete and reliable set of biomarkers for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. In the study presented here, an extract of a systematic study is illustrated investigating a range of surfactants assisting trypsin proteolytic activity. Method development was trialled on fingermarks; this specimen results from a transfer of sweat from an individual's fingertip to a surface upon contact. As sweat carries a plethora of biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, fingermarks are, potentially, a very valuable specimen for non-invasive prognostic or diagnostic screening. A recent study has demonstrated the opportunity to quickly detect peptides and small proteins in fingermarks using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Profiling (MALDI MSP). However, intact detection bears low sensitivity and does not allow species identification; therefore, a shotgun proteomic approach was employed involving in situ proteolysis. Data demonstrate that in fingermarks, further improvements to the existing method can be achieved using MEGA-8 as surfactant in higher percentages as well as combinations of different detergents. Also, for the first time, Rapigest SF, normally used in solution digestions, has been shown to successfully work also for in situ proteolysis.

  13. The role of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich domain in VWF binding and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Rens; Lane, David A; Crawley, James T B

    2015-03-19

    ADAMTS13 proteolytically regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF). ADAMTS13 function is dependent upon multiple exosites that specifically bind the unraveled VWF A2 domain and enable proteolysis. We carried out a comprehensive functional analysis of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich (Cys-rich) domain using engineered glycans, sequence swaps, and single point mutations in this domain. Mutagenesis of Cys-rich domain-charged residues had no major effect on ADAMTS13 function, and 5 out of 6 engineered glycans on the Cys-rich domain also had no effect on ADAMTS13 function. However, a glycan attached at position 476 appreciably reduced both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of Cys-rich sequences for the corresponding regions in ADAMTS1 identified a hydrophobic pocket involving residues Gly471-Val474 as being of critical importance for both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of hydrophobic VWF A2 domain residues to serine in a region (residues 1642-1659) previously postulated to interact with the Cys-rich domain revealed the functional importance of VWF residues Ile1642, Trp1644, Ile1649, Leu1650, and Ile1651. Furthermore, the functional deficit of the ADAMTS13 Cys-rich Gly471-Val474 variant was dependent on these same hydrophobic VWF residues, suggesting that these regions form complementary binding sites that directly interact to enhance the efficiency of the proteolytic reaction.

  14. Ectdomain shedding and regulated intracellular proteolysis in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca-B, Pavel

    2010-12-01

    The term Ectodomain Shedding (ES) refers to extracellular domain proteolytic release from cell membrane molecules. This proteolysis is mediated mainly by matrix metalloproteases (MMP) or disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAM), although some other proteases may mediate it. Virtually, all functional categories of cell membrane molecules are subject of this kind of proteolysis, for this reason ES is involved in different cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, migration, differentiation or pathologies such as inflammation, cancer and degeneration among others. ES releases membrane molecule's extracellular domain (or ectodomain) to the extracellular milieu where it can play different biological functions. ES of transmembrane molecules also generates membrane attached terminal fragments comprising transmembrane and intracellular domains that enable their additional processing by intracellular proteases known as Regulated Intracellular Proteolysis (RIP). This second proteolytic cleavage delivers molecule's intracellular domain (ICD) that carry out intracellular functions. RIP is mediated by the group of intracellular cleaving proteases (i-CLiPs) that include presenilin from the γ-secretase complex. In the CNS the best well known ES is that of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, although many other membrane molecules expressed by cells of the CNS are also subject to ES and RIP. In this review, these molecules are summarized, and some meaningful examples are highlighted and described. In addition, ES and RIP implications in the context of cell biology are discussed. Finally, some considerations that rise from the study of ES and RIP are formulated in view of the unexpected roles of intracellular fragments.

  15. Mass spectrometric characterization of limited proteolysis activity in human plasma samples under mild acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingzhi; Röwer, Claudia; Koy, Cornelia; Ruß, Manuela; Rüger, Christopher P; Zimmermann, Ralf; von Fritschen, Uwe; Bredell, Marius; Finke, Juliane C; Glocker, Michael O

    2015-11-01

    We developed a limited proteolysis assay for estimating dynamics in plasma-borne protease activities using MALDI ToF MS analysis as readout. A highly specific limited proteolysis activity was elicited in human plasma by shifting the pH to 6. Mass spectrometry showed that two singly charged ion signals at m/z 2753.44 and m/z 2937.56 significantly increased in abundance under mild acidic conditions as a function of incubation time. For proving that a provoked proteolytic activity in mild acidic solution caused the appearance of the observed peptides, control measurements were performed (i) with pepstatin as protease inhibitor, (ii) with heat-denatured samples, (iii) at pH 1.7, and (iv) at pH 7.5. Mass spectrometric fragmentation analysis showed that the observed peptides encompass the amino acid sequences 1-24 and 1-26 from the N-terminus of human serum albumin. Investigations on peptidase specificities suggest that the two best candidates for the observed serum albumin cleavages are cathepsin D and E. Reproducibility, robustness, and sensitivity prove the potential of the developed limited proteolysis assay to become of clinical importance for estimating dynamics of plasma-borne proteases with respect to associated pathophysiological tissue conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional and Evolutionary Analyses Identify Proteolysis as a General Mechanism for NLRP1 Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría-Smith, Joseph; Mitchell, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that initiate immune responses to infection by recruiting and activating the Caspase-1 protease. Human NLRP1 was the first protein shown to form an inflammasome, but its physiological mechanism of activation remains unknown. Recently, specific variants of mouse and rat NLRP1 were found to be activated upon N-terminal cleavage by the anthrax lethal factor protease. However, agonists for other NLRP1 variants, including human NLRP1, are not known, and it remains unclear if they are also activated by proteolysis. Here we demonstrate that two mouse NLRP1 paralogs (NLRP1AB6 and NLRP1BB6) are also activated by N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. We also demonstrate that proteolysis within a specific N-terminal linker region is sufficient to activate human NLRP1. Evolutionary analysis of primate NLRP1 shows the linker/cleavage region has evolved under positive selection, indicative of pathogen-induced selective pressure. Collectively, these results identify proteolysis as a general mechanism of NLRP1 inflammasome activation that appears to be contributing to the rapid evolution of NLRP1 in rodents and primates. PMID:27926929

  17. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P R O

    2008-02-26

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or "collagenolysis." The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's "interaction domain," which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  18. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  19. Skeletal muscle proteolysis in response to short-term unloading in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, Per A.; von Walden, Ferdinand; Gustafsson, Thomas; Linnehan, Richard M.; Trappe, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is evident after muscle disuse, unloading, or spaceflight and results from decreased protein content as a consequence of decreased protein synthesis, increased protein breakdown or both. At this time, there are essentially no human data describing proteolysis in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy on Earth or in space, primarily due to lack of valid and accurate methodology. This particular study aimed at assessing the effects of short-term unloading on the muscle contractile proteolysis rate. Eight men were subjected to 72-h unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and intramuscular interstitial levels of the naturally occurring proteolytic tracer 3-methylhistidine (3MH) were measured by means of microdialysis before and on completion of this intervention. The 3MH concentration following 72-h ULLS (2.01 ± 0.22 nmol/ml) was 44% higher (P < 0.05) than before ULLS (1.56 ± 0.20 nmol/ml). The present experimental model and the employed method determining 3MH in microdialysates present a promising tool for monitoring skeletal muscle proteolysis or metabolism of specific muscles during conditions resulting in atrophy caused by, e.g., disuse and real or simulated microgravity. This study provides evidence that the atrophic processes are evoked rapidly and within 72 h of unloading and suggests that countermeasures should be employed in the early stages of space missions to offset or prevent muscle loss during the period when the rate of muscle atrophy is the highest. PMID:18535133

  20. The role of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich domain in VWF binding and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, David A.; Crawley, James T. B.

    2015-01-01

    ADAMTS13 proteolytically regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF). ADAMTS13 function is dependent upon multiple exosites that specifically bind the unraveled VWF A2 domain and enable proteolysis. We carried out a comprehensive functional analysis of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich (Cys-rich) domain using engineered glycans, sequence swaps, and single point mutations in this domain. Mutagenesis of Cys-rich domain–charged residues had no major effect on ADAMTS13 function, and 5 out of 6 engineered glycans on the Cys-rich domain also had no effect on ADAMTS13 function. However, a glycan attached at position 476 appreciably reduced both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of Cys-rich sequences for the corresponding regions in ADAMTS1 identified a hydrophobic pocket involving residues Gly471-Val474 as being of critical importance for both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of hydrophobic VWF A2 domain residues to serine in a region (residues 1642-1659) previously postulated to interact with the Cys-rich domain revealed the functional importance of VWF residues Ile1642, Trp1644, Ile1649, Leu1650, and Ile1651. Furthermore, the functional deficit of the ADAMTS13 Cys-rich Gly471-Val474 variant was dependent on these same hydrophobic VWF residues, suggesting that these regions form complementary binding sites that directly interact to enhance the efficiency of the proteolytic reaction. PMID:25564400

  1. Calpastatin overexpression limits calpain-mediated proteolysis and behavioral deficits following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Kathleen M.; Evans, Heather N.; Brelsfoard, Jennifer M.; Madathil, Sindhu K.; Takano, Jiro; Saido, Takaomi C.; Saatman, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in abrupt, initial cell damage leading to delayed neuronal death. The calcium-activated proteases, calpains, are known to contribute to this secondary neurodegenerative cascade. Although the specific inhibitor of calpains, calpastatin, is present within neurons, normal levels of calpastatin are unable to fully prevent the damaging proteolytic activity of calpains after injury. In this study, increased calpastatin expression was achieved using transgenic mice that overexpress the human calpastatin (hCAST) construct under control of a calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase II α promoter. Naïve hCAST transgenic mice exhibited enhanced neuronal calpastatin expression and significantly reduced protease activity. Acute calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis in the cortex and hippocampus induced by controlled cortical impact brain injury was significantly attenuated in calpastatin overexpressing mice. Aspects of posttraumatic motor and cognitive behavioral deficits were also lessened in hCAST transgenic mice compared to their wildtype littermates. However, volumetric analyses of neocortical contusion revealed no histological neuroprotection at either acute or long-term time points. Partial hippocampal neuroprotection observed at a moderate injury severity was lost after severe TBI. This study underscores the effectiveness of calpastatin overexpression in reducing calpain-mediated proteolysis and behavioral impairment after TBI, supporting the therapeutic potential for calpain inhibition. In addition, the reduction in spectrin proteolysis without accompanied neocortical neuroprotection suggests the involvement of other factors that are critical for neuronal survival after contusion brain injury. PMID:22572592

  2. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  3. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  4. Proteolysis of ankyrin and of band 3 protein in chemically induced cell fusion. Ca2+ is not mandatory for fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, R D; Wickenden, C; Wynne, J; Lucy, J A

    1984-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were fused by incubation with 0.5-2 mM-chlorpromazine hydrochloride at pH 6.8-7.6. Fusogenic preparations of chlorpromazine were cloudy suspensions of microdroplets, and below pH 6.8 chlorpromazine gave clear solutions that were inactive. Unlike control cells, the lateral mobility of the intramembranous particles of the PF-fracture face of chlorpromazine-treated cells was relatively unrestricted, since the particles were partly clustered at 37 degrees C and they exhibited extensive cold-induced clustering. Ca2+ stimulated fusion, but fusion was only very weakly inhibited by EGTA (10 mM) and by N-ethylmaleimide (50 mM); pretreatment of the cells with Tos-Lys-CH2Cl (7-amino-1-chloro-3-L-tosylamidoheptan-2-one) (7.5 mM) markedly inhibited fusion. Changes in the membrane proteins of erythrocytes fused by chlorpromazine, before and after treatment with chymotrypsin to remove band 3 protein, were investigated. The several observations made indicate that the Ca2+-insensitive component of fusion is associated with degradation of ankyrin (band 2.1 protein) to band 2.3-2.6 proteins and to smaller polypeptides by a serine proteinase that is inhibited by Tos-Lys-CH2Cl, and that the component of fusion inhibited by EGTA and N-ethylmaleimide is associated with degradation of band 3 protein to band 4.5 protein by a Ca2+-activated cysteine proteinase. Proteolysis of ankyrin appeared to be sufficient to permit the chlorpromazine-induced fusion of human erythrocytes, but fusion occurred more rapidly when band 3 protein was also degraded in the presence of Ca2+. Since other cells have structures comparable with the spectrin-actin skeleton of the erythrocyte membrane, the observations reported may be relevant to the initiation of naturally occurring fusion reactions in biomembranes. It is also suggested that, should polypeptides with fusogenic properties be produced from integral and skeletal membrane proteins by endogenous proteolysis, their formation would provide

  5. New Concepts in Molecular Imaging: Non-Invasive MRI Spotting of Proteolysis Using an Overhauser Effect Switch

    PubMed Central

    Mellet, Philippe; Massot, Philippe; Madelin, Guillaume; Marque, Sylvain R. A.; Harte, Etienne; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolysis, involved in many processes in living organisms, is tightly regulated in space and time under physiological conditions. However deregulation can occur with local persistent proteolytic activities, e.g. in inflammation, cystic fibrosis, tumors, or pancreatitis. Furthermore, little is known about the role of many proteases, hence there is a need of new imaging methods to visualize specifically normal or disease-related proteolysis in intact bodies. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, a new concept for non invasive proteolysis imaging is proposed. Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI) at 0.2 Tesla was used to monitor the enzymatic hydrolysis of a nitroxide-labeled protein. In vitro, image intensity switched from 1 to 25 upon proteolysis due to the associated decrease in the motional correlation time of the substrate. The OMRI experimental device used in this study is consistent with protease imaging in mice at 0.2 T without significant heating. Simulations show that this enzymatic-driven OMRI signal switch can be obtained at lower frequencies suitable for larger animals or humans. Conclusions/Significance The method is highly sensitive and makes possible proteolysis imaging in three dimensions with a good spatial resolution. Any protease could be targeted specifically through the use of taylor-made cleavable macromolecules. At short term OMRI of proteolysis may be applied to basic research as well as to evaluate therapeutic treatments in small animal models of experimental diseases. PMID:19396361

  6. Cell cycle-controlled proteolysis of a flagellar motor protein that is asymmetrically distributed in the Caulobacter predivisional cell.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal, U; Shapiro, L

    1996-01-01

    Flagellar biogenesis and release are developmental events tightly coupled to the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. A single flagellum is assembled at the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell and is released later in the cell cycle. Here we show that the MS-ring monomer FliF, a central motor component that anchors the flagellum in the cell membrane, is synthesized only in the predivisional cell and is integrated into the membrane at the incipient swarmer cell pole, where it initiates flagellar assembly. FliF is proteolytically turned over during swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation, coinciding with the loss of the flagellum, suggesting that its degradation is coupled to flagellar release. The membrane topology of FliF was determined and a region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain was shown to be required for the interaction with a component of the motor switch. The very C-terminal end of FliF contains a turnover determinant, required for the cell cycle-dependent degradation of the MS-ring. The cell cycle-dependent proteolysis of FliF and the targeting of FliF to the swarmer pole together contribute to the asymmetric localization of the MS-ring in the predivisional cell. Images PMID:8665847

  7. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  8. Tubulin secondary structure analysis, limited proteolysis sites, and homology to FtsZ.

    PubMed

    de Pereda, J M; Leynadier, D; Evangelio, J A; Chacón, P; Andreu, J M

    1996-11-12

    The far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectrum of the alpha beta-tubulin dimer analyzed by six different methods indicates an average content of approximately 33% alpha helix, 21% beta sheet, and 45% other secondary structure. Deconvolution of Fourier transform infrared spectra indicates 24% sheet, 37% (maximum) helix, and 38% (minimum) other structure. Separate alignments of 75 alpha-tubulin, 106 beta-tubulin, and 14 gamma-tubulin sequences and 12 sequences of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ have been employed to predict their secondary structures with the multiple-sequence method PHD [Rost, B., & Sander, C. (1993a) J. Mol. Biol. 232, 584-599]. The predicted secondary structures average of 33% alpha helix, 24% beta sheet, and 43% loop for the alpha beta dimer. The predictions have been compared with sites of limited proteolysis by 12 proteases at the surfaces of the heterodimer and taxol-induced microtubules [de Pereda, J. M., & Andreu, J. M. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 14184-14202]. From 24 experimentally determined nicking sites, 18 are at predicted loops or at the extremes of secondary structure elements. Proteolysis zone A (including acetylable Lys40 and probably Lys60 in alpha-tubulin and Gly93 in beta-tubulin) and proteolysis zone B (extending between residues 167 and 183 in both chains) are accessible in microtubules. Proteolysis zone C, between residues 278 and 295, becomes partially occluded in microtubules. The alpha-tubulin nicking site Arg339-Ser340 is at a loop following a predicted alpha helix in proteolysis zone D. This site is protected in taxol microtubules; however, a new tryptic site appears which is probably located at the N-terminal end of the same helix. Zone D also contains beta-tubulin Cys354, which is accessible in microtubules. Proteolysis zone E includes the C-terminal hypervariable loops (10-20 residues) of each tubulin chain. These follow the two larger predicted helical zones (residues 372-395 and 405-432 in beta-tubulin), which

  9. The lumbrical muscle: a novel in situ system to evaluate adult skeletal muscle proteolysis and anticatabolic drugs for therapeutic purposes.

    PubMed

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Figueiredo, Leonardo Bruno; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    The molecular regulation of skeletal muscle proteolysis and the pharmacological screening of anticatabolic drugs have been addressed by measuring tyrosine release from prepubertal rat skeletal muscles, which are thin enough to allow adequate in vitro diffusion of oxygen and substrates. However, the use of muscle at accelerated prepubertal growth has limited the analysis of adult muscle proteolysis or that associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we established the adult rat lumbrical muscle (4/hindpaw; 8/rat) as a new in situ experimental model for dynamic measurement of skeletal muscle proteolysis. By incubating lumbrical muscles attached to their individual metatarsal bones in Tyrode solution, we showed that the muscle proteolysis rate of adult and aged rats (3-4 to 24 mo old) is 45-25% of that in prepubertal animals (1 mo old), which makes questionable the usual extrapolation of proteolysis from prepubertal to adult/senile muscles. While acute mechanical injury or 1- to 7-day denervation increased tyrosine release from adult lumbrical muscle by up to 60%, it was reduced by 20-28% after 2-h incubation with β-adrenoceptor agonists, forskolin or phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Using inhibitors of 26S-proteasome (MG132), lysosome (methylamine), or calpain (E64/leupeptin) systems, we showed that ubiquitin-proteasome is accountable for 40-50% of total lumbrical proteolysis of adult, middle-aged, and aged rats. In conclusion, the lumbrical model allows the analysis of muscle proteolysis rate from prepubertal to senile rats. By permitting eight simultaneous matched measurements per rat, the new model improves similar protocols performed in paired extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from prepubertal rats, optimizing the pharmacological screening of drugs for anticatabolic purposes.

  10. Contribution of a selected fungal population to proteolysis on dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J; Núñez, Félix; Benito, María J; Asensio, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    The proteolytic changes taking place in dry-cured hams lead to increases in free amino acids. Such free amino acids not only contribute to flavour, but also serve as precursors of volatile compounds. Several months of ripening time are required to allow the particular flavour to develop. The fungal population allowed to grow on the surface of some types of dry-cured could play a key role on proteolysis, as it has been shown for dry-cured sausages. The purpose of this work was to study the possible contribution of fungi to proteolysis in dry-cured ham. For this, a strain each of non-toxigenic Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) and Debaryomyces hansenii (Dh345), selected for their proteolytic activity on myofibrillar proteins, were inoculated as starter cultures. Changes in the high ionic strength-soluble proteins of an external muscle (adductor) revealed in only 6 months higher proteolysis in the inoculated hams when compared to non-inoculated control hams. Proteolytic strains among the wild fungal population on non-inoculated control hams prevented from obtaining similar differences at the end of processing. However, inoculation with Pg222 and Dh345 led to higher levels for most free amino acids at the external muscle in fully dry-cured hams. In addition, the concentration for some of the more polar free amino acids (i.e. Asp, Glu, Ser and Gln) in inoculated hams was higher at external than at internal (biceps femoris) muscles. These promising results deserve further studies to know the impact of a selected fungal population on the volatile compounds and sensory properties of dry-cured ham.

  11. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, Hironori; Maeda, Masatomo

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  12. Expression of SPARC during development of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane: evidence for regulated proteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Iruela-Arispe, M L; Lane, T F; Redmond, D; Reilly, M; Bolender, R P; Kavanagh, T J; Sage, E H

    1995-01-01

    SPARC is a secreted glycoprotein that has been shown to disrupt focal adhesions and to regulate the proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, peptides resulting from the proteolysis of SPARC exhibit angiogenic activity. Here we describe the temporal synthesis, turnover, and angiogenic potential of SPARC in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed specific expression of SPARC protein in endothelial cells, and significantly higher levels of SPARC were observed in smaller newly formed blood vessels in comparison to larger, developmentally older vessels. SPARC mRNA was detected at the earliest stages of chorioallantoic membrane morphogenesis and reached maximal levels at day 13 of embryonic development. Interestingly, steady-state levels of SPARC mRNA did not correlate directly with protein accumulation; moreover, the protein appeared to undergo limited degradation during days 10-15. Incubation of [125I]-SPARC with chorioallantoic membranes of different developmental ages confirmed that extracellular proteolysis occurred during days 9-15, but not at later stages (e.g., days 17-21). Comparison of peptides produced by incubation with chorioallantoic membranes with those generated by plasmin showed an identical pattern of proteolysis. Plasmin activity was present throughout development, and in situ zymography identified sites of plasminogen activator activity that corresponded to areas exhibiting high levels of SPARC expression. Synthetic peptides from a plasmin-sensitive region of SPARC, between amino acids 113-130, stimulated angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane in a dose-dependent manner; in contrast, intact SPARC was inactive in similar assays. We have shown that SPARC is expressed in endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels in a manner that is both temporally and spatially restricted. Between days 9 and 15 of chorioallantoic membrane development, the protein undergoes proteolytic cleavage that

  13. MMP-9 facilitates selective proteolysis of the histone H3 tail at genes necessary for proficient osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Punj, Vasu; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Sunyoung; Ulmer, Tobias S.; Lu, Wange; Rice, Judd C.; An, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Although limited proteolysis of the histone H3 N-terminal tail (H3NT) is frequently observed during mammalian differentiation, the specific genomic sites targeted for H3NT proteolysis and the functional significance of H3NT cleavage remain largely unknown. Here we report the first method to identify and examine H3NT-cleaved regions in mammals, called chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of acetylated chromatin (ChIPac). By applying ChIPac combined with deep sequencing (ChIPac-seq) to an established cell model of osteoclast differentiation, we discovered that H3NT proteolysis is selectively targeted near transcription start sites of a small group of genes and that most H3NT-cleaved genes displayed significant expression changes during osteoclastogenesis. We also discovered that the principal H3NT protease of osteoclastogenesis is matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). In contrast to other known H3NT proteases, MMP-9 primarily cleaved H3K18-Q19 in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, our results support CBP/p300-mediated acetylation of H3K18 as a central regulator of MMP-9 H3NT protease activity both in vitro and at H3NT cleavage sites during osteoclastogenesis. Importantly, we found that abrogation of H3NT proteolysis impaired osteoclastogenic gene activation concomitant with defective osteoclast differentiation. Our collective results support the necessity of MMP-9-dependent H3NT proteolysis in regulating gene pathways required for proficient osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26744418

  14. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; ...

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself wasmore » not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N

  15. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis.

    IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled

  16. Chemically induced degradation of CDK9 by a proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC).

    PubMed

    Robb, Caroline M; Contreras, Jacob I; Kour, Smit; Taylor, Margaret A; Abid, Mohammad; Sonawane, Yogesh A; Zahid, Muhammad; Murry, Daryl J; Natarajan, Amarnath; Rana, Sandeep

    2017-07-04

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), a member of the cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) family, is involved in transcriptional elongation of several target genes. CDK9 is ubiquitously expressed and has been shown to contribute to a variety of malignancies such as pancreatic, prostate and breast cancers. Here we report the development of a heterobifunctional small molecule proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC) capable of cereblon (CRBN) mediated proteasomal degradation of CDK9. In HCT116 cells, it selectively degrades CDK9 while sparing other CDK family members. This is the first example of a PROTAC that selectively degrades CDK9.

  17. New monitoring system for proteolysis in soil as influenced by selected herbicidal applications.

    PubMed Central

    Cullimore, D R; Ball, L

    1978-01-01

    Proteolysis in soil (Regina heavy clay) was monitored by the gelatinolytic etching of developed color film emulsion, using a film immersion-slide carrier technique. Etching followed a sigmoid curve to completion. A total of 11 herbicides were tested for their potential influence on this proteolytic function. Eight caused some inhibition, and two were stimulative at 200 microliter of applied herbicide per liter. Eptam was found to stimulate at low concentrations and inhibit at higher concentrations (greater than 1,000 microliter of applied Eptam per liter). Images PMID:736547

  18. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. This study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N-terminal degron and

  19. Huntingtin proteolysis releases non-polyQ fragments that cause toxicity through dynamin 1 dysregulation.

    PubMed

    El-Daher, Marie-Thérèse; Hangen, Emilie; Bruyère, Julie; Poizat, Ghislaine; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Pardo, Raul; Bourg, Nicolas; Souquere, Sylvie; Mayet, Céline; Pierron, Gérard; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Botas, Juan; Humbert, Sandrine; Saudou, Frédéric

    2015-09-02

    Cleavage of mutant huntingtin (HTT) is an essential process in Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Cleavage generates N-ter fragments that contain the polyQ stretch and whose nuclear toxicity is well established. However, the functional defects induced by cleavage of full-length HTT remain elusive. Moreover, the contribution of non-polyQ C-terminal fragments is unknown. Using time- and site-specific control of full-length HTT proteolysis, we show that specific cleavages are required to disrupt intramolecular interactions within HTT and to cause toxicity in cells and flies. Surprisingly, in addition to the canonical pathogenic N-ter fragments, the C-ter fragments generated, that do not contain the polyQ stretch, induced toxicity via dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and increased ER stress. C-ter HTT bound to dynamin 1 and subsequently impaired its activity at ER membranes. Our findings support a role for HTT on dynamin 1 function and ER homoeostasis. Proteolysis-induced alteration of this function may be relevant to disease.

  20. Overexpression of the essential Sis1 chaperone reduces TDP-43 effects on toxicity and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sei-Kyoung; Hong, Joo Y.; Arslan, Fatih; Tietsort, Alex; Tank, Elizabeth M. H.; Li, Xingli

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons with inclusions frequently containing the RNA/DNA binding protein TDP-43. Using a yeast model of ALS exhibiting TDP-43 dependent toxicity, we now show that TDP-43 overexpression dramatically alters cell shape and reduces ubiquitin dependent proteolysis of a reporter construct. Furthermore, we show that an excess of the Hsp40 chaperone, Sis1, reduced TDP-43’s effect on toxicity, cell shape and proteolysis. The strength of these effects was influenced by the presence of the endogenous yeast prion, [PIN+]. Although overexpression of Sis1 altered the TDP-43 aggregation pattern, we did not detect physical association of Sis1 with TDP-43, suggesting the possibility of indirect effects on TDP-43 aggregation. Furthermore, overexpression of the mammalian Sis1 homologue, DNAJB1, relieves TDP-43 mediated toxicity in primary rodent cortical neurons, suggesting that Sis1 and its homologues may have neuroprotective effects in ALS. PMID:28531192

  1. Overexpression of the essential Sis1 chaperone reduces TDP-43 effects on toxicity and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sei-Kyoung; Hong, Joo Y; Arslan, Fatih; Kanneganti, Vydehi; Patel, Basant; Tietsort, Alex; Tank, Elizabeth M H; Li, Xingli; Barmada, Sami J; Liebman, Susan W

    2017-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motor neurons with inclusions frequently containing the RNA/DNA binding protein TDP-43. Using a yeast model of ALS exhibiting TDP-43 dependent toxicity, we now show that TDP-43 overexpression dramatically alters cell shape and reduces ubiquitin dependent proteolysis of a reporter construct. Furthermore, we show that an excess of the Hsp40 chaperone, Sis1, reduced TDP-43's effect on toxicity, cell shape and proteolysis. The strength of these effects was influenced by the presence of the endogenous yeast prion, [PIN+]. Although overexpression of Sis1 altered the TDP-43 aggregation pattern, we did not detect physical association of Sis1 with TDP-43, suggesting the possibility of indirect effects on TDP-43 aggregation. Furthermore, overexpression of the mammalian Sis1 homologue, DNAJB1, relieves TDP-43 mediated toxicity in primary rodent cortical neurons, suggesting that Sis1 and its homologues may have neuroprotective effects in ALS.

  2. Proteolysis of the endothelial cell protein C receptor by neutrophil proteinase 3

    PubMed Central

    VILLEGAS-MENDEZ, A; MONTES, R; AMBROSE, L R; WARRENS, A N; LAFFAN, M; LANE, D A

    2007-01-01

    Background The endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) presents protein C to the thrombin:thrombomodulin complex on the endothelium of large vessels, and enhances the generation of activated protein C (APC) and activation of protease-activated receptor-1. A previous report has demonstrated binding of soluble (s) EPCR to activated neutrophils via surface proteinase 3 (PR3). Methods We now report further characterization of this interaction. Activated neutrophils and purified PR3 both decrease endothelial cell (EC) surface EPCR, suggestive of its proteolysis. Results When added to purified recombinant sEPCR, PR3 produced multiple cleavages, with early products including 20 kDa N-terminal and C-terminal (after Lys176) fragments. The binding of active site blocked PR3 to sEPCR was studied by surface plasmon resonance. Estimates of the KD of 18.5–102 nm were obtained with heterogeneous binding, suggestive of more than a single interaction site. Conclusions This work demonstrates PR3 binding to and proteolysis of EPCR and suggests a mechanism by which anticoagulant and cell protective pathways can be down-regulated during inflammation. PMID:17459006

  3. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  4. Proteolysis of AKAP121 regulates mitochondrial activity during cellular hypoxia and brain ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Carlucci, Annalisa; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Scorziello, Antonella; Viggiano, Davide; Foca, Mariapaola; Cuomo, Ornella; Annunziato, Lucio; Gottesman, Max; Feliciello, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A-kinase anchor protein 121 (AKAP121) assembles a multivalent signalling complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane that controls persistence and amplitude of cAMP and src signalling to mitochondria, and plays an essential role in oxidative metabolism and cell survival. Here, we show that AKAP121 levels are regulated post-translationally by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Seven In-Absentia Homolog 2 (Siah2), an E3–ubiquitin ligase whose expression is induced in hypoxic conditions, formed a complex and degraded AKAP121. In addition, we show that overexpression of Siah2 or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) promotes Siah2-mediated ubiquitination and proteolysis of AKAP121. Upregulation of Siah2, by modulation of the cellular levels of AKAP121, significantly affects mitochondrial activity assessed as mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative capacity. Also during cerebral ischaemia, AKAP121 is degraded in a Siah2-dependent manner. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of attenuation of cAMP/PKA signaling, which occurs at the distal sites of signal generation mediated by proteolysis of an AKAP scaffold protein. By regulating the stability of AKAP121-signalling complex at mitochondria, cells efficiently and rapidly adapt oxidative metabolism to fluctuations in oxygen availability. PMID:18323779

  5. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  6. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of tropomodulin isoforms leads to thin filament elongation in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gokhin, David S; Tierney, Matthew T; Sui, Zhenhua; Sacco, Alessandra; Fowler, Velia M

    2014-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) induces sarcolemmal mechanical instability and rupture, hyperactivity of intracellular calpains, and proteolytic breakdown of muscle structural proteins. Here we identify the two sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms, Tmod1 and Tmod4, as novel proteolytic targets of m-calpain, with Tmod1 exhibiting ∼10-fold greater sensitivity to calpain-mediated cleavage than Tmod4 in situ. In mdx mice, increased m-calpain levels in dystrophic soleus muscle are associated with loss of Tmod1 from the thin filament pointed ends, resulting in ∼11% increase in thin filament lengths. In mdx/mTR mice, a more severe model of DMD, Tmod1 disappears from the thin filament pointed ends in both tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles, whereas Tmod4 additionally disappears from soleus muscle, resulting in thin filament length increases of ∼10 and ∼12% in TA and soleus muscles, respectively. In both mdx and mdx/mTR mice, both TA and soleus muscles exhibit normal localization of α-actinin, the nebulin M1M2M3 domain, Tmod3, and cytoplasmic γ-actin, indicating that m-calpain does not cause wholesale proteolysis of other sarcomeric and actin cytoskeletal proteins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. These results implicate Tmod proteolysis and resultant thin filament length misspecification as novel mechanisms that may contribute to DMD pathology, affecting muscles in a use- and disease severity-dependent manner.

  7. Mapping the consequence of Notch1 proteolysis in vivo with NIP-CRE.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marc; Ong, Chin-Tong; Hadland, Brandon; Huppert, Stacey; Liu, Zhenyi; Korving, Jeroen; van den Born, Maaike; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Wu, Yumei; Clevers, Hans; Kopan, Raphael

    2007-02-01

    The four highly conserved Notch receptors receive short-range signals that control many biological processes during development and in adult vertebrate tissues. The involvement of Notch1 signaling in tissue self-renewal is less clear, however. We developed a novel genetic approach N(1)IP-CRE (Notch1 Intramembrane Proteolysis) to follow, at high resolution, the descendents of cells experiencing Notch1 activation in the mouse. By combining N(1)IP-CRE with loss-of-function analysis, Notch activation patterns were correlated with function during development, self-renewal and malignancy in selected tissues. Identification of many known functions of Notch1 throughout development validated the utility of this approach. Importantly, novel roles for Notch1 signaling were identified in heart, vasculature, retina and in the stem cell compartments of self-renewing epithelia. We find that the probability of Notch1 activation in different tissues does not always indicate a requirement for this receptor and that gradients of Notch1 activation are evident within one organ. These findings highlight an underappreciated layer of complexity of Notch signaling in vivo. Moreover, NIP-CRE represents a general strategy applicable for monitoring proteolysis-dependent signaling in vivo.

  8. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α stimulates ADAM10-mediated proteolysis of APP.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Grant T; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-07-07

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) derivative β-amyloid (Aβ) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sequential proteolysis of APP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generates Aβ. Conversely, the α-secretase "a disintegrin and metalloproteinase" 10 (ADAM10) cleaves APP within the eventual Aβ sequence and precludes Aβ generation. Therefore, up-regulation of ADAM10 represents a plausible therapeutic strategy to combat overproduction of neurotoxic Aβ. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a transcription factor that regulates genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Here, we determined that the Adam10 promoter harbors PPAR response elements; that knockdown of PPARα, but not PPARβ or PPARγ, decreases the expression of Adam10; and that lentiviral overexpression of PPARα restored ADAM10 expression in Ppara(-/-) neurons. Gemfibrozil, an agonist of PPARα, induced the recruitment of PPARα:retinoid x receptor α, but not PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), to the Adam10 promoter in wild-type mouse hippocampal neurons and shifted APP processing toward the α-secretase, as determined by augmented soluble APPα and decreased Aβ production. Accordingly, Ppara(-/-) mice displayed elevated SDS-stable, endogenous Aβ and Aβ1-42 relative to wild-type littermates, whereas 5XFAD mice null for PPARα (5X/α(-/-)) exhibited greater cerebral Aβ load relative to 5XFAD littermates. These results identify PPARα as an important factor regulating neuronal ADAM10 expression and, thus, α-secretase proteolysis of APP.

  9. Hepatic steatosis inhibits autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Inami, Yoshihiro; Yamashina, Shunhei; Izumi, Kousuke; Ueno, Takashi; Tanida, Isei; Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Acidification of autophagosome was blunted in steatotic hepatocytes. {yields} Hepatic steatosis did not disturb fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome. {yields} Proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes was inhibited by steatosis. {yields} Hepatic expression of cathepsin B and L was suppressed by steatosis. -- Abstract: Autophagy, one of protein degradation system, contributes to maintain cellular homeostasis and cell defense. Recently, some evidences indicated that autophagy and lipid metabolism are interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatic steatosis impairs autophagic proteolysis. Though accumulation of autophagosome is observed in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice, expression of p62 was augmented in liver from ob/ob mice more than control mice. Moreover, degradation of the long-lived protein leucine was significantly suppressed in hepatocytes isolated from ob/ob mice. More than 80% of autophagosomes were stained by LysoTracker Red (LTR) in hepatocytes from control mice; however, rate of LTR-stained autophagosomes in hepatocytes were suppressed in ob/ob mice. On the other hand, clearance of autolysosomes loaded with LTR was blunted in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice. Although fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome was not disturbed, proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes and cathepsin B and L expression of liver were suppressed in ob/ob mice. These results indicate that lipid accumulation blunts autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression.

  10. Protein Degradation by In-Cell Self-Assembly of Proteolysis Targeting Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective degradation of proteins by proteolysis targeting chimeras (PROTACs) offers a promising potential alternative to protein inhibition for therapeutic intervention. Current PROTAC molecules incorporate a ligand for the target protein, a linker, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruiting group, which bring together target protein and ubiquitinating machinery. Such hetero-bifunctional molecules require significant linker optimization and possess high molecular weight, which can limit cellular permeation, solubility, and other drug-like properties. We show here that the hetero-bifunctional molecule can be formed intracellularly by bio-orthogonal click combination of two smaller precursors. We designed a tetrazine tagged thalidomide derivative which reacts rapidly with a trans-cyclo-octene tagged ligand of the target protein in cells to form a cereblon E3 ligase recruiting PROTAC molecule. The in-cell click-formed proteolysis targeting chimeras (CLIPTACs) were successfully used to degrade two key oncology targets, BRD4 and ERK1/2. ERK1/2 degradation was achieved using a CLIPTAC based on a covalent inhibitor. We expect this approach to be readily extendable to other inhibitor-protein systems because the tagged E3 ligase recruiter is capable of undergoing the click reaction with a suitably tagged ligand of any protein of interest to elicit its degradation. PMID:28058282

  11. Natural mitochondrial proteolysis confirms transcription systematically exchanging/deleting nucleotides, peptides coded by expanded codons.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-02-07

    Protein sequences have higher linguistic complexities than human languages. This indicates undeciphered multilayered, overprinted information/genetic codes. Some superimposed genetic information is revealed by detections of transcripts systematically (a) exchanging nucleotides (nine symmetric, e.g. A<->C, fourteen asymmetric, e.g. A->C->G->A, swinger RNAs) translated according to tri-, tetra- and pentacodons, and (b) deleting mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs). Here analyses of two independent proteomic datasets considering natural proteolysis confirm independently translation of these non-canonical RNAs, also along tetra- and pentacodons, increasing coverage of putative, cryptically encoded proteins. Analyses assuming endoproteinase GluC and elastase digestions (cleavages after residues D, E, and A, L, I, V, respectively) detect additional peptides colocalizing with detected non-canonical RNAs. Analyses detect fewer peptides matching GluC-, elastase- than trypsin-digestions: artificial trypsin-digestion outweighs natural proteolysis. Results suggest occurrences of complete proteins entirely matching non-canonical, superimposed encoding(s). Protein-coding after bijective transformations could explain genetic code symmetries, such as along Rumer's transformation.

  12. Extracellular Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) by Secreted Serine Neuronal Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Irfan Y.; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G. William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occuring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches. PMID:24675880

  13. Extracellular proteolysis of apolipoprotein E (apoE) by secreted serine neuronal protease.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occurring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches.

  14. The phage λ CII transcriptional activator carries a C-terminal domain signaling for rapid proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kobiler, Oren; Koby, Simi; Teff, Dinah; Court, Donald; Oppenheim, Amos B.

    2002-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases, like FtsH (HflB), recognize specific protein substrates. One of these is the λ CII protein, which plays a key role in the phage lysis-lysogeny decision. Here we provide evidence that the conserved C-terminal end of CII acts as a necessary and sufficient cis-acting target for rapid proteolysis. Deletions of this conserved tag, or a mutation that confers two aspartic residues at its C terminus do not affect the structure or activity of CII. However, the mutations abrogate CII degradation by FtsH. We have established an in vitro assay for the λ CIII protein and demonstrated that CIII directly inhibits proteolysis by FtsH to protect CII and CII mutants from degradation. Phage λ carrying mutations in the C terminus of CII show increased frequency of lysogenization, which indicates that this segment of CII may itself be sensitive to regulation that affects the lysis-lysogeny development. In addition, the region coding for the C-terminal end of CII overlaps with a gene that encodes a small antisense RNA called OOP. We show that deletion of the end of the cII gene can prevent OOP RNA, supplied in trans, interfering with CII activity. These findings provide an example of a gene that carries a region that modulates stability at the level of mRNA and protein. PMID:12397182

  15. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases.

    PubMed

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Wolf, Sharon G; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-09-27

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM-cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior.

  16. Huntingtin proteolysis releases non-polyQ fragments that cause toxicity through dynamin 1 dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Daher, Marie-Thérèse; Hangen, Emilie; Bruyère, Julie; Poizat, Ghislaine; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Pardo, Raul; Bourg, Nicolas; Souquere, Sylvie; Mayet, Céline; Pierron, Gérard; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Botas, Juan; Humbert, Sandrine; Saudou, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage of mutant huntingtin (HTT) is an essential process in Huntington’s disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Cleavage generates N-ter fragments that contain the polyQ stretch and whose nuclear toxicity is well established. However, the functional defects induced by cleavage of full-length HTT remain elusive. Moreover, the contribution of non-polyQ C-terminal fragments is unknown. Using time- and site-specific control of full-length HTT proteolysis, we show that specific cleavages are required to disrupt intramolecular interactions within HTT and to cause toxicity in cells and flies. Surprisingly, in addition to the canonical pathogenic N-ter fragments, the C-ter fragments generated, that do not contain the polyQ stretch, induced toxicity via dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and increased ER stress. C-ter HTT bound to dynamin 1 and subsequently impaired its activity at ER membranes. Our findings support a role for HTT on dynamin 1 function and ER homoeostasis. Proteolysis-induced alteration of this function may be relevant to disease. PMID:26165689

  17. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases

    PubMed Central

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM–cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior. PMID:27630193

  18. Deamidation, acylation and proteolysis of a model peptide in PLGA films.

    PubMed

    Houchin, M L; Heppert, K; Topp, E M

    2006-05-01

    The relative rates of deamidation, acylation and proteolysis (i.e. amide bond cleavage) were determined for a model peptide (VYPNGA) in poly (dl-lactide-co-glycolide) films. Films were stored at 70 degrees C and either 95%, 75%, 60%, 45%, 28%, or approximately 0% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C and 95% relative humidity. Peptide degradation products were identified by ESI+MS/MS and quantitated by LC/MS/MS. Extensive overlap of degradation mechanisms occurred, producing a complex mixture of products. Acylation was the dominant peptide degradation reaction (10-20% of total peptide) at early stages of PLGA hydrolysis and at intermediate relative humidity (60-45% RH). Deamidation and proteolysis were dominant (25-50% and 20-40% of total peptide, respectively) at later stages and at high relative humidity (95-75% RH). Understanding the relative rates of each peptide degradation reaction will allow for improved design of PLGA formulations that preserve the stability of peptide and protein drugs.

  19. Orientation of bacteriorhodopsin in Halobacterium halobium as studied by selective proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Gerhard E.; Gray, Christopher P.; Wildenauer, Dieter; Khorana, H. Gobind

    1977-01-01

    The orientation of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium has been studied by proteolytic degradation of purple membrane sheets, reconstituted vesicles, and whole cells, with the following results: (i) Bacteriorhodopsin in purple membrane sheets is cleaved at a single site by Pronase or trypsin; a polypeptide segment of about 15 amino acids is lost from the carboxyl end. Carboxypeptidase A sequentially releases amino acids from the carboxyl end; the tetrapeptide sequence -Ala-Ala-Thr-Ser(COOH) was tentatively deduced for this terminus. (ii) The apomembrane, which lacks retinal, undergoes a second cleavage with trypsin releasing a fragment of approximately 6300 molecular weight from the amino terminus. (iii) Vesicles reconstituted from the purple membrane sheets and synthetic lecithins, in which the direction of proton pumping is opposite to that in the whole cells, have the carboxyl terminus of bacteriorhodopsin accessible to proteolysis. (iv) In envelope vesicles, which largely pump protons in the same direction as the whole cells, the carboxyl terminus is largely protected against proteolysis. (v) Treatment of whole cells with proteinase K hydrolyzes the cell wall proteins but has no effect on acteriorhodopsin. However, the same treatment after lysis of the cells results in degradation of the hydrophilic region at the carboxyl terminus. The results show that the carboxyl terminus as well as the additional cleavage site near the amino terminus observed in apomembrane are on the cytoplasmic side of the purple membrane. Images PMID:271965

  20. The Transcription Activity of Gis1 Is Negatively Modulated by Proteasome-mediated Limited Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional response to environmental changes has to be prompt but appropriate. Previously, it has been shown that the Gis1 transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of postdiauxic shift genes in response to nutrient starvation, and this transcription regulation is dependent upon the Rim15 kinase. Here we demonstrate that the activity of Gis1 is negatively modulated by proteasome-mediated limited proteolysis. Limited degradation of Gis1 by the proteasome leads to the production of smaller variants, which have weaker transcription activities than the full-length protein. The coiled-coil domain, absent from the smaller variants, is part of the second transcription activation domain in Gis1 and is essential for both the limited proteolysis of Gis1 and its full activity. Endogenous Gis1 and its variants, regardless of their transcription capabilities, activate transcription in a Rim15-dependent manner. However, when the full-length Gis1 accumulates in cells due to overexpression or inhibition of the proteasome function, transcription activation by Gis1 is no longer solely controlled by Rim15. Together, these data strongly indicate that the function of the limited degradation is to ensure that Gis1-dependent transcription is strictly regulated by the Rim15 kinase. Furthermore, we have revealed that the kinase activity of Rim15 is essential for this regulation. PMID:20022953

  1. Increased intracellular proteolysis reduces disease severity in an ER stress-associated dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Mullan, Lorna A; Mularczyk, Ewa J; Kung, Louise H; Forouhan, Mitra; Wragg, Jordan Ma; Goodacre, Royston; Bateman, John F; Swanton, Eileithyia; Briggs, Michael D; Boot-Handford, Raymond P

    2017-09-18

    The short-limbed dwarfism metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS) is linked to mutations in type X collagen, which increase ER stress by inducing misfolding of the mutant protein and subsequently disrupting hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation. Here, we show that carbamazepine (CBZ), an autophagy-stimulating drug that is clinically approved for the treatment of seizures and bipolar disease, reduced the ER stress induced by 4 different MCDS-causing mutant forms of collagen X in human cell culture. Depending on the nature of the mutation, CBZ application stimulated proteolysis of misfolded collagen X by either autophagy or proteasomal degradation, thereby reducing intracellular accumulation of mutant collagen. In MCDS mice expressing the Col10a1.pN617K mutation, CBZ reduced the MCDS-associated expansion of the growth plate hypertrophic zone, attenuated enhanced expression of ER stress markers such as Bip and Atf4, increased bone growth, and reduced skeletal dysplasia. CBZ produced these beneficial effects by reducing the MCDS-associated abnormalities in hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation. Stimulation of intracellular proteolysis using CBZ treatment may therefore be a clinically viable way of treating the ER stress-associated dwarfism MCDS.

  2. Influence of chymosin type and curd scalding temperature on proteolysis of hard cooked cheeses.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Luciana M; Bergamini, Carina V; Pozza, Leila; Cuffia, Facundo; Candioti, Mario C; Hynes, Erica

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the type of coagulant enzyme and the curd scalding temperature on the proteolysis and residual coagulant and plasmin activities of a cooked cheese, Reggianito, in the interest of reducing ripening time. A two-factor experimental design was applied in two levels: type of coagulant enzyme, bovine chymosin or camel chymosin, and curd scalding temperature, 50 or 56 °C. The experimental treatments were applied in Reggianito cheese making experiments, and the samples were ripened for 90 d at 12 °C. Scalding temperature influenced residual coagulant activity; the cheeses cooked at 50 °C had significantly higher activity than those treated at 56 °C. In contrast, scalding temperature did not modify plasmin activity. Proteolysis was primarily affected by curd cooking temperature because chymosin-mediated hydrolysis of αs1 casein was slower in cheeses treated at 56 °C. Additionally, the nitrogen content in the cheese soluble fractions was consistently lower in the cheeses scalded at 56 °C than those cooked at 50 °C. A significant influence of the type of coagulant enzyme was observed, especially in the nitrogen fractions and peptide profiles, which demonstrated that camel chymosin was slightly less proteolytic; however, these differences were lower than those caused by the scalding temperature.

  3. Disintegrin Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 Regulates Endothelial Permeability and T Cell Transmigration by Proteolysis of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Beate; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Maretzky, Thorsten; Ludwig, Andreas; Blobel, Carl P.; Saftig, Paul; Reiss, Karina

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is the major adhesion molecule of endothelial adherens junctions. It plays an essential role in controlling endothelial permeability, vascular integrity, leukocyte transmigration, and angiogenesis. Elevated levels of soluble VE-cadherin are associated with diseases like coronary atherosclerosis. Previous data showed that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin is released by an unknown metalloprotease activity during apoptosis. In this study, we used gain of function analyses, inhibitor studies and RNA interference experiments to analyze the proteolytic release of VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that VE-cadherin is specifically cleaved by the disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM10 in its ectodomain releasing a soluble fragment and generating a carboxyterminal membrane bound stub, which is a substrate for a subsequent γ-secretase cleavage. This ADAM10-mediated proteolysis could be induced by Ca2+-influx and staurosporine treatment, indicating that ADAM10-mediated VE-cadherin cleavage contributes to the dissolution of adherens junctions during endothelial cell activation and apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, protein kinase C activation or inhibition did not modulate VE-cadherin processing. Increased ADAM10 expression was functionally associated with an increase in endothelial permeability. Remarkably, our data indicate that ADAM10 activity also contributes to the thrombin-induced decrease of endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Moreover, knockdown of ADAM10 in HUVECs as well as in T cells by small interfering RNA impaired T cell transmigration. Taken together our data identify ADAM10 as a novel regulator of vascular permeability and demonstrate a hitherto unknown function of ADAM10 in the regulation of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial cell functions and leukocyte transendothelial migration. PMID:18420943

  4. Vinculin Proteolysis Unmasks an ActA Homolog for Actin-based Shigella Motility

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Roney O.; Zeile, William; Kang, Fan; Purich, Daniel L.; Southwick, Frederick S.

    1997-01-01

    To generate the forces needed for motility, the plasma membranes of nonmuscle cells adopt an activated state that dynamically reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton. By usurping components from focal contacts and the actin cytoskeleton, the intracellular pathogens Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes use molecular mimicry to create their own actin-based motors. We raised an antibody (designated FS-1) against the FEFPPPPTDE sequence of Listeria ActA, and this antibody: (a) localized at the trailing end of motile intracellular Shigella, (b) inhibited intracellular locomotion upon microinjection of Shigella-infected cells, and (c) cross-reacted with the proteolytically derived 90-kD human vinculin head fragment that contains the Vinc-1 oligoproline sequence, PDFPPPPPDL. Antibody FS-1 reacted only weakly with full-length vinculin, suggesting that the Vinc-1 sequence in full-length vinculin may be masked by its tail region and that this sequence is unmasked by proteolysis. Immunofluoresence staining with a monoclonal antibody against the head region of vinculin (Vin 11-5) localized to the back of motile bacteria (an identical staining pattern observed with the anti-ActA FS-1 antibody), indicating that motile bacteria attract a form of vinculin containing an unmasked Vinc-1 oligoproline sequence. Microinjection of submicromolar concentrations of a synthetic Vinc-1 peptide arrested Shigella intracellular motility, underscoring the functional importance of this sequence. Western blots revealed that Shigella infection induces vinculin proteolysis in PtK2 cells and generates p90 head fragment over the same 1–3 h time frame when intracellular bacteria move within the host cell cytoplasm. We also discovered that microinjected p90, but not full-length vinculin, accelerates rates of pathogen motility by a factor of 3 ± 0.4 in Shigella-infected PtK2 cells. These experiments suggest that vinculin p90 is a rate-limiting component in actin-based Shigella motility, and that

  5. Proteolysis approach without chemical modification for a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bonds using thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds in proteins are important not only for the conformational stability of the protein but also for the regulation of oxidation-reduction in signal transduction. The conventional method for the assignment of disulfide bond by chemical cleavage and/or proteolysis is a time-consuming multi-step procedure. In this study, we report a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bond from protein digests that were prepared by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors. The feasibility and performance of this approach were evaluated by digesting lysozyme and BSA at several temperatures. The proteins which stabilize their conformations by disulfide bonds were thermally denatured during proteolysis and were efficiently digested by the immobilized protease but not by free protease. The digests were directly analyzed by ESI-TOF MS without any purification or concentration step. All four disulfide bonds on lysozyme and 10 of 17 on BSA were assigned from the digests by the trypsin-immobilized microreactor at 50 degrees C. The procedure for proteolysis and the assignment were achieved within 2 h without any reduction and alkylation procedure. From the present results, the proteolysis approach by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactor provides a strategy for the high-throughput analysis of disulfide bond in proteomics.

  6. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  7. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  8. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  9. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  10. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residuesmore » 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.« less

  11. Chemical and proteolysis-derived changes during long-term storage of lactose-hydrolyzed ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Therese; Jensen, Hanne B; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Clausen, Morten R; Eggers, Nina; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-11-19

    Proteolytic activity in milk may release bitter-tasting peptides and generate free amino terminals that react with carbohydrates, which initiate Maillard reaction. Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) heat treatment inactivates the majority of proteolytic enzymes in milk. In lactose-hydrolyzed milk a β-galactosidase preparation is applied to the milk after heat treatment, which has proteolytic side activities that may induce quality deterioration of long-term-stored milk. In the present study proteolysis, glycation, and volatile compound formation were investigated in conventional (100% lactose), filtered (60% lactose), and lactose-hydrolyzed (<1% lactose) UHT milk using reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteolysis was observed in all milk types. However, the degree of proteolysis was significantly higher in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to the conventional and filtered milk. The proteins most prone to proteolysis were β-CN and αs1-CN, which were clearly hydrolyzed after approximately 90 days of storage in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk.

  12. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  13. Regulation of development and cancer by the R2B subfamily of RPTPs and the implications of proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Sonya E.L.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2014-01-01

    The initial cloning of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) was met with excitement because of their hypothesized function in counterbalancing receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. In recent years, members of a subfamily of RPTPs with homophilic cell-cell adhesion capabilities, known as the R2B subfamily, have been shown to have functions beyond that of counteracting tyrosine kinase activity, by independently influencing cell signaling in their own right and by regulating cell adhesion. The R2B subfamily is composed of four members: PTPmu (PTPRM), PTPrho (PTPRT), PTPkappa (PTPRK), and PCP-2 (PTPRU). The effects of this small subfamily of RPTPs is far reaching, influencing several developmental processes and cancer. In fact, R2B RPTPs are predicted to be tumor suppressors and are among the most frequently mutated protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in cancer. Confounding these conclusions are more recent studies suggesting that proteolysis of the full-length R2B RPTPs result in oncogenic extracellular and intracellular protein fragments. This review discusses the current knowledge of the role of R2B RPTPs in development and cancer, with special detail given to the mechanisms and implications that proteolysis has on R2B RPTP function. We also touch upon the concept of exploiting R2B proteolysis to develop cancer imaging tools, and consider the effects of R2B proteolysis on axon guidance, perineural invasion and collective cell migration. PMID:25223585

  14. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.

  15. Mechanisms of accelerated proteolysis in rat soleus muscle atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Kirby, Christopher; Rosenberg, Sara; Tome, Margaret; Chase, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Tischler and coworkers (Henriksen et al., 1986; Tischler et al., 1990) concerning the mechanisms of atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation was tested using rat soleus muscle from animals subjected to hindlimb suspension and denervation of muscles. The procedure included (1) measuring protein degradation in isolated muscles and testing the effects of lysosome inhibitors, (2) analyzing the lysosome permeability and autophagocytosis, (3) testing the effects of altering calcium-dependent proteolysis, and (4) evaluating in vivo the effects of various agents to determine the physiological significance of the hypothesis. The results obtained suggest that there are major differences between the mechanisms of atrophies caused by unweighting and denervation, though slower protein synthesis is an important feature common for both.

  16. The effect of limited proteolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin on bovine colostral IgG1.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, F R; Ortega, F; Piñeiro, A

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of bovine colostral IgG1 by trypsin caused loss of specific antibody activity but column chromatography showed that relatively little cleavage into fragements had occurred. Polyacrlamide-agarose SDS electrophoresis of the 2-mercaptoethanol-treated digest revealed, however, that extensive cleavage of light chains had occurred even though most of the material before reduction had a mol. wt close to that of undigested IgG1. Although a Fab-type fragment was detected in the digest by immunoelectrophoresis it appeared to be only a minor component. Chymotrypsin had little effect upon either the structure or antibody activity of IgG1. These findings may explain the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity of colostral antibodies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:321343

  17. Characterization of human red cell Rh (rhesus-)specific polypeptides by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Krahmer, M; Prohaska, R

    1987-12-21

    Human red cells of various Rh phenotypes were surface-labelled with 125I and the Rh-specific labelled polypeptides were isolated by preparative SDS-PAGE. The polypeptides were subjected to limited proteolysis and the resulting fragments were analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Chymotryptic peptide maps of proteins obtained from Rh(D)-positive and -negative types appeared completely identical, whereas tryptic peptide maps revealed a difference: a fragment of Mr 17,500 was associated with the Rh(D) antigen, and one of Mr 19,000 with the Rh(C/c,E/e) antigens. Treatment of Rh polypeptides with carboxypeptidase Y prior to tryptic digestion resulted in a shift of nearly all tryptic fragments, including a fragment of Mr 8,000, indicating that the surface label was incorporated into the C-terminal part of the molecule.

  18. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N; Janecke, Andreas R; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-07-06

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development.

  19. Mechanisms of accelerated proteolysis in rat soleus muscle atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Kirby, Christopher; Rosenberg, Sara; Tome, Margaret; Chase, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Tischler and coworkers (Henriksen et al., 1986; Tischler et al., 1990) concerning the mechanisms of atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation was tested using rat soleus muscle from animals subjected to hindlimb suspension and denervation of muscles. The procedure included (1) measuring protein degradation in isolated muscles and testing the effects of lysosome inhibitors, (2) analyzing the lysosome permeability and autophagocytosis, (3) testing the effects of altering calcium-dependent proteolysis, and (4) evaluating in vivo the effects of various agents to determine the physiological significance of the hypothesis. The results obtained suggest that there are major differences between the mechanisms of atrophies caused by unweighting and denervation, though slower protein synthesis is an important feature common for both.

  20. Mapping of radiolabeled peptides derived from proteolysis of polypeptides bound to nitrocellulose after Western blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Carrey, E.A.; Hardie, D.G.

    1986-11-01

    Sections of nitrocellulose containing bound /sup 32/P-labeled polypeptides were excised from Western blots and exhaustively digested by trypsin in order to analyze the distribution of phosphorylation sites between the products of limited proteolysis of the multifunctional protein CAD. Using the criterion of analytical isoelectric focusing, the /sup 32/P-peptides obtained by this method were found to be similar, although not identical, to peptides obtained by a more conventional digestion of trichloroacetic acid precipitates. Digestion on Western blots is more straightforward than electrophoretic elution of individual gel slices, gives better recoveries than direct digestion of gel slices, and is particularly suitable for peptide mapping of small peptides which bind to nitrocellulose but would diffuse out of polyacrylamide gels during the commonly used fixing and staining procedures.

  1. Combining in situ proteolysis and mass spectrometry to crystallize Escherichia coli PgaB

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Yip, Patrick; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The periplasmic poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) de-N-acetylase PgaB from Escherichia coli was overexpressed and purified, but was recalcitrant to crystallization. Use of the in situ proteolysis technique produced crystals of PgaB, but these crystals could not be optimized for diffraction studies. By analyzing the initial crystal hits using SDS–PAGE and mass spectrometry, the boundaries of the protein species that crystallized were determined. The re-­engineered protein target crystallized reproducibly without the addition of protease and with significantly increased crystal quality. Crystals of the selenomethionine-incorporated protein exhibited the symmetry of space group P212121 and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. PMID:22750880

  2. Neutrophils from subjects with chronic obstructive lung disease show enhanced chemotaxis and extracellular proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Burnett, D; Chamba, A; Hill, S L; Stockley, R A

    1987-11-07

    Peripheral polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from subjects with emphysema or bronchiectasis digested significantly more iodine-125-labelled fibronectin (on average, 250% and 280%, respectively) than did those from control subjects. PMN from patients with bronchiectasis contained significantly more of the serine proteinase elastase than did the control cells, which may have contributed to their greater extracellular proteolysis. PMN from patients with emphysema, but not those with bronchiectasis, showed enhanced chemotaxis (on average 260%) in response to a chemotactic peptide compared with control cells. Thus, PMN from subjects with chronic obstructive lung diseases can digest more extracellular connective tissue protein than PMN from healthy subjects. This behaviour suggests a mechanism for the pathological tissue damage associated with these disorders. Furthermore, the sensitivity to chemotactic factors of PMN from emphysematous patients would contribute to the larger numbers of these cells in their lung tissues, thus increasing further the proteolytic burden in the lungs.

  3. Engineering the oxyanion hole of trypsin for promoting the reverse of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Franke, Lars; Liebscher, Sandra; Bordusa, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Although proteases are capable of synthesizing peptide bonds via the reverse of proteolysis, they are not proficient at peptide fragment ligation. Further manipulations are needed to shift the native enzyme activity from the cleavage to the synthesis of peptides especially when longer peptides or even proteins are the target molecules of the reaction. This account reports on the synthetic potential of trypsin variants with engineered oxyanion holes mutated by proline mutations, which were designed to minimize proteolytic side reactions during peptide bond synthesis. From the six single and double proline-mutated trypsins, in particular, trypsinQ192P came out as the most promising biocatalyst enabling not only the ligation of cleavage-sensitive peptide fragments but also the selective N-terminal modification of a real protein substrate.

  4. Probing structure and function of ion channels using limited proteolysis and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Trkulja, Carolina L; Jansson, Erik T; Jardemark, Kent; Orwar, Owe

    2014-10-22

    Even though gain, loss, or modulation of ion channel function is implicated in many diseases, both rare and common, the development of new pharmaceuticals targeting this class has been disappointing, where it has been a major problem to obtain correlated structural and functional information. Here, we present a microfluidic method in which the ion channel TRPV1, contained in proteoliposomes or in excised patches, was exposed to limited trypsin proteolysis. Cleaved-off peptides were identified by MS, and electrophysiological properties were recorded by patch clamp. Thus, the structure-function relationship was evaluated by correlating changes in function with removal of structural elements. Using this approach, we pinpointed regions of TRPV1 that affect channel properties upon their removal, causing changes in current amplitude, single-channel conductance, and EC50 value toward its agonist, capsaicin. We have provided a fast "shotgun" method for chemical truncation of a membrane protein, which allows for functional assessments of various peptide regions.

  5. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: Negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression. PMID:26301444

  6. Cross-system excision of chaperone-mediated proteolysis in chaperone-assisted recombinant protein production

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Main Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones such as DnaK are key components of the control quality network designed to minimize the prevalence of polypeptides with aberrant conformations. This is achieved by both favoring refolding activities but also stimulating proteolytic degradation of folding reluctant species. This last activity is responsible for the decrease of the proteolytic stability of recombinant proteins when co-produced along with DnaK, where an increase in solubility might be associated to a decrease in protein yield. However, when DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ are co-produced in cultured insect cells or whole insect larvae (and expectedly, in other heterologous hosts), only positive, folding-related effects of these chaperones are observed, in absence of proteolysis-mediated reduction of recombinant protein yield. PMID:21326941

  7. The Use of in situ Proteolysis in the Crystallization of Murine CstF-77

    SciTech Connect

    Bai,Y.; Auperin, T.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    The cleavage-stimulation factor (CstF) is required for the cleavage of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structure determination of the 77 kDa subunit of the murine CstF complex (CstF-77), it was serendipitously discovered that a solution infected by a fungus was crucial for the crystallization of this protein. CstF-77 was partially proteolyzed during crystallization; this was very likely to have been catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. It was found that the fungal protease can be replaced by subtilisin and this in situ proteolysis protocol produced crystals of sufficient size for structural studies. After an extensive search, it was found that 55% glucose can be used as a cryoprotectant while maintaining the diffraction quality of the crystals; most other commonly used cryoprotectants were detrimental to the diffraction quality.

  8. Proteolysis of synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, U J; Malek, S K; Liu, L; Li, H L

    1999-10-01

    Synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, and SNAP-25 were identified in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells by Western blot analysis. Synaptobrevin-2 was localized in the lamellar bodies, and syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 were found in 0.4% Nonidet P40-soluble and -insoluble fractions, respectively, of the type II cells. When the isolated type II cells were stimulated for secretion with calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, these proteins were found to have been proteolyzed. Preincubation of cells with calpain inhibitor II (N-acetylleucylleucylmethionine), however, prevented the proteolysis. Treatment of the cell lysate with exogenous calpain resulted in a time-dependent decrease of these proteins. The data suggest that synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 are subject to proteolytic modification by activated calpain in intact type II cells stimulated for secretion.

  9. Effect of Flavourzyme on proteolysis, antioxidant activity and sensory qualities of Cantonese bacon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyu; Zhang, Chaoyang; Qiao, Yan; Xing, Lujuan; Kang, Dacheng; Khan, Iftikhar Ali; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Flavourzyme on protein degradation, antioxidant activity and sensory qualities of Cantonese bacon made at 60°C for 28h. Flavourzyme was used at doses of 8, 16, 24, 32 and 40LAUP/kg of raw meat. Results indicated that Flavourzyme addition in Cantonese bacon promoted proteolysis, which was reflected by the increase of various free amino acids and SDS-PAGE-detected changes in the myogen and myofibrillar proteins. Sensory qualities were improved while TPA (texture profile analysis) was decreased significantly (P<0.05). The best sensory scores were obtained at between 24 and 32LAPU/kg. Besides, Flavourzyme addition improved antioxidant activity, and decreased water activity and protein carbonyl content of Cantonese bacon. This study indicated that the addition of Flavourzyme improved eating attributes and storage stability of Cantonese bacon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  11. Proteolysis in microfluidic droplets: an approach to interface protein separation and peptide mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ji; Nie, Lei; Qiao, Liang; Li, Yixin; Guo, Liping; Liu, Baohong; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-08-07

    A versatile microreactor protocol based on microfluidic droplets has been developed for on-line protein digestion. Proteins separated by liquid chromatography are fractionated in water-in-oil droplets and digested in sequence. The microfluidic reactor acts also as an electrospray ionization emitter for mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides produced in the individual droplets. Each droplet is an enzymatic micro-reaction unit with efficient proteolysis due to rapid mixing, enhanced mass transfer and automated handling. This droplet approach eliminates sample loss, cross-contamination, non-specific absorption and memory effect. A protein mixture was successfully identified using the droplet-based micro-reactor as interface between reverse phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  12. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  13. Application of exopolysaccharide-producing cultures in reduced-fat Cheddar cheese: composition and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Awad, S; Hassan, A N; Halaweish, F

    2005-12-01

    Proteolysis during ripening of reduced fat Cheddar cheeses made with different exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing and nonproducing cultures was studied. A ropy strain of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris (JFR1) and capsule-forming nonropy and moderately ropy strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were used in making reduced-fat Cheddar cheese. Commercial Cheddar starter was used in making full-fat cheese. Results showed that the actual yield of cheese made with JFR1 was higher than that of all other reduced-fat cheeses. Cheese made with JFR1 contained higher moisture, moisture in the nonfat substance, and residual coagulant activity than all other reduced-fat cheeses. Proteolysis, as determined by PAGE and the level of water-soluble nitrogen, was also higher in cheese made with JFR1 than in all other cheeses. The HPLC analysis showed a significant increase in hydrophobic peptides (causing bitterness) during storage of cheese made with JFR1. Cheese made with the capsule-forming nonropy adjunct of S. thermophilus, which contained lower moisture and moisture in the nonfat substance levels and lower chymosin activity than did cheese made with JFR1, accumulated less hydrophobic peptides. In conclusion, some EPS-producing cultures produced reduced-fat Cheddar cheese with moisture in the nonfat substance similar to that in its full-fat counterpart without the need for modifying the standard cheese-making protocol. Such cultures might accumulate hydrophobic (bitter) peptides if they do not contain the system able to hydrolyze them. For making high quality reduced-fat Cheddar cheese, EPS-producing cultures should be used in conjunction with debittering strains.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells correct impaired diabetic wound healing by decreasing ECM proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junwang; Zgheib, Carlos; Hodges, Maggie M; Caskey, Robert C; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2017-10-01

    Impaired diabetic wound healing is associated with a dermal extracellular matrix protein profile favoring proteolysis; within the healing diabetic wound, this is represented by an increase in activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs). Treatment of diabetic wounds with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to improve wound healing; however, there has not yet been an assessment of their ability to correct dysregulation of MMPs in diabetic wounds. Furthermore, there has been no prior assessment of the role of microRNA29b (miR-29b), an inhibitory regulatory molecule that targets MMP-9 mRNA. Using in vitro models of fibroblast coculture with MSCs and in vivo murine wound healing models, we tested the hypothesis that MSCs correct dysregulation of MMPs in a microRNA-29b-dependent mechanism. In this study, we first demonstrated that collagen I and III protein content is significantly reduced in diabetic wounds, and treatment with MSCs significantly improves collagen I content in both nondiabetic and diabetic wounds. We then found that MMP-9 gene expression and protein content were significantly upregulated in diabetic wounds, indicating elevated proteolysis. Treatment with MSCs resulted in a decrease in MMP-9 gene expression and protein content level in diabetic wounds 3 and 7 days after wounding. Zymographic analysis indicated that MSC treatment also decreased the amount of activated MMP-9 present in diabetic wounds. Furthermore, miR-29b expression was inversely associated with MMP-9 gene expression; miR-29b expression was decreased in diabetic wounds and diabetic fibroblast. Following treatment of diabetic wounds with MSCs, as well as in diabetic fibroblasts cocultured with MSCs, miR-29b was significantly increased. These findings suggest a potential mechanism through which MSCs enhance diabetic wound healing by improving collagen I content in diabetic wounds through decreasing MMP-9 expression and increasing miR-29b expression. Copyright © 2017 the American

  15. Effect and proposed mechanism of vitamin C modulating amino acid regulation of autophagic proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Karim, Md Razaul; Kadowaki, Motoni

    2017-08-10

    Autophagy is an intracellular bulk degradation process, induced under nutrient starvation. Failure of autophagy has been recognized as a contributor to aging and multiple age related neurodegenerative diseases. Improving autophagy is a beneficial anti-aging strategy, however very few physiological regulators have been identified. Here, we demonstrate that vitamin C is a nutritional stimulator of autophagy. Supplementation of fresh hepatocytes with vitamin C increased autophagic proteolysis significantly in the presence of amino acids in a dose- and time-dependent manner, although no effect was observed in the absence of amino acids. In addition, inhibitor studies with 3-methyladenine, chloroquine, leupeptin and β-lactone confirmed that vitamin C is active through the lysosomal autophagy and not the proteasome pathway. Furthermore, the autophagy marker LC3 protein was significantly increased by vitamin C, suggesting its possible site of action is at the formation step. Both the reduced (ascorbic acid, AsA) and oxidized form (dehydroascorbic acid, DHA) of vitamin C exhibited equal enhancing effect, indicating that the effect does not depend on the anti-oxidation functionality of vitamin C. To understand the mechanism, we established that the effective dose (50 μM) was 15× lower than the intracellular content suggesting these would be only a minor influx from the extracellular pool. Moreover, transporter inhibitor studies in an AsA deficient ODS model rat revealed more accurately that the enhancing effect on autophagic proteolysis still existed, even though the intracellular influx of AsA was blocked. Taken together, these results provide evidence that vitamin C can potentially act through extracellular signaling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  17. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. PMID:27190215

  18. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-12-14

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn(2+) were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  19. Proteolysis mediated by cysteine cathepsins and legumain-recent advances and cell biological challenges.

    PubMed

    Brix, Klaudia; McInnes, Joseph; Al-Hashimi, Alaa; Rehders, Maren; Tamhane, Tripti; Haugen, Mads H

    2015-05-01

    Proteases play essential roles in protein degradation, protein processing, and extracellular matrix remodeling in all cell types and tissues. They are also involved in protein turnover for maintenance of homeostasis and protein activation or inactivation for cell signaling. Proteases range in function and specificity, with some performing distinct substrate cleavages, while others accomplish proteolysis of a wide range of substrates. As such, different cell types use specialized molecular mechanisms to regulate the localization of proteases and their function within the compartments to which they are destined. Here, we focus on the cysteine family of cathepsin proteases and legumain, which act predominately within the endo-lysosomal pathway. In particular, recent knowledge on cysteine cathepsins and their primary regulator legumain is scrutinized in terms of their trafficking to endo-lysosomal compartments and other less recognized cellular locations. We further explore the mechanisms that regulate these processes and point to pathological cases which arise from detours taken by these proteases. Moreover, the emerging biological roles of specific forms and variants of cysteine cathepsins and legumain are discussed. These may be decisive, pathogenic, or even deadly when localizing to unusual cellular compartments in their enzymatically active form, because they may exert unexpected effects by alternative substrate cleavage. Hence, we propose future perspectives for addressing the actions of cysteine cathepsins and legumain as well as their specific forms and variants. The increasing knowledge in non-canonical aspects of cysteine cathepsin- and legumain-mediated proteolysis may prove valuable for developing new strategies to utilize these versatile proteases in therapeutic approaches.

  20. Hemin inhibits ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in both a higher plant and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Sullivan, M.L.

    1988-05-03

    In eukaryotes, a major route for ATP-dependent protein breakdown proceeds through covalent intermediates of target proteins destined for degradation and the highly conserved, 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin. In rabbit reticulocytes, it has been shown that hemin effectively inhibits this pathway by blocking the catabolism of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Here the authors demonstrate that hemin is also an effective inhibitor of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in both a higher plant, oats (Avena sativa), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hemin inhibits all stages of the pathway in vitro, including ATP-dependent formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, disassembly of conjugates by ubiquitin-protein lyase(s) (or isopeptidases), and degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by ATP-dependent protease(s). Using ubiquitin-/sup 125/I-lysozyme conjugates synthesized in vitro as substrates, they determined the specific effects of hemin on the rates of disassembly and degradation separately. The concentration of hemin required for half-maximal inhibition of both processes was identical in each species, approx. 60 ..mu..M in oats and approx. 50 ..mu..M in yeast. Similar inhibitory effects were observed when two hemin analogues, mesoheme or protoporphyrin IX, were employed. These results demonstrate that the effect of hemin on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is not restricted to erythroid cells and as a result hemin may be a useful tool in studies of this pathway in all eukaryotic cells. These results also question models where hemin serves as a specific negative modulator of proteolysis in erythroid cells.

  1. Effect of enhanced proteolysis on formation of biogenic amines by lactobacilli during Gouda cheese ripening.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, R G; Kurihara, R; Hammes, W P

    1998-10-20

    The effect of enhanced proteolysis on amine formation by amino acid decarboxylase positive Lactobacillus sp. during Gouda cheese ripening was examined. A commercial proteolytic enzyme preparation was added to pasteurized milk prior to cheese preparation. The effect of this manipulation on the formation of putrescine, histamine and tyramine was investigated in the presence and absence of amino acid decarboxylase-positive strains during a 12-week ripening period. Four batches were supplemented with a proteolytic enzyme. Batch I contained the proteolytic enzyme only, whereas batches II-IV were additionally supplemented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii LTH 1260 (batch II), Lactobacillus buchneri LTH 1388 (batch III) or Lactobacillus brevis LTH 2560 (batch IV). In batch I putrescine was detected with 4 mg/kg, in batch II, 42 mg/kg putrescine, 238 mg/kg histamine and 636 mg/kg tyramine were found. Batch III contained 13 mg/kg putrescine and 418 mg/kg histamine, whereas in batch IV, 26 mg/kg putrescine and 776 mg/kg tyramine were present. Batch V was supplemented with all three lactobacilli but did not contain the proteolytic enzyme. In this experiment, 4 mg/kg putrescine, 179 mg/kg histamine and 337 mg/kg tyramine were detected. A control cheese batch (VI) without addition of amine forming lactobacilli or a proteolytic enzyme was produced and only 4 mg/kg putrescine were detected. An increase in amine concentration during cheese ripening under conditions of enhanced proteolysis in the presence of starter and spoilage lactobacilli was evident from the experiments.

  2. Effect of chestnut tannin on fermentation quality, proteolysis, and protein rumen degradability of alfalfa silage.

    PubMed

    Tabacco, E; Borreani, G; Crovetto, G M; Galassi, G; Colombo, D; Cavallarin, L

    2006-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted on alfalfa to investigate the effects of the addition of commercial chestnut hydrolyzable tannin at ensiling on 1) silage fermentation quality in lab-scale silos and protein degradation in the rumen, and 2) silage fermentation quality and proteolysis in bale silages. Wilted alfalfa was prepared with 4 tannin levels (0, 2, 4, and 6% on a dry matter (DM) basis; T0, T1, T2, T3, respectively) and ensiled in lab-scale silos. Silages (33% DM) were analyzed for fermentation quality, protein rumen degradability in situ, and organic matter digestibility in vitro through gas production after 120 d of conservation. Wilted alfalfa containing 0 and 4% tannin (T0 and T2) was harvested at 40% DM (wilting level I) and 53% DM (wilting level II) for bale (600 mm diameter) silage. Silages were analyzed for fermentation quality after 78 d of conservation. All the silages were well fermented with no butyric acid. Lab-scale silages showed reductions in ammonia, nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) and DM losses in T2 and T3 treatments, while the fermentation acid profiles were unaffected. In experiment 1, the untreated silage (T0) had the highest protein degradability after being incubated in the rumen. The addition of tannin reduced crude protein ruminal disappearance in a dose-dependent manner. However, the tannin reduced the organic matter digestibility by 5.1% for all of the tannin addition levels. The tannin positively affected the silage quality in the round bale silages, in particular reducing ammonia and NPN in the lowest wilting level. In both experiments, T2 treatment reduced proteolysis without any influence of DM on the binding reaction and reduced the NPN by 15% in comparison to the control.

  3. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the interleukin-1 receptor II by alpha-, beta-, and gamma-secretase.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Marjaux, Els; Imhof, Axel; De Strooper, Bart; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2007-04-20

    Ectodomain shedding and intramembrane proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by alpha-, beta- and gamma-secretase are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Increased proteolytic processing and secretion of another membrane protein, the interleukin-1 receptor II (IL-1R2), have also been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. IL-1R2 is a decoy receptor that may limit detrimental effects of IL-1 in the brain. At present, the proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 remains little understood. Here we show that IL-1R2 can be proteolytically processed in a manner similar to APP. IL-1R2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells first undergoes ectodomain shedding in an alpha-secretase-like manner, resulting in secretion of the IL-1R2 ectodomain and the generation of an IL-1R2 C-terminal fragment. This fragment undergoes further intramembrane proteolysis by gamma-secretase, leading to the generation of the soluble intracellular domain of IL-1R2. Intramembrane cleavage of IL-1R2 was abolished by a highly specific inhibitor of gamma-secretase and was absent in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in gamma-secretase activity. Surprisingly, the beta-secretase BACE1 and its homolog BACE2 increased IL-1R2 secretion resulting in C-terminal fragments nearly identical to the ones generated by the alpha-secretase-like cleavage. This suggests that both proteases may act as alternative alpha-secretase-like proteases. Importantly, BACE1 and BACE2 did not cleave several other membrane proteins, demonstrating that both proteases do not contribute to general membrane protein turnover but only cleave specific proteins. This study reveals a similar proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 and APP and may provide an explanation for the increased IL-1R2 secretion observed in AD.

  4. Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis and Degradation of Murine Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule mEpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Hachmeister, Matthias; Bobowski, Karolina D.; Hogl, Sebastian; Dislich, Bastian; Fukumori, Akio; Eggert, Carola; Mack, Brigitte; Kremling, Heidi; Sarrach, Sannia; Coscia, Fabian; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.; Gires, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-)stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM) is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF) are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:24009667

  5. Effects of plant enzyme inactivation or sterilization on lipolysis and proteolysis in alfalfa silage.

    PubMed

    Ding, W R; Long, R J; Guo, X S

    2013-04-01

    This experiment studied the contribution of plant enzymes and microbial activity on lipolysis and proteolysis in ensiled alfalfa. Before ensiling, the wilted alfalfa was treated with plant enzyme inactivation by autoclaving or with sterilization by γ-ray irradiation. The treated alfalfa was then inoculated with commercial lactic acid bacteria inoculants and ensiled for 40 d. Alfalfa without treatment was ensiled as the control. The content of total fatty acid (FA) after ensiling decreased 43% in the control silage and 28% in the γ-ray-treated silage, but did not change in the autoclave-treated silage. Among the major FA (C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3), a considerable increase was observed in proportion of C16:0 in the control silage as compared with fresh alfalfa; conversely, decreases in proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 occurred during ensilage. Silage treated with γ-ray radiation at ensiling had a smaller proportion of C16:0 and greater proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 than control silage. Autoclave treatment further decreased proportions of C16:0 and most of the other FA, and increased C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 proportions in comparison with γ-ray treatment. Proportions of C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and other detected FA (except for the proportion of C15:0) did not differ between fresh forage and autoclave-treated silage. Remarkably, smaller nonprotein nitrogen content was observed in the autoclave-treated silage compared with the γ ray-treated silage or the control silage. These results indicated that an extensive lipolysis occurred during ensiling of alfalfa, and plant enzymes played a major role in lipolysis and proteolysis.

  6. Hemin inhibits ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in both a higher plant and yeast.

    PubMed

    Vierstra, R D; Sullivan, M L

    1988-05-03

    In eukaryotes, a major route for ATP-dependent protein breakdown proceeds through covalent intermediates of target proteins destined for degradation and the highly conserved, 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin. In rabbit reticulocytes, it has been shown that hemin effectively inhibits this pathway by blocking the catabolism of ubiquitin-protein conjugates [KI = 25 microM (Haas, A. L., & Rose, I. A. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78, 6845-6848)]. Here, we demonstrate that hemin is also an effective inhibitor of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in both a higher plant, oats (Avena sativa), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hemin inhibits all stages of the pathway in vitro, including ATP-dependent formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, disassembly of conjugates by ubiquitin-protein lyase(s) (or isopeptidases), and degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by ATP-dependent protease(s). Using ubiquitin-125I-lysozyme conjugates synthesized in vitro as substrates, we determined the specific effects of hemin on the rates of disassembly and degradation separately. The concentration of hemin required for half-maximal inhibition of both processes was identical in each species, approximately 60 microM in oats and approximately 50 microM in yeast. Similar inhibitory effects were observed when two hemin analogues, mesoheme or protoporphyrin IX, were employed. These results demonstrate that the effect of hemin on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is not restricted to erythroid cells and as a result hemin may be a useful tool in studies of this pathway in all eukaryotic cells. These results also question models where hemin serves as a specific negative modulator of proteolysis in erythroid cells.

  7. Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein A-I by Secretory Phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Jayaraman, Shobini

    2014-01-01

    In the acute phase of the inflammatory response, secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) reaches its maximum levels in plasma, where it is mostly associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL). Overexpression of human sPLA2 in transgenic mice reduces both HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) plasma levels through increased HDL catabolism by an unknown mechanism. To identify unknown PLA2-mediated activities on the molecular components of HDL, we characterized the protein and lipid products of the PLA2 reaction with HDL. Consistent with previous studies, hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids by PLA2 reduced the particle size without changing its protein composition. However, when HDL was destabilized in the presence of PLA2 by the action of cholesteryl ester transfer protein or by guanidine hydrochloride treatment, a fraction of apoA-I, but no other proteins, dissociated from the particle and was rapidly cleaved. Incubation of PLA2 with lipid-free apoA-I produced similar protein fragments in the range of 6–15 kDa, suggesting specific and direct reaction of PLA2 with apoA-I. Mass spectrometry analysis of isolated proteolytic fragments indicated at least two major cleavage sites at the C-terminal and the central domain of apoA-I. ApoA-I proteolysis by PLA2 was Ca2+-independent, implicating a different mechanism from the Ca2+-dependent PLA2-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis. Inhibition of proteolysis by benzamidine suggests that the proteolytic and lipolytic activities of PLA2 proceed through different mechanisms. Our study identifies a previously unknown proteolytic activity of PLA2 that is specific to apoA-I and may contribute to the enhanced catabolism of apoA-I in inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:24523407

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-mediated cell differentiation to proteolysis mechanism networks from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Diao, Haizhen; Zhou, Huilei; Li, Xiaohe; Chen, Qingchun; Jiang, Zhenfu; Feng, Haitao; Wolfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To understand cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) mechanism network from human normal adjacent tissues to lung adenocarcinoma. COMP complete different activated (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC < 0.25) and uncomplete (partly no positive correlation except COMP, Pearson CC < 0.25) network were identified in higher lung adenocarcinoma compared with lower human normal adjacent tissues from the corresponding COMP-stimulated (≥0.25) or inhibited (Pearson CC ≤ -0.25) overlapping molecules of Pearson correlation coefficient (CC) and GRNInfer, respectively. COMP complete different activated and inhibited (all no positive correlation, Pearson CC < 0.25) mechanisms networks of higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues were constructed by integration of Pearson CC, GRNInfer and GO. As visualized by integration of GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and Disease, we deduced COMP complete different activated and inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma and lower human normal adjacent tissues. As visualized by GO, KEGG, GenMAPP, BioCarta and disease database integration, we proposed mainly that the mechanism and function of COMP complete different activated network in higher lung adenocarcinoma was involved in COMP activation with matrix-localized insulin-like factor coupling carboxypeptidase to metallopeptidase-induced proteolysis, whereas the corresponding inhibited network in lower human normal adjacent tissues participated in COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized vasculogenesis, B and T cell differentiation and neural endocrine factors coupling pyrophosphatase-mediated proteolysis. However, COMP complete different inhibited network in higher lung adenocarcinoma included COMP inhibition with nucleus-localized chromatin maintenance, licensing and assembly factors coupling phosphatase-inhibitor to cytokinesis regulators-mediated cell differentiation, whereas the corresponding activated network in lower human normal adjacent tissues

  9. Implications of the Maillard reaction on bovine alpha-lactalbumin and its proteolysis during in vitro infant digestion.

    PubMed

    Joubran, Yousef; Moscovici, Alice; Portmann, Reto; Lesmes, Uri

    2017-06-21

    This study investigated the functionality and digestibility of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) of alpha-lactalbumin (α-la), a major whey protein and component of infant formulas. The impact of different carbohydrates (glucose, galactose or galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) and heating duration was studied. SDS-PAGE, UV and color measurements monitored reaction extent, which varied between carbohydrates whereby galactose reacted more readily than glucose. Surface hydrophobicity and antioxidant capacity were found to be significantly (p < 0.05) higher following Maillard conjugation, with GOS-based MRPs elevating antioxidant capacity ∼50-fold compared to α-la. In addition, the digestive proteolysis of MRPs was evaluated using an infant in vitro gastro-duodenal model. SDS-PAGE analyses of digesta revealed Maillard conjugation generally increased α-la's susceptibility to proteolysis. Interestingly, GOS-based MRPs presented an optimization challenge, since heating for 12 h delayed proteolysis, while extended heating resulted in the highest susceptibility to proteolysis. Proteomic analyses further demonstrated the differences in enzymatic cleavage patterns and helped identify bioactive peptides rendered bioaccessible during the digestion of α-la or its MRPs. Bioinformatic mining of the proteomic data using PeptideRanker also gave rise to two potentially novel bioactive peptides, FQINNKIW and GINYWLAHKALCS. Finally, antioxidant capacity of luminal contents, measured by DPPH, revealed Maillard conjugation increased the antioxidant capacity of both gastric and duodenal digesta. Overall, this work draws a link between the Maillard reaction, digestive proteolysis and the bioaccessibility of bioactive peptides and antioxidant species in the infant alimentary canal. This could help rationally process infant formulas towards improved nutritional and extra-nutritional benefits.

  10. The proteolysis adaptor, NblA, initiates protein pigment degradation by interacting with the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Sendersky, Eleonora; Kozer, Noga; Levi, Mali; Garini, Yuval; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2014-07-01

    Degradation of the cyanobacterial protein pigment complexes, the phycobilisomes, is a central acclimation response that controls light energy capture. The small protein, NblA, is essential for proteolysis of these large complexes, which may reach a molecular mass of up to 4 MDa. Interactions of NblA in vitro supported the suggestion that NblA is a proteolysis adaptor that labels the pigment proteins for degradation. The mode of operation of NblA in situ, however, remained unresolved. Particularly, it was unclear whether NblA interacts with phycobilisome proteins while part of the large complex, or alternatively interaction with NblA, necessitates dissociation of pigment subunits from the assembly. Fluorescence intensity profiles demonstrated the preferential presence of NblA::GFP (green fluorescent protein) at the photosynthetic membranes, indicating co-localization with phycobilisomes. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy provided in situ evidence for interaction of NblA with phycobilisome protein pigments. Additionally, we demonstrated the role of NblA in vivo as a proteolysis tag based on the rapid degradation of the fusion protein NblA::GFP compared with free GFP. Taken together, these observations demonstrated in vivo the role of NblA as a proteolysis adaptor. Additionally, the interaction of NblA with phycobilisomes indicates that the dissociation of protein pigment subunits from the large complex is not a prerequisite for interaction with this adaptor and, furthermore, implicates NblA in the disassembly of the protein pigment complex. Thus, we suggest that, in the case of proteolysis of the phycobilisome, the adaptor serves a dual function: undermining the complex stability and designating the dissociated pigments for degradation.

  11. Lysosomal proteolysis inhibition selectively disrupts axonal transport of degradative organelles and causes an Alzheimer’s-like axonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Sato, Yutaka; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    In the hallmark neuritic dystrophy of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), autophagic vacuoles containing incompletely digested proteins selectively accumulate in focal axonal swellings, reflecting defects in both axonal transport and autophagy. Here, we investigated the possibility that impaired lysosomal proteolysis could be a basis for both defects leading to neuritic dystrophy. In living primary mouse cortical neurons expressing fluorescence-tagged markers, LC3-positive autophagosomes forming in axons rapidly acquired the endo-lysosomal markers, Rab7 and LAMP1, and underwent exclusive retrograde movement. Proteolytic clearance of these transported autophagic vacuoles was initiated upon fusion with bi-directionally moving lysosomes that increase in number at more proximal axon levels and in the perikaryon. Disrupting lysosomal proteolysis by either inhibiting cathepsins directly or by suppressing lysosomal acidification slowed the axonal transport of autolysosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes and caused their selective accumulation within dystrophic axonal swellings. Mitochondria and other organelles lacking cathepsins moved normally under these conditions, indicating that the general functioning of the axonal transport system was preserved. Dystrophic swellings induced by lysosomal proteolysis inhibition resembled in composition those in several mouse models of AD and also acquired other AD-like features, including immunopositivity for ubiquitin, APP, and neurofilament protein hyperphosphorylation. Restoration of lysosomal proteolysis reversed the affected movements of proteolytic Rab7 vesicles, which in turn, largely cleared autophagic substrates and reversed the axonal dystrophy. These studies identify the AD-associated defects in neuronal lysosomal proteolysis as a possible basis for the selective transport abnormalities and highly characteristic pattern of neuritic dystrophy associated with AD. PMID:21613495

  12. The proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) active site and cleavage sequence differentially regulate protein secretion from proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chorba, John S; Shokat, Kevan M

    2014-10-17

    Biologic-based strategies to inhibit proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) show promise as anti-hypercholesterolemic and, therefore, anti-atherosclerotic therapies. Despite substantial effort, no small molecule strategy to inhibit PCSK9 has demonstrated feasibility. In this study we interrogated the chemistry of the PCSK9 active site and its adjacent residues to identify a foothold with which to drug the PCSK9 processing pathway and ultimately disrupt the interaction with the LDL receptor. Here, we develop a system in which we amplify the readout of PCSK9 proteolysis with a highly specific substrate in cells, showing that the PCSK9 catalytic domain is capable of proteolysis in trans. We use this system to show that the substrate specificity for PCSK9 proteolysis is distinct from the specificity for PCSK9 secretion, demonstrating that PCSK9 processing occurs in two separate sequential steps: that of proteolysis followed by secretion. We show that specific residues in the protease recognition sequence can differentially modulate the effects on proteolysis and secretion. Additionally, we demonstrate that the clinically described, dominant negative Q152H mutation restricts proteolysis and secretion independently. Our results suggest that the PCSK9 active site and its adjacent residues serve as an allosteric modulator of protein secretion independent of its role in proteolysis, revealing a new strategy for intracellular PCSK9 inhibition. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A serendipitous discovery that in situ proteolysis is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Corey R.; Gebauer, Damara; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang

    2006-10-01

    Proteolysis in situ by a protease secreted by a contaminating fungus is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  14. A metabolic study of the regulation of proteolysis by sugars in maize root tips: effects of glycerol and dihydroxyacetone.

    PubMed

    Brouquisse, Renaud; Rolin, Dominique; Cortès, Sandra; Gaudillère, Monique; Evrard, Adeline; Roby, Claude

    2007-02-01

    Sugars, the main growth substrates of plants, act as physiological signals in the complex regulatory network of sugar metabolism. To investigate the function of different glycolytic steps in sugar sensing and signaling we compared the effects of carbon starvation with those of glucose, glycerol and dihydroxyacetone on carbon metabolism, proteolysis, and protease expression in excised maize (Zea mays L.) root tips. Respiration, soluble proteins, protein turnover and proteolytic activities were monitored as a function of time, along with in vitro and in vivo analysis of a variety of metabolites (sugars, amino and organic acids, phosphoesters, adenine nucleotides...) using (13)C, (31)P and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Our results indicate that, in maize root tips, endopeptidase activities and protease expression are induced in response to a decrease in carbon supply to the upper part of the glycolytic pathway, i.e. at the hexokinase step. Proteolysis would be controlled downstream glycolysis, probably at the level of the respiratory substrate supply to mitochondria.

  15. Immobilization of trypsin on graphene oxide for microwave-assisted on-plate proteolysis combined with MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guobin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Pengyuan; Yang, Dong; Wei, Liming

    2012-06-21

    With an ultra-high surface area and abundant functional groups, graphene oxide (GO) provides an ideal substrate for the immobilization of trypsin. We demonstrated that trypsin could be immobilized on GO sheets assisted by polymers as molecular spacers to maintain the activity of the enzyme. And with the trypsin-linked GO as the enzyme immobilization probe, a novel microwave-assisted on-plate digestion method has been developed with subsequent analysis by MALDI-MS. The feasibility and performance of the digestion approach were demonstrated by the proteolysis of standard proteins. The results show that this novel approach substantially accelerated proteolysis and reduced the time required for traditional procedures involving on-plate enzymatic digestion and sample preparation prior to MALDI-MS analysis. The novel digestion approach is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high throughput protein identification.

  16. Multivariate analysis of proteolysis patterns differentiated the impact of six strains of probiotic bacteria on a semi-hard cheese.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C V; Hynes, E R; Candioti, M C; Zalazar, C A

    2009-06-01

    The individual contribution of 6 strains of probiotic bacteria (3 of Lactobacillus acidophilus and 3 of the Lactobacillus casei group) to proteolysis patterns in a semi-hard cheese was assessed. Control cheeses (without probiotics) and 2 types of experimental cheeses (with the addition of probiotics either directly to milk or by a 2-step fermentation method) were manufactured. Cheeses containing Lb. acidophilus showed the most extensive peptidolysis, which was evidenced by changes in the peptide profiles and a noticeable increase of free amino acids compared with control cheeses. The strains of the Lb. casei group showed a lower contribution to cheese peptidolysis, which consisted mainly of free amino acid increase. Two-step fermentation improved peptidolytic activity for only one of the cultures of Lb. acidophilus tested. The addition of Lb. acidophilus strains into cheese may be suitable not only for their beneficial health effect but also for their influence on secondary proteolysis, consistent with acceleration of ripening and improved flavor formation.

  17. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  18. The Putative O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase SPINDLY Inhibits Class I TCP Proteolysis to Promote Sensitivity to Cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Evyatar; Livne, Sivan; Kobinson-Katz, Tammy; Tal, Lior; Pri-Tal, Oded; Mosquna, Assaf; Tarkowská, Danuše; Mueller, Bruno; Tarkowski, Petr; Weiss, David

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SPINDLY (SPY) is a putative serine and threonine O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT). While SPY has been shown to suppress gibberellin signaling and to promote cytokinin (CK) responses, its catalytic OGT activity was never demonstrated and its effect on protein fate is not known. We previously showed that SPY interacts physically and functionally with TCP14 and TCP15 to promote CK responses. Here, we aimed to identify how SPY regulates TCP14/15 activities and how these TCPs promote CK responses. We show that SPY activity is required for TCP14 stability. Mutation in the putative OGT domain of SPY (spy-3) stimulated TCP14 proteolysis by the 26S proteasome, which was reversed by mutation in CULLIN1 (CUL1), suggesting a role for SKP, CUL1, F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in TCP14 proteolysis. TCP14 proteolysis in spy-3 suppressed all TCP14 misexpression phenotypes, including the enhanced CK responses. The increased CK activity in TCP14/15-overexpressing flowers resulted from increased sensitivity to the hormone and not from higher CK levels. TCP15 overexpression enhanced the response of the CK-induced synthetic promoter pTCS to CK, suggesting that TCP14/15 affect early steps in CK signaling. We propose that posttranslational modification of TCP14/15 by SPY inhibits their proteolysis and that the accumulated proteins promote the activity of the CK phosphorelay cascade in developing Arabidopsis leaves and flowers. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. The YjbH Protein of Bacillus subtilis Enhances ClpXP-Catalyzed Proteolysis of Spx ▿

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Saurabh K.; Kommineni, Sushma; Henslee, Luke; Zhang, Ying; Zuber, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator Spx of Bacillus subtilis is controlled at several levels of the gene expression process. It is maintained at low concentrations during unperturbed growth by the ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Under disulfide stress, Spx concentration increases due in part to a reduction in ClpXP-catalyzed proteolysis. Recent studies of Larsson and coworkers (Mol. Microbiol. 66:669-684, 2007) implicated the product of the yjbH gene as being necessary for the proteolytic control of Spx. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid analysis and protein-protein cross-linking showed that Spx interacts with YjbH. YjbH protein was shown to enhance the proteolysis of Spx in reaction mixtures containing ClpXP protease but not ClpCP protease. An N-terminal truncated form of YjbH with a deletion of residues 1 to 24 (YjbHΔ1-24) showed no proteolysis enhancement activity. YjbH is specific for Spx as it did not accelerate proteolysis of the ClpXP substrate green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SsrA, a GFP derivative with a C-terminal SsrA tag that is recognized by ClpXP. Using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol release experiments, YjbH was found to contain zinc atoms. Zinc analysis of YjbHΔ1-24 revealed that the N-terminal histidine-rich region is indispensable for the coordination of at least one Zn atom. A Zn atom coordinated by the N-terminal region was rapidly released from the protein upon treatment with a strong oxidant. In conclusion, YjbH is proposed to be an adaptor for ClpXP-catalyzed Spx degradation, and a model of YjbH redox control involving Zn dissociation is presented. PMID:19074380

  20. Propofol Ameliorates Calpain-induced Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Proteolysis in Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yun; Jian, Min-Yu; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Han, Ru-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2), a multifunctional cytosolic protein highly expressed in the brain, is degraded by calpain following traumatic brain injury (TBI), possibly inhibiting posttraumatic neurite regeneration. Lipid peroxidation (LP) is involved in triggering postinjury CRMP2 proteolysis. We examined the hypothesis that propofol could attenuate LP, calpain-induced CRMP2 degradation, and brain injury after TBI. Methods: A unilateral moderate controlled cortical impact injury was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were randomly divided into seven groups: Sham control group, TBI group, TBI + propofol groups (including propofol 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h groups), TBI + U83836E group and TBI + fat emulsion group. The LP inhibitor U83836E was used as a control to identify that antioxidation partially accounts for the potential neuroprotective effects of propofol. The solvent of propofol, fat emulsion, was used as the vehicle control. Ipsilateral cortex tissues were harvested at 24 h post-TBI. Immunofluorescent staining, Western blot analysis, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling were used to evaluate LP, calpain activity, CRMP2 proteolysis and programmed cell death. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and a paired t-test. Results: Propofol and U83836E significantly ameliorated the CRMP2 proteolysis. In addition, both propofol and U83836E significantly decreased the ratio of 145-kDa αII-spectrin breakdown products to intact 270-kDa spectrin, the 4-hydroxynonenal expression and programmed cell death in the pericontusional cortex at 24 h after TBI. There was no difference between the TBI group and the fat emulsion group. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that propofol postconditioning alleviates calpain-mediated CRMP2 proteolysis and provides neuroprotective effects following moderate TBI potentially by counteracting LP and reducing calpain activation

  1. Use of high-gradient magnetic fishing for reducing proteolysis during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Maury, Trine L; Ottow, Kim E; Brask, Jesper; Villadsen, John; Hobley, Timothy J

    2012-07-01

    Proteolysis during fermentation may have a severe impact on the yield and quality of a secreted product. In the current study, we demonstrate the use of high-gradient magnetic fishing (HGMF) as an efficient alternative to the more conventional methods of preventing proteolytic degradation. Bacitracin-linked magnetic affinity adsorbents were employed directly in a fermenter during Bacillus licheniformis cultivation to remove trace amounts of unwanted proteases. The constructed magnetic adsorbents had excellent, highly specific binding characteristics in the fermentation broth (K(d) = 1.94 micromolar; Q(max) = 222.8 mg/g), which obeyed the Langmuir isotherm and had rapid binding kinetics (equilibrium in <300 s). When applied directly in shake-flask cultures or in a 1-L fermenter and then removed by HGMF, the degradation of the model protein bovine serum albumin was stopped. The adsorbents could be recycled and reused during the same fermentation to remove freshly produced proteases, extending the life of the model protein in the fermenter. HGMF may provide an efficient method of stabilizing heterologous proteins produced in cultivation processes.

  2. Proteolysis and formation of volatile compounds in cheese manufactured with a bacteriocin-producing adjunct culture.

    PubMed

    Oumer, B A; Gaya, P; Fernández-García, E; Marciaca, R; Garde, S; Medina, M; Nuñez, M

    2001-02-01

    Hispánico cheese, a semi-hard Spanish variety, was manufactured from a mixture of pasteurized cows' and ewes' milks (4:1) using a commercial mesophilic LD-type starter comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis var diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris. Varying amounts (0-1.0 g/kg) of an Enterococcus faecalis INIA 4 culture in milk were added as a bacteriocin-producing adjunct. Differences in pH between cheeses manufactured with and without the bacteriocin producer did not exceed 0.11 pH units. Starter lactococci lost viability more rapidly in cheeses made with the bacteriocin producer, which reached counts of up to 6 x 10(7) cfu/g during ripening. Aminopeptidase activity in 1-d-old cheese made from milk inoculated with 1.0 g bacteriocin-producing culture/kg was twice that in control cheese. Degrees of overall proteolysis and levels of total free amino acids in 45-d-old cheese made with 1.0 g bacteriocin-producing culture/kg were 1.80-fold and 2.17-fold those in control cheese of the same age. Inoculating milk with 1.0 g/kg bacteriocin-producing culture reduced the level of hydrophobic peptides in the resultant cheese, increased the concentrations of 3-methyl-1-butanal, diacetyl and acetoin, and resulted in the highest scores for flavour quality and flavour intensity throughout ripening.

  3. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  4. A new approach on valproic acid induced hepatotoxicity: involvement of lysosomal membrane leakiness and cellular proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Pourahmad, Jalal; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Kaghazi, Amineh; Shaki, Fatemeh; Shahraki, Jafar; Fard, Javad Khalili

    2012-06-01

    Although valproic acid (VPA) a proven anticonvulsant agent thought to have relatively few side-effects VPA has been referred as the third most common xenobiotic suspected of causing death due to liver injury. In this study the cellular pathways involved in VPA hepatotoxicity were investigated in isolated rat hepatocytes. Accelerated cytotoxicity mechanism screening (ACMS) techniques using fluorescent probes including, ortho-phthalaldehyde, rhodamine 123 and acridine orange were applied for measurement of ROS formation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential and Lysosomal membrane damage, respectively. Our results showed that cytotoxic action of VPA is mediated by lysosomal membrane leakiness along with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and decline of mitochondrial membrane potential before cell lysis ensued. Incubation of hepatocytes with VPA also caused rapid hepatocyte glutathione (GSH) depletion which is another marker of cellular oxidative stress. Most of the VPA induced GSH depletion could be attributed to the expulsion of GSSG. Our results also showed that CYP2EI is involved in the mechanism of VPA cytotoxicity. We finally concluded that VPA hepatotoxicity is a result of metabolic activation by CYP2E1 and ROS formation, leading to lysosomal labialization, mitochondrial/lysosomal toxic cross-talk and finally general cellular proteolysis in the rat hepatocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulated proteolysis of a cross-link-specific peptidoglycan hydrolase contributes to bacterial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Parveen, Sadiya; SaiSree, L; Reddy, Manjula

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial growth and morphogenesis are intimately coupled to expansion of peptidoglycan (PG), an extensively cross-linked macromolecule that forms a protective mesh-like sacculus around the cytoplasmic membrane. Growth of the PG sacculus is a dynamic event requiring the concerted action of hydrolases that cleave the cross-links for insertion of new material and synthases that catalyze cross-link formation; however, the factors that regulate PG expansion during bacterial growth are poorly understood. Here, we show that the PG hydrolase MepS (formerly Spr), which is specific to cleavage of cross-links during PG expansion in Escherichia coli, is modulated by proteolysis. Using combined genetic, molecular, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that MepS is rapidly degraded by a proteolytic system comprising an outer membrane lipoprotein of unknown function, NlpI, and a periplasmic protease, Prc (or Tsp). In summary, our results indicate that the NlpI-Prc system contributes to growth and enlargement of the PG sacculus by modulating the cellular levels of the cross-link-cleaving hydrolase MepS. Overall, this study signifies the importance of PG cross-link cleavage and its regulation in bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  6. Study of proteolysis in river buffalo mozzarella cheese using a proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Petrella, G; Pati, S; Gagliardi, R; Rizzuti, A; Mastrorilli, P; la Gatta, B; Di Luccia, A

    2015-11-01

    The guarantee of the origin and quality of raw material is essential for the protection and valorization of Campana buffalo mozzarella cheese. The risk of utilization of semifinished products and stored milk in substitution for fresh milk is increasing, due to the continuous desire to reduce production costs. A proteomics approach and electrophoresis survey of retail mozzarella cheeses indicated different rates of proteolysis in the production of dairy industries. The use of fresh milk and correct cheesemaking protocol yielded only γ-caseins, which are derived from β-casein by plasmin, and para-κ-casein, which is derived from κ-casein by chymosin. The detection of abnormal hydrolysis resulting in β- and αS1-casein fragments, identified by mass spectrometry, indicates the use of stored milk or stored and pressed curd, or the reuse of unsold mozzarella cheese, to produce mozzarella. The formation of γ-caseins and other fragments during a long storage of raw materials at room or refrigeration temperature was ascribed to plasmin (endogenous milk enzyme), whereas formation of αS1-casein fragments, mainly αS1-I(6P)- and αS1-I(7P)-casein during the storage of curd was ascribed to the action of chymosin (exogenous enzyme) from rennet. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and alkaline urea-PAGE permitted us to evaluate the freshness of the raw materials used in the manufacturing of buffalo mozzarella cheese and to reveal possible inappropriate preservation.

  7. RhoA Proteolysis Regulates the Actin Cytoskeleton in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Girouard, Marie-Pier; Pool, Madeline; Alchini, Ricardo; Rambaldi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA regulates the actin cytoskeleton to affect multiple cellular processes including endocytosis, migration and adhesion. RhoA activity is tightly regulated through several mechanisms including GDP/GTP cycling, phosphorylation, glycosylation and prenylation. Previous reports have also reported that cleavage of the carboxy-terminus inactivates RhoA. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of RhoA proteolysis that generates a stable amino-terminal RhoA fragment (RhoA-NTF). RhoA-NTF is detectable in healthy cells and tissues and is upregulated following cell stress. Overexpression of either RhoA-NTF or the carboxy-terminal RhoA cleavage fragment (RhoA-CTF) induces the formation of disorganized actin stress fibres. RhoA-CTF also promotes the formation of disorganized actin stress fibres and nuclear actin rods. Both fragments disrupt the organization of actin stress fibres formed by endogenous RhoA. Together, our findings describe a novel RhoA regulatory mechanism. PMID:27992599

  8. Characterization of aroma-active compounds, sensory properties, and proteolysis in Ezine cheese.

    PubMed

    Yuceer, Y Karagul; Tuncel, B; Guneser, O; Engin, B; Isleten, M; Yasar, K; Mendes, M

    2009-09-01

    Ezine cheese is a white pickled cheese ripened in tinplate containers for at least 8 mo. A mixture of milk from goat, sheep, and cow is used to make Ezine cheese. Ezine cheese has geographical indication status. The purposes of this study were to determine and compare the changes in basic composition, aroma, and sensory characteristics, and proteolytic activity of Ezine cheese stored in tinplate containers and plastic vacuum packages during storage. Aroma-active compounds were determined by thermal desorption gas chromatography olfactometry. To evaluate the proteolytic activity, casein and nitrogen fractions were determined. The results indicated that compounds identified at high intensities were dimethyl sulfide, ethyl butyrate, hexanal, ethyl pentanoate, (Z)-4-heptenal, 1-octen-3-one, acetic acid, butyric acid, and p-cresol. Characteristic descriptive terms were cooked, whey, creamy, animal-like, sour, and salty. The level of proteolysis increased in Ezine cheese during storage. Ezine cheese can be ripened in small-size packaging after 3 mo of storage. Approximately 6 mo is sufficient to produce the characteristic properties of Ezine cheese.

  9. Proteolysis in goat "coalho" cheese supplemented with probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; de Araujo, Ana Rita Ribeiro; do Nascimento, Edilza Santos; de Matos Paz, José Eduardo; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; Gadelha, Tatiane Santi; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; do Egypto Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos; de Oliveira, Maria Elieidy Gomes; Madruga, Marta Suely

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the proteolytic effects of adding isolated and combined probiotic strains to goat "coalho" cheese. The cheeses were: QS - with culture Start, composed by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris (R704); QLA - with Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5); QLP - with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (L. casei 01); QB - with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB 12); and QC, co-culture with the three probiotic microorganisms. The cheeses were analysed during 28 days of storage at 10°C. The probiotic cell count was higher than 6.5 and 7 log colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) of cheese at the 1st and 28th days of storage, respectively. The addition of co-culture influenced (p<0.01) proteolysis in the cheese and resulted in a higher content of soluble protein and release of amino acids at the 1st day after processing. However, over all 28 days, the cheese supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis in its isolated form showed the highest proteolytic activity, particularly in the hydrolysis of the alpha-s2 and kappa-casein fractions.

  10. Gold nanoparticle assembly microfluidic reactor for efficient on-line proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Xue, Yan; Ji, Ji; Chen, Xian; Kong, Jilie; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2007-08-01

    A microchip reactor coated with a gold nanoparticle network entrapping trypsin was designed for the efficient on-line proteolysis of low level proteins and complex extracts originating from mouse macrophages. The nanostructured surface coating was assembled via a layer-by-layer electrostatic binding of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and gold nanoparticles. The assembly process was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance. The controlled adsorption of trypsin was theoretically studied on the basis of the Langmuir isotherm model, and the fitted Gamma(max) and K values were estimated to be 1.2 x 10(-7) mol/m(2) and 4.1 x 10(5) M(-1), respectively. An enzymatic kinetics assay confirmed that trypsin, which was entrapped in the biocompatible gold nanoparticle network with a high loading capacity, preserved its bioactivity. The maximum proteolytic rate of the adsorbed trypsin was 400 mM/(min.microg). Trace amounts of proteins down to femtomole per analysis were digested using the microchip reactor, and the resulting tryptic products were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. The protein mixtures extracted from the mouse macrophages were efficiently identified by on-line digestion and LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis.

  11. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  12. The structure of infant formulas impacts their lipolysis, proteolysis and disintegration during in vitro gastric digestion.

    PubMed

    Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; De La Chevasnerie, Alix; Sams, Laura; Rousseau, Florence; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Robert, Benoît; Deglaire, Amélie; Pezennec, Stéphane; Bouhallab, Saïd; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Milk lipids supply most of the calories necessary for newborn growth in maternal milk or infant formulas. The chemical composition of infant formulas has been optimized but not the structure of the emulsion. There is still a major difference between the native emulsions of milk fat globules and processed submicronic emulsions in infant formulas. This difference may modify the kinetics of digestion of emulsions in newborns and influence lipid metabolism. To check this, semi-dynamic gastric in vitro digestions were conducted on three matrices: a standardized milk emulsion containing native milk fat globules referred to as minimally-processed emulsion and two processed model infant formulas (homogenized or homogenized/pasteurized). Gastric conditions mimicked those reported in newborns. The minimally-processed emulsion was lipolyzed and proteolyzed slower than processed formulas. The difference in initial structure persisted during digestion. The surface of the droplets was the key parameter to control gastric lipolysis kinetics, the pattern of released fatty acids and proteolysis by faster hydrolysis of adsorbed proteins.

  13. “Disaggregation” of Phytochrome in Vitro—A Consequence of Proteolysis 1

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Gary; Pike, Carl S.; Rice, Harbert V.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1971-01-01

    The relationship between a large molecular weight (9S) and a small molecular weight (4.5S, 60,000 molecular weight) species of phytochrome was examined to determine if the larger species was an aggregate of the smaller. Alterations of pH, salt concentration, or phytochrome concentration did not cause any observable formation of the large form from the small form. However, in partially purified phytochrome extracts from Secale cereale L. and Avena sativa L., the large form was converted to the small form over time at 4 C in the dark. This breakdown was inhibitable by the protease inhibitor phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride. When highly purified large molecular weight rye phytochrome was incubated with a neutral protease isolated from etiolated oat shoots, the large phytochrome was converted to the small form without qualitative visible absorbancy changes. The effect of the oat protease could be mimicked by a wide variety of commercial endopeptidases, including trypsin. Examination of the trypsin-induced breakdown on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that as the size of the photoreversible unit changes from large to small, the size of its constituent polypeptide chains is reduced from 120,000 to 62,000 molecular weight. These experiments provide evidence that the endogenous breakdown observed in extracts is a result of contaminant protease and, consequently, that the small molecular weight species of phytochrome is an artifact due to proteolysis. Images PMID:16657862

  14. Influence of lamb rennet paste containing probiotic on proteolysis and rheological properties of pecorino cheese.

    PubMed

    Santillo, A; Albenzio, M

    2008-05-01

    Pecorino cheeses made from heat-treated ewes' milk using traditional lamb rennet paste (RP), lamb rennet paste containing Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5; RPL), and lamb rennet paste containing a mix of Bifidobacterium lactis (BB-12) and Bifidobacterium longum (BB-46; RPB) were characterized for proteolytic and rheological features during ripening. Consumer acceptance of cheeses at 60 d of ripening was evaluated. Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium mix displayed counts of 8 log(10) cfu/g and 9 log(10) cfu/g, respectively, in cheese during ripening. The RPB cheese displayed a greater degradation of casein (CN) matrix carried out by the enzymes associated to both Bifidobacterium mix and endogenous lactic acid microflora, resulting in the highest values of non-CN N and water-soluble N and the highest amount of alpha(s)-CN degradation products in cheese at 60 d of ripening. The RPL cheese displayed intermediate levels of lactic acid bacteria and of N fractions. The percentage of gamma-CN in RP and RPL cheeses at 60 d was 2-fold higher than in the cheese curd of the same groups, whereas the mentioned parameter was 3-fold higher in RPB cheese than in the corresponding fresh curd according to its highest plasmin content. The lower hardness in RPB at the end of ripening could be ascribed to the greater proteolysis observed in cheese harboring the Bifidobacterium mix. Although differences in proteolytic patterns were found among treatments, there were no differences in smell and taste scores.

  15. Ozone, but not nitrogen dioxide, fragments elastin and increases its susceptibility to proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Winters, R S; Burnette-Vick, B A; Johnson, D A

    1994-10-01

    The effects of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on the solubility and proteolytic susceptibility of elastin were examined to better understand how these oxidant air pollutants might damage the lung. In vitro O3 exposures at pH 7.4 resulted in the complete solubilization of elastin, but NO2 had no effect on solubility. The initial solubilization rate was 65 micrograms/mumol of O3, which increased to 150 micrograms/mumol in the midregion of a sigmoidal solubilization curve. Peptide fragments of the O3-solubilized elastin ranged in size from 5 to 20 kD. The conversion of insoluble elastin into soluble fragments by O3 was not due to the destruction of desmosine crosslinks. The effect of O3 on the proteolytic susceptibility of elastin was measured using insoluble elastin recovered from exposures that resulted in 5.3%, 12.8%, and 26.3% solubilization. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) digested the remaining insoluble elastin samples 4.3, 6.0, and 9.8 times faster than unexposed elastin. In contrast, NO2-exposed elastin was no more susceptible to digestion by HNE. Ascorbate, EDTA, and uric acid reduced the proteolytic susceptibility of O3-exposed elastin, but mannitol afforded no protection. These findings indicate that the inhalation of O3 may contribute to lung disease by directly damaging elastin and by increasing its susceptibility to proteolysis, whereas NO2 probably damages lungs via alternative mechanisms.

  16. The role of limited proteolysis of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in thermoregulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, C.

    1982-01-01

    Cyclo (His-Pro) is a biologiclly active cyclic dipeptide derived from thyrotropin-releasing hormone by its limited proteolysis. We have developed a specific radioimmunoassay for this cyclic peptide and shown its presence throughout rat and monkey brains. The normal rat brain concentration of cyclo (His-Pro) ranged from 35-61 pmols/brain. The elution profiles of rat brain cyclo (His-Pro)-like immunoreactivity and synthetic radioactive cyclo (His-Pro) following gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography were similar. An analysis of the regional distribution of cyclo (His-Pro) and TRH in rat and monkey brains exhibited no apparent precursor-product relationship. Studies on the neuroanatomic sites for the thermoregulatory effects of cyclo (His-Pro) suggested that the neural loci responsible for cyclo (His-Pro)-induced hypothermia resides within POA/AHA. The endogenous levels of brain cyclo (His-Pro) were elevated when rats were made either hypothyroid by surgical thyroidectomy or forced to drink alcohol for six weeks. These studies demonstrate that cyclo (His-Pro) is present throughout the central nervous system in physiologically relevant concentrations which can be modified by appropriate physiological and pharamacological manipulations. These data in conjunction with earlier reports of multiple biological activities of exogenous cyclo (His-Pro), suggest that endogenous cyclo (His-Pro) is a biological active peptide and it may play a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator role in the central nervous system.

  17. Immobilization of trypsin on silica-coated fiberglass core in microchip for highly efficient proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Gang

    2009-03-15

    In this report, trypsin was immobilized on silica-coated fiberglass core in microchip to form a core-changeable bioreactor for highly efficient proteolysis. To prepare the fiber core, a layer of organic-inorganic hybrid silica coating was prepared on the surface of a piece of glass fiber by a sol-gel method with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as precursors. Subsequently, trypsin was immobilized on the coating with the aid of glutaraldehyde. Prior to use, the enzyme-immobilized fiber was inserted into the channel of a microchip to form an in-channel fiber bioreactor. The novel bioreactor can be regenerated by changing its fiber core. The scanning electron microscopy images of the cross-section of a trypsin-immobilized fiber indicated that a layer of approximately 1mum thick film formed on the glass substrate. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by the tryptic digestion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 10s. The digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with sequence coverages of 45% (BSA) and 77% (Cyt-c) that were comparable to those obtained by 12-h conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The fiber-based microchip bioreactor provides a promising platform for the high-throughput protein identification.

  18. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  19. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  20. A unified mechanism for proteolysis and autocatalytic activation in the 20S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Eva M.; Heinemeyer, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark; Groll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the 20S proteasome is tightly regulated. The N-terminal propeptides protecting the active-site threonines are autocatalytically released only on completion of assembly. However, the trigger for the self-activation and the reason for the strict conservation of threonine as the active site nucleophile remain enigmatic. Here we use mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays to suggest that Lys33 initiates nucleophilic attack of the propeptide by deprotonating the Thr1 hydroxyl group and that both residues together with Asp17 are part of a catalytic triad. Substitution of Thr1 by Cys disrupts the interaction with Lys33 and inactivates the proteasome. Although a Thr1Ser mutant is active, it is less efficient compared with wild type because of the unfavourable orientation of Ser1 towards incoming substrates. This work provides insights into the basic mechanism of proteolysis and propeptide autolysis, as well as the evolutionary pressures that drove the proteasome to become a threonine protease. PMID:26964885

  1. ARH directs megalin to the endocytic recycling compartment to regulate its proteolysis and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mehul; Baterina, Oscar Y.; Taupin, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Receptors internalized by endocytosis can return to the plasma membrane (PM) directly from early endosomes (EE; fast recycling) or they can traffic from EE to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and recycle from there (slow recycling). How receptors are sorted for trafficking along these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is required for trafficking of megalin, a member of the LDL receptor family, from EE to the ERC by coupling it to dynein; in the absence of ARH, megalin returns directly to the PM from EE via the connecdenn2/Rab35 fast recycling pathway. Binding of ARH to the endocytic adaptor AP-2 prevents fast recycling of megalin. ARH-mediated trafficking of megalin to the ERC is necessary for γ-secretase mediated cleavage of megalin and release of a tail fragment that mediates transcriptional repression. These results identify a novel mechanism for sorting receptors for trafficking to the ERC and link ERC trafficking to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) and expression of megalin. PMID:23836931

  2. ARH directs megalin to the endocytic recycling compartment to regulate its proteolysis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul; Baterina, Oscar Y; Taupin, Vanessa; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2013-07-08

    Receptors internalized by endocytosis can return to the plasma membrane (PM) directly from early endosomes (EE; fast recycling) or they can traffic from EE to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and recycle from there (slow recycling). How receptors are sorted for trafficking along these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is required for trafficking of megalin, a member of the LDL receptor family, from EE to the ERC by coupling it to dynein; in the absence of ARH, megalin returns directly to the PM from EE via the connecdenn2/Rab35 fast recycling pathway. Binding of ARH to the endocytic adaptor AP-2 prevents fast recycling of megalin. ARH-mediated trafficking of megalin to the ERC is necessary for γ-secretase mediated cleavage of megalin and release of a tail fragment that mediates transcriptional repression. These results identify a novel mechanism for sorting receptors for trafficking to the ERC and link ERC trafficking to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) and expression of megalin.

  3. Quantitative proteomics and terminomics to elucidate the role of ubiquitination and proteolysis in adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theo; Viner, Rosa I.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is the specialized defence mechanism in vertebrates that evolved to eliminate pathogens. Specialized lymphocytes recognize specific protein epitopes through antigen receptors to mount potent immune responses, many of which are initiated by nuclear factor-kappa B activation and gene transcription. Most, if not all, pathways in adaptive immunity are further regulated by post-translational modification (PTM) of signalling proteins, e.g. phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination and proteolytic processing. The importance of PTMs is reflected by genetic or acquired defects in these pathways that lead to a dysfunctional immune response. Here we discuss the state of the art in targeted proteomics and systems biology approaches to dissect the PTM landscape specifically regarding ubiquitination and proteolysis in B- and T-cell activation. Recent advances have occurred in methods for specific enrichment and targeted quantitation. Together with improved instrument sensitivity, these advances enable the accurate analysis of often rare PTM events that are opaque to conventional proteomics approaches, now rendering in-depth analysis and pathway dissection possible. We discuss published approaches, including as a case study the profiling of the N-terminome of lymphocytes of a rare patient with a genetic defect in the paracaspase protease MALT1, a key regulator protease in antigen-driven signalling, which was manifested by elevated linear ubiquitination. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644975

  4. Selective repression of MEF2 activity by PKA-dependent proteolysis of HDAC4

    PubMed Central

    Worst, Barbara C.; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Patrick, David M.; Jebessa, Zegeye; Kreusser, Michael M.; Sun, Qiang; Chen, Lan; Heft, Claudia; Katus, Hugo A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) regulates numerous gene expression programs through its signal-dependent repression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and serum response factor (SRF) transcription factors. In cardiomyocytes, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling promotes hypertrophy and pathological remodeling, at least in part by phosphorylating HDAC4, with consequent stimulation of MEF2 activity. In this paper, we describe a novel mechanism whereby protein kinase A (PKA) overcomes CaMKII-mediated activation of MEF2 by regulated proteolysis of HDAC4. PKA induces the generation of an N-terminal HDAC4 cleavage product (HDAC4-NT). HDAC4-NT selectively inhibits activity of MEF2 but not SRF, thereby antagonizing the prohypertrophic actions of CaMKII signaling without affecting cardiomyocyte survival. Thus, HDAC4 functions as a molecular nexus for the antagonistic actions of the CaMKII and PKA pathways. These findings have implications for understanding the molecular basis of cardioprotection and other cellular processes in which CaMKII and PKA exert opposing effects. PMID:22042619

  5. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A; Martin, William F; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Bevins, Charles L; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2013-05-03

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective-released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . The predigestion of milk proteins and the consequent release of antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection.

  6. IL-1β is an innate immune sensor of microbial proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    LaRock, Christopher N.; Todd, Jordan; LaRock, Doris L.; Olson, Joshua; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a key proinflammatory cytokine that drives antimicrobial immune responses. IL-1β is aberrantly activated in autoimmune diseases, and IL-1β inhibitors are used as therapeutic agents to treat patients with certain autoimmune disorders. Review of postmarketing surveillance of patients receiving IL-1β inhibitors found a disproportionate reporting of invasive infections by group A Streptococcus (GAS). IL-1β inhibition increased mouse susceptibility to GAS infection, but IL-1β was produced independent of canonical inflammasomes. Newly synthesized IL-1β has an amino-terminal prodomain that blocks signaling activity, which is usually proteolytically removed by caspase-1, a protease activated within the inflammasome structure. In place of host caspases, the secreted GAS cysteine protease SpeB generated mature IL-1β. During invasive infection, GAS isolates may acquire pathoadaptive mutations eliminating SpeB expression to evade detection by IL-1β. Pharmacological IL-1β inhibition alleviates this selective pressure, allowing invasive infection by nonpathoadapted GAS. Thus, IL-1β is a sensor that directly detects pathogen-associated proteolysis through an independent pathway operating in parallel with host inflammasomes. Because IL-1β function is maintained across species, yet cleavage by caspases does not appear to be, detection of microbial proteases may represent an ancestral system of innate immune regulation.

  7. [Effect of proteasomal proteolysis on NO-synthase activity in isolated platelets].

    PubMed

    Dosenko, V E; Zagoriĭ, V Iu; Moĭbenko, A A

    2005-01-01

    In experiments with isolated platelets it was shown, that application of proteasomal fraction II (PF II) from rabbit's reticulocytes changes the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). During incubation of sonicated platelets with PF II eNOS activity increased by 24.6% (p = 0.02). Methylated ubiquitin and clasto-lactacystin beta-lacton significantly eliminated this effect. So, it is not eNOS that is subsequent to proteasomal degradation, but a certain negative regulator of its activity. eNOS activity in platelets, treated with H2O2 (1 mM), after incubation with PF II increased to a higer extent, and was 3.4 +/- 0.36 UF/min x 10(6) cells (for 51.3% more, than in control), but H2O2 did not affect the activity of enzyme in platelets under analogous condition without addition of PF II. It was established, that eNOS activity decreases after 60 min of incubation with 10 mM of clasto-lactacystin beta-lacton by 11.6%, and with 20 mM--by 28.6% (p < 0.05). Data obtained witnesses about participation of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal proteolysis in regulation of eNOS activity and possibility of the effect upon intensity of NO production due to acceleration of degradation of intracellular regulators of this enzyme's activity.

  8. Calpain A modulates Toll responses by limited Cactus/IκB proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fontenele, Marcio; Lim, Bomyi; Oliveira, Danielle; Buffolo, Márcio; Perlman, David H.; Schupbach, Trudi; Araujo, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent cysteine proteases of the calpain family are modulatory proteases that cleave their substrates in a limited manner. Among their substrates, calpains target vertebrate and invertebrate IκB proteins. Because proteolysis by calpains potentially generates novel protein functions, it is important to understand how this affects NFκB activity. We investigate the action of Calpain A (CalpA) on the Drosophila melanogaster IκB homologue Cactus in vivo. CalpA alters the absolute amounts of Cactus protein. Our data indicate, however, that CalpA uses additional mechanisms to regulate NFκB function. We provide evidence that CalpA interacts physically with Cactus, recognizing a Cactus pool that is not bound to Dorsal, a fly NFκB/Rel homologue. We show that proteolytic cleavage by CalpA generates Cactus fragments lacking an N-terminal region required for Toll responsiveness. These fragments are generated in vivo and display properties distinct from those of full-length Cactus. We propose that CalpA targets free Cactus, which is incorporated into and modulates Toll-responsive complexes in the embryo and immune system. PMID:23864715

  9. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  10. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. [Proteolysis of human proinsulin catalysed by native, modified, and immobilized trypsin].

    PubMed

    Mirgorodskaia, O A; Kazanina, G A; Mirgorodskaia, E P; Shevchenko, A A; Mal'tsev, K V; Miroshnikov, A I; Roipstorff, P

    1997-02-01

    Proteolysis of recombinant human proinsulin by the native trypsin, by trypsin modified with a copolymer of vinylpyrrolidone and acrolein, and by the same modified trypsin immobilized on Silochrom 1.5 was studied by RP HPLC and mass spectrometry. Rate constants of the main stages of proinsulin hydrolysis by the native trypsin were estimated. The values of rate constants of the digestions of the most easily hydrolyzable bonds (those formed by the pairs of the basic amino acid residues) in proinsulin were found to be of the same order as those formed by the separate lysine residues (Lys7) and those formed by the four basic amino acid residues of the C-terminal cluster of melittin. It was established that covalent trypsin binding to the copolymer did not change the ratio of the rate constants of the individual stages of proinsulin hydrolysis, whereas after the immobilization of modified trypsin on the Silochrome, the formation of diarginyl insulin-ArgArg, intermediate forms of hydrolyzed insulin, and desThr-insulin proceeds with comparable rates.

  12. Proteolysis on maturing enamel surface, as shown by gel-coating methods.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yoshiro; Nakano, Yukiko; Yamamoto-Shuda, Yoko; Baba, Otto; Terashima, Tatsuo

    2006-05-01

    Degradation of enamel matrix proteins, and their removal during early maturation, is critical for the growth of large enamel crystals in the subsequent processes of enamel maturation. In this study, we sought to demonstrate, using in vivo zymography, the exact sites of proteolysis in maturing enamel and its relationship to the overlying ameloblasts. The maturing enamel surfaces of rat and bovine incisors were exposed and painted either with pre-exposed autoradiographic emulsion or with densely fluorescein-conjugated (DQ) gelatin. After a few hours, photographic development of the emulsion revealed alternate black and white banding patterns over the maturing enamel surface. DQ gelatin also revealed similar banding patterns of fluorescent and non-fluorescent regions. White, powdery areas of emulsion and fluorescent bands of DQ gelatin both corresponded to the areas of ruffle-ended ameloblasts, at least up to the mid stages of enamel maturation, implicating a predominant contribution of ruffle-ended ameloblasts in the degradation of enamel matrix proteins. Powdery white bands in autoradiographic emulsion shifted from the areas of ruffle-ended to smooth-ended ameloblasts in late maturation in both bovine and rat incisors and were not influenced by proteinase inhibitors or heat inactivation, implicating non-enzymatic interactions. DQ gelatin, in fact, did not generate any fluorescence in such smooth-ended ameloblast regions.

  13. Cdt1 downregulation by proteolysis and geminin inhibition prevents DNA re-replication in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Anatoliy; Blow, J Julian

    2005-01-01

    In late mitosis and G1, Mcm2–7 are assembled onto replication origins to ‘license' them for initiation. At other cell cycle stages, licensing is inhibited, thus ensuring that origins fire only once per cell cycle. Three additional factors—the origin recognition complex, Cdc6 and Cdt1—are required for origin licensing. We examine here how licensing is regulated in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Cdt1 is downregulated late in the cell cycle by two different mechanisms: proteolysis, which occurs in part due to the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C), and inhibition by a protein called geminin. If both these regulatory mechanisms are abrogated, extracts undergo uncontrolled re-licensing and re-replication. The extent of re-replication is limited by checkpoint kinases that are activated as a consequence of re-replication itself. These results allow us to build a comprehensive model of how re-replication of DNA is prevented in Xenopus, with Cdt1 regulation being the key feature. The results also explain the original experiments that led to the proposal of a replication licensing factor. PMID:15616577

  14. Structural changes in emulsion-bound bovine beta-lactoglobulin affect its proteolysis and immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Mauro; Miriani, Matteo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barbiroli, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption on the surface of sub-micrometric oil droplets resulted in significant changes in the tertiary structure of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein broadly used as a food ingredient and a major food allergen. The adsorbed protein had increased sensitivity to trypsin, and increased immunoreactivity towards specific monoclonal antibodies. In spite of the extensive tryptic breakdown of emulsion-bound BLG, some sequence stretches in BLG became trypsin-insensitive upon absorption of the protein on the fat droplets. As a consequence - at contrast with free BLG - proteolysis of emulsion-bound BLG did not decrease the immunoreactivity of the protein, and some of the large peptides generated by trypsinolysis of emulsion-bound BLG were still recognizable by specific monoclonal antibodies. Structural changes occurring in emulsion-bound BLG and their consequences are discussed in comparison with those occurring when the tertiary structure of BLG is modified by lipophilic salts, by urea, or upon interaction with solid hydrophobic surfaces. Such a comparison highlights the relevance of situation-specific structural modifications, that in turn may affect physiologically relevant features of the protein.

  15. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that can reduce post-harvest proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L; Foster, Jamie L

    2013-08-15

    Studies of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) suggest its hay and haylage have greater levels of rumen undegraded protein (RUP) than other legume forages such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Greater RUP can result in more efficient nitrogen utilization by ruminant animals with positive economic and environmental effects. We sought to determine whether, like red clover (Trifolium pretense L.), perennial peanut contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that might be responsible for increased RUP. Perennial peanut extracts contain immunologically detectible PPO protein and high levels of PPO activity (>100 nkatal mg(-1) protein). Addition of caffeic acid (PPO substrate) to perennial peanut extracts depleted of endogenous substrates reduced proteolysis by 90%. Addition of phenolics prepared from perennial peanut leaves to extracts of either transgenic PPO-expressing or control (non-expressing) alfalfa showed peanut phenolics could reduce proteolysis >70% in a PPO-dependent manner. Two abundant likely PPO substrates are present in perennial peanut leaves including caftaric acid. Perennial peanut contains PPO and PPO substrates that together are capable of inhibiting post-harvest proteolysis, suggesting a possible mechanism for increased RUP in this forage. Research related to optimizing the PPO system in other forage crops will likely be applicable to perennial peanut. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Prevention of unloading-induced atrophy by vitamin E supplementation: links between oxidative stress and soleus muscle proteolysis?

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Stéphane; Letexier, Dominique; Favier, Roland; Duchamp, Claude; Desplanches, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to reduced activity induces skeletal muscle atrophy. Oxidative stress might contribute to muscle wasting via proteolysis activation. This study aimed to test two hypotheses in rats. Firstly, supplementation of the antioxidant vitamin E, prior and during the phase of unloading, would partly counteract unloading-induced soleus muscle atrophy. Secondly, vitamin E supplementation would decrease the rate of muscle proteolysis by reducing expression of calpains, caspase-3, -9, -12 and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and MAFbx). Soleus muscle atrophy (− 49%) induced by fourteen days of hindlimb unloading was reduced to only 32 % under vitamin E. Vitamin E partly prevented the decrease in type I and IIa fiber size. Supplementation increased HSP72 content, suppressed the rise in muscle level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance caused by unloading but failed to modify the lower ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione, the higher uncoupling proteins mRNA and the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) observed after unloading. Vitamin E treatment abolished the large upregulation of caspase 9, 12 and MuRF1 transcripts in unloaded muscle and greatly decreased the upregulation of μ-calpain, caspase 3 and MAFbx mRNA. In conclusion, the protective effect of vitamin E might be due to modulation of muscle proteolysis-related genes rather than to its antioxidant function. PMID:17291986

  17. A comparison of the folding characteristics of free and ribosome-tethered polypeptide chains using limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Khadijeh; Reuther, Julia; Deuerling, Elke; Radford, Sheena E; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of protein folding are commonly studied in vitro by denaturing/renaturing intact protein sequences. How these folding mechanisms relate to de novo folding that occurs as the nascent polypeptide emerges from the ribosome is much less well understood. Here, we have employed limited proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry analyses to compare directly free and ribosome-tethered polypeptide chains of the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain and its unfolded variant, SH3-m10. The disordered variant was found to undergo faster proteolysis than SH3. Furthermore, the trypsin cleavage patterns observed show minor, but significant, differences for the free and ribosome-bound nascent chains, with significantly fewer tryptic peptides detected in the presence of ribosome. The results highlight the utility of limited proteolysis coupled with mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of these complex systems, and pave the way for detailed future analyses by combining this technique with chemical labeling methods (for example, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, photochemical oxidation) to analyze protein folding in real time, including in the presence of additional ribosome-associated factors. PMID:25970093

  18. The Copper Efflux Regulator CueR Is Subject to ATP-Dependent Proteolysis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Kraus, Alexander; Schäkermann, Sina; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The trace element copper serves as cofactor for many enzymes but is toxic at elevated concentrations. In bacteria, the intracellular copper level is maintained by copper efflux systems including the Cue system controlled by the transcription factor CueR. CueR, a member of the MerR family, forms homodimers, and binds monovalent copper ions with high affinity. It activates transcription of the copper tolerance genes copA and cueO via a conserved DNA-distortion mechanism. The mechanism how CueR-induced transcription is turned off is not fully understood. Here, we report that Escherichia coli CueR is prone to proteolysis by the AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpXP, and ClpAP. Using a set of CueR variants, we show that CueR degradation is not altered by mutations affecting copper binding, dimerization or DNA binding of CueR, but requires an accessible C terminus. Except for a twofold stabilization shortly after a copper pulse, proteolysis of CueR is largely copper-independent. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent proteolysis contributes to copper homeostasis in E. coli by turnover of CueR, probably to allow steady monitoring of changes of the intracellular copper level and shut-off of CueR-dependent transcription. PMID:28293558

  19. Cell cycle– and cell growth–regulated proteolysis of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on APC–CDH1

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Birgit Otzen; Wagener, Christian; Marinoni, Federica; Kramer, Edgar R.; Melixetian, Marina; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini; Gieffers, Christian; Matteucci, Cristian; Peters, Jan-Michael; Helin, Kristian

    2000-01-01

    CDC6 is conserved during evolution and is essential and limiting for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Human CDC6 activity is regulated by periodic transcription and CDK-regulated subcellular localization. Here, we show that, in addition to being absent from nonproliferating cells, CDC6 is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the anaphase promoting complex (APC)/cyclosome in G1. A combination of point mutations in the destruction box and KEN-box motifs in CDC6 stabilizes the protein in G1 and in quiescent cells. Furthermore, APC, in association with CDH1, ubiquitinates CDC6 in vitro, and both APC and CDH1 are required and limiting for CDC6 proteolysis in vivo. Although a stable mutant of CDC6 is biologically active, overexpression of this mutant or wild-type CDC6 is not sufficient to induce multiple rounds of DNA replication in the same cell cycle. The APC–CDH1-dependent proteolysis of CDC6 in early G1 and in quiescent cells suggests that this process is part of a mechanism that ensures the timely licensing of replication origins during G1. PMID:10995389

  20. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  1. Prevention of unloading-induced atrophy by vitamin E supplementation: links between oxidative stress and soleus muscle proteolysis?

    PubMed

    Servais, Stéphane; Letexier, Dominique; Favier, Roland; Duchamp, Claude; Desplanches, Dominique

    2007-03-01

    Exposure to reduced activity induces skeletal muscle atrophy. Oxidative stress might contribute to muscle wasting via proteolysis activation. This study aimed to test two hypotheses in rats. First, supplementation of the antioxidant vitamin E, prior and during the phase of unloading, would partly counteract unloading-induced soleus muscle atrophy. Secondly, vitamin E supplementation would decrease the rate of muscle proteolysis by reducing expression of calpains, caspases-3, -9, and -12, and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and MAFbx). Soleus muscle atrophy (-49%) induced by 14 days of hindlimb unloading was reduced to only 32% under vitamin E. Vitamin E partly prevented the decrease in type I and IIa fiber size. Supplementation increased HSP72 content and suppressed the rise in muscle level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance caused by unloading but failed to modify the lower ratio of reduced vs oxidized glutathione, the higher uncoupling proteins mRNA, and the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) observed after unloading. Vitamin E treatment abolished the large upregulation of caspases-9 and -12 and MuRF1 transcripts in unloaded muscle and greatly decreased the upregulation of mu-calpain, caspase-3, and MAFbx mRNA. In conclusion, the protective effect of vitamin E might be due to modulation of muscle proteolysis-related genes rather than to its antioxidant function.

  2. Granzyme B-dependent proteolysis acts as a switch to enhance the pro-inflammatory activity of IL-1α

    PubMed Central

    Afonina, Inna S.; Tynan, Graham A.; Logue, Susan E.; Cullen, Sean P.; Bots, Michael; Lüthi, Alexander U.; Reeves, Emer P.; McElvaney, Noel G.; Medema, Jan P.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Martin, Seamus J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Granzyme B is a cytotoxic lymphocyte-derived protease that plays a central role in promoting apoptosis of virus-infected target cells, through direct proteolysis and activation of constituents of the cell death machinery. However, previous studies have also implicated granzymes A and B in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, via a mechanism that remains undefined. Here we show that IL-1α is a substrate for granzyme B and that proteolysis potently enhanced the biological activity of this cytokine in vitro as well as in vivo. Consistent with this, compared with full-length IL-1α, granzyme B-processed IL-1α exhibited more potent activity as an immunoadjuvant in vivo. Furthermore, proteolysis of IL-1α within the same region, by proteases such as calpain and elastase, was also found to enhance its biological potency. Thus, IL-1α processing by multiple immune-related proteases, including granzyme B, acts as a switch to enhance the pro-inflammatory properties of this cytokine. PMID:22017873

  3. The Copper Efflux Regulator CueR Is Subject to ATP-Dependent Proteolysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Kraus, Alexander; Schäkermann, Sina; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The trace element copper serves as cofactor for many enzymes but is toxic at elevated concentrations. In bacteria, the intracellular copper level is maintained by copper efflux systems including the Cue system controlled by the transcription factor CueR. CueR, a member of the MerR family, forms homodimers, and binds monovalent copper ions with high affinity. It activates transcription of the copper tolerance genes copA and cueO via a conserved DNA-distortion mechanism. The mechanism how CueR-induced transcription is turned off is not fully understood. Here, we report that Escherichia coli CueR is prone to proteolysis by the AAA(+) proteases Lon, ClpXP, and ClpAP. Using a set of CueR variants, we show that CueR degradation is not altered by mutations affecting copper binding, dimerization or DNA binding of CueR, but requires an accessible C terminus. Except for a twofold stabilization shortly after a copper pulse, proteolysis of CueR is largely copper-independent. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent proteolysis contributes to copper homeostasis in E. coli by turnover of CueR, probably to allow steady monitoring of changes of the intracellular copper level and shut-off of CueR-dependent transcription.

  4. Dietary L-Lysine Suppresses Autophagic Proteolysis and Stimulates Akt/mTOR Signaling in the Skeletal Muscle of Rats Fed a Low-Protein Diet.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-09-23

    Amino acids, especially L-leucine, regulate protein turnover in skeletal muscle and have attracted attention as a means of increasing muscle mass in people suffering from malnutrition, aging (sarcopenia), or a bedridden state. We previously showed that oral administration of L-lysine (Lys) by gavage suppressed proteolysis in skeletal muscles of fasted rats. However, the intake of Lys in the absence of other dietary components is unlikely in a non-experimental setting, and other dietary components may interfere with the suppressive effect of Lys on proteolysis. We supplemented Lys to a 10% casein diet and investigated the effect of Lys on proteolysis and autophagy, a major proteolytic system, in the skeletal muscle of rats. The rate of proteolysis was evaluated from 3-methylhisitidine (MeHis) released from isolated muscles, in plasma, and excreted in urine. Supplementing lysine with the 10% casein diet decreased the rate of proteolysis induced by intake of a low-protein diet. The upregulated autophagy activity [light chain 3 (LC3)-II/total LC3] caused by a low-protein diet was reduced, and the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway was activated by Lys. Importantly, continuous feeding of a Lys-rich 10% casein diet for 15 days increased the masses of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Taken together, supplementation of Lys to a low-protein diet suppresses autophagic proteolysis through the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and continuous feeding of a Lys-rich diet may increase skeletal muscle mass.

  5. Proteolysis of submembrane cytoskeletal proteins ankyrin-G and alpha-II-spectrin following diffuse brain injury: A role in white matter vulnerability at Nodes of Ranvier

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Thomas M.; Greer, John E.; Vanderveer, Andrew S.; Phillips, Linda L.

    2012-01-01

    A high membrane-to-cytoplasm ratio makes axons particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury. Posttraumatic shifts in ionic homeostasis promote spectrin cleavage, disrupt ankyrin linkages, and destabilize axolemmal proteins. This study contrasted ankyrin-G and αII-spectrin degradation in cortex and corpus callosum following diffuse axonal injury produced by fluid percussion insult. Ankyrin-G lysis occurred preferentially in white matter, with acute elevation of all fragments and long term reduction of a low kD form. Calpain-generated αII-spectrin fragments increased in both regions. Caspase-3 lysis of αII-spectrin showed a small, acute rise in cortex, but was absent in callosum. White matter displayed nodal damage, with horseradish peroxidase permeability into the submyelin space. Ankyrin-G binding protein neurofascin and spectrin binding protein ankyrin-B showed acute alterations in expression. These results support ankyrin-G vulnerability in white matter following trauma and suggest that ankyrin-G and αII-spectrin proteolysis disrupts Node of Ranvier integrity. The time course of such changes were comparable to previously observed functional deficits in callosal fibers. PMID:20557305

  6. SCF-FBXO31 E3 Ligase Targets DNA Replication Factor Cdt1 for Proteolysis in the G2 Phase of Cell Cycle to Prevent Re-replication*

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pegah; Jeffery, Jessie; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Schulz, Renèe B.; Callen, David F.; Kumar, Raman; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    FBXO31 was originally identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene in breast, ovarian, hepatocellular, and prostate cancers. By screening a set of cell cycle-regulated proteins as potential FBXO31 interaction partners, we have now identified Cdt1 as a novel substrate. Cdt1 DNA replication licensing factor is part of the pre-replication complex and essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. We show that FBXO31 specifically interacts with Cdt1 and regulates its abundance by ubiquitylation leading to subsequent degradation. We also show that Cdt1 regulation by FBXO31 is limited to the G2 phase of the cell cycle and is independent of the pathways previously described for Cdt1 proteolysis in S and G2 phase. FBXO31 targeting of Cdt1 is mediated through the N terminus of Cdt1, a region previously shown to be responsible for its cell cycle regulation. Finally, we show that Cdt1 stabilization due to FBXO31 depletion results in re-replication. Our data present an additional pathway that contributes to the FBXO31 function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:24828503

  7. Phenylbutyric Acid Rescues Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Suppression of APP Proteolysis and Prevents Apoptosis in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jesse C.; Meabon, James S.; Frankowski, Harald; Smith, Elise A.; Schecterson, Leslayann C.; Bothwell, Mark; Ladiges, Warren C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an identical pathology with a severe disparity in the time of onset [1]. The pathological similarity suggests that epigenetic processes may phenocopy the Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mutations within sporadic AD. Numerous groups have demonstrated that FAD mutations in presenilin result in ‘loss of function’ of γ-secretase mediated APP cleavage [2], [3], [4], [5]. Accordingly, ER stress is prominent within the pathologically impacted brain regions in AD patients [6] and is reported to inhibit APP trafficking through the secretory pathway [7], [8]. As the maturation of APP and the cleaving secretases requires trafficking through the secretory pathway [9], [10], [11], we hypothesized that ER stress may block trafficking requisite for normal levels of APP cleavage and that the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) may rescue the proteolytic deficit. Methodology/Principal Findings The APP-Gal4VP16/Gal4-reporter screen was stably incorporated into neuroblastoma cells in order to assay γ-secretase mediated APP proteolysis under normal and pharmacologically induced ER stress conditions. Three unrelated pharmacological agents (tunicamycin, thapsigargin and brefeldin A) all repressed APP proteolysis in parallel with activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling—a biochemical marker of ER stress. Co-treatment of the γ-secretase reporter cells with PBA blocked the repressive effects of tunicamycin and thapsigargin upon APP proteolysis, UPR activation, and apoptosis. In unstressed cells, PBA stimulated γ-secretase mediated cleavage of APP by 8–10 fold, in the absence of any significant effects upon amyloid production, by promoting APP trafficking through the secretory pathway and the stimulation of the non-pathogenic α/γ-cleavage. Conclusions/Significance ER stress represses γ-secretase mediated APP proteolysis, which replicates some of the proteolytic deficits

  8. Phenylbutyric acid rescues endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced suppression of APP proteolysis and prevents apoptosis in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jesse C; Meabon, James S; Frankowski, Harald; Smith, Elise A; Schecterson, Leslayann C; Bothwell, Mark; Ladiges, Warren C

    2010-02-09

    The familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have an identical pathology with a severe disparity in the time of onset [1]. The pathological similarity suggests that epigenetic processes may phenocopy the Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mutations within sporadic AD. Numerous groups have demonstrated that FAD mutations in presenilin result in 'loss of function' of gamma-secretase mediated APP cleavage [2], [3], [4], [5]. Accordingly, ER stress is prominent within the pathologically impacted brain regions in AD patients [6] and is reported to inhibit APP trafficking through the secretory pathway [7], [8]. As the maturation of APP and the cleaving secretases requires trafficking through the secretory pathway [9], [10], [11], we hypothesized that ER stress may block trafficking requisite for normal levels of APP cleavage and that the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) may rescue the proteolytic deficit. The APP-Gal4VP16/Gal4-reporter screen was stably incorporated into neuroblastoma cells in order to assay gamma-secretase mediated APP proteolysis under normal and pharmacologically induced ER stress conditions. Three unrelated pharmacological agents (tunicamycin, thapsigargin and brefeldin A) all repressed APP proteolysis in parallel with activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling-a biochemical marker of ER stress. Co-treatment of the gamma-secretase reporter cells with PBA blocked the repressive effects of tunicamycin and thapsigargin upon APP proteolysis, UPR activation, and apoptosis. In unstressed cells, PBA stimulated gamma-secretase mediated cleavage of APP by 8-10 fold, in the absence of any significant effects upon amyloid production, by promoting APP trafficking through the secretory pathway and the stimulation of the non-pathogenic alpha/gamma-cleavage. ER stress represses gamma-secretase mediated APP proteolysis, which replicates some of the proteolytic deficits associated with the FAD mutations. The small molecular

  9. Ubiquitinated sperm mitochondria, selective proteolysis, and the regulation of mitochondrial inheritance in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, P; Moreno, R D; Ramalho-Santos, J; Dominko, T; Simerly, C; Schatten, G

    2000-08-01

    The strictly maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in mammals is a developmental paradox promoted by an unknown mechanism responsible for the destruction of the sperm mitochondria shortly after fertilization. We have recently reported that the sperm mitochondria are ubiquitinated inside the oocyte cytoplasm and later subjected to proteolysis during preimplantation development (P. Sutovsky et al., Nature 1999; 402:371-372). Here, we provide further evidence for this process by showing that the proteolytic destruction of bull sperm mitochondria inside cow egg cytoplasm depends upon the activity of the universal proteolytic marker, ubiquitin, and the lysosomal apparatus of the egg. Binding of ubiquitin to sperm mitochondria was visualized by monospecific antibodies throughout pronuclear development and during the first embryonic divisions. The recognition and disposal of the ubiquitinated sperm mitochondria was prevented by the microinjection of anti-ubiquitin antibodies and by the treatment of the fertilized zygotes with lysosomotropic agent ammonium chloride. The postfecundal ubiquitination of sperm mitochondria and their destruction was not seen in the hybrid embryos created using cow eggs and sperm of wild cattle, gaur, thus supporting the hypothesis that sperm mitochondrion destruction is species specific. The initial ligation of ubiquitin molecules to sperm mitochondrial membrane proteins, one of which could be prohibitin, occurs during spermatogenesis. Even though the ubiquitin cross-reactivity was transiently lost from the sperm mitochondria during epididymal passage, likely as a result of disulfide bond cross-linking, it was restored and amplified after fertilization. Ubiquitination therefore may represent a mechanism for the elimination of paternal mitochondria during fertilization. Our data have important implications for anthropology, treatment of mitochondrial disorders, and for the new methods of assisted procreation, such as

  10. Oral branched-chain amino acids decrease whole-body proteolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Williams, B. D.; Stuart, C. A.; Lane, H. W.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study reports the effects of ingesting branched-chain amino acids (leucine, valine, and isoleucine) on protein metabolism in four men. METHODS: To calculate leg protein synthesis and breakdown, we used a new model that utilized the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine and the sampling of the leg arterial-venous difference and muscle biopsies. In addition, protein-bound enrichments provided for the direct calculation of muscle fractional synthetic rate. Four control subjects ingested an equivalent amount of essential amino acids (threonine, methionine, and histidine) to discern the effects of branched-chain amino acid nitrogen vs the effects of essential amino acid nitrogen. Each drink also included 50 g of carbohydrate. RESULTS: Consumption of the branched-chain and the essential amino acid solutions produced significant threefold and fourfold elevations in their respective arterial concentrations. Protein synthesis and breakdown were unaffected by branched-chain amino acids, but they increased by 43% (p < .05) and 36% (p < .03), respectively, in the group consuming the essential amino acids. However, net leg balance of phenylalanine was unchanged by either drink. Direct measurement of protein synthesis by tracer incorporation into muscle protein (fractional synthetic rate) revealed no changes within or between drinks. Whole-body phenylalanine flux was significantly suppressed by each solution but to a greater extent by the branched-chain amino acids (15% and 20%, respectively) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that branched-chain amino acid ingestion suppresses whole-body proteolysis in tissues other than skeletal muscle in normal men.

  11. BET protein proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC) exerts potent lethal activity against mantle cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Fiskus, W; Qian, Y; Rajapakshe, K; Raina, K; Coleman, K G; Crew, A P; Shen, A; Saenz, D T; Mill, C P; Nowak, A J; Jain, N; Zhang, L; Wang, M; Khoury, J D; Coarfa, C; Crews, C M; Bhalla, K N

    2017-06-30

    Bromodomain extraterminal protein (BETP) inhibitors transcriptionally repress oncoproteins and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) target genes that undermines the growth and survival of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells. However, BET bromodomain inhibitor (BETi) treatment causes accumulation of BETPs, associated with reversible binding and incomplete inhibition of BRD4 that potentially compromises the activity of BETi in MCL cells. Unlike BETi, BET-PROTACs (proteolysis-targeting chimera) ARV-825 and ARV-771 (Arvinas, Inc.) recruit and utilize an E3-ubiquitin ligase to effectively degrade BETPs in MCL cells. BET-PROTACs induce more apoptosis than BETi of MCL cells, including those resistant to ibrutinib. BET-PROTAC treatment induced more perturbations in the mRNA and protein expressions than BETi, with depletion of c-Myc, CDK4, cyclin D1 and the NF-κB transcriptional targets Bcl-xL, XIAP and BTK, while inducing the levels of HEXIM1, NOXA and CDKN1A/p21. Treatment with ARV-771, which possesses superior pharmacological properties compared with ARV-825, inhibited the in vivo growth and induced greater survival improvement than the BETi OTX015 of immune-depleted mice engrafted with MCL cells. Cotreatment of ARV-771 with ibrutinib or the BCL2 antagonist venetoclax or CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib synergistically induced apoptosis of MCL cells. These studies highlight promising and superior preclinical activity of BET-PROTAC than BETi, requiring further in vivo evaluation of BET-PROTAC as a therapy for ibrutinib-sensitive or -resistant MCL.Leukemia advance online publication, 28 July 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.207.

  12. Oral branched-chain amino acids decrease whole-body proteolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Williams, B. D.; Stuart, C. A.; Lane, H. W.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study reports the effects of ingesting branched-chain amino acids (leucine, valine, and isoleucine) on protein metabolism in four men. METHODS: To calculate leg protein synthesis and breakdown, we used a new model that utilized the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine and the sampling of the leg arterial-venous difference and muscle biopsies. In addition, protein-bound enrichments provided for the direct calculation of muscle fractional synthetic rate. Four control subjects ingested an equivalent amount of essential amino acids (threonine, methionine, and histidine) to discern the effects of branched-chain amino acid nitrogen vs the effects of essential amino acid nitrogen. Each drink also included 50 g of carbohydrate. RESULTS: Consumption of the branched-chain and the essential amino acid solutions produced significant threefold and fourfold elevations in their respective arterial concentrations. Protein synthesis and breakdown were unaffected by branched-chain amino acids, but they increased by 43% (p < .05) and 36% (p < .03), respectively, in the group consuming the essential amino acids. However, net leg balance of phenylalanine was unchanged by either drink. Direct measurement of protein synthesis by tracer incorporation into muscle protein (fractional synthetic rate) revealed no changes within or between drinks. Whole-body phenylalanine flux was significantly suppressed by each solution but to a greater extent by the branched-chain amino acids (15% and 20%, respectively) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that branched-chain amino acid ingestion suppresses whole-body proteolysis in tissues other than skeletal muscle in normal men.

  13. Proteolysis of EphA2 converts it from a tumor suppressor to an oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    KOSHIKAWA, Naohiko; HOSHINO, Daisuke; TANIGUCHI, Hiroaki; MINEGISHI, Tomoko; TOMARI, Taizo; NAM, Sung-Ouk; AOKI, Mikiko; SUETA, Takayuki; NAKAGAWA, Takashi; MIYAMOTO, Shingo; NABESHIMA, Kazuki; WEAVER, Alissa M.; SEIKI, Motoharu

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases are considered candidate therapeutic targets in cancer, but they can exert opposing effects on cell growth. In presence of its ligands, Eph receptor EphA2 suppresses signaling by other growth factor receptors, including ErbB, whereas ligand-independent activation of EphA2 augments ErbB signaling. To deploy EphA2-targeting drugs effectively in tumors, the anti-oncogenic ligand-dependent activation state of EphA2 must be discriminated from its oncogenic ligand-independent state. Since the molecular basis for the latter is little understood, we investigated how the activation state of EphA2 can be switched in tumor tissue. We found that ligand-binding domain of EphA2 is cleaved frequently by the membrane metalloproteinase MT1-MMP, a powerful modulator of the pericellular environment in tumor cells. EphA2 immunostaining revealed a significant loss of the N-terminal portion of EphA2 in areas of tumor tissue that expressed MT1-MMP. Moreover, EphA2 phosphorylation patterns that signify ligand-independent activation were observed specifically in these areas of tumor tissue. Mechanistic experiments revealed that processing of EphA2 by MT1-MMP promoted ErbB signaling, anchorage-independent growth, and cell migration. Conversely, expression of a proteolysis-resistant mutant of EphA2 prevented tumorigenesis and metastasis of human tumor xenografts in mice. Overall, our results showed how the proteolytic state of EphA2 in tumors determines its effector function and influences its status as a candidate biomarker for targeted therapy. PMID:26130649

  14. Structural inferences for the native skeletal muscle sodium channel as derived from patterns of endogenous proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, S.; Yang, J.; Barchi, R. )

    1989-08-05

    The alpha subunit (Mr approximately 260,000) of the rat skeletal muscle sodium channel is sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases during the isolation of muscle surface membrane. Antisera against synthetic oligopeptides were used to map the resultant fragments in order to identify protease-sensitive regions of the channel's structure in its native membrane environment. Antibodies to the amino terminus labeled major fragments of Mr approximately 130,000 and 90,000 and lesser amounts of other peptides as small as Mr approximately 12,000. Antisera to epitopes within the carboxyl-terminal half of the primary sequence recognized two fragments of Mr approximately 110,000 and 78,000. Individual antisera also selectively labeled smaller polypeptides in the most extensively cleaved preparations. The immunoreactivity patterns of monoclonal antibodies previously raised against the purified channel were then surveyed. The binding sites for one group of monoclonals, including several that recognize subtype-specific epitopes in the channel structure, were localized within a 12-kDa fragment near the amino terminus. The distribution of carbohydrate along the primary structure of the channel was also assessed by quantitating {sup 125}I-wheat germ agglutinin and 125I-concanavalin A binding to the proteolytic peptides. Most of the carbohydrate detected by these lectins was located between 22 and 90 kDa from the amino terminus of the protein. No lectin binding was detected to fragments arising from carboxyl-terminal half of the protein. These results were analyzed in terms of current models of sodium channel tertiary structure. In its normal membrane environment, the skeletal muscle sodium channel appears sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases in regions predicted to link the four repeat domains on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane while the repeat domains themselves are resistant to proteolysis.

  15. Extracellular proteolysis of fibronectin by neutrophils: characterization and the effects of recombinant cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chamba, A; Afford, S C; Stockley, R A; Burnett, D

    1991-04-01

    We have used 125I-labeled fibronectin (FN) as an extracellular substrate for neutrophils (PMN) in order to investigate the mechanism responsible for FN solubilization by PMN and the effects of recombinant cytokines on this process. Pure active alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT), when added to PMN before or during, but not after, adherence to FN, inhibited solubilization of the substrate in a dose-dependent manner, but alpha 1AT that had been inactivated by proteolysis or oxidation and alpha 1AT Pittsburgh (alpha 1AT 358Met-Arg) had no significant effect. The solubilization of FN was also inhibited by the PMN elastase inhibitor N-methoxysuccinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-valine-chloromethylketone but not by the chymotrypsin and cathepsin G inhibitor N-Cbz-glycyl-glycyl-phenylalanine-chloromethylketone, nor by catalase or superoxide dismutase. The products of solubilization of FN by PMN, analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, were similar to those produced by pure PMN elastase but not cathepsin G. These results suggest that FN solubilization by PMN is caused largely by the pericellular activity of PMN elastase. The solubilization of FN by PMN was increased significantly by adding tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha, or interferon-gamma to the adherent cells but without a significant general release of elastase into the culture supernatants. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) had no significant effect. None of the cytokines had any effect when preincubated with the cells in suspension, and non increased FN solubilization by PMN incubated with the optimal (10(-6) mol/liter) or suboptimal dose (10(-8) mol/liter) of the peptide formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. I. Differential susceptibility to proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    To study the possible heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors, isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were enzymatically altered (`stripped') by exposure to pronase or papain. Pronase treatment markedly increased the percentages of PBL binding IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), while simultaneously removing or inactivating their receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG). Papain treatment markedly diminished the ability of PBL to bind both EA and aggG. Essentially identical results were obtained utilizing EA composed of either human Rh-positive type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley) or with chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit anti-CRBC IgG (CRBC-A). CRBC sensitized with Fab'2 fragments of rabbit anti-CRBC IgG were incapable of forming rosettes with normal or with pronase- or papain-stripped PBL. Pre-treatment of normal lymphocytes with aggG totally ablated their ability to rosette with EA. Incubation of pronase-stripped PBL for 18–20 hr in 5% CO2-air at 37°C resulted in diminution (to levels originally present) in the percentages of lymphocytes binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. Similar incubation of papain-stripped PBL resulted in significant reappearance of receptors binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. These results strongly suggest that: (1) lymphocyte receptors that bind EA complexes differ from those that bind aggG; (2) some lymphocytes possess cryptic receptors for EA that are expressed after proteolysis with pronase; (3) PBL having receptors for EA also have aggG receptors; and (4) there is no evidence that proteolytic stripping of PBL results in the generation of functionally different receptors for complexed IgG, since the Fc specificity of this receptor remains unchanged. PMID:737911

  17. Top-down MS, a powerful complement to the high capabilities of proteolysis proteomics.

    PubMed

    McLafferty, Fred W; Breuker, Kathrin; Jin, Mi; Han, Xuemei; Infusini, Giuseppe; Jiang, Honghai; Kong, Xianglei; Begley, Tadhg P

    2007-12-01

    For the characterization of protein sequences and post-translational modifications by MS, the 'top-down' proteomics approach utilizes molecular and fragment ion mass data obtained by ionizing and dissociating a protein in the mass spectrometer. This requires more complex instrumentation and methodology than the far more widely used 'bottom-up' approach, which instead uses such data of peptides from the protein's digestion, but the top-down data are far more specific. The ESI MS spectrum of a 14 protein mixture provides full separation of its molecular ions for MS/MS dissociation of the individual components. False-positive rates for the identification of proteins are far lower with the top-down approach, and quantitation of multiply modified isomers is more efficient. Bottom-up proteolysis destroys the information on the size of the protein and the connectivities of the peptide fragments, but it has no size limit for protein digestion. In contrast, the top-down approach has a approximately 500 residue, approximately 50 kDa limitation for the extensive molecular ion dissociation required. Basic studies indicate that this molecular ion intractability arises from greatly strengthened electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, in the gas-phase molecular ions. This limit is now greatly extended by variable thermal and collisional activation just after electrospray ('prefolding dissociation'). This process can cleave 287 inter-residue bonds in the termini of a 1314 residue (144 kDa) protein, specify previously unidentified disulfide bonds between eight of 27 cysteines in a 1714 residue (200 kDa) protein, and correct sequence predictions in two proteins, one of 2153 residues (229 kDa).

  18. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  19. The effect of limited proteolysis by different proteases on the formation of whey protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Zhe; Xu, Hong-Hua; Ju, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases: trypsin, protease A, pepsin, and protease M were selected to modify whey protein concentrate (WPC) at a low degree of hydrolysis (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%) before adjusting to pH 2.0 and heating at 90°C to gain insight into the influence of proteolysis on fibril formation. The kinetics of fibril formation were performed on native and modified WPC using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy and far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy for the morphological and secondary structural analyses. The change in surface hydrophobicity and content of free sulfhydryl groups were also observed during the formation of fibrils for the native and modified WPC. The content of aggregation and thioflavin T kinetic data indicated that the ability of fibril formation was apparently different for WPC modified by the 4 proteases. Whey protein concentrate modified by trypsin aggregated more during heating and the fibril formation rate was faster than that of the native WPC. Whey protein concentrate modified by the other proteases showed slower aggregation with worse amyloid fibril morphology. Compared with the native WPC, the structure of WPC changed differently after being modified by proteases. The state of α-helix structure for modified WPC played the most important role in the formation of fibrils. Under the mild conditions used in this work, the α-helix structure of WPC modified by trypsin caused little destruction and resulted in fibrils with good morphology; the content of α-helices for WPC modified by other proteases decreased to 36.19 to 50.94%; thus, fibril formation was inhibited. In addition, it was beneficial for the modified WPC to form fibrils such that the surface hydrophobicity increased and the content of free sulfhydryl groups slightly decreased during heating.

  20. Pharmacological strategies in lung cancer-induced cachexia: effects on muscle proteolysis, autophagy, structure, and weakness.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Fermoselle, Clara; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Diament, Miriam J; de Kier Joffé, Elisa D Bal; Sandri, Marco; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-11-01

    Cachexia is a relevant comorbid condition of chronic diseases including cancer. Inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, ubiquitin-proteasome system, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia. Currently available treatment is limited and data demonstrating effectiveness in in vivo models are lacking. Our objectives were to explore in respiratory and limb muscles of lung cancer (LC) cachectic mice whether proteasome, NF-κB, and MAPK inhibitors improve muscle mass and function loss through several molecular mechanisms. Body and muscle weights, limb muscle force, protein degradation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, signaling pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation, autophagy, contractile and functional proteins, myostatin and myogenin, and muscle structure were evaluated in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing cachectic mice (BALB/c), with and without concomitant treatment with NF-κB (sulfasalazine), MAPK (U0126), and proteasome (bortezomib) inhibitors. Compared to control animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of LC cachectic mice: muscle proteolysis, ubiquitinated proteins, autophagy, myostatin, protein oxidation, FoxO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, and muscle abnormalities were increased, while myosin, creatine kinase, myogenin, and slow- and fast-twitch muscle fiber size were decreased. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK, but not the proteasome system, induced in cancer cachectic animals, a substantial restoration of muscle mass and force through a decrease in muscle protein oxidation and catabolism, myostatin, and autophagy, together with a greater content of myogenin, and contractile and functional proteins. Attenuation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway effects on muscles is beneficial in cancer-induced cachexia.

  1. Distinct roles of two alternative splice variants of matrilin-2 in protein oligomerization and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxuan; Zhang, Liangqing; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Guirong; Gong, Rujun; Wang, Zhengke; Peng, Jinwu; Wang, Shuhua; Genochio, David; Zhao, Bin; Luo, Junming

    2012-11-01

    Matrilin-2 (matn2) contains a unique domain, between the second von Willebrand factor A (vWFA) domain and the C-terminal coiled-coil domain, with no sequence homology with other family members. Complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence analysis of matn2 expression in both mice and humans revealed an alternative splice site in the region of the unique domain, which forms a short and a long splicing variant (containing an additional 19 amino acids). However, the expression heterogeneity of the alternative spliced variants, and the roles of the unique domain in oligomerization and proteolysis of matn2 are unknown. In this study, we examined the expression of the two alternative splice variants of matn2 in several skeletal and non-skeletal tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Both splice variants of matn2 were detected at the mRNA level in all tissues studied. To explore the biochemical significance, several minigene constructs containing the second vWFA domain, the unique domain (with either a long or short form) and the coiled-coil domain of mouse mini matn2 were generated. Ectopic expression of these constructs demonstrated that the long form of matn2 is capable of self-assembling into several oligomeric forms, including a tetramer, trimer, pentamer or multimer; but the short form is only capable of forming a tetramer, trimer or dimer. Moreover, we observed that the splice variants of matn2 are important in modulating matn2 cleavage when co-expressed with matrilin-1 or matrilin-3. These results indicate that the two alternative splice variants have distinct roles in the processes of post-translational modification of matn2, which may have an impact on the homeostasis of the matrilin filamentous network of the extracellular matrix.

  2. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor–dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Sylvain M.; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S.; Bugge, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  3. A simple fluorescence labeling method for studies of protein oxidation, protein modification, and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2012-01-15

    Proteins are sensitive to oxidation, and oxidized proteins are excellent substrates for degradation by proteolytic enzymes such as the proteasome and the mitochondrial Lon protease. Protein labeling is required for studies of protein turnover. Unfortunately, most labeling techniques involve (3)H or (14)C methylation, which is expensive, exposes researchers to radioactivity, generates large amounts of radioactive waste, and allows only single-point assays because samples require acid precipitation. Alternative labeling methods have largely proven unsuitable, either because the probe itself is modified by the oxidant(s) being studied or because the alternative labeling techniques are too complex or too costly for routine use. What is needed is a simple, quick, and cheap labeling technique that uses a non-radioactive marker, binds strongly to proteins, is resistant to oxidative modification, and emits a strong signal. We have devised a new reductive method for labeling free carboxyl groups of proteins with the small fluorophore 7-amino-4-methycoumarin (AMC). When bound to target proteins, AMC fluoresces very weakly but when AMC is released by proteinases, proteases, or peptidases, it fluoresces strongly. Thus, without acid precipitation, the proteolysis of any target protein can be studied continuously, in multiwell plates. In direct comparisons, (3)H-labeled proteins and AMC-labeled proteins exhibited essentially identical degradation patterns during incubation with trypsin, cell extracts, and purified proteasome. AMC-labeled proteins are well suited to studying increased proteolytic susceptibility after protein modification, because the AMC-protein bond is resistant to oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite and is stable over time and to extremes of pH, temperature (even boiling), freeze-thaw, mercaptoethanol, and methanol. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The selective biotin tagging and thermolysin proteolysis of chloroplast outer envelope proteins reveals information on protein topology and association into complexes.

    PubMed

    Hardré, Hélène; Kuhn, Lauriane; Albrieux, Catherine; Jouhet, Juliette; Michaud, Morgane; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of chloroplast function requires the precise localization of proteins in each of its sub-compartments. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry has allowed the inventory of proteins in thylakoid, stroma, and envelope fractions. Concerning membrane association, proteins can be either integral or peripheral or even soluble proteins bound transiently to a membrane complex. We sought a method providing information at the surface of the outer envelope membrane (OEM), based on specific tagging with biotin or proteolysis using thermolysin, a non-membrane permeable protease. To evaluate this method, envelope, thylakoid, and stroma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by immunostaining and mass spectrometry. A short selection of proteins associated to the chloroplast envelope fraction was checked after superficial treatments of intact chloroplasts. We showed that this method could allow the characterization of OEM embedded proteins facing the cytosol, as well as peripheral and soluble proteins associated via tight or lose interactions. Some stromal proteins were associated with biotinylated spots and analyzes are still needed to determine whether polypeptides were tagged prior import or if they co-migrated with OEM proteins. This method also suggests that some proteins associated with the inner envelope membrane (IEM) might need the integrity of a trans-envelope (IEM-OEM) protein complex (e.g., division ring-forming components) or at least an intact OEM partner. Following this evaluation, proteomic analyzes should be refined and the putative role of inter-membrane space components stabilizing trans-envelope complexes demonstrated. For future comprehensive studies, perspectives include the dynamic analyses of OEM proteins and IEM-OEM complexes in various physiological contexts and using virtually any other purified membrane organelle.

  5. The selective biotin tagging and thermolysin proteolysis of chloroplast outer envelope proteins reveals information on protein topology and association into complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hardré, Hélène; Kuhn, Lauriane; Albrieux, Catherine; Jouhet, Juliette; Michaud, Morgane; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A.; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of chloroplast function requires the precise localization of proteins in each of its sub-compartments. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry has allowed the inventory of proteins in thylakoid, stroma, and envelope fractions. Concerning membrane association, proteins can be either integral or peripheral or even soluble proteins bound transiently to a membrane complex. We sought a method providing information at the surface of the outer envelope membrane (OEM), based on specific tagging with biotin or proteolysis using thermolysin, a non-membrane permeable protease. To evaluate this method, envelope, thylakoid, and stroma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by immunostaining and mass spectrometry. A short selection of proteins associated to the chloroplast envelope fraction was checked after superficial treatments of intact chloroplasts. We showed that this method could allow the characterization of OEM embedded proteins facing the cytosol, as well as peripheral and soluble proteins associated via tight or lose interactions. Some stromal proteins were associated with biotinylated spots and analyzes are still needed to determine whether polypeptides were tagged prior import or if they co-migrated with OEM proteins. This method also suggests that some proteins associated with the inner envelope membrane (IEM) might need the integrity of a trans-envelope (IEM–OEM) protein complex (e.g., division ring-forming components) or at least an intact OEM partner. Following this evaluation, proteomic analyzes should be refined and the putative role of inter-membrane space components stabilizing trans-envelope complexes demonstrated. For future comprehensive studies, perspectives include the dynamic analyses of OEM proteins and IEM–OEM complexes in various physiological contexts and using virtually any other purified membrane organelle. PMID:24999344

  6. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Lund-Palau, Helena; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization. Methods Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations), proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days) of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts) and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts) following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used. Results Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis. Conclusions A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised. PMID

  7. The splicing factor U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghee; Chung, In Kwon

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Identification of U2AF65 as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. •U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. •U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4. •U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres. -- Abstract: The human telomeric protein TRF1 is a component of the six-subunit protein complex shelterin, which provides telomere protection by organizing the telomere into a high-order structure. TRF1 functions as a negative regulator of telomere length by controlling the access of telomerase to telomeres. Thus, the cellular abundance of TRF1 at telomeres should be maintained and tightly regulated to ensure proper telomere function. Here, we identify U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) auxiliary factor 65 (U2AF65), an essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. U2AF65 interacts with TRF1 in vitro and in vivo and is capable of stabilizing TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We also found that U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for TRF1. Depletion of endogenous U2AF65 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the stability of endogenous TRF1 whereas overexpression of U2AF65 significantly extended the half-life of TRF1. These findings demonstrate that U2AF65 plays a critical role in regulating the level of TRF1 through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres.

  8. Reliance of Wolbachia on High Rates of Host Proteolysis Revealed by a Genome-Wide RNAi Screen of Drosophila Cells.

    PubMed

    White, Pamela M; Serbus, Laura R; Debec, Alain; Codina, Adan; Bray, Walter; Guichet, Antoine; Lokey, R Scott; Sullivan, William

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia are gram-negative, obligate, intracellular bacteria carried by a majority of insect species worldwide. Here we use a Wolbachia-infected Drosophila cell line and genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screening to identify host factors that influence Wolbachia titer. By screening an RNAi library targeting 15,699 transcribed host genes, we identified 36 candidate genes that dramatically reduced Wolbachia titer and 41 that increased Wolbachia titer. Host gene knockdowns that reduced Wolbachia titer spanned a broad array of biological pathways including genes that influenced mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism. In addition, knockdown of seven genes in the host ubiquitin and proteolysis pathways significantly reduced Wolbachia titer. To test the in vivo relevance of these results, we found that drug and mutant inhibition of proteolysis reduced levels of Wolbachia in the Drosophila oocyte. The presence of Wolbachia in either cell lines or oocytes dramatically alters the distribution and abundance of ubiquitinated proteins. Functional studies revealed that maintenance of Wolbachia titer relies on an intact host Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation pathway (ERAD). Accordingly, electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Wolbachia is intimately associated with the host ER and dramatically alters the morphology of this organelle. Given Wolbachia lack essential amino acid biosynthetic pathways, the reliance of Wolbachia on high rates of host proteolysis via ubiquitination and the ERAD pathways may be a key mechanism for provisioning Wolbachia with amino acids. In addition, the reliance of Wolbachia on the ERAD pathway and disruption of ER morphology suggests a previously unsuspected mechanism for Wolbachia's potent ability to prevent RNA virus replication. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. The core of tau-paired helical filaments studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Martin; Barghorn, Stefan; Müller, Shirley A; Pickhardt, Marcus; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Davies, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2006-05-23

    In Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intracellular paired helical filaments (PHFs). The filaments formed in vivo consist mainly of full-length molecules of the six different isoforms present in adult brain. The substructure of the PHF core is still elusive. Here we applied scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and limited proteolysis to probe the mass distribution of PHFs and their surface exposure. Tau filaments assembled from the three repeat domain have a mass per length (MPL) of approximately 60 kDa/nm and filaments from full-length tau (htau40DeltaK280 mutant) have approximately 160 kDa/nm, compared with approximately 130 kDa/nm for PHFs from Alzheimer's brain. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin accelerate assembly but are not incorporated into PHFs. Limited proteolysis combined with N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of fragments reveals a protease-sensitive N-terminal half and semiresistant PHF core starting in the first repeat and reaching to the C-terminus of tau. Continued proteolysis leads to a fragment starting at the end of the first repeat and ending in the fourth repeat. PHFs from tau isoforms with four repeats revealed an additional cleavage site within the middle of the second repeat. Probing the PHFs with antibodies detecting epitopes either over longer stretches in the C-terminal half of tau or in the fourth repeat revealed that they grow in a polar manner. These data describe the physical parameters of the PHFs and enabled us to build a model of the molecular arrangement within the filamentous structures.

  10. Proteolysis of Virulence Regulator ToxR Is Associated with Entry of Vibrio cholerae into a Dormant State

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K.; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state. PMID:25849031

  11. Differences in the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Inui, Mariko; Yoshimoto, Yu; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic selection results in a higher growth rate and meat yield in broiler chickens than in layer chickens. We herein demonstrated differences in the effects of 24 h of fasting on the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks. The mRNA levels of proteolysis-related genes were analyzed in the pectoralis major muscle of 14-day-old chicks after 0 or 24 h of fasting. The mRNA levels of ubiquitin ligases such as atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF-1) as well as transcription factor forkhead box class O (FOXO) 1 were significantly increased by fasting in broiler and layer chicks, suggesting that the FOXO1-induced ubiquitin-proteasome system, a major proteolytic system in skeletal muscles, was activated by fasting in both chicks. The mRNA levels of atrogin-1 were significantly lower in broiler chicks than in layer chicks after fasting. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 were significantly decreased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. The mRNA levels of FOXO3 were significantly increased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. Therefore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system did not appear to have been fully upregulated in broiler chicks. These results suggest that differences in the expression of genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation are one of the causes of the high growth rate in broiler chickens.

  12. Daily variations in dietary lysine content alter the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Tesseraud, Sophie; Bouvarel, Isabelle; Collin, Anne; Audouin, Estelle; Crochet, Sabine; Seiliez, Iban; Leterrier, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids are known to be anabolic factors that affect protein metabolism, but the response of animals to daily amino acid changes is little understood. We aimed to test the effects of feeding birds with alternations of diets varying in lysine content on the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken muscle. Cyclic feeding programs with 2 diets, each given for 24 h during 48-h cycles, were carried out from 10 d of age. Three programs were used: 1) control treatment with continuous distribution of a complete diet containing standard medium lysine level (ML; 11.9 g/kg); 2) alternation of diets with high (HL) and low (LL) lysine levels; 3) alternation of ML and LL diets, where LL = 70%, ML = 100%, HL = 130% of standard lysine level. The Pectoralis major muscles were sampled after 2 wk of cyclic feeding. Measurements included the expression patterns of 6 genes involved in proteolysis, and mammalian target of rapamycin and Forkhead box-O transcription factor (FoxO) signaling. Cathepsin B, m-calpain, and E3 ubiquitin ligases Muscle Ring Finger-1 and Muscle Atrophy F box were significantly overexpressed in chickens transiently fed the LL diet, whereas the mRNA levels of 20S proteasome C2 subunit and ubiquitin remained unchanged. Modifications of E3 ubiquitin ligase expression can be partly explained by significant changes in FoxO phosphorylation with cyclic dietary treatments. Our results suggest timing-sensitive regulation of proteolysis in chicken muscle according to dietary treatment and a high metabolism capacity to compensate for changes in amino acid supply, which might be used for nutritional purposes.

  13. Human platelet calmodulin-binding proteins: identification and Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent proteolysis upon platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.W.; Tallant, E.A.; McManus, M.C.

    1987-05-19

    Calmodulin-binding proteins have been identified in human platelets by using Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-calmodulin. Ten distinct proteins of 245, 225, 175, 150, 90, 82 (2), 60, and 41 (2) kilodaltons (kDa) bound /sup 125/I-calmodulin in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner; the binding was blocked by ethylene glycol bis(..beta..-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), trifluoperazine, and nonradiolabeled calmodulin. Proteins of 225 and 90 kDa were labeled by antisera against myosin light chain kinase; 60- and 82-kDa proteins were labeled by antisera against the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase and caldesmon, respectively. The remaining calmodulin-binding proteins have not been identified. Calmodulin-binding proteins were degraded upon addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ to a platelet homogenate; the degradation could be blocked by either EGTA, leupeptin, or N-ethylmaleimide which suggests that the degradation was due to a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent protease. Activation of intact platelets by thrombin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, and collagen under conditions which promote platelet aggregation also resulted in limited proteolysis of calmodulin-binding proteins including those labeled with antisera against myosin light chain kinase and the calmodulin-dependent phosphatase. Activation by the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophores A23187 and ionomycin also promoted degradation of the calmodulin-binding proteins in the presence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The data indicate that limited proteolysis of Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes also occurs in the intact platelet and suggest that the proteolysis is triggered by an influx of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ associated with platelet aggregation.

  14. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    PubMed

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state.

  15. The maturational disassembly and differential proteolysis of paralogous vitellogenins in a marine pelagophil teleost: a conserved mechanism of oocyte hydration.

    PubMed

    Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2007-06-01

    A structural analysis of the differential proteolysis of vitellogenin (Vtg)-derived yolk proteins in the maturing oocytes of a marine teleost that spawns very large pelagic eggs is presented. Two full-length hepatic cDNAs (hhvtgAa and hhvtgAb) encoding paralogous vitellogenins (HhvtgAa and HhvtgAb) were cloned from nonestrogenized Atlantic halibut, and the N-termini of their subdomain structures were mapped to the oocyte and egg yolk proteins (Yps). The maturational oocyte Yp degradation products were further mapped to the free amino acid (FAA) pool in the ovulated egg. The deduced amino acid sequences conformed to the linear NH(2)-(LvH-Pv-LvL-beta'-CT)-COO(-) structure of complete teleost Vtgs. However, the Yps did not match the expected cleavage products of complete Vtgs. Specifically, the phosvitin subdomain of the HhvtgAa paralogue remains covalently attached to the lipovitellin light chain, while the phosvitin subdomain of the HhvtgAb paralogue remains covalently attached to a C-terminal fragment of the lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH). During oocyte hydration, the LvH of the HhvtgAa paralogue is disassembled and extensively degraded to FAA. In the HhvtgAb paralogue, the LvH is nicked in the C-sheet in a manner similar to that seen in lamprey and other teleosts. A small part of the C-terminal end of the LvH-Ab undergoes proteolysis to FAA, together with the phosvitin, beta' component, and much ( approximately 65%) of the lipovitellin light chain (LvL-Ab). The independently measured FAA pool in the ovulated egg corroborates that calculated from differential proteolysis of the Yps. Based on the 3:1 (HhvtgAb:HhvtgAa) Yp expression ratio, each paralogue contributes approximately equal amounts of FAA to the organic osmolyte pool of the hydrating oocyte during maturation.

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation.

  17. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  18. Regulated proteolysis of the alternative sigma factor SigX in Streptococcus mutans: implication in the escape from competence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SigX (σX), the alternative sigma factor of Streptococcus mutans, is the key regulator for transcriptional activation of late competence genes essential for taking up exogenous DNA. Recent studies reveal that adaptor protein MecA and the protease ClpC act as negative regulators of competence by a mechanism that involves MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX by the ClpC in S. mutans. However, the molecular detail how MecA and ClpC negatively regulate competence in this species remains to be determined. Here, we provide evidence that adaptor protein MecA targets SigX for degradation by the protease complex ClpC/ClpP when S. mutans is grown in a complex medium. Results By analyzing the cellular levels of SigX, we demonstrate that the synthesis of SigX is transiently induced by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), but the SigX is rapidly degraded during the escape from competence. A deletion of MecA, ClpC or ClpP results in the cellular accumulation of SigX and a prolonged competence state, while an overexpression of MecA enhances proteolysis of SigX and accelerates the escape from competence. In vitro protein-protein interaction assays confirm that MecA interacts with SigX via its N-terminal domain (NTD1–82) and with ClpC via its C-terminal domain (CTD123–240). Such an interaction mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex, triggering the ATP-dependent degradation of SigX in the presence of ClpP. A deletion of the N-terminal or C-terminal domain of MecA abolishes its binding to SigX or ClpC. We have also found that MecA-regulated proteolysis of SigX appears to be ineffective when S. mutans is grown in a chemically defined medium (CDM), suggesting the possibility that an unknown mechanism may be involved in negative regulation of MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX under this condition. Conclusion Adaptor protein MecA in S. mutans plays a crucial role in recognizing and targeting SigX for degradation by the protease ClpC/ClpP. Thus, Mec

  19. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  20. Rate and extent of pH decline affect proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins and water-holding capacity in pork.

    PubMed

    Bee, Giuseppe; Anderson, Abbey L; Lonergan, Steven M; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which early postmortem (PM) pH decline influences proteolysis of the intermediate filament protein desmin, the costameric proteins vinculin and talin and autolysis of μ-calpain in the longissimus muscle (LM) of pigs from two genetic lines. Based on the LM 3h pH (H=3h pH of LM>6.0; L=3h pH of LM pH<5.7) PM, 10 carcasses per line and pH group were selected. The average 3h pH within pH group was 6.23 (H) and 5.44 (L). The LM samples were collected 24, 48, 72, and 120h PM and percent drip loss was measured after 1, 2, and 4d of storage. Samples collected at 24, 48, 72, and 120h PM were used to monitor desmin, vinculin, and talin degradation and samples collected at 24h PM were used to determine the extent of μ-calpain autolysis by immunoblotting. Higher (P<0.01) pH values at 45min, 6h, and 24h PM and lower (P<0.01) drip losses after 1, 2, and 4d of storage were recorded in the H-compared to the L-group. Abundance of the 76kDa μ-calpain autolysis product was greater (P<0.01), proteolysis of talin at all measured time points and proteolysis of desmin after 24 and 48h PM was greater (P⩽0.03) in the H-group than in the L-group. The current findings indicate activation rate of μ-calpain may be associated with proteolysis of desmin and talin and could play a role in the development of drip loss. The rate of early PM pH decline can partly explain the variation of desmin and talin degradation by affecting the activation of μ-calpain.

  1. Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Patrick C; Patel, Kevin M; Gomez, Timothy M

    2017-02-08

    , and may identify areas of therapeutic intervention in disease or injury. One important signal that controls growth cones is that of local Ca(2+) transients, which control the rate and direction of axon outgrowth. We demonstrate here that Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition axon outgrowth and guidance is mediated by calpain proteolysis of the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into Ca(2+)/calpain regulation of growth cone motility and axon guidance during neuronal development.

  2. Identification of the domains of neuronal nitric oxide synthase by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, P N; Smith, D; Stammers, D K; Riveros-Moreno, V; Moncada, S; Charles, I; Boyhan, A

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (EC 1.14.13.39) binds arginine and NADPH as substrates, and FAD, FMN, tetrahydrobiopterin, haem and calmodulin as cofactors. The protein consists of a central calmodulin-binding sequence flanked on the N-terminal side by a haem-binding region, analogous to cytochrome P-450, and on the C-terminal side by a region homologous with NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase. The structure of recombinant rat brain nitric oxide synthase was analysed by limited proteolyis. The products were identified by using antibodies to defined sequences, and by N-terminal sequencing. Low concentrations of trypsin produced three fragments, similar to those in a previous report [Sheta, McMillan and Masters (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15147-15153]: that of Mr approx. 135000 (N-terminus Gly-221) resulted from loss of the N-terminal extension (residues 1-220) unique to neuronal nitric oxide synthase. The fragments of Mr 90000 (haem region) and 80000 (reductase region, N-terminus Ala-728) were produced by cleavage within the calmodulin-binding region. With more extensive trypsin treatment, these species were shown to be transient, and three smaller, highly stable fragments of Mr 14000 (N-terminus Leu-744 within the calmodulin region), 60000 (N-terminus Gly-221) and 63000 (N-terminus Lys-856 within the FMN domain) were formed. The species of Mr approx. 60000 represents a domain retaining haem and nitroarginine binding. The two species of Mr 63000 and 14000 remain associated as a complex. This complex retains cytochrome c reductase activity, and thus is the complete reductase region, yet cleaved at Lys-856. This cleavage occurs within a sequence insertion relative to the FMN domain present in inducible nitric oxide synthase. Prolonged proteolysis treatment led to the production of a protein of Mr approx. 53000 (N-terminus Ala-953), corresponding to a cleavage between the FMN and FAD domains. The major products after chymotryptic digestion were similar to those with trypsin

  3. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinzhong; Wan, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Lei, Xiling; Niu, Qi; Jiang, Lanxin; Passtoors, Willemijn M; Zang, Aiping; Fraering, Patrick C; Wu, Fang

    2017-04-01

    Deregulation of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has recently been demonstrated to predominately promote survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells. Intramembrane proteolysis mediated by presenilin/γ-secretase is known to regulate the homeostasis of some RTKs. In the present study, we demonstrate that AXL, but not TYRO3 or MERTK, is efficiently and sequentially cleaved by α- and γ-secretases in various types of cancer cell lines. Proteolytic processing of AXL redirected signaling toward a secretase-mediated pathway, away from the classic, well-known, ligand-dependent canonical RTK signaling pathway. The AXL intracellular domain cleavage product, but not full-length AXL, was further shown to translocate into the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence that harbored a basic HRRKK motif. Of interest, we found that the γ-secretase-uncleavable AXL mutant caused an elevated chemoresistance in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that AXL can undergo sequential processing mediated by various proteases kept in a homeostatic balance. This newly discovered post-translational processing of AXL may provide an explanation for the diverse functions of AXL, especially in the context of drug resistance in cancer cells.-Lu, Y., Wan, J., Yang, Z., Lei, X., Niu, Q., Jiang, L., Passtoors, W. M., Zang, A., Fraering, P. C., Wu, F. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  4. Controlled Biodegradation of Self-Assembling β-hairpin Peptide Hydrogels by Proteolysis with Matrix Metalloproteinase-13

    PubMed Central

    Giano, Michael C.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled biodegradation specific to matrix metalloproteinase-13 was incorporated into the design of self-assembling β-hairpin peptide hydrogels. Degrading Peptides (DP peptides) are a series of five peptides that have varying proteolytic susceptibilities towards MMP-13. These peptides undergo environmentally triggered folding and self-assembly under physiologically relevant conditions (150 mM NaCl, pH 7.6) to form self supporting hydrogels. In the presence of enzyme, gels prepared from distinct peptides are degraded at rates that differ according to the primary sequence of the single peptide comprising the gel. Material degradation was monitored by oscillatory shear rheology over the course of 14 days, where overall degradation of the gels vary from 5% to 70%. Degradation products were analyzed by HPLC and identified by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. This data shows that proteolysis of the parent peptides constituting each gel occurs at the intended sequence location. DP hydrogels show specificity to MMP-13 and are only minimally cleaved by matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), another common enzyme present during tissue injury. In vitro migration assays performed with SW1353 cells show that migration rates through each gel differs according to peptide sequence, which is consistent with the proteolysis studies using exogenous MMP-13. PMID:21683437

  5. Effect of monoclonal antibodies on limited proteolysis of native glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Pereira, L.; Hampar, B.; Zweig, M.; Cohen, G.H.

    1982-02-01

    We examined the properties of 17 monoclonal antibodies to glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) (gD-1) and HSV-2 (gD-2). The antibodies recognized eight separate determinants of gD, based on differences in radioimmuno-precipitation and neutralization assays. The determinants were distributed as follows: three were gD-1 specific, one was gD-2 specific, and four were type common. Several type-specific and type-common determinants appeared to be involved in neutralization. We developed a procedure for examining the effect that binding of monoclonal antibody has on proteolysis of native gD-1 by Staphylococcus aureus protease V8. We showed that several different patterns of protease V8 cleavage were obtained, depending on the monoclonal antibody used. The proteolysis patterns were generally consistent with the immunological groupings. With four groups of antibodies, we found that fragments of gD-1 remained bound to antibody after V8 treatment. A 38,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies in three different groups of monoclonal antibodies. This fragment appeared to contain one type-common and two type-specific determinants. A 12,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies belonging to one type-common group of monoclonal antibodies. Tryptic peptide analysis revealed that the 12,000-dalton fragment represented a portion of the 38,000-dalton fragment and was enriched in a type-common arginine tryptic peptide.

  6. The role of proteosome-mediated proteolysis in modulating potentially harmful transcription factor activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bonzanni, Nicola; Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G.; Fisher, Jasmin

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: The appropriate modulation of the stress response to variable environmental conditions is necessary to maintain sustained viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Particularly, controlling the abundance of proteins that may have detrimental effects on cell growth is crucial for rapid recovery from stress-induced quiescence. Results: Prompted by qualitative modeling of the nutrient starvation response in yeast, we investigated in vivo the effect of proteolysis after nutrient starvation showing that, for the Gis1 transcription factor at least, proteasome-mediated control is crucial for a rapid return to growth. Additional bioinformatics analyses show that potentially toxic transcriptional regulators have a significantly lower protein half-life, a higher fraction of unstructured regions and more potential PEST motifs than the non-detrimental ones. Furthermore, inhibiting proteasome activity tends to increase the expression of genes induced during the Environmental Stress Response more than those in the rest of the genome. Our combined results suggest that proteasome-mediated proteolysis of potentially toxic transcription factors tightly modulates the stress response in yeast. Contact: jasmin.fisher@microsoft.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21685082

  7. Vaccinia virus A12L protein and its AG/A proteolysis play an important role in viral morphogenic transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su Jung; Hruby, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Like the major vaccinia virus (VV) core protein precursors, p4b and p25K, the 25 kDa VV A12L late gene product (p17K) is proteolytically maturated at the conserved Ala-Gly-Ala motif. However, the association of the precursor and its cleavage product with the core of mature virion suggests that both of the A12L proteins may be required for virus assembly. Here, in order to test the requirement of the A12L protein and its proteolysis in viral replication, a conditional lethal mutant virus (vvtetOA12L) was constructed to regulate A12L expression by the presence or absence of an inducer, tetracycline. In the absence of tetracycline, replication of vvtetOA12L was inhibited by 80% and this inhibition could be overcome by transient expression of the wild-type copy of the A12L gene. In contrast, mutation of the AG/A site abrogated the ability of the transfected A12L gene to rescue, indicating that A12L proteolysis plays an important role in viral replication. Electron microscopy analysis of the A12L deficient virus demonstrated the aberrant virus particles, which were displayed by the AG/A site mutation. Thus, we concluded that the not only A12L protein but also its cleavage processing plays an essential role in virus morphogenic transition. PMID:17625005

  8. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yinzhong; Wan, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Lei, Xiling; Niu, Qi; Jiang, Lanxin; Passtoors, Willemijn M.; Zang, Aiping; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Deregulation of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has recently been demonstrated to predominately promote survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells. Intramembrane proteolysis mediated by presenilin/γ-secretase is known to regulate the homeostasis of some RTKs. In the present study, we demonstrate that AXL, but not TYRO3 or MERTK, is efficiently and sequentially cleaved by α- and γ-secretases in various types of cancer cell lines. Proteolytic processing of AXL redirected signaling toward a secretase-mediated pathway, away from the classic, well-known, ligand-dependent canonical RTK signaling pathway. The AXL intracellular domain cleavage product, but not full-length AXL, was further shown to translocate into the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence that harbored a basic HRRKK motif. Of interest, we found that the γ-secretase–uncleavable AXL mutant caused an elevated chemoresistance in non–small-cell lung cancer cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that AXL can undergo sequential processing mediated by various proteases kept in a homeostatic balance. This newly discovered post-translational processing of AXL may provide an explanation for the diverse functions of AXL, especially in the context of drug resistance in cancer cells.—Lu, Y., Wan, J., Yang, Z., Lei, X., Niu, Q., Jiang, L., Passtoors, W. M., Zang, A., Fraering, P. C., Wu, F. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells. PMID:28034848

  9. Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is involved in the response to flooding stress in soybean roots, independent of oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis plays an important role in the response to several environmental stresses. Here, we described the relationship of the proteolysis in the flooding stress in soybean (Glycine max L. cultivar Enrei). Immunoblot analyses were performed using antibodies against two subunits of 26S proteasome, Rpt5 and Rpn10, 20S proteasome and two subunits of COP9 signalosome (CSN), CSN4 and CSN5, to compare between flooded and untreated roots. We also examined their protein amounts in the condition of low oxygen. Moreover, crude extracts from flooded or untreated roots incubated with or without a proteasome inhibitor MG132 were analyzed by proteomics technique. We revealed that the amount of ubiquitinated proteins in soybean roots decreased after flooding treatment and increased to levels similar to controls after de-submergence. Both CSN4 and CSN5 accumulated following flooding treatment, although no significant difference was observed in proteasome. Low oxygen had no effect on the amount of ubiquitinated proteins or CSN4. By 2D-PAGE, the amount of 6 proteins changed significantly following MG132 treatment in flooding stressed plants. We conclude that the accumulation of CSN proteins might enhance the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins independent of hypoxia caused by flooding, thereby lowering their abundance during flooding stress.

  10. The Vip3Ag4 Insecticidal Protoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis Adopts A Tetrameric Configuration That Is Maintained on Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Palma, Leopoldo; Scott, David J; Harris, Gemma; Din, Salah-Ud; Williams, Thomas L; Roberts, Oliver J; Young, Mark T; Caballero, Primitivo; Berry, Colin

    2017-05-14

    The Vip3 proteins produced during vegetative growth by strains of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis show insecticidal activity against lepidopteran insects with a mechanism of action that may involve pore formation and apoptosis. These proteins are promising supplements to our arsenal of insecticidal proteins, but the molecular details of their activity are not understood. As a first step in the structural characterisation of these proteins, we have analysed their secondary structure and resolved the surface topology of a tetrameric complex of the Vip3Ag4 protein by transmission electron microscopy. Sites sensitive to proteolysis by trypsin are identified and the trypsin-cleaved protein appears to retain a similar structure as an octomeric complex comprising four copies each of the ~65 kDa and ~21 kDa products of proteolysis. This processed form of the toxin may represent the active toxin. The quality and monodispersity of the protein produced in this study make Vip3Ag4 a candidate for more detailed structural analysis using cryo-electron microscopy.

  11. Digestive fate of dietary carrageenan: Evidence of interference with digestive proteolysis and disruption of gut epithelial function.

    PubMed

    Fahoum, Lulu; Moscovici, Alice; David, Shlomit; Shaoul, Ron; Rozen, Geila; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G; Lesmes, Uri

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to interrogate two mechanisms by which commercial Carrageenans (E407) (CGN) may adversely affect human health: (i) Through modification of gastric proteolysis and (ii) Through affecting gut epithelial structure and function. Three commercial CGN samples with distinct zeta-potentials (stable at the pH range of 3-7 and varied with physiological levels of CaCl2 ) were mixed with milk, soy or egg protein isolates, then subjected to a semi-dynamic in vitro digestion model and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. This revealed varying levels of interference with gastric digestive proteolysis and a significant decrease in pepsin activity. Further, a Caco-2 cell model was used to explore various effects of physiologically digested CGN (pdCGN) on various epithelial cell functions and characteristics. Samples of pdCGN (0.005-0.5 mg/mL) affected the epithelial barrier function, including redistribution of the tight-junction protein Zonula Occludens (Zo)-1, changes in cellular F-actin architecture and increased monolayer permeability to the transfer of macromolecules. Moreover, pdCGN induced elevation in the levels of the pro-inflammatory IL-8 receptor CXCR1. This work raises the possibility that CGN may reduce protein and peptide bioaccessibility, disrupt normal epithelial function, promote intestinal inflammation, and consequently compromise consumer health. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Vip3Ag4 Insecticidal Protoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis Adopts A Tetrameric Configuration That Is Maintained on Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Leopoldo; Scott, David J.; Harris, Gemma; Din, Salah-Ud; Williams, Thomas L.; Roberts, Oliver J.; Young, Mark T.; Caballero, Primitivo; Berry, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Vip3 proteins produced during vegetative growth by strains of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis show insecticidal activity against lepidopteran insects with a mechanism of action that may involve pore formation and apoptosis. These proteins are promising supplements to our arsenal of insecticidal proteins, but the molecular details of their activity are not understood. As a first step in the structural characterisation of these proteins, we have analysed their secondary structure and resolved the surface topology of a tetrameric complex of the Vip3Ag4 protein by transmission electron microscopy. Sites sensitive to proteolysis by trypsin are identified and the trypsin-cleaved protein appears to retain a similar structure as an octomeric complex comprising four copies each of the ~65 kDa and ~21 kDa products of proteolysis. This processed form of the toxin may represent the active toxin. The quality and monodispersity of the protein produced in this study make Vip3Ag4 a candidate for more detailed structural analysis using cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:28505109

  13. Substrate Recognition by the Cdh1 Destruction Box Receptor Is a General Requirement for APC/CCdh1-mediated Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Guimarães, Dimitrius Santiago P S F; Melesse, Michael; Hall, Mark C

    2016-07-22

    The anaphase-promoting complex, or cyclosome (APC/C), is a ubiquitin ligase that selectively targets proteins for degradation in mitosis and the G1 phase and is an important component of the eukaryotic cell cycle control system. How the APC/C specifically recognizes its substrates is not fully understood. Although well characterized degron motifs such as the destruction box (D-box) and KEN-box are commonly found in APC/C substrates, many substrates apparently lack these motifs. A variety of alternative APC/C degrons have been reported, suggesting either that multiple modes of substrate recognition are possible or that our definitions of degron structure are incomplete. We used an in vivo yeast assay to compare the G1 degradation rate of 15 known substrates of the APC/C co-activator Cdh1 under normal conditions and conditions that impair binding of D-box, KEN-box, and the recently identified ABBA motif degrons to Cdh1. The D-box receptor was required for efficient proteolysis of all Cdh1 substrates, despite the absence of canonical D-boxes in many. In contrast, the KEN-box receptor was only required for normal proteolysis of a subset of substrates and the ABBA motif receptor for a single substrate in our system. Our results suggest that binding to the D-box receptor may be a shared requirement for recognition and processing of all Cdh1 substrates.

  14. Quantitative characterization of the mechanism of action and impact of a 'proteolysis-permitting' anti-PCSK9 antibody.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan J; Berna, Michael J; Sperry, Andrea E; Beyer, Thomas P; Wroblewski, Victor J; Schroeder, Krista M; Eacho, Patrick I

    A recent report described a novel mechanism of action for an anti-proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibody (LY3015014, or LY), wherein the antibody has improved potency and duration of action due to the PCSK9 epitope for LY binding. Unlike other antibodies, proteolysis of PCSK9 can occur when LY is bound to PCSK9. We hypothesized that this allowance of PCSK9 cleavage potentially improves LY efficiency through two pathways, namely lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 and reduced clearance of LY. A quantitative modeling approach is necessary to further understand this novel mechanism of action. We developed a mechanism-based model to characterize the relationship between antibody pharmacokinetics, PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol levels in animals, and used the model to better understand the underlying drivers for the improved efficiency of LY. Simulations suggested that the allowance of cleavage of PCSK9 resulting in a lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 is the major driver of the improved potency and durability of LY. The modeling reveals that this novel 'proteolysis-permitting' mechanism of LY is a means by which an efficient antibody can be developed with a total antibody dosing rate that is lower than the target production rate. We expect this engineering approach may be applicable to other targets and that the mathematical models presented herein will be useful in evaluating similar approaches.

  15. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations: relationship between calcium chelation and proteolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette; Brayden, David J; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Buckley, Stephen T

    2014-04-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation activity was developed and verified experimentally using an ion-selective electrode. The effects of CA, its salt (citrate, Cit) and the established permeation enhancer, lauroyl carnitine chloride (LCC) were compared by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of insulin and FD4 across Caco-2 monolayers and rat small intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Proteolytic degradation of insulin was determined in rat luminal extracts across a range of pH values in the presence of CA. CA's capacity to chelate calcium decreased ~10-fold for each pH unit moving from pH 6 to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral bioavailability since this is a weak property of CA.

  16. Composition, proteolysis indices and coagulating properties of ewe milk as affected by bulk tank somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Martí-De Olives, Ana; Navarro-Ríos, María Jesús; Rubert-Alemán, Joaquín; Fernández, Nemesio; Molina, Maria Pilar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ovine bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) on composition, proteose-peptone (p-p) content and casein fractions as indicating parameters for proteolysis and coagulating properties of milk. A total of 97 samples of bulk tank milk from Manchega breed ewe flocks were grouped according to somatic cell count (SCC) into four classes: fewer than 500,000 cells/ml, from 500,000 to 10,00000 cells/ml, from 10,00000 to 15,00000 and more than 15,00000 cells/ml. The casein : protein ratio and lactose content decreased with BTSCC. Proteolysis increased with BTSCC, causing a drop in β-casein and an increase in the γ-caseins from a concentration of 500,000 cells/ml. Regarding coagulation behaviour, the rennet clotting time (RCT) and firming time (k20) rose from 10,00000-15,00000 cells/ml of milk. The results showed that the impairment of milk quality and milk ability to make cheese as affected by intramammary infection (IMI) can be inferred from the bulk tank milk of flocks with poor udder health.

  17. Quantitative characterization of the mechanism of action and impact of a ‘proteolysis-permitting’ anti-PCSK9 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ryan J.; Berna, Michael J.; Sperry, Andrea E.; Schroeder, Krista M.; Eacho, Patrick I.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recent report described a novel mechanism of action for an anti-proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibody (LY3015014, or LY), wherein the antibody has improved potency and duration of action due to the PCSK9 epitope for LY binding. Unlike other antibodies, proteolysis of PCSK9 can occur when LY is bound to PCSK9. We hypothesized that this allowance of PCSK9 cleavage potentially improves LY efficiency through two pathways, namely lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 and reduced clearance of LY. A quantitative modeling approach is necessary to further understand this novel mechanism of action. We developed a mechanism-based model to characterize the relationship between antibody pharmacokinetics, PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol levels in animals, and used the model to better understand the underlying drivers for the improved efficiency of LY. Simulations suggested that the allowance of cleavage of PCSK9 resulting in a lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 is the major driver of the improved potency and durability of LY. The modeling reveals that this novel ‘proteolysis-permitting’ mechanism of LY is a means by which an efficient antibody can be developed with a total antibody dosing rate that is lower than the target production rate. We expect this engineering approach may be applicable to other targets and that the mathematical models presented herein will be useful in evaluating similar approaches. PMID:27981884

  18. Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a is required for CD74 intramembrane proteolysis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Kruchen, Anne; Fluhrer, Regina; Müller, Ingo; Saftig, Paul; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Martin, Christa L; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The invariant chain (CD74) mediates targeting of the MHCII complex to endosomal compartments, where CD74 undergoes degradation allowing MHCII to acquire peptides. We demonstrated recently that intramembrane proteolysis of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is catalysed by Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) and that this process is indispensable for development and function of B lymphocytes in mice. In SPPL2a−/− mice, homeostasis of these cells is disturbed by the accumulation of the unprocessed CD74 NTF. So far, evidence for this essential role of SPPL2a is restricted to mice. Nevertheless, inhibition of SPPL2a has been suggested as novel approach to target B cells for treating autoimmunity. Here, we characterize human B cell lines with a homozygous microdeletion on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that this deletion disrupts the SPPL2a genomic locus and leads to loss of SPPL2a transcript. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with this deletion exhibit absence of SPPL2a at the protein level and show an accumulation of the CD74 NTF comparable to B cells from SPPL2a−/− mice. By this means, we present evidence that the role of SPPL2a in CD74 proteolysis is conserved in human B cells and provide support for modulation of SPPL2a activity as a therapeutic concept. PMID:25035924

  19. Effect of pulsed electric field on the proteolysis of cold boned beef M. Longissimus lumborum and M. Semimembranosus.

    PubMed

    Suwandy, Via; Carne, Alan; van de Ven, Remy; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) and ageing (3, 7, 14 and 21 days) on the shear force, protein profile, and post-mortem proteolysis of beef loins (M. Longissimus lumborum, LL) and topsides (M. Semimembranosus, SM) were investigated using a range of pulsed electric field treatments [voltages (5 and 10 kV) and frequencies (20, 50, and 90 Hz)]. PEF treatment decreased the shear force of beef LL and SM muscles by up to 19%. The reduction in the shear force in the LL was not affected by the treatment intensity whereas the reduction in the SM was dependent on PEF frequency. PEF treated beef loins showed increased proteolysis, both early post-mortem and during subsequent post-mortem storage reflected by increased degradation of troponin-T and desmin. The most prominent troponin-T degradation was found in samples treated with 5 kV-90 Hz, 10 kV-20 Hz at day 3 and day 7 post-treatment in addition to 10 kV-50 Hz in subsequent post-treatment times. The degradation of desmin in PEF treated beef loins increased with ageing time.

  20. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis.

  1. Impact of chymosin- and plasmin-mediated primary proteolysis on the growth and biochemical activities of lactobacilli in miniature Cheddar-type cheeses.

    PubMed

    Milesi, M M; McSweeney, P L H; Hynes, E R

    2008-09-01

    Strongly proteolytic starters seem to improve the growth of nonstarter lactobacilli during cheese ripening, but no information is available on the impact of the nonmicrobial proteases usually active in cheese on their development. In the current study, the influence of chymosin- and plasmin-mediated proteolysis on the growth and biochemical activities of lactobacilli during ripening of miniature Cheddar-type cheeses, manufactured under controlled microbiological conditions, was studied. Two experiments were performed; in the first, residual chymosin activity was inhibited by the addition of pepstatin, and in the second, plasmin activity was increased by adding more enzyme, obtained in vitro through the activation of plasminogen induced by urokinase. Cheeses with or without a Lactobacillus plantarum I91 adjunct culture and with or without added pepstatin or plasmin solution were manufactured and ripened for 60 d. The addition of the adjunct culture resulted in enhancement of secondary proteolysis, evidenced by an increase in the total content of free amino acids (FAA) and modifications of the individual FAA profiles. Reduction in residual chymosin activity caused a decrease in primary and secondary proteolysis, characterized by the absence of alpha(s1)-casein hydrolysis and reduced production of peptides and FAA, respectively. The increase in plasmin activity accelerated primary proteolysis but no enhancement of secondary proteolysis was observed. Chymosin- and plasmin-mediated proteolysis did not influence the growth and biochemical activities of adventitious or adjunct lactobacilli, indicating that it is not a limiting factor for the development and proteolytic-peptidolytic activities of lactobacilli in the cheese model studied.

  2. A RelA-dependent two-tiered regulated proteolysis cascade controls synthesis of a contact-dependent intercellular signal in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-04-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of precursor proteins to generate intercellular signals is a common mechanism in all cells. In Myxococcus xanthus the contact-dependent intercellular C-signal is a 17 kDa protein (p17) generated by proteolytic cleavage of the 25 kDa csgA protein (p25), and is essential for starvation-induced fruiting body formation. p25 accumulates in the outer membrane and PopC, the protease that cleaves p25, in the cytoplasm of vegetative cells. PopC is secreted in response to starvation, therefore, restricting p25 cleavage to starving cells. We focused on identifying proteins critical for PopC secretion in response to starvation. PopC secretion depends on the (p)ppGpp synthase RelA and the stringent response, and is regulated post-translationally. PopD, which is encoded in an operon with PopC, forms a soluble complex with PopC and inhibits PopC secretion whereas the integral membrane AAA+ protease FtsH(D) is required for PopC secretion. Biochemical and genetic evidence suggest that in response to starvation, RelA is activated and induces the degradation of PopD thereby releasing pre-formed PopC for secretion and that FtsH(D) is important for PopD degradation. Hence, regulated PopC secretion depends on regulated proteolysis. Accordingly, p17 synthesis depends on a proteolytic cascade including FtsH(D) -dependent degradation of PopD and PopC-dependent cleavage of p25.

  3. The Putative O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase SPINDLY Inhibits Class I TCP Proteolysis to Promote Sensitivity to Cytokinin1

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Evyatar; Livne, Sivan; Kobinson-Katz, Tammy; Tal, Lior; Pri-Tal, Oded; Mueller, Bruno; Tarkowski, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SPINDLY (SPY) is a putative serine and threonine O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT). While SPY has been shown to suppress gibberellin signaling and to promote cytokinin (CK) responses, its catalytic OGT activity was never demonstrated and its effect on protein fate is not known. We previously showed that SPY interacts physically and functionally with TCP14 and TCP15 to promote CK responses. Here, we aimed to identify how SPY regulates TCP14/15 activities and how these TCPs promote CK responses. We show that SPY activity is required for TCP14 stability. Mutation in the putative OGT domain of SPY (spy-3) stimulated TCP14 proteolysis by the 26S proteasome, which was reversed by mutation in CULLIN1 (CUL1), suggesting a role for SKP, CUL1, F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in TCP14 proteolysis. TCP14 proteolysis in spy-3 suppressed all TCP14 misexpression phenotypes, including the enhanced CK responses. The increased CK activity in TCP14/15-overexpressing flowers resulted from increased sensitivity to the hormone and not from higher CK levels. TCP15 overexpression enhanced the response of the CK-induced synthetic promoter pTCS to CK, suggesting that TCP14/15 affect early steps in CK signaling. We propose that posttranslational modification of TCP14/15 by SPY inhibits their proteolysis and that the accumulated proteins promote the activity of the CK phosphorelay cascade in developing Arabidopsis leaves and flowers. PMID:27208284

  4. Reducing fat levels in cheddar-like goat cheese: impact on proteolysis and rheological properties over 6 months of refrigerated storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of low-fat goat cheeses that appeal to health conscious consumers requires information on how the reduction of fat affects the quality traits of the cheese, such as its proteolysis and rheology. Goat milk samples containing 3.6, 2.0, 1.0, and <0.5% fat were processed into full-fat (F...

  5. Proteasome-mediated Proteolysis of the Polyglutamine-expanded Androgen Receptor Is a Late Event in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (SBMA) Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Erin M.; Berger, Tamar R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R.; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a “toxic fragment” that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis. PMID:25795778

  6. Proteasome-mediated proteolysis of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor is a late event in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heine, Erin M; Berger, Tamar R; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E

    2015-05-15

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a "toxic fragment" that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis.

  7. Limited proteolysis and peptide mapping for comparability of biopharmaceuticals: An evaluation of repeatability, intra-assay precision and capability to detect structural change.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Camille; Burkitt, Will; Perraud, Xavier; O'Hara, John; Jone, Carl

    2016-05-10

    The use of limited proteolysis followed by peptide mapping for the comparability of the higher-order structure of biopharmaceuticals was investigated. In this approach the proteolysis is performed under non-reducing and non-denaturing conditions, and the resulting peptide map is determined by the samples primary and higher order structures. This allows comparability of biopharmaceuticals to be made in terms of their higher order structure, using a method that is relatively simple to implement. The digestion of a monoclonal antibody under non-denaturing conditions was analyzed using peptide mapping, circular dichroism (CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This allowed an optimal digestion time to be chosen. This method was then assessed for its ability to detect structural change using a monoclonal antibody, which had been subjected to a range of stresses; deglycosylation, mild denaturation and a batch that had failed specifications due to in-process reduction. The repeatability and inter-assay precision were assessed. It was demonstrated that the limited proteolysis peptide maps of the three stressed samples were significantly different to control samples and that the differences observed were consistent between the occasions when the assays were run. A combination of limited proteolysis and CD or SDS-PAGE analysis was shown to enhance the capacity of these techniques to detect structural change, which otherwise would not have been observed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Causal Relationship between Microbial Ecology Dynamics and Proteolysis during Manufacture and Ripening of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Cheese Canestrato Pugliese

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. PMID:24771032

  9. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  10. High-pressure improves enzymatic proteolysis and the release of peptides with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities from lentil proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Mora, P; Peñas, E; Frias, J; Gomez, R; Martinez-Villaluenga, C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides are receiving attention due to their beneficial effects in the prevention/treatment of hypertension. The objective was to explore the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HP) on proteolysis by different proteases and the release of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins. Pressurisation (100-300 MPa) enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of Protamex, Savinase and Corolase 7089 compared to Alcalase. Proteolysis at 300 MPa led to a complete degradation of lentil proteins and increased peptide (<3 kDa) concentration by all enzymes. Proteolysis at 300 MPa by Savinase gave rise to lentil hydrolysates (S300) with the highest ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities that were retained upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The peptides responsible for the multifunctional properties of S300 hydrolysate were identified as different fragments from storage proteins and the allergen Len c 1. These results support the potential of HP as a technology for the cost-effective production of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins during enzymatic proteolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Immobilization of trypsin on poly(urea-formaldehyde)-coated fiberglass cores in microchip for highly efficient proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huizhi; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-08-01

    Trypsin was covalently immobilized on poly(urea-formaldehyde)-coated fiberglass cores based on the condensation reaction between poly(urea-formaldehyde) and trypsin for efficient microfluidic proteolysis in this work. Prior to use, a piece of the trypsin-immobilized fiber was inserted into the main channel of a microchip under a magnifier to form a core-changeable bioreactor. Because trypsin was not permanently immobilized on the channel wall, the novel bioreactor was regenerable. Two standard proteins, hemoglobin (HEM) and lysozyme (LYS), were digested by the unique bioreactor to demonstrate its feasibility and performance. The interaction time between the flowing proteins and the immobilized trypsin was evaluated to be less than 10 s. The peptides in the digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS to obtain PMF. The results indicated that digestion performance of the microfluidic bioreactor was better than that of 12-h in-solution digestion.

  12. Impact of pasteurization of human milk on preterm newborn in vitro digestion: Gastrointestinal disintegration, lipolysis and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; Bellanger, Amandine; Henry, Gwénaële; Rousseau, Florence; Dirson, Emelyne; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie

    2016-11-15

    Human milk feeding is an important recommendation for preterm newborns considering their vulnerability and digestive immaturity. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30min) applied in milk banks modifies its biological quality and its microstructure. We investigated the impact of pasteurization of preterm human milk on its gastrointestinal kinetics of lipolysis, proteolysis and structural disintegration. An in vitro dynamic system was set up to simulate the gastrointestinal digestion of preterm newborns. A pool of preterm human milk was digested as raw or after Holder pasteurization. Pasteurization impacted the microstructure of undigested human milk, its gastrointestinal disintegration and tended to limit the intestinal lipolysis. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of some fatty acids was decreased by pasteurization, while the intestinal bioaccessibility of some amino acids was selectively modulated. The impact of pasteurization on the digestion of human milk may have nutritional relevance in vivo and potentially modulates preterm development and growth.

  13. A Serendipitous Discover that in situ Proteolysis is Essential for the Crystallization of Yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Gebauer, D.; Zhang, H.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  14. A serendipitous discovery that in situ proteolysis is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Corey R.; Gebauer, Damara; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant. PMID:17012808

  15. Selective Elimination of the Exonuclease Activity of the Deoxyribonucleic Acid Polymerase from Escherichia coli B by Limited Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Klenow, H.; Henningsen, I.

    1970-01-01

    Purification of DNA polymerase from E. coli B has in two cases each time led to the isolation of two separate polymerase activities, enzyme A and enzyme B. Enzyme A was in contrast to enzyme B almost completely devoid of exonuclease activity. Each of the two enzymes yielded a single symmetrical activity peak in gel filtration chromatograms. From the elution volumes the molecular weights were estimated to be about 70,000 for enzyme A and about 150,000 for enzyme B. Treatment of enzyme B with subtilisin led to an increase of about 30 per cent of the polymerase activity while the exonuclease activity almost completely disappeared. The product of the subtilisin treatment (enzyme C) gave rise to a single symmetrical polymerase activity peak in a gel filtration chromatogram. The elution volume was identical to that obtained with enzyme A. It is concluded that enzyme A and enzyme C are formed by limited proteolysis of enzyme B. PMID:4905667

  16. Influence of milk quality and production protocol on proteolysis and lipolysis in Monti Dauni Meridionali Caciocavallo cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, Marzia; Santillo, Antonella; Russo, Donatella Esterina; Caroprese, Mariangela; Marino, Rosaria; Sevi, Agostino

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of milk source and of cheese production protocol on proteolytic and lipolytic pattern of cheese during ripening. The study involved six dairy factories located in Monti Dauni Meridionali area of Southern Italy; three dairy factories processed the milk produced by their own cow herds, while the other three dairy factories processed the milk collected in other dairy farms located in the neighbouring area. Cow milk processed to cheese had different nutritional parameters and hygienic quality. Caciocavallo cheese showed differences in the evolution of proteolysis during ripening and in the intensity of the lipolytic process detected at the end of ripening. The main factors influencing Caciocavallo cheese features were the quality of the starting milk, differences in technological steps such as milk heating, type of starter cultures and coagulant used.

  17. Proteolysis and bioconversion of cereal proteins to glutamate and γ-Aminobutyrate (GABA) in Rye malt sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Stromeck, Achim; Hu, Ying; Chen, Lingyun; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-02-23

    This study aimed to achieve the conversion of cereal proteins to the alternative end products glutamate or γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). Rye malt, fungal proteases, and lactobacilli were employed to convert wheat gluten or barley proteins. Glutamate and GABA formations were strain-dependent. Lactobacillus reuteri TMW1.106 and Lactobacillus rossiae 34J accumulated glutamate; L. reuteri LTH5448 and LTH5795 accumulated GABA. Glutamate and GABA accumulation by L. reuteri TMW1.106 and LTH5448 increased throughout fermentation time over 96 h, respectively. Peptides rather than amino acids were the main products of proteolysis in all doughs, and barley proteins were more resistant to degradation by rye malt proteases than wheat gluten. However, addition of fungal protease resulted in comparable degradation of both substrates. Glutamate and GABA accumulated to concentrations up to 63 and 90 mmol kg(-1) DM, respectively. Glutamate levels obtained through bioconversion of cereal proteins enable the use of hydrolyzed cereal protein as condiment.

  18. Hair follicle aging is driven by transepidermal elimination of stem cells via COL17A1 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroyuki; Mohri, Yasuaki; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Morinaga, Hironobu; Fukuda, Makoto; Ito, Mayumi; Kurata, Sotaro; Hoeijmakers, Jan; Nishimura, Emi K

    2016-02-05

    Hair thinning and loss are prominent aging phenotypes but have an unknown mechanism. We show that hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) aging causes the stepwise miniaturization of hair follicles and eventual hair loss in wild-type mice and in humans. In vivo fate analysis of HFSCs revealed that the DNA damage response in HFSCs causes proteolysis of type XVII collagen (COL17A1/BP180), a critical molecule for HFSC maintenance, to trigger HFSC aging, characterized by the loss of stemness signatures and by epidermal commitment. Aged HFSCs are cyclically eliminated from the skin through terminal epidermal differentiation, thereby causing hair follicle miniaturization. The aging process can be recapitulated by Col17a1 deficiency and prevented by the forced maintenance of COL17A1 in HFSCs, demonstrating that COL17A1 in HFSCs orchestrates the stem cell-centric aging program of the epithelial mini-organ. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Hector, Amy J; McGlory, Chris; Damas, Felipe; Mazara, Nicole; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2017-09-12

    Preservation of lean body mass (LBM) may be important during dietary energy restriction (ER) and requires equal rates of muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle protein breakdown (MPB). Currently, the relative contribution of MPS and MPB to the loss of LBM during ER in humans is unknown. We aimed to determine the impact of dietary protein intake and resistance exercise on MPS and MPB during a controlled short-term energy deficit. Adult men (body mass index, 28.6 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); age 22 ± 1 yr) underwent 10 d of 40%-reduced energy intake while performing unilateral resistance exercise and consuming lower protein (1.2 g/kg/d, n = 12) or higher protein (2.4 g/kg per d, n = 12). Pre- and postintervention testing included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, primed constant infusion of ring-[(13)C6]phenylalanine, and (15)[N]phenylalanine to measure acute postabsorptive MPS and MPB; D2O to measure integrated MPS; and gene and protein expression. There was a decrease in acute MPS after ER (higher protein, 0.059 ± 0.006 to 0.051 ± 0.009%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.005-0.045 ± 0.006%/h; P < 0.05) that was attenuated with resistance exercise (higher protein, 0.067 ± 0.01%/h; lower protein, 0.061 ± 0.006%/h), and integrated MPS followed a similar pattern. There was no change in MPB (energy balance, 0.080 ± 0.01%/hr; ER rested legs, 0.078 ± 0.008%/hr; ER exercised legs, 0.079 ± 0.006%/hr). We conclude that a reduction in MPS is the main mechanism that underpins LBM loss early in ER in adult men.-Hector, A. J., McGlory, C., Damas, F., Mazara, N., Baker, S. K., Phillips, S. M. Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise. © FASEB.

  20. Matriptase Complexes and Prostasin Complexes with HAI-1 and HAI-2 in Human Milk: Significant Proteolysis in Lactation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsin; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Chou, Feng-Pai; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Tseng, Chun-Che; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Significant proteolysis may occur during milk synthesis and secretion, as evidenced by the presence of protease-protease inhibitor complex containing the activated form of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and the transmembrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. In order to identify other proteolysis events that may occur during lactation, human milk was analyzed for species containing HAI-1 and HAI-2 which is closely related to HAI-1. In addition to the previously demonstrated matriptase-HAI-1 complex, HAI-1 was also detected in complex with prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease. HAI-2 was also detected in complexes, the majority of which appear to be part of higher-order complexes, which do not bind to ionic exchange columns or immunoaffinity columns, suggesting that HAI-2 and its target proteases may be incorporated into special protein structures during lactation. The small proportion HAI-2 species that could be purified contain matriptase or prostasin. Human mammary epithelial cells are the likely cellular sources for these HAI-1 and HAI-2 complexes with matriptase and prostasin given that these protease-inhibitor complexes with the exception of prostasin-HAI-2 complex were detected in milk-derived mammary epithelial cells. The presence of these protease-inhibitor complexes in human milk provides in vivo evidence that the proteolytic activity of matriptase and prostasin are significantly elevated at least during lactation, and possibly contribute to the process of lactation, and that they are under tight control by HAI-1 and HAI-2.

  1. Fibulin-3, -4, and -5 Are Highly Susceptible to Proteolysis, Interact with Cells and Heparin, and Form Multimers*

    PubMed Central

    Djokic, Jelena; Fagotto-Kaufmann, Christine; Bartels, Rainer; Nelea, Valentin; Reinhardt, Dieter P.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular short fibulins, fibulin-3, -4, and -5, are components of the elastic fiber/microfibril system and are implicated in the formation and homeostasis of elastic tissues. In this study, we report new structural and functional properties of the short fibulins. Full-length human short fibulins were recombinantly expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. All three fibulins showed various levels of degradation after the purification procedure. N-terminal sequencing revealed that all three fibulins are highly susceptible to proteolysis within the N-terminal linker region of the first calcium-binding epidermal growth factor domain. Proteolytic susceptibility of the linker correlated with its length. Exposure of these fibulins to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, -7, -9, and -12 resulted in similar proteolytic fragments with MMP-7 and -12 being the most potent proteases. Fibulin-3 proteolysis was almost completely inhibited in cell culture by the addition of 25 μm doxycycline (a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor). Reducible fibulin-4 dimerization and multimerization were consistently observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry. Atomic force microscopy identified monomers, dimers, and multimers in purified fibulin-4 preparations with sizes of ∼10–15, ∼20–25, and ∼30–50 nm, respectively. All short fibulins strongly adhered to human fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. Although only fibulin-5 has an RGD integrin binding site, all short fibulins adhere at a similar level to the respective cells. Solid phase binding assays detected strong calcium-dependent binding of the short fibulins to immobilized heparin, suggesting that these fibulins may bind cell surface-located heparan sulfate. PMID:23782690

  2. Proteolysis of calcineurin is increased in human hippocampus during mild cognitive impairment and is stimulated by oligomeric Abeta

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Baig, Irfan; LeVine, Harry; Guttmann, Rodney P; Norris, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent reports demonstrate that the activation and interaction of the protease calpain (CP) and the protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) are elevated in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the extent to which CPs and CN interact during earlier stages of disease progression remains unknown. Here, we investigated CP and CN protein levels in cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane fractions prepared from human postmortem hippocampal tissue from aged non-demented subjects, and subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The results revealed a parallel increase in CP I and the 48 kDa CN-Aα (ΔCN-Aα48) proteolytic fragment in cytosolic fractions during MCI. In primary rat hippocampal cultures, CP-dependent proteolysis and activation of CN was stimulated by application of oligomeric Aβ(1-42) peptides. Deleterious effects of Aβ on neuronal morphology were reduced by blockade of either CP or CN. NMDA-type glutamate receptors, which help regulate cognition and neuronal viability, and are modulated by CPs and CN, were also investigated in human hippocampus. Relative to controls, MCI subjects showed significantly greater proteolytic levels of the NR2B subunit. Within subjects, the extent of NR2B proteolysis was strongly correlated with the generation of ΔCN-Aα48 in the cytosol. A similar proteolytic pattern for NR2B was also observed in primary rat hippocampal cultures treated with oligomeric Aβ and prevented by inhibition of CP or CN. Together, the results demonstrate that the activation and interaction of CPs and CN are increased early in cognitive decline associated with AD and may help drive other pathologic processes during disease progression. PMID:20969723

  3. Andrographolide alleviates imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fenli; Tan, Tao; Tan, Yang; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xingxin; Xu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with excessive activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play important roles in developing psoriasis. Targeting TLR signaling remains a challenge for treating psoriasis. Here, we found that andrographolide (Andro), a small-molecule natural product, alleviated imiquimod- but not interleukin 23 (IL-23)-induced psoriasis in mice with reducing expressions of IL-23 and IL-1β in the skin. The improvement in imiquimod-induced psoriasis by Andro was not observed in microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (MAP1LC3B) knockout mice. Furthermore, Andro inhibited mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6 and IL-1β but not CD80 and CD86 in bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a MAP1LC3B-dependent manner. In addition, Andro inhibited imiquimod-induced mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6, IL-1β, CD80 and CD86 in BMDCs from mice. Interestingly, Andro induced a degradation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and blocked the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to MyD88 upon LPS stimulation in BMDCs from mice. Blockade of autophagic proteolysis using NH4Cl or MAP1LC3B(-/-) BMDCs abolished the Andro-induced MyD88 degradation. In conclusion, Andro controls activation of MyD88-dependent cytokines and alleviates psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88, which could be a novel strategy to treat psoriasis.

  4. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage. PMID:27382160

  5. Proteolysis of chloroplast proteins is responsible for accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Sihua; Zeng, Lanting; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2017-03-22

    Shade management (dark treatment) on tea (Camellia sinensis) plants is a common approach to improve free amino acids in raw materials of tea leaves. However, the reason for amino acid accumulation in dark-treated tea leaves is still unknown. In the present study, dark treatment significantly increased content of free amino acids and reduced content of soluble proteins in tea leaves. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that most enzymes involved in biosyntheses of amino acids were down-accumulated by dark treatment. Chloroplast numbers reduced in dark-treated leaves and the content of soluble proteins reduced in the chloroplasts isolated from dark-treated leaves compared to control. These suggest that proteolysis of chloroplast proteins contributed to amino acid accumulation in dark-treated leaves. Two chloroplasts proteases, ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit 3 and protease Do-like 2, were up-accumulated in dark-treated leaves. This study firstly elucidated the mechanism of accumulation of amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves. Effect of dark on crop growth has been widely studied, while less attention has been paid to effect of dark on quality-related metabolites in crops. Shade management (dark treatment) on tea plants is a common approach to improve free amino acids in tea leaves. However, the reason for accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves is still unknown. In the present study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was performed and the results revealed the accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves was not due to activation of biosyntheses of amino acids, but resulted from proteolysis of chloroplast proteins. The information will advance our understanding of formation of quality or function-related metabolites in agricultural crops exposed to dark stress/shade management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. MMP-13 Regulates Growth of Wound Granulation Tissue and Modulates Gene Expression Signatures Involved in Inflammation, Proteolysis, and Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Toriseva, Mervi; Laato, Matti; Carpén, Olli; Ruohonen, Suvi T.; Savontaus, Eriika; Inada, Masaki; Krane, Stephen M.; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play a pivotal role in wound healing by regulating cell-matrix interactions and availability of bioactive molecules. The role of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in granulation tissue growth was studied in subcutaneously implanted viscose cellulose sponge in MMP-13 knockout (Mmp13−/−) and wild type (WT) mice. The tissue samples were harvested at time points day 7, 14 and 21 and subjected to histological analysis and gene expression profiling. Granulation tissue growth was significantly reduced (42%) at day 21 in Mmp13−/− mice. Granulation tissue in Mmp13−/− mice showed delayed organization of myofibroblasts, increased microvascular density at day 14, and virtual absence of large vessels at day 21. Gene expression profiling identified differentially expressed genes in Mmp13−/− mouse granulation tissue involved in biological functions including inflammatory response, angiogenesis, cellular movement, cellular growth and proliferation and proteolysis. Among genes linked to angiogenesis, Adamts4 and Npy were significantly upregulated in early granulation tissue in Mmp13−/− mice, and a set of genes involved in leukocyte motility including Il6 were systematically downregulated at day 14. The expression of Pdgfd was downregulated in Mmp13−/− granulation tissue in all time points. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases Mmp2, Mmp3, Mmp9 was also significantly downregulated in granulation tissue of Mmp13−/− mice compared to WT mice. Mmp13−/− mouse skin fibroblasts displayed altered cell morphology and impaired ability to contract collagen gel and decreased production of MMP-2. These results provide evidence for an important role for MMP-13 in wound healing by coordinating cellular activities important in the growth and maturation of granulation tissue, including myofibroblast function, inflammation, angiogenesis, and proteolysis. PMID:22880047

  7. Regulation of limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 in tumor via acetylation and its role in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bhakat, Kishor K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Adeniyi, Victor F.; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Bellot, Larry J.; Feng, Dan; Mantha, Anil K.; Sinha, Mala; Qiu, Suimin; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1), a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the repair of both endogenous and drug-induced DNA damages in the genome. Unlike its E.coli counterpart Xth, mammalian APE1 has a unique N-terminal domain and possesses both DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulatory functions. Although the overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and the association of APE1 expression with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis are well documented, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter APE1 functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show the presence of full-length APE1 and N-terminal truncated isoforms of APE1 in tumor tissue samples of various cancer types. However, primary tumor tissue has higher levels of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) as well as full-length APE1 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. We found that APE1 is proteolytically cleaved by an unknown serine protease at its N-terminus following residue lysine (Lys) Lys6 and/or Lys7 and after Lys27 and Lys31 or Lys32. Acetylation of these Lys residues in APE1 prevents this proteolysis. The N-terminal domain of APE1 and its acetylation are required for modulation of the expression of hundreds of genes. Importantly, we found that AcAPE1 is essential for sustained cell proliferation. Together, our study demonstrates that increased acetylation levels of APE1 in tumor cells inhibit the limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 and thereby maintain the functions of APE1 to promote tumor cells' sustained proliferation and survival. PMID:26981776

  8. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R; Stuehr, Dennis J; Panda, Koustubh

    2016-07-19

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage.

  9. Detection of Plasma Protease Activity Using Microsphere-Cytometry Assays with E. coli Derived Substrates: VWF Proteolysis by ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Shobhit; Lo, Chi Y.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Protease levels in human blood are often prognostic indicators of inflammatory, thrombotic or oncogenic disorders. The measurement of such enzyme activities in substrate-based assays is complicated due to the low prevalence of these enzymes and steric hindrance of the substrates by the more abundant blood proteins. To address these limitations, we developed a molecular construct that is suitable for microsphere-cytometer based assays in the milieu of human blood plasma. In this proof of principle study, we demonstrate the utility of this substrate to measure metalloprotease ADAMTS13 activity. The substrate, expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein, contains the partial A2-domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF amino acids 1594–1670) that is mutated to include a single primary amine at the N-terminus and free cysteines at the C-terminus. N-terminus fluorescence conjugation was possible using NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) chemistry. Maleimide-PEG(Polyethylene glycol)n-biotin coupling at the C-terminus allowed biotinylation with variable PEG spacer lengths. Once bound to streptavidin-bearing microspheres, the substrate fluorescence signal decreased in proportion with ADAMTS13 concentration. Whereas recombinant ADAMTS13 activity could be quantified using substrates with all PEG repeat-lengths, only the construct with the longer 77 PEG-unit could quantify proteolysis in blood plasma. Using this longer substrate, plasma ADAMTS13 down to 5% of normal levels could be detected within 30 min. Such measurements could also be readily performed under conditions resembling hyperbilirubinemia. Enzyme catalytic activity was tuned by varying buffer calcium, with lower divalent ion concentrations enhancing cleavage. Overall, the study highlights the substrate design features important for the creation of efficient proteolysis assays in the setting of human plasma. In particular, it emphasizes the need to introduce PEG spacers in plasma-based experiments, a design attribute commonly

  10. Caspase-dependent Proteolysis of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunits R2 and p53R2 during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tebbi, Ali; Guittet, Olivier; Tuphile, Karine; Cabrié, Aimeric; Lepoivre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RnR) is a key enzyme synthesizing deoxyribonucleotides for DNA replication and repair. In mammals, the R1 catalytic subunit forms an active complex with either one of the two small subunits R2 and p53R2. Expression of R2 is S phase-specific and required for DNA replication. The p53R2 protein is expressed throughout the cell cycle and in quiescent cells where it provides dNTPs for mitochondrial DNA synthesis. Participation of R2 and p53R2 in DNA repair has also been suggested. In this study, we investigated the fate of the RnR subunits during apoptosis. The p53R2 protein was cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in K-562 cells treated with inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl oncogenic kinase and in HeLa 229 cells incubated with TNF-α and cycloheximide. The cleavage site was mapped between Asp342 and Asn343. Caspase attack released a C-terminal p53R2 peptide of nine residues containing the conserved heptapeptide essential for R1 binding. As a consequence, the cleaved p53R2 protein was inactive. In vitro, purified caspase-3 and -8 could release the C-terminal tail of p53R2. Knocking down these caspases, but not caspase-2, -7, and -10, also inhibited p53R2 cleavage in cells committed to die via the extrinsic death receptor pathway. The R2 subunit was subjected to caspase- and proteasome-dependent proteolysis, which was prevented by siRNA targeting caspase-8. Knocking down caspase-3 was ineffective. Protein R1 was not subjected to degradation. Adding deoxyribonucleosides to restore dNTP pools transiently protected cells from apoptosis. These data identify RnR activity as a prosurvival function inactivated by proteolysis during apoptosis. PMID:25878246

  11. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 regulates proteolysis of centromeric histone H3 variant Cse4 and prevents its mislocalization to euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Fulp, Alyona; Lawrimore, Josh; Au, Wei-Chun; Pasupala, Nagesh; Levy-Myers, Reuben; Warren, Jack; Strunnikov, Alexander; Baker, Richard E.; Kerscher, Oliver; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2016-01-01

    Centromeric histone H3, CENP-ACse4, is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. Stringent regulation of cellular levels of CENP-ACse4 restricts its localization to centromeres. Mislocalization of CENP-ACse4 is associated with aneuploidy in yeast and flies and tumorigenesis in human cells; thus defining pathways that regulate CENP-A levels is critical for understanding how mislocalization of CENP-A contributes to aneuploidy in human cancers. Previous work in budding yeast shows that ubiquitination of overexpressed Cse4 by Psh1, an E3 ligase, partially contributes to proteolysis of Cse4. Here we provide the first evidence that Cse4 is sumoylated by E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in vivo and in vitro. Ubiquitination of Cse4 by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 plays a critical role in proteolysis of Cse4 and prevents mislocalization of Cse4 to euchromatin under normal physiological conditions. Accumulation of sumoylated Cse4 species and increased stability of Cse4 in slx5∆ strains suggest that sumoylation precedes ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4. Slx5-mediated Cse4 proteolysis is independent of Psh1, since slx5∆ psh1∆ strains exhibit higher levels of Cse4 stability and mislocalization than either slx5∆ or psh1∆ strains. Our results demonstrate a role for Slx5 in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4 to prevent its mislocalization and maintain genome stability. PMID:26960795

  12. In vivo effect of an antilipolytic drug (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole) on autophagic proteolysis and autophagy-related gene expression in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessio; Ventruti, Annamaria; Cavallini, Gabriella; Masini, Matilde; Vittorini, Simona; Chantret, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-02-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway induced by starvation, inhibited by nutrients, that is responsible for degradation of long-lived proteins and altered cell organelles. This process is involved in cell maintenance could be induced by antilipolytic drugs and may have anti-aging effects [A. Donati, The involvement of macroautophagy in aging and anti-aging interventions, Mol. Aspects Med. 27 (2006) 455-470]. We analyzed the effect of an intraperitoneal injection of an antilipolytic agent (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole, DMP, 12mg/kg b.w.), that mimics nutrient shortage on autophagy and expression of autophagic genes in the liver of male 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley albino rats. Autophagy was evaluated by observing electron micrographs of the liver autophagosomal compartment and by monitoring protein degradation assessed by the release of valine into the bloodstream. LC3 gene expression, whose product is one of the best known markers of autophagy, was also monitored. As expected, DMP decreased the plasma levels of free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin and increased autophagic vacuoles and proteolysis. DMP treatment caused an increase in the expression of the LC3 gene although this occurred later than the induction of authophagic proteolysis caused by DMP. Glucose treatment rescued the effects caused by DMP on glucose and insulin plasma levels and negatively affected the rate of autophagic proteolysis, but did not suppress the positive regulatory effect on LC3 mRNA levels. In conclusion, antilipolytic drugs may induce both autophagic proteolysis and higher expression of an autophagy-related gene and the effect on autophagy gene expression might not be secondary to the stimulation of autophagic proteolysis.

  13. In vivo effect of an antilipolytic drug (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole) on autophagic proteolysis and autophagy-related gene expression in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, Alessio; Ventruti, Annamaria; Cavallini, Gabriella; Masini, Matilde; Vittorini, Simona; Chantret, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-02-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway induced by starvation, inhibited by nutrients, that is responsible for degradation of long-lived proteins and altered cell organelles. This process is involved in cell maintenance could be induced by antilipolytic drugs and may have anti-aging effects [A. Donati, The involvement of macroautophagy in aging and anti-aging interventions, Mol. Aspects Med. 27 (2006) 455-470]. We analyzed the effect of an intraperitoneal injection of an antilipolytic agent (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole, DMP, 12 mg/kg b.w.), that mimics nutrient shortage on autophagy and expression of autophagic genes in the liver of male 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley albino rats. Autophagy was evaluated by observing electron micrographs of the liver autophagosomal compartment and by monitoring protein degradation assessed by the release of valine into the bloodstream. LC3 gene expression, whose product is one of the best known markers of autophagy, was also monitored. As expected, DMP decreased the plasma levels of free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin and increased autophagic vacuoles and proteolysis. DMP treatment caused an increase in the expression of the LC3 gene although this occurred later than the induction of authophagic proteolysis caused by DMP. Glucose treatment rescued the effects caused by DMP on glucose and insulin plasma levels and negatively affected the rate of autophagic proteolysis, but did not suppress the positive regulatory effect on LC3 mRNA levels. In conclusion, antilipolytic drugs may induce both autophagic proteolysis and higher expression of an autophagy-related gene and the effect on autophagy gene expression might not be secondary to the stimulation of autophagic proteolysis.

  14. Biochemical features of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 related to its auto-proteolysis and HeLa cell attachment activities

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-yun; Liu, Xiao-fang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lin-lin; Liu, Kai-wen; Tang, Yu-bo; Zhang, Min; Tan, Min-jia; Cheng, Shan-mei; Xu, Ye-chun; Yang, Huai-yu; Liu, Zhi-jie; Song, Gao-jie; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    CD97 belongs to the adhesion GPCR family characterized by a long ECD linked to the 7TM via a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) and plays important roles in modulating cell migration and invasion. CD97 (EGF1-5) is a splicing variant of CD97 that recognizes a specific ligand chondroitin sulfate on cell membranes and the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to elucidate the extracellular molecular basis of the CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in protein expression, auto-proteolysis and cell adhesion, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, as well as GPS mutagenesis and N-glycosylation. Both wild-type (WT) CD97-ECD and its truncated, GPS mutated, PNGase F-deglycosylated, and N-glycosylation site mutated forms were expressed and purified. The auto-proteolysis of the proteins was analyzed with Western blotting and SDS-PAGE. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modeling were used to determine a structural profile of the properly expressed receptor. Potential N-glycosylation sites were identified using MS and were modulated with PNGase F digestion and glyco-site mutations. A flow cytometry-based HeLa cell attachment assay was used for all aforementioned CD97 variants to elucidate the molecular basis of CD97-HeLa interactions. A unique concentration-dependent GPS auto-proteolysis was observed in CD97 EGF1-5 isoform with the highest concentration (4 mg/mL) per sample was self-cleaved much faster than the lower concentration (0.1 mg/mL), supporting an intermolecular mechanism of auto-proteolysis that is distinct to the reported intramolecular mechanism for other CD97 isoforms. N-glycosylation affected the auto-proteolysis of CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in a similar way as the other previously reported CD97 isoforms. SAXS data for WT and deglycosylated CD97ECD revealed a spatula-like shape with GAIN and EGF domains constituting the body and handle, respectively. Structural modeling indicated a potential interaction

  15. Biochemical features of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 related to its auto-proteolysis and HeLa cell attachment activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Yun; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Kai-Wen; Tang, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Min; Tan, Min-Jia; Cheng, Shan-Mei; Xu, Ye-Chun; Yang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Song, Gao-Jie; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    CD97 belongs to the adhesion GPCR family characterized by a long ECD linked to the 7TM via a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) and plays important roles in modulating cell migration and invasion. CD97 (EGF1-5) is a splicing variant of CD97 that recognizes a specific ligand chondroitin sulfate on cell membranes and the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to elucidate the extracellular molecular basis of the CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in protein expression, auto-proteolysis and cell adhesion, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, as well as GPS mutagenesis and N-glycosylation. Both wild-type (WT) CD97-ECD and its truncated, GPS mutated, PNGase F-deglycosylated, and N-glycosylation site mutated forms were expressed and purified. The auto-proteolysis of the proteins was analyzed with Western blotting and SDS-PAGE. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modeling were used to determine a structural profile of the properly expressed receptor. Potential N-glycosylation sites were identified using MS and were modulated with PNGase F digestion and glyco-site mutations. A flow cytometry-based HeLa cell attachment assay was used for all aforementioned CD97 variants to elucidate the molecular basis of CD97-HeLa interactions. A unique concentration-dependent GPS auto-proteolysis was observed in CD97 EGF1-5 isoform with the highest concentration (4 mg/mL) per sample was self-cleaved much faster than the lower concentration (0.1 mg/mL), supporting an intermolecular mechanism of auto-proteolysis that is distinct to the reported intramolecular mechanism for other CD97 isoforms. N-glycosylation affected the auto-proteolysis of CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in a similar way as the other previously reported CD97 isoforms. SAXS data for WT and deglycosylated CD97ECD revealed a spatula-like shape with GAIN and EGF domains constituting the body and handle, respectively. Structural modeling indicated a potential interaction

  16. Effects of FlAsH/tetracysteine (TC) Tag on PrP proteolysis and PrPres formation by TC-scanning.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuzuru; Hohsfield, Lindsay A; Hollister, Jason R; Baron, Gerald S

    2013-09-02

    Protein-protein interactions associated with proteolytic processing and aggregation are integral to normal and pathological aspects of prion protein (PrP) biology. Characterization of these interactions requires the identification of amino acid residues involved. The FlAsH/tetracysteine (FlAsH/TC) tag is a small fluorescent tag amenable to insertion at internal sites in proteins. In this study, we used serial FlAsH/TC insertions (TC-scanning) as a probe to characterize sites of protein-protein interaction between PrP and other molecules. To explore this application in the context of substrate-protease interactions, we analyzed the effect of FlAsH/TC insertions on proteolysis of cellular prion protein (PrPsen) in in vitro reactions and generation of the C1 metabolic fragment of PrPsen in live neuroblastoma cells. The influence of FlAsH/TC insertion was evaluated by TC-scanning across the cleavage sites of each protease. The results showed that FlAsH/TC inhibited protease cleavage only within limited ranges of the cleavage sites, which varied from about one to six residues in width, depending on the protease, providing an estimate of the PrP residues interacting with each protease. TC-scanning was also used to probe a different type of protein-protein interaction: the conformational conversion of FlAsH-PrPsen to the prion disease-associated isoform, PrPres. PrP constructs with FlAsH/TC insertions at residues 90-96 but not 97-101 were converted to FlAsH-PrPres, identifying a boundary separating loosely versus compactly folded regions of PrPres. Our observations demonstrate that TC-scanning with the FlAsH/TC tag can be a versatile method for probing protein-protein interactions and folding processes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Myocardial overexpression of TIMP3 after myocardial infarction exerts beneficial effects by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing early proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Takawale, Abhijit; Zhang, Pu; Azad, Abul; Wang, Wang; Wang, Xiuhua; Murray, Allan G; Kassiri, Zamaneh

    2017-08-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in loss of cardiomyocytes, adverse extracellular matrix (ECM) and structural remodeling, and left ventricular (LV) dilation and dysfunction. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMPs) inhibit matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main regulators of ECM turnover. TIMPs also have MMP-independent functions. TIMP3 levels are reduced in the heart within 24 h of MI in mice. We investigated if overexpression of TIMP3 post-MI limits adverse remodeling and LV dilation and dysfunction. MI was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in 10- to 12-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice, and adenoviral constructs expressing human (h)TIMP3 (Ad-hTIMP3) or no TIMP (Ad-Null) were injected in the peri-infarct zone (5.4 × 10(7) plaque-forming units/heart, 5 injections/heart). Cardiac function assessed by echocardiography showed improved LV physiology and reduced LV dilation after TIMP3 overexpression compared with the Ad-Null-MI group. Post-MI adverse remodeling was attenuated in the Ad-hTIMP3-MI group, as assessed by greater cardiomyocyte density, less infarct expansion, and ECM disruption. TIMP3 overexpression blunted the early rise in proteolytic activities post-MI. A higher density of coronary arteries and a greater number of proliferating endothelial cells were detected in the infarct and peri-infarct regions in the Ad-hTIMP3-MI group compared with the Ad-Null-MI group. In vitro three-dimensional angiogenesis assay confirmed that recombinant TIMP3 promotes angiogenesis in human endothelial cells, although biphasically and in a dose-dependent manner. Intriguingly, overexpression of Ad-hTIMP3 at 10-fold higher concentration had no beneficial effects, consistent with antiangiogenic effects of TIMP3 at higher doses. In conclusion, optimal overexpression of TIMP3 can be a promising therapeutic approach to limit adverse post-MI remodeling by dually inhibiting early proteolysis and promoting angiogenesis.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we report

  18. Branched-chain amino acids and arginine supplementation attenuates skeletal muscle proteolysis induced by moderate exercise in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizuno, M; Mizuno, T; Dilling-Hansen, B; Lahoz, A; Bertelsen, V; Münster, H; Jordening, H; Hamada, K; Doi, T

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a single oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) with Arg on skeletal muscle protein metabolism during moderate exercise in young individuals. Eight healthy volunteers (4 males and 4 females, means +/- SEM, 26 +/- 1 yrs, 177.8 +/- 3.7 cm, 72.6 +/- 3.9 kg) were studied in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The subjects performed 3 bouts of 20-min cycling exercise (5-min break between each bout) at 126 +/- 13 W corresponding to 50 % of the maximal work intensity. A single oral supplement of either a BCAA drink containing 2 g of BCAA and 0.5 g of Arg or an isocaloric placebo drink was given at 10 min of the 1st exercise bout. Both arterial and venous blood samples were simultaneously taken from the radial artery and the femoral vein, respectively. Blood flow in the femoral artery was determined using the ultrasound Doppler technique. The blood sampling and blood flow measurements were performed at rest, every 10 min during each exercise bout. Net balance of BCAA and Phe across the leg muscles were measured by the arteriovenous difference method. The BCAA ingestion resulted in increases in both the plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA uptake into the working leg. The Phe release from the leg during exercise significantly increased as compared to the basal level in the placebo trial (0.97 +/- 0.28 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.22 micromol/min, p < 0.05). In the BCAA trial, the cumulative Phe release from the leg during the 3rd exercise bout was significantly lower than that in the placebo trial (5.0 +/- 7.4 vs. 35.9 +/- 13.2 micromol/25 min, p < 0.05). These results suggest that endurance exercise at moderate intensity enhances proteolysis in working muscles, and a single oral intake of 2 g of BCAA with Arg at onset of exercise effectively suppresses exercise-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis.

  19. Proteolysis by Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria: Effects on Wheat Flour Protein Fractions and Gliadin Peptides Involved in Human Cereal Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Lavermicocca, Paola; De Vincenzi, Massimo; Giovannini, Claudio; Faccia, Michele; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    Sourdough lactic acid bacteria were preliminarily screened for proteolytic activity by using a digest of albumin and globulin polypeptides as a substrate. Based on their hydrolysis profile patterns, Lactobacillus alimentarius 15M, Lactobacillus brevis 14G, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis 7A, and Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B were selected and used in sourdough fermentation. A fractionated method of protein extraction and subsequent two-dimensional electrophoresis were used to estimate proteolysis in sourdoughs. Compared to a chemically acidified (pH 4.4) dough, 37 to 42 polypeptides, distributed over a wide range of pIs and molecular masses, were hydrolyzed by L. alimentarius 15M, L. brevis 14G, and L. sanfranciscensis 7A. Albumin, globulin, and gliadin fractions were hydrolyzed, while glutenins were not degraded. The concentrations of free amino acids, especially proline and glutamic and aspartic acids, also increased in sourdoughs. Compared to the chemically acidified dough, proteolysis by lactobacilli positively influenced the softening of the dough during fermentation, as determined by rheological analyses. Enzyme preparations of the selected lactobacilli which contained proteinase or peptidase enzymes showed hydrolysis of the 31-43 fragment of A-gliadin, a toxic peptide for celiac patients. A toxic peptic-tryptic (PT) digest of gliadins was used for in vitro agglutination tests on K 562 (S) subclone cells of human myelagenous leukemia origin. The lowest concentration of PT digest that agglutinated 100% of the total cells was 0.218 g/liter. Hydrolysis of the PT digest by proteolytic enzymes of L. alimentarius 15M and L. brevis 14G completely prevented agglutination of the K 562 (S) cells by the PT digest at a concentration of 0.875 g/liter. Considerable inhibitory effects by other strains and at higher concentrations of the PT digest were also found. The mixture of peptides produced by enzyme preparations of selected lactobacilli showed a decreased agglutination

  20. Proteolysis by sourdough lactic acid bacteria: effects on wheat flour protein fractions and gliadin peptides involved in human cereal intolerance.

    PubMed

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Lavermicocca, Paola; De Vincenzi, Massimo; Giovannini, Claudio; Faccia, Michele; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-02-01

    Sourdough lactic acid bacteria were preliminarily screened for proteolytic activity by using a digest of albumin and globulin polypeptides as a substrate. Based on their hydrolysis profile patterns, Lactobacillus alimentarius 15M, Lactobacillus brevis 14G, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis 7A, and Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B were selected and used in sourdough fermentation. A fractionated method of protein extraction and subsequent two-dimensional electrophoresis were used to estimate proteolysis in sourdoughs. Compared to a chemically acidified (pH 4.4) dough, 37 to 42 polypeptides, distributed over a wide range of pIs and molecular masses, were hydrolyzed by L. alimentarius 15M, L. brevis 14G, and L. sanfranciscensis 7A. Albumin, globulin, and gliadin fractions were hydrolyzed, while glutenins were not degraded. The concentrations of free amino acids, especially proline and glutamic and aspartic acids, also increased in sourdoughs. Compared to the chemically acidified dough, proteolysis by lactobacilli positively influenced the softening of the dough during fermentation, as determined by rheological analyses. Enzyme preparations of the selected lactobacilli which contained proteinase or peptidase enzymes showed hydrolysis of the 31-43 fragment of A-gliadin, a toxic peptide for celiac patients. A toxic peptic-tryptic (PT) digest of gliadins was used for in vitro agglutination tests on K 562 (S) subclone cells of human myelagenous leukemia origin. The lowest concentration of PT digest that agglutinated 100% of the total cells was 0.218 g/liter. Hydrolysis of the PT digest by proteolytic enzymes of L. alimentarius 15M and L. brevis 14G completely prevented agglutination of the K 562 (S) cells by the PT digest at a concentration of 0.875 g/liter. Considerable inhibitory effects by other strains and at higher concentrations of the PT digest were also found. The mixture of peptides produced by enzyme preparations of selected lactobacilli showed a decreased agglutination

  1. Proteolysis, fermentation efficiency, and in vitro ruminal digestion of peanut stover ensiled with raw or heated corn.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-M J

    2005-08-01

    Peanut stover (PS) is similar to full-bloom alfalfa hay in chemical composition. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of adding raw or heated corn meal to PS at ensiling on silage N components, fermentation acids, and digestion by ruminal microorganisms. The PS was collected after harvesting of peanuts and ensiled immediately without and with addition of raw or heated corn meal (100 g/kg of fresh weight). Corn was added to PS so that the initial mixture would contain adequate dry matter (DM) (approximately 30%) and additional nonfiber carbohydrate to enhance silage fermentation. After 8 wk of silo fermentation, corn-treated silages contained less structural carbohydrates but more non-fiber carbohydrates compared with the untreated control. A shift from hemicellulose to nonfiber carbohydrate use during silage fermentation was evident by corn treatment. Additional corn at ensiling resulted in silage N with less water-soluble N, protein N, nonprotein N, nonprotein nonammonia N (peptides plus amino acids), and ammonia N. Based on changes in soluble nonprotein N before and after ensiling, the amount of proteolysis was approximately 66% for control silage and was nearly 40% lower in response to corn treatment. Adding corn increased silage lactic acid, but both acetic and propionic acids decreased. These changes were reflected in the lower pH and higher fermentation efficiency with corn-treated silages. More DM was digested and greater amounts of volatile fatty acids, except for branched-chain acids, were produced in vitro by ruminal microorganisms with corn-treated silages. In addition, incubations with silage treated with heated corn contained higher concentrations of acetic and propionic acids compared with raw corn. In vitro ammonia accumulation per unit of DM digested was lower for corn treatments than the control, and for heated corn vs. raw corn-treated silage. These results indicate that supplementation of either raw or heated corn on PS at

  2. Free dissociable IGF-I: Association with changes in IGFBP-3 proteolysis and insulin sensitivity after surgery.

    PubMed

    Bang, Peter; Thorell, Anders; Carlsson-Skwirut, Christine; Ljungqvist, Olle; Brismar, Kerstin; Nygren, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Patients receiving a carbohydrate drink (CHO) before major abdominal surgery display improved insulin sensitivity postoperatively and increased proteolysis of IGFBP-3 (IGFBP-3-PA) compared to patients undergoing similar surgery after overnight fasting. We hypothesized that serum IGFBP-3-PA increases bioavailability of circulating IGF-I and preserves insulin sensitivity in patients given CHO. Matched control study. At Karolinska University Hospital, patients given CHO before major elective abdominal surgery (CHO,n = 8) were compared to patients undergoing similar surgical procedures after overnight fasting (FAST,n = 10). Results from two different techniques for determination of free-dissociable IGF-I (fdIGF-I) were compared with changes in IGFBP-3-PA and insulin sensitivity. Postoperatively, CHO displayed 18% improvement in insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic clamp) and increased IGFBP-3-PA vs. FAST. As determined by IRMA, fdIGF-I increased by 48 ± 25% in CHO while fdIGF-I decreased by 13 ± 18% in FAST (p < 0.01 vs. CHO, when corrected for duration of surgery). However, fdIGF-I determined by ultra-filtration decreased similarly in both groups (-22 ± 8% vs. -25 ± 8%, p = 0.8) and IGFBP-1 increased similarly in both groups. Patients with less insulin resistance after surgery demonstrated larger increases in fdIGF-I by IRMA (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). Fifty-three % of the variability of the changes in fdIGF-I by IRMA could be explained by changes in IGFBP-3-PA and total IGF-I levels (p < 0.05), while IGFBP-1 did not contribute significantly. During conditions when serum IGF-I bioavailability is regulated by IGFBP-3 proteolysis, measurements of fdIGF-I by IRMA is of physiological relevance as it correlates with the associated changes in insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Advances in nanomaterial-based microwaves and infrared wave-assisted tryptic digestion for ultrafast proteolysis and rapid detection by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical/chemical properties of nanomaterials have significant impacts in electromagnetic waves (microwave and infrared waves)-assisted tryptic digestion approaches by using them as heat absorbers to expedite digestion and as affinity probes to enrich digested proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis. We review recent developments in electromagnetic waves (microwaves and infrared waves)-assisted proteolysis using nanomaterials as heat absorbers and as affinity probes for analysis of digested proteins in MALDI-MS. New trends in ultrafast proteolysis (nonphosphoproteins- lysozyme, cytochrome c, myoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA); phosphoproteins- α- and β- caseins) using nanomaterials based microwaves and infrared (IR) waves assisted digestion approaches for rapid identification of digested proteins in the MALDI-MS.

  4. Prediction of exposure degree diagram and sites of limited proteolysis in globular proteins as an approach to computer-aided design of protein bioregulators with prolonged action.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, M A; Galaktionov, S G; Akhrem, A A

    1987-11-02

    In order to prolong the lifetime of protein bioregulators in blood it is possible to engineer analogs with protected sites of limited proteolysis. To determine the sites, primarily accessible to trypsin-like proteases, a computer procedure has been developed, including a prediction algorithm, to produce the residue diagram of a globular protein and a discriminant algorithm to determine the sites most liable to proteolysis. The accuracy of prediction of amino acid residue exposure is characterised by correlation coefficients between experimental and theoretical exposure values, the coefficients being about 0.7 as calculated for 10 globular proteins. The classification of Arg and Lys residues into two groups, susceptible or insusceptible to protease, has an error percentage of about 25.

  5. Analysis of the extreme diversity of salivary alpha-amylase isoforms generated by physiological proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Punyadeera, Chamindie; Cooper-White, Justin J; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2012-12-12

    Saliva is a crucial biofluid for oral health and is also of increasing importance as a non-invasive source of disease biomarkers. Salivary alpha-amylase is an abundant protein in saliva, and changes in amylase expression have been previously associated with a variety of diseases and conditions. Salivary alpha-amylase is subject to a high diversity of post-translational modifications, including physiological proteolysis in the oral cavity. Here we developed methodology for rapid sample preparation and non-targeted LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of saliva from healthy subjects and observed an extreme diversity of alpha-amylase proteolytic isoforms. Our results emphasize the importance of consideration of post-translational events such as proteolysis in proteomic studies, biomarker discovery and validation, particularly in saliva. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. GSK-3β Targets Cdc25A for Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteolysis and GSK-3β Inactivation Correlates with Cdc25A Overproduction in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tiebang; Wei, Yongkun; Chiang, Yu-Chi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Hung, Mien-Chie; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Cdc25A phosphatase positively regulates cell cycle transitions; is degraded by the proteosome throughout interphase and in response to stress; and is overproduced in human cancers. The kinases targeting Cdc25A for proteolysis during early cell cycle phases have not been identified and mechanistic insight into the cause of Cdc25A overproduction in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylates Cdc25A to promote its proteolysis in early cell cycle phases. Phosphorylation by GSK-3β requires priming of Cdc25A and this can be catalyzed by polo-like kinase 3 (Plk-3). Importantly, a strong correlation between Cdc25A overproduction and GSK-3β inactivation was observed in human tumor tissues indicating that GSK-3β inactivation may account for Cdc25A overproduction in a subset of human tumors. PMID:18167338

  7. [Analytical biotechnology of recombinant peptides and proteins. II. Primary structure of the fusion protein containing human proinsulin and optimization of its proteolysis by trypsin].

    PubMed

    Sergeev, N V; Glukhova, N S; Nazimov, I V; Guliaev, V A; Donetskiĭ, I A; Miroshnikov, A I

    2000-07-01

    The kinetics of trypsin proteolysis of the fusion protein (FP) containing human proinsulin was studied by a set of analytical micromethods. These were the microcolumn reversed-phase HPLC and the qualitative identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing. The first stage of the proteolysis was shown to be the cleavage of FP into the leader fragment and proinsulin. The subsequent splitting off of C-peptide from proinsulin results in the formation of ArgB31-ArgB32-insulin. The effect of temperature on the formation of de-ThrB30-insulin, a by-product, was also studied. The structure of FP was confirmed by the peptide mapping technique, and the leader fragment was shown to contain no N-terminal Met residue.

  8. Limited proteolysis of Hansenula polymorpha yeast amine oxidase: isolation of a C-terminal fragment containing both a copper and quino-cofactor.

    PubMed

    Plastino, J; Klinman, J P

    1995-09-11

    Limited proteolysis of recombinant Hansenula polymorpha yeast amino oxidase produces a 48 kDa fragment which corresponds to the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein. The fragment contains both TOPA (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine) and copper, as well as the histidine ligands implicated in copper binding. The fragment is proposed to be the domain responsible for cofactor production in yeast amine oxidase.

  9. Lon-Mediated Proteolysis of the FeoC Protein Prevents Salmonella enterica from Accumulating the Fe(II) Transporter FeoB under High-Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunkeun; Lee, Hwiseop

    2014-01-01

    The Salmonella Feo system consists of the FeoA, FeoB, and FeoC proteins and mediates ferrous iron [Fe(II)] import. FeoB is an inner membrane protein that, along with contributions from two small hydrophilic proteins, FeoA and FeoC, transports Fe(II). We previously reported that FeoC binds to and protects the FeoB transporter from FtsH-mediated proteolysis. In the present study, we report proteolytic regulation of FeoC that occurs in an oxygen-dependent fashion. While relatively stable under low-oxygen conditions, FeoC was rapidly degraded by the Lon protease under high-oxygen conditions. The putative Fe-S cluster of FeoC seemed to function as an oxygen sensor to control FeoC stability, as evidenced by the finding that mutation of the putative Fe-S cluster-binding site greatly increased FeoC stability under high-oxygen conditions. Salmonella ectopically expressing the feoB and feoC genes was able to accumulate FeoB and FeoC only under low-oxygen conditions, suggesting that FeoC proteolysis prevents Salmonella from accumulating the FeoB transporter under high-oxygen conditions. Finally, we propose that Lon-mediated FeoC proteolysis followed by FtsH-mediated FeoB proteolysis helps Salmonella to avoid uncontrolled Fe(II) uptake during the radical environmental changes encountered when shifting from low-iron anaerobic conditions to high-iron aerobic conditions. PMID:25313398

  10. Therapeutic effects of remediating autophagy failure in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease by enhancing lysosomal proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Wesson, Daniel W; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Yang, Austin J; Wilson, Donald A; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M; Nixon, Ralph A

    2011-07-01

    The extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain has revealed a major defect: in the proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates. Autophagy failure contributes on several levels to AD pathogenesis and has become an important therapeutic target for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We recently observed broad therapeutic effects of stimulating autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD that exhibits defective proteolytic clearance of autophagic substrates, robust intralysosomal amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular β-amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits. By genetically deleting the lysosomal cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin B (CstB), to selectively restore depressed cathepsin activities, we substantially cleared Aβ, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates from autolysosomes/lysosomes and rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, as well as reduced total Aβ40/42 levels and extracellular amyloid deposition, highlighting the underappreciated importance of the lysosomal system for Aβ clearance. Most importantly, lysosomal remediation prevented the marked learning and memory deficits in TgCRND8 mice. Our findings underscore the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in AD and demonstrate the value of reversing this dysfunction as an innovative therapeautic strategy for AD.

  11. Selective proteolysis of apolipoprotein B-100 by Arg-gingipain mediates atherosclerosis progression accelerated by bacterial exposure.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Munetaka; Kadowaki, Tomoko; Tsukuba, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2006-11-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest the association of periodontal infections with atherosclerosis, however, the mechanism underlying this association remains poorly understood. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic agent of adult periodontitis and produces a unique class of cysteine proteinases consisting of Arg-gingipain (Rgp) and Lys-gingipain (Kgp). To elucidate key mechanisms for progression of atherosclerosis by P. gingivalis infection, we tested the effects of the disruption of genes encoding Rgp and/or Kgp and inhibitors specific for the respective enzymes on atherosclerosis progression in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. Repeated intravenous injection of wild-type P. gingivalis resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesions as well as an increase in the serum LDL cholesterol and a decrease of HDL cholesterol in these animals. LDL particles in P. gingivalis-injected animals were modified as a result of selective proteolysis of apoB-100 in LDL particles. This modification of LDL by P. gingivalis resulted in an increase in LDL uptake by macrophages and consequent foam cell formation in vitro. The atherosclerotic changes induced by P. gingivalis infection were attenuated by disruption of Rgp-encoding genes or by an Rgp-specific inhibitor. Our results indicate that degradation of apoB-100 by Rgp plays a crucial role in the promotion of atherosclerosis by P. gingivalis infection.

  12. Secretion and proteolysis of heterologous proteins fused to the Escherichia coli maltose binding protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Kate A; Gomez, Seth R; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W; Franz, Andreas H; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins.

  13. The ETS protein MEF is regulated by phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis via the protein-ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hedvat, Cyrus V; Mao, Shifeng; Zhu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Jinjuan; Nguyen, Hoang; Koff, Andrew; Nimer, Stephen D

    2006-04-01

    MEF is an ETS-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activating activity that affects hematopoietic stem cell behavior and is required for normal NK cell and NK T-cell development. The MEF (also known as ELF4) gene is repressed by several leukemia-associated fusion transcription factor proteins (PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha and AML1-ETO), but it is also activated by retroviral insertion in several cancer models. We have previously shown that cyclin A-dependent phosphorylation of MEF largely restricts its activity to the G(1) phase of the cell cycle; we now show that MEF is a short-lived protein whose expression level also peaks during late G(1) phase. Mutagenesis studies show that the rapid turnover of MEF in S phase is dependent on the specific phosphorylation of threonine 643 and serine 648 at the C terminus of MEF by cdk2 and on the Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex SCF(Skp2), which targets MEF for ubiquitination and proteolysis. Overexpression of MEF drives cells through the G(1)/S transition, thereby promoting cell proliferation. The tight regulation of MEF levels during the cell cycle contributes to its effects on regulating cell cycle entry and cell proliferation.

  14. The C. elegans sex-determining GLI protein TRA-1A is regulated by sex-specific proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Schvarzstein, Mara; Spence, Andrew M

    2006-11-01

    TRA-1A is the sole representative in Caenorhabditis elegans of the Gli transcription factor family. Its activity is required to specify all somatic female cell fates in XX hermaphrodites. We have found that TRA-1 protein levels are much higher in hermaphrodites than in males, and that the difference is attributable to the predominance in hermaphrodites of C-terminally truncated isoforms that are nearly undetectable in males. Our results support a model in which TRA-1A is negatively regulated by male-specific proteolysis that depends upon specific TRA-1A protein sequences and upon the activity of the fem genes. C-terminally truncated TRA-1 isoforms are stable and can inappropriately feminize XO males, suggesting that they escape this negative regulation. Thus, although C. elegans appears to lack a Hedgehog-signaling pathway, our results indicate that proteolytic processing and degradation of Gli family transcription factors, commonly seen during Hedgehog signaling in other organisms, also control C. elegans sex determination.

  15. A Brucella spp. Protease Inhibitor Limits Antigen Lysosomal Proteolysis, Increases Cross-Presentation, and Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Tkach, Mercedes; Sabbione, Florencia; Bruno, Laura; Carabajal, Marianela V; Berguer, Paula M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Schillaci, Roxana; Trevani, Analía S; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the unlipidated (U) outer membrane protein (Omp) 19 from Brucella spp. is a competitive inhibitor of human cathepsin L. U-Omp19 inhibits lysosome cathepsins and APC-derived microsome activity in vitro and partially inhibits lysosomal cathepsin L activity within live APCs. Codelivery of U-Omp19 with the Ag can reduce intracellular Ag digestion and increases Ag half-life in dendritic cells (DCs). U-Omp19 retains the Ag in Lamp-2(+) compartments after its internalization and promotes a sustained expression of MHC class I/peptide complexes in the cell surface of DCs. Consequently, U-Omp19 enhances Ag cross-presentation by DCs to CD8(+) T cells. U-Omp19 s.c. delivery induces the recruitment of CD11c(+)CD8α(+) DCs and monocytes to lymph nodes whereas it partially limits in vivo Ag proteolysis inside DCs. Accordingly, this protein is able to induce CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo against codelivered Ag. Antitumor responses were elicited after U-Omp19 coadministration, increasing survival of mice in a murine melanoma challenge model. Collectively, these results indicate that a cysteine protease inhibitor from bacterial origin could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against tumors. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. In situ proteolysis, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a VHH that binds listeria internalin B.

    PubMed

    Huh, Ian; Gene, Robert; Kumaran, Jyothi; MacKenzie, C Roger; Brooks, Cory L

    2014-11-01

    The variable region of camelid heavy-chain antibodies produces the smallest known antibody fragment with antigen-binding capability (a VHH). The VHH R303 binds internalin B (InlB), a virulence factor expressed by the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. InlB is critical for initiation of Listeria infection, as it binds a receptor (c-Met) on epithelial cells, triggering the entry of bacteria into host cells. InlB is surface-exposed and is required for virulence, hence a VHH targeting InlB has potential applications for pathogen detection or therapeutic intervention. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction of R303 are reported. Crystals of R303 were obtained following in situ proteolysis with trypsin. Gel filtration and SDS-PAGE revealed that trypsin removed the C-terminal tag region of R303, facilitating crystal formation. Crystals of R303 diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=46.4, b=31.2, c=74.8 Å, β=93.8°. The crystals exhibited a Matthews coefficient of 1.95 Å3 Da(-1) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Effect of high pressure homogenisation of milk on cheese yield and microbiology, lipolysis and proteolysis during ripening of Caciotta cheese.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, Rosalba; Vannini, Lucia; Patrignani, Francesca; Iucci, Luciana; Vallicelli, Melania; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    The principal aim of this work was to compare Caciotta cheeses obtained from cow milk previously subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH) at 100 MPa with those produced from raw (R) or heat-treated (P) cow milk. HPH had both direct and indirect effects on cheese characteristics and their evolution during ripening. In particular, HPH treatment of milk induced a significant increase of the cheese yield; moreover, it affected the microbial ecology of both curd and cheese. Compared with the thermal treatment, the HPH treatment resulted in a decrease of about one log cfu/g of yeast and lactobacilli cell loads of the curd. The initial milk treatment also affected the evolution over time and the levels attained at the end of ripening of all the microbial groups studied. In fact, lactobacilli, microstaphylococci and yeast cell loads remained at lower levels in the cheeses obtained from HPH milk with respect to the other cheese types over the whole ripening period. Moreover, HPH of milk induced marked and extensive lipolysis. Cheeses from HPH milk showed the presence of high amounts of free fatty acids immediately after brining. The electrophoretic patterns of the different cheese types showed that Caciotta made from HPH-treated milk was characterized by a more extensive and faster proteolysis as well as a significant modification of its volatile molecule profile. The results obtained and the sensory analysis indicated that HPH treatment of milk was able to differentiate Caciotta cheese or to modify its ripening patterns.

  18. Regulated proteolysis of Trop2 drives epithelial hyperplasia and stem cell self-renewal via β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Goldstein, Andrew S; Cai, Houjian; Drake, Justin M; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2012-10-15

    The cell surface protein Trop2 is expressed on immature stem/progenitor-like cells and is overexpressed in many epithelial cancers. However the biological function of Trop2 in tissue maintenance and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that Trop2 is a regulator of self-renewal, proliferation, and transformation. Trop2 controls these processes through a mechanism of regulated intramembrane proteolysis that leads to cleavage of Trop2, creating two products: the extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. The intracellular domain of Trop2 is released from the membrane and accumulates in the nucleus. Heightened expression of the Trop2 intracellular domain promotes stem/progenitor self-renewal through signaling via β-catenin and is sufficient to initiate precursor lesions to prostate cancer in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrate that loss of β-catenin or Trop2 loss-of-function cleavage mutants abrogates Trop2-driven self-renewal and hyperplasia in the prostate. These findings suggest that heightened expression of Trop2 is selected for in epithelial cancers to enhance the stem-like properties of self-renewal and proliferation. Defining the mechanism of Trop2 function in self-renewal and transformation is essential to identify new therapeutic strategies to block Trop2 activation in cancer.

  19. Effect of limited proteolysis in the 8th loop of the barrel and of antibodies on porcine pancreas amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, V; Payan, F; Ajandouz, E H; Svensson, B; Haser, R; Marchis-Mouren, G

    1991-11-15

    The porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase is a (beta/alpha)8-barrel protein, containing domains A and B (peptide sequence 1-403) and a distinct C-domain (peptide sequence 404-496). Separation of the terminal C-domain from the A and B domains has been attempted by limited proteolysis in the hinge region. Subtilisin was found to hydrolyse amylase between residues 369 and 370 situated in the loop between the eighth beta-strand and alpha-helix. The cleaved amylase was isolated by chromatofocusing and found to retain about 60% of the activity of the native enzyme, while the isolated fragments were inactive. Antigen binding fragments prepared from polyclonal antibodies to native amylase and the CNBr-fragment P1 (peptide sequence 395-496) respectively, were tested for influence on the enzyme activity. Antibodies directed against P1 had no effect whereas antibodies against the peptide sequence 1-394 and amylase respectively inhibited hydrolysis of substrates having four or more glucose residues but not of shorter oligomaltosides. Crystallographic analysis revealed that changes in the region of residue 369 might affect the conformation of the active site as well as of a second binding site. This site, located on the enzyme surface, is proposed to be required for the hydrolysis of larger substrates.

  20. Bombay phenotype is associated with reduced plasma-VWF levels and an increased susceptibility to ADAMTS13 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, James S; McKinnon, Thomas A J; Crawley, James T B; Lane, David A; Laffan, Michael A

    2005-09-15

    ABO blood group is an important determinant of plasma von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) levels, with lower levels in group O. Previous reports have suggested that ABO(H) sugars affect the susceptibility of VWF to ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type-1 repeats-13) cleavage. To further test this hypothesis, we collected plasma from individuals with the rare Bombay blood group. VWF:Ag levels were significantly lower in Bombay patients (median, 0.69 IU/mL) than in groups AB, A, or B (P < .05) and lower than in group O individuals (median, 0.82 IU/mL). Susceptibility of purified VWF fractions to recombinant ADAMTS13 cleavage, assessed using VWF collagen-binding assay (VWF:CB), was increased in Bombays compared with either group O or AB. Increasing urea concentration (0.5 to 2 M) increased the cleavage rate for each blood group but eliminated the differences between groups. We conclude that reduction in the number of terminal sugars on N-linked glycan increases susceptibility of globular VWF to ADAMTS13 proteolysis and is associated with reduced plasma VWF:Ag and VWF:CB levels.

  1. Hyperosmotic Shock Engages Two Positive Feedback Loops through Caspase-3-dependent Proteolysis of JNK1-2 and Bid*

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jicheng; Ben Messaoud, Nabil; López, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperosmotic shock induces early calpain activation, Smac/DIABLO release from the mitochondria, and p38/JNK activation in Xenopus oocytes. These pathways regulate late cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Here, we show that JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 are activated early by osmostress, and sustained activation of both isoforms accelerates the apoptotic program. When caspase-3 is activated, JNK1-2 is proteolyzed at Asp-385 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity, thereby creating a positive feedback loop. Expression of Bcl-xL markedly reduces hyperosmotic shock-induced apoptosis. In contrast, expression of Bid induces rapid caspase-3 activation, even in the absence of osmostress, which is blocked by Bcl-xL co-expression. In these conditions a significant amount of Bid in the cytosol is mono- and bi-ubiquitinated. Caspase-3 activation by hyperosmotic shock induces proteolysis of Bid and mono-ubiquitinated Bid at Asp-52 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation, and thus creating a second positive feedback loop. Revealing the JNK isoforms and the loops activated by osmostress could help to design better treatments for human diseases caused by perturbations in fluid osmolarity. PMID:26511318

  2. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  3. Sustained Induction of Collagen Synthesis by TGF-β Requires Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis of CREB3L1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyue; Lee, Ching-En; Denard, Bray; Ye, Jin

    2014-01-01

    CREB3L1 (cAMP response element binding protein 3-like 1), a transcription factor synthesized as a membrane-bound precursor and activated through Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP), is essential for collagen production by osteoblasts during bone development. Here, we show that TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β), a cytokine known to stimulate production of collagen during wound healing and fibrotic diseases, induces proteolytic activation of CREB3L1 in human A549 cells. This activation results from inhibition of expression of TM4SF20 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 20), which normally inhibits RIP of CREB3L1. Cleavage of CREB3L1 releases its NH2-terminal domain from membranes, allowing it to enter the nucleus where it binds to Smad4 to activate transcription of genes encoding proteins required for assembly of collagen-containing extracellular matrix. Our findings raise the possibility that inhibition of RIP of CREB3L1 could prevent excess deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic diseases. PMID:25310401

  4. Effect of proteolysis and calcium equilibrium on functional properties of natural cheddar cheese during ripening and the resultant processed cheese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoying; Luo, Jie; Guo, Huiyuan; Zeng, Steve S; Ren, Fazheng

    2011-04-01

    The changes in proteolysis, calcium (Ca) equilibrium, and functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses during ripening and the resultant processed cheeses were investigated. For natural Cheddar cheeses, the majority of the changes in pH 4.6 soluble nitrogen as a percentage of total nitrogen (pH 4.6 SN/TN) and the soluble Ca content occurred in the first 90 d of ripening, and subsequently, the changes were slight. During ripening, functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses changed, that is, hardness decreased, meltability was improved, storage modulus at 70 °C (G'T=70) decreased, and the maximum tan delta (TDmax) increased. Both pH 4.6 SN/TN and the soluble Ca were correlated with changes in functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses during ripening. Kendall's partial correlation analysis indicated that pH 4.6 SN/TN was more significantly correlated with changes in hardness and TDmax. For processed cheeses manufactured from natural Cheddar cheeses with different ripening times, the soluble Ca content did not show significant difference, and the trends of changes in hardness, meltability, G'T=70, and TDmax were similar to those of natural Cheddar cheeses. Kendall's partial correlation analysis suggested that only pH 4.6 SN/TN was significantly correlated with the changes in functional properties of processed cheeses.

  5. Hyperosmotic Shock Engages Two Positive Feedback Loops through Caspase-3-dependent Proteolysis of JNK1-2 and Bid.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jicheng; Ben Messaoud, Nabil; López, José M

    2015-12-18

    Hyperosmotic shock induces early calpain activation, Smac/DIABLO release from the mitochondria, and p38/JNK activation in Xenopus oocytes. These pathways regulate late cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Here, we show that JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 are activated early by osmostress, and sustained activation of both isoforms accelerates the apoptotic program. When caspase-3 is activated, JNK1-2 is proteolyzed at Asp-385 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity, thereby creating a positive feedback loop. Expression of Bcl-xL markedly reduces hyperosmotic shock-induced apoptosis. In contrast, expression of Bid induces rapid caspase-3 activation, even in the absence of osmostress, which is blocked by Bcl-xL co-expression. In these conditions a significant amount of Bid in the cytosol is mono- and bi-ubiquitinated. Caspase-3 activation by hyperosmotic shock induces proteolysis of Bid and mono-ubiquitinated Bid at Asp-52 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation, and thus creating a second positive feedback loop. Revealing the JNK isoforms and the loops activated by osmostress could help to design better treatments for human diseases caused by perturbations in fluid osmolarity.

  6. Enhancement of myofibrillar proteolysis following infusion of amino acid mixture correlates positively with elevation of core body temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Ippei; Mikura, Mayumi; Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Masako; Kawano, Yuichi; Nakayama, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Administration of an amino acid (AA) mixture stimulates muscle protein synthesis and elevates core body temperature (T(b)), as characteristically found under anesthetic conditions. We tested the hypothesis that not only AA given, but also AA produced by degradation of endogenous muscular protein are provided for muscle protein synthesis, which is further reflected in T(b) modifications. Rats were intravenously administered an AA mixture or saline in combination with the anesthetic propofol or lipid emulsion. We measured plasma 3-methylhistidine (MeHis) concentrations as an index of myofibrillar protein degradation, rectal temperature and mRNA expression of atrogin-1, MuRF-1 and ubiquitin in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of rats following 3 h infusion of test solutions. T(b) did not differ significantly between conscious groups, but was higher in the AA group than in the saline group among anesthetized rats. Plasma MeHis concentrations were higher in the AA group than in the saline group under both conditions. Plasma MeHis levels correlated positively with T(b) of rats under both conditions. AA administration decreased mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and ubiquitin in gastrocnemius muscle and all mRNA levels in soleus muscle. These results suggest that AA administration enhances myofibrillar protein degradation and that the change is a determinant of T(b) modification by AA administration. However, the mechanisms underlying AA administration-associated enhancement of myofibrillar proteolysis remains yet to be determined.

  7. Selective Oma1 Protease-mediated Proteolysis of Cox1 Subunit of Cytochrome Oxidase in Assembly Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Jeong, Mi-Young; Watts, Talina; Ferris, Elliott; Winge, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Stalled biogenesis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) complex results in degradation of subunits containing redox cofactors. The conserved Oma1 metalloproteinase mediates facile Cox1 degradation in cells lacking the Coa2 assembly factor, but not in a series of other mutants stalled in CcO maturation. Oma1 is activated in coa2Δ cells, but the selective Cox1 degradation does not arise merely from its activation. Oma1 is also active in cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and cox11Δ cells impaired in CcO maturation, but this activation does not result in Oma1-mediated Cox1 degradation. The facile and selective degradation of Cox1 in coa2Δ cells, relative to other CcO assembly mutants, is likely due to impaired hemylation and subsequent misfolding of the subunit. Specific Cox1 proteolysis in coa2Δ cells arises from a combination of Oma1 activation and a susceptible conformation of Cox1. PMID:22219186

  8. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-01-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. Images PMID:8895573

  9. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  10. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  11. Glutathione peroxidase 3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppresses non-enzymatic proteolysis of glutamine synthetase in an activity-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil Young; Kho, Chang Won; Lee, Do Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Kang, Seongman; Lee, Sang Chul; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Sung Goo

    2007-10-19

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3) is ubiquitously expressed and is important antioxidant enzyme in yeast. It modulates the activities of redox-sensitive thiol proteins, particularly those involved in signal transduction pathway and protein translocation. Through immunoprecipitation/two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IP-2DE), MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and a pull down assay, we found glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) as a candidate interacting protein with Gpx3. GS is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation. It has been known that GS is non-enzymatically cleaved by ROS generated by MFO (thiol/ Fe(3+)/O(2) mixed-function oxidase) system. In this study, it is demonstrated that GS interacts with Gpx3 through its catalytic domain both in vivo and in vitro regardless of redox state. In addition, Gpx3 helps to protect GS from inactivation and degradation via oxidative stress in an activity-independent manner. Based on the results, it is suggested that Gpx3 protects GS from non-enzymatic proteolysis, thereby contributing to cell homeostasis when cell is exposed to oxidative stress.

  12. SsrA-mediated tagging and proteolysis of LacI and its role in the regulation of lac operon.

    PubMed

    Abo, T; Inada, T; Ogawa, K; Aiba, H

    2000-07-17

    SsrA RNA of Escherichia coli, also known as 10Sa RNA or tmRNA, acts both as tRNA and mRNA when ribosomes are paused at the 3' end of an mRNA lacking a stop codon. This process, referred to as trans-translation, leads to the addition of a short peptide tag to the C-terminus of the incomplete nascent polypeptide. The tagged polypeptide is then degraded by C-terminal-specific proteases. Here, we focused on endogenous targets for the SsrA system and on a potential regulatory role of SsrA RNA. First, we show that trans-translation events occur frequently in normally growing E. COLI: cells. More specifically, we report that the lacI mRNA encoding Lac repressor (LacI) is a specific natural target for trans-translation. The binding of LacI to the lac operators results in truncated lacI mRNAs that are, in turn, recognized by the SsrA system. The SsrA-mediated tagging and proteolysis of LacI appears to play a role in cellular adaptation to lactose availability by supporting a rapid induction of lac operon expression.

  13. Secretion and Proteolysis of Heterologous Proteins Fused to the Escherichia coli Maltose Binding Protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C.; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T.; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Katherine A.; Gomez, Seth R.; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W.; Franz, Andreas H.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  14. Limited Proteolysis Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling Reveals Conformational Changes in Protein (Pseudo)kinases upon Binding Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Michela; Stes, Elisabeth; Vandermarliere, Elien; Arora, Rohit; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; van Heerde, Erika; Zubarev, Roman; Bonnet, Pascal; Linders, Joannes T M; Jacoby, Edgar; Brehmer, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-10-02

    Likely due to conformational rearrangements, small molecule inhibitors may stabilize the active conformation of protein kinases and paradoxically promote tumorigenesis. We combined limited proteolysis with stable isotope labeling MS to monitor protein conformational changes upon binding of small molecules. Applying this method to the human serine/threonine kinase B-Raf, frequently mutated in cancer, we found that binding of ATP or its nonhydrolyzable analogue AMP-PNP, but not ADP, stabilized the structure of both B-Raf(WT) and B-Raf(V600E). The ATP-competitive type I B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib and the type II inhibitor sorafenib stabilized the kinase domain (KD) but had distinct effects on the Ras-binding domain. Stabilization of the B-Raf(WT) KD was confirmed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results are further supported by cellular assays in which we assessed cell viability and phosphorylation profiles in cells expressing B-Raf(WT) or B-Raf(V600E) in response to vemurafenib or sorafenib. Our data indicate that an overall stabilization of the B-Raf structure by specific inhibitors activates MAPK signaling and increases cell survival, helping to explain clinical treatment failure. We also applied our method to monitor conformational changes upon nucleotide binding of the pseudokinase KSR1, which holds high potential for inhibition in human diseases.

  15. Continuous fast Fourier transforms cyclic voltammetry as a new approach for investigation of skim milk k-casein proteolysis, a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shayeh, Javad Shabani; Sefidbakht, Yahya; Siadat, Seyed Omid Ranaei; Niknam, Kaveh

    2017-10-01

    Cheese production is relied upon the action of Rennet on the casein micelles of milk. Chymosin assay methods are usually time consuming and offline. Herein, we report a new electrochemical technique for studying the proteolysis of K-casein. The interaction of rennet and its substrate was studied by fast Fourier transform continuous cyclic voltammetry (FFTCCV) based on a determination of k-casein in aqueous solution. FFTCCV technique is a very useful method for studying the enzymatic procedures. Fast response, no need of modified electrodes or complex equipment is some of FFTCCV advantages. Various concentrations of enzyme and substrate were selected and the increase in the appearance of charged species in solution as a result of the addition of rennet was studied. Data obtained using FFTCCV technique were also confirmed by turbidity analysis. The results show that rennet proteolysis activity occurs in much shorter time scales compare with its aggregation. Hence, following the appearance of charged segments as a result of proteolysis could be under consideration as a rapid and online method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. YjbH-Enhanced Proteolysis of Spx by ClpXP in Bacillus subtilis Is Inhibited by the Small Protein YirB (YuzO)▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kommineni, Sushma; Garg, Saurabh K.; Chan, Chio Mui; Zuber, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Spx protein of Bacillus subtilis is a global regulator of the oxidative stress response. Spx concentration is controlled at the level of proteolysis by the ATP-dependent protease ClpXP and a substrate-binding protein, YjbH, which interacts with Spx. A yeast two-hybrid screen was carried out using yjbH as bait to uncover additional substrates or regulators of YjbH activity. Of the several genes identified in the screen, one encoded a small protein, YirB (YuzO), which elevated Spx concentration and activity in vivo when overproduced from an isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible yirB construct. Pulldown experiments using extracts of B. subtilis cells producing a His-tagged YirB showed that native YjbH interacts with YirB in B. subtilis. Pulldown experiments using affinity-tagged Spx showed that YirB inhibited YjbH interaction with Spx. In vitro, YjbH-mediated proteolysis of Spx by ClpXP was inhibited by YirB. The activity of YirB is similar to that of the antiadaptor proteins that were previously shown to reduce proteolysis of a specific ClpXP substrate by interacting with a substrate-binding protein. PMID:21378193

  17. Proteolysis and sensory properties of dry-cured bacon as affected by the partial substitution of sodium chloride with potassium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haizhou; Zhang, Yingyang; Long, Men; Tang, Jing; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Jiamei; Zhang, Jianhao

    2014-03-01

    Quadriceps femoris muscle samples (48) from 24 pigs were processed into dry-cured bacon. This study investigated the influence of partial substitution of sodium chloride (NaCl) with potassium chloride (KCl) on proteolysis and sensory properties of dry-cured bacon. Three salt treatments were considered, namely, I (100% NaCl), II (60% NaCl, 40% KCl), and III (30% NaCl, 70% KCl). No significant differences were observed among treatments in the proteolysis, which was reflected by SDS-PAGE, proteolysis index, amino acid nitrogen, and peptide nitrogen contents. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the moisture content between control and treatment II, whereas the moisture content in treatment III was significantly higher (p<0.05) in comparison with control (treatment I). The sensory analysis indicated that it was possible to reduce NaCl by 40% without adverse effects on sensory properties, but 70% replacement of NaCl with KCl resulted in bacon with less hardness and saltiness and higher (p<0.05) juiciness and bitterness.

  18. Effect of curd washing level on proteolysis and functionality of low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with galactose-fermenting culture.

    PubMed

    Osaili, Tareq M; Ayyash, Mutamed M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Shaker, Reyad R; Shah, Nagendra P

    2010-06-01

    The effect of curd washing on functional properties of low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with galactose-fermenting culture was investigated. A total of 4 curd washing levels (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% wt/wt) were used during low-moisture mozzarella cheese manufacture, and cheeses were stored for 63 d at 4 degrees C and the influence of curd washing on proteolysis and functionality of low-moisture mozzarella cheese were examined. Curd washing had a significant effect on moisture and ash contents. In general, moisture contents increased and ash contents decreased with increased curd washing levels. Low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with 10% curd washing levels showed higher proteolysis, meltability, and stretchability during storage than other experimental cheeses. In general, galactose contents decreased during storage; however, cheeses made with 25% and 50% curd washing levels had lower galactose contents than those with control or 10%. L-values (browning) decreased and proteolysis increased in low-moisture mozzarella cheeses during storage.

  19. Combinatory use of cell-free protein expression, limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry for the high-throughput protein domain identification.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Chen, Siyuan; Ge, Heng

    2014-02-21

    The structural domains of proteins have often been identified through the use of limited proteolysis. In structural genomics studies, it is necessary to carry this out in a high-throughput manner. Here, we constructed a novel high-throughput system, which consists of cell-free protein expression and one-step affinity purification, followed by limited proteolysis using a unique new method, referred to "on beads method". All these steps were carried out on 96-well plate formats and completed in two days, even by manual handling. The merits of the new method versus the conventional one are as follows: (1) experimental times are reduced, (2) the sample preparation for limited proteolysis experiments is simplified, and (3) both protein purification and limited digestion can be performed "in situ" on the same sample plate. This preparation method is therefore suitable for highly automated, proteolytic analyses coupled to mass spectrometry techniques at a micro-scale protein expression level. The resulting protease-resistant fragments were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS and protein domains of 34 mouse cDNA products were identified with this system.

  20. Changes of proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheese as affected by adjunct culture and ripening temperature.

    PubMed

    Sahingil, Didem; Hayaloglu, Ali A; Kirmaci, Huseyin A; Ozer, Barbaros; Simsek, Osman

    2014-11-01

    The effects of use of adjunct cultures (Lactobacillus helveticus and Lb. casei) and ripening temperatures (6 or 12 °C) on proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheeses were investigated during 120 d ripening. Proteolysis was monitored by urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE) and reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC) of water-insoluble and -soluble fractions of the cheeses, respectively. Urea-PAGE patterns of the samples revealed that the intensities of the bands representing casein fractions decreased in the experimental cheeses, being more pronounced in the cheeses made with adjunct cultures. Similarly, peptide profiles and the concentrations of individual and total free amino acids were influenced by both the adjunct cultures and ripening temperatures. The ACE-inhibitory activity of the water-soluble extracts of the cheeses were higher in the cheeses made using adjunct cultures (especially Lb. helveticus) and ripened at 12 °C. The ACE-inhibitory activity did not decrease during ripening. The contribution of Lb. helveticus to the development of proteolysis and ACE-inhibitory peptide activities were higher than that of Lb. casei. To conclude, the use of Lb. helveticus as adjunct culture in white-brined cheese and ripening at 12 °C would be recommended to obtain white-brined cheese with high ACE-I-inhibitory peptides activity and higher levels of preoteolysis.

  1. Mildly Acidic Conditions Eliminate Deamidation Artifact during Proteolysis: Digestion with Endoprotease Glu-C at pH 4.5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanshan; Moulton, Kevin Ryan; Auclair, Jared Robert; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Common yet often overlooked, deamidation of peptidyl asparagine (Asn or N) generates aspartic acid (Asp or D) or isoaspartic acid (isoAsp or isoD). Being a spontaneous, non-enzymatic protein post-translational modification, deamidation artifact can be easily introduced during sample preparation, especially proteolysis where higher-order structures are removed. This artifact not only complicates the analysis of bona fide deamidation but also affects a wide range of chemical and enzymatic processes; for instance, the newly generated Asp and isoAsp residues may block or introduce new proteolytic sites, and also convert one Asn peptide into multiple species that affect quantification. While the neutral to mildly basic conditions for common proteolysis favor deamidation, mildly acidic conditions markedly slow down the process. Unlike other commonly used endoproteases, Glu-C remains active under mildly acid conditions. As such, as demonstrated herein, deamidation artifact during proteolysis was effectively eliminated by simply performing Glu-C digestion at pH 4.5 in ammonium acetate, a volatile buffer that is compatible with mass spectrometry. Moreover, nearly identical sequence specificity was observed at both pH’s (8.0 for ammonium bicarbonate), rendering Glu-C as effective at pH 4.5. In summary, this method is generally applicable for protein analysis as it requires minimal sample preparation and uses the readily available Glu-C protease. PMID:26748652

  2. Effect of Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller) on survivability, extent of proteolysis and ACE inhibition of potential probiotic cultures in fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Basannavar, Santosh; Pothuraju, Ramesh; Sharma, Raj Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In the present investigation, the effect of Aloe vera gel powder on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, extent of proteolysis during fermentation and survival of Lactobacillus casei NCDC19 during storage of fermented milk was studied. Among the different cultures screened for ACE inhibitory activity, Lactobacillus casei NCDC 19 exhibited the highest ACE inhibition (approx. 40%) as well as extent of proteolysis (0.37, Abs₃₄₀). In the presence of Aloe vera (0.5% and 1% w/v) an increase in extent of proteolysis (0.460 ± 0.047 and 0.480 ± 0.027) and percent ACE inhibitory activity (44.32 ± 2.83 and 47.52 ± 1.83) was observed in comparison to control. Aloe vera powder addition also led to an increase in viable counts (>11 log cfu mL⁻¹) of L. casei NCDC 19 in fermented milk during storage for 7 days and the counts were maintained in sufficiently higher numbers. The study suggests Aloe vera to be a good functional ingredient which can be further explored for different health attributes. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiansong; Lin, Borong; Huang, Qiuling; Hu, Lili; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2017-04-01

    Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM) and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections.

  4. A microfluidic reactor for rapid, low-pressure proteolysis with on-chip electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Rob, Tamanna; Wilson, Derek J

    2010-02-01

    A microfluidic reactor that enables rapid digestion of proteins prior to on-line analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is introduced. The device incorporates a wide (1.5 cm), shallow (10 microm) reactor 'well' that is functionalized with pepsin-agarose, a design that facilitates low-pressure operation and high clogging resistance. Electrospray ionization is carried out directly from a short metal capillary integrated into the chip outlet. Fabrication, involving laser ablation of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), is exceedingly straightforward and inexpensive. High sequence coverage spectra of myoglobin (Mb), ubiquitin (Ub) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) digests were obtained after <4 s of residence time in the reactor. Stress testing showed little loss of performance over approximately 2 h continuous use at high flow rates (30 microL/min). The device provides a convenient platform for a range of applications in proteomics and structural biology, i.e. to enable high-throughput workflows or to limit back-exchange in spatially resolved hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) experiments. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Cardiac sympathetic neurons provide trophic signal to the heart via β2-adrenoceptor-dependent regulation of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Zaglia, Tania; Milan, Giulia; Franzoso, Mauro; Bertaggia, Enrico; Pianca, Nicola; Piasentini, Eleonora; Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Chiavegato, David; Brum, Patricia C; Glass, David J; Schiaffino, Stefano; Sandri, Marco; Mongillo, Marco

    2013-02-01

    Increased cardiac sympathetic neuron (SN) activity has been associated with pathologies such as heart failure and hypertrophy, suggesting that cardiac innervation regulates cardiomyocyte trophism. Whether continuous input from the SNs is required for the maintenance of the cardiomyocyte size has not been determined thus far. To address the role of cardiac innervation in cardiomyocyte size regulation, we monitored the effect of pharmacological sympathetic denervation in mice on cardiac structure, function, and signalling from 24 h to 30 days in the absence of other pathological stimuli. SN ablation caused an immediate reduction in the cardiomyocyte size with minimal consequences on the resting contractile function. Atrophic remodelling was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system through FOXO-dependent early induction of the muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases Atrogin-1/MAFbx and MuRF1, which was followed by activation of the autophagy-lysosome system. MuRF1 was found to be determinant in denervation atrophy as remodelling did not develop in denervated MuRF1 knock-out (KO) hearts. These effects were caused by decreased basal stimulation of cardiomyocyte β2-adrenoceptor (AR), as atrophy was prevented by treatment of denervated mice with the β2-AR agonist clenbuterol. Consistent with these data, we also observed that β2-AR KO mice showed cardiac atrophy at rest. Cardiac SNs are strong regulators of the cardiomyocyte size via β2-AR-dependent repression of proteolysis, demonstrating that the neuro-cardiac axis operates constitutively for the determination of the physiological cardiomyocyte size. These results are of great clinical relevance given the role of β-AR in cardiovascular diseases and their modulation in therapy.

  6. HtrC is involved in proteolysis of YpeB during germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Bernhards, Casey B; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah; Popham, David L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+) ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation.

  7. Loss of keratinocyte focal adhesion kinase stimulates dermal proteolysis through upregulation of MMP9 in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victor W; Garg, Ravi K; Sorkin, Michael; Rustad, Kristine C; Akaishi, Satoshi; Levi, Kemal; Nelson, Emily R; Tran, Misha; Rennert, Robert; Liu, Wei; Longaker, Michael T; Dauskardt, Reinhold H; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2014-12-01

    To investigate how epithelial mechanotransduction pathways impact wound repair. Mechanical forces are increasingly recognized to influence tissue repair, but their role in chronic wound pathophysiology remains unknown. Studies have shown that chronic wounds exhibit high levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a key proteolytic enzyme that regulates wound remodeling. We hypothesized that epithelial mechanosensory pathways regulated by keratinocyte-specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) control dermal remodeling via MMP9. A standard wound model was applied to keratinocyte-specific FAK knockout (KO) and control mice. Rates of wound healing were measured and tissue was obtained for histologic and molecular analyses. Transcriptional and immunoblot assays were used to assess the activation of FAK, intracellular kinases, and MMP9 in vitro. A cell suspension model was designed to validate the importance of FAK mechanosensing, p38, and MMP9 secretion in human cells. Biomechanical testing was utilized to evaluate matrix tensile properties in FAK KO and control wounds. Wound healing in FAK KO mice was significantly delayed compared with controls (closure at 15 days compared with 20 days, P = 0.0003). FAK KO wounds demonstrated decreased dermal thickness and collagen density. FAK KO keratinocytes exhibited overactive p38 and MMP9 signaling in vitro, findings recapitulated in human keratinocytes via the deactivation of FAK in the cell suspension model. Functionally, FAK KO wounds were significantly weaker and more brittle than control wounds, results consistent with the histologic and molecular analyses. Keratinocyte FAK is highly responsive to mechanical cues and may play a critical role in matrix remodeling via regulation of p38 and MMP9. These findings suggest that aberrant epithelial mechanosensory pathways may contribute to pathologic dermal proteolysis and wound chronicity.

  8. Lipolysis and proteolysis profiles of fresh artisanal goat cheese made with raw milk with 3 different fat contents.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Morales-Delanuez, A; Moreno-Indias, I; Hernández-Castellano, L E; Mendoza-Grimón, V; Castro, N; Argüello, A

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the proteolysis and lipolysis profiles in goat cheese made in the Canary Islands (Spain) using raw milk with 3 different fat contents (0.5, 1.5, and 5%) and ripened for 1, 7, 14, and 28 d. β-Casein was the most abundant protein in all cheeses and at all ripening times. Quantitative analysis showed a general decrease in caseins as ripening progressed, and degradation rates were higher for α(S1)-casein than for β-casein and α(S2)-casein. Furthermore, the degradation rate during the experimental time decreased with lower fat contents. The α(S2)-casein and α(S1)-casein levels that remained in full-fat and reduced-fat cheeses were less than those in low-fat cheese. In contrast, β-casein also showed degradation along with ripening, but differences in degradation among the 3 cheese types were not significant at 28 d. The degradation products increased with the ripening time in all cheeses, but they were higher in full-fat cheese than in reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. The free fatty acid concentration per 100g of cheese was higher in full-fat cheese than in reduced- and low-fat cheese; however, when the results were expressed as milligrams of free fatty acids per gram of fat in cheese, then lipolysis occurred more rapidly in low-fat cheese than in reduced- and full-fat cheeses. These results may explain the atypical texture and off-flavors found in low-fat goat cheeses, likely the main causes of non-acceptance.

  9. Antioxidant activity of bovine alpha lactalbumin Maillard products and evaluation of their in vitro gastro-duodenal digestive proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Joubran, Yousef; Moscovici, Alice; Lesmes, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Food processing offers various pathways to tailor food functionality and digestibility. This work sought to study the impact of thermally-induced Maillard reaction between bovine alpha-lactalbumin (α-la) and fructose or fructo-oligosacchrides on physicochemical properties, antioxidant capacity and in vitro digestive fate under simulated adult and infant conditions. Colloidal stability (measured by DLS) was decreased as a result of the Maillard glycation, while antioxidant capacity (determined by FRAP) and surface hydrophobicity (H0 measurements) were elevated. Semi-dynamic in vitro digestion of Maillard conjugates revealed a mixed trend as a result of postulated competing effects of glycation on α-la's susceptibility to proteolysis; steric hindrance accompanied by protein unfolding could hinder or promote the availability of enzymatic cleavage sites. Results also showed thermal processing altered the digestive breakdown profile of α-la under infant conditions contrary to negligible effects observed under adult conditions. Evaluation of the antioxidant capacity during digestion (via DPPH assay) revealed that adult digesta possessed increased antioxidant activity throughout the gastric phase compared to infant digesta, whereas infant digesta of conjugates exhibited an increase in antioxidant capacity in the duodenum compared to adult. Moreover, during infant digestion of conjugates, an increase in antioxidant capacity was observed in the later stages of the digestion. Overall, this work demonstrates that controlled thermal processing of bovine α-la could potentially modulate its functionality and digestibility, particularly as it pertains to its ability to interfere with oxidative reactions in the lumen, possibly through the generation of bioactive peptides.

  10. Conformational changes in the NS3 protease from hepatitis C virus strain Bk monitored by limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Orrù, S.; Dal Piaz, F.; Casbarra, A.; Biasiol, G.; De Francesco, R.; Steinkühler, C.; Pucci, P.

    1999-01-01

    Conformational changes occurring within the NS3 protease domain from the hepatitis C virus Bk strain (NS3(1-180)) under different physico-chemical conditions either in the absence or in the presence of its cofactor Pep4A were investigated by limited proteolysis experiments. Because the surface accessibility of the protein is affected by conformational changes, when comparative experiments were carried out on NS3(1-180) either at different glycerol concentrations or in the presence of Pep4A, differential peptide maps were obtained from which protein regions involved in the structural changes could be inferred. The surface topology of isolated NS3(1-180) in solution was essentially consistent with the crystal structure of the protein with the N-terminal segment showing a high conformational flexibility. At higher glycerol concentration, the protease assumed a more compact structure showing a decrease in the accessibility of the N-terminal segment that either was forced to interact with the protein or originate intermolecular interactions with neighboring molecules. Binding of the cofactor Pep4A caused the displacement of the N-terminal arm from the protein moiety, leading this segment to again adopt an open and flexible conformation, thus suggesting that the N-terminus of the protease contributes only marginally to the stability of the complex. The observed conformational changes might be directly correlated with the activation mechanism of the protease by either the cosolvent or the cofactor peptide because they lead to tighter packing of the substrate binding site. PMID:10422832

  11. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM
and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns
of Edam Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Cichosz, Grażyna; Nalepa, Beata; Kowalska, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=–0.807) and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) (R=0.775). After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87%) and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60%) and control cheese (6.24%). The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48%) but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24%) after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=–0.813) and TCA-SN/TN (R=–0.717) fractions were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the viability of probiotic counts. Water activity (aw) strongly correlated with the PTA-SN/TN level (R=–0.824) and bacteria viability (R=–0.728). All of the analyzed cheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening. PMID:27904317

  12. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-10-29

    Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding alphavbeta5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain.

  13. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  14. Therapeutic Approaches in Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Proteolysis, and Structural Alterations of Diaphragm and Gastrocnemius in Rats With Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Marin-Corral, Judith; Chacón-Cabrera, Alba; Salazar-Degracia, Anna; Mateu, Xavier; Puente-Maestu, Luis; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Molina, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) experience exercise intolerance, fatigue and muscle wasting, which negatively influence their survival. We hypothesized that treatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib of rats with monocrotaline-induced CHF may restore inspiratory and limb muscle mass, function, and structure through several molecular mechanisms involved in protein breakdown and metabolism in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius. In these muscles of CHF-cachectic rats with and without treatment with NAC or bortezomib (N = 10/group) and non-cachectic controls, proteolysis (tyrosine release, proteasome activities, ubiquitin-proteasome markers), oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial function, myosin, NF-κB transcriptional activity, muscle structural abnormalities, and fiber morphometry were analyzed together with muscle and cardiac functions. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of CHF-cachectic rats, tyrosine release, proteasome activity, protein ubiquitination, atrogin-1, MURF-1, NF-κB activity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and structural abnormalities were increased, while muscle and cardiac functions, myosin content, slow- and fast-twitch fiber sizes, and mitochondrial activity were decreased. Concomitant treatment of CHF-cachectic rats with NAC or bortezomib improved protein catabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, muscle fiber sizes, function and damage, superoxide dismutase and myosin levels, mitochondrial function (complex I, gastrocnemius), cardiac function and decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity in both muscles. Treatment of CHF-cachectic animals with NAC or bortezomib attenuated the functional (heart, muscles), biological, and structural alterations in muscles. Nonetheless, future studies conducted in actual clinical settings are warranted in order to assess the potential beneficial effects and safety concerns of these pharmacological agents on muscle mass loss and wasting in

  15. HtrC Is Involved in Proteolysis of YpeB during Germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Bernhards, Casey B.; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn2+ or Ca2+ ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation. PMID:25384476

  16. Inhibition of proteolysis at harvest using heat in alfalfa silages: effects on silage composition and digestion by sheep.

    PubMed

    Charmley, E; Veira, D M

    1990-03-01

    Heat treatment at harvest was used to investigate the effects of proteolysis on silage composition and digestion by sheep. Four alfalfa (Medicago sativa) silages were prepared, two from mid-bloom and two from pre-bloom crops from the same field. Mid-bloom alfalfa was conserved with formic acid as two unwilted silages, either without (unwilted control; UWC) or after heat treatment (unwilted heated; UWH) applied as steam for 1 min. Pre-bloom alfalfa was ensiled either after 24 h wilting (wilted control; WC) or after heating in a crop dehydrator for 2 min (wilted control; WH). Heated treatments were inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum. Eight wethers, cannulated in the rumen and duodenum, were given the silages to determine the effects of heat treatment on digestion. Heat treatment inhibited protease activity and reduced protein catabolism in the silo. In unwilted silages, heat treatment had no effects (P greater than .05) on OM or N digestion, but it reduced (P less than .05) CP degradability in the rumen. In wilted silages, heat treatment reduced (P less than .05) apparent OM digestion in the rumen and increased (P less than .05) the proportion of N intake flowing to the intestines as non-ammonia N (NAN). Efficiency of microbial protein synthesis also was increased (P less than .01). Absorption of N posterior to the duodenum was increased (P less than .05) in WH compared to WC, but there was no effect (P greater than .05) of heat treatment on apparent total tract N digestibility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Pericellular versican regulates the fibroblast-myofibroblast transition: a role for ADAMTS5 protease-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Noriko; Carrino, David A; Lauer, Mark E; Vasanji, Amit; Wylie, James D; Nelson, Courtney M; Apte, Suneel S

    2011-09-30

    The cell and its glycosaminoglycan-rich pericellular matrix (PCM) comprise a functional unit. Because modification of PCM influences cell behavior, we investigated molecular mechanisms that regulate PCM volume and composition. In fibroblasts and other cells, aggregates of hyaluronan and versican are found in the PCM. Dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5(-/-) mice, which lack a versican-degrading protease, ADAMTS5, had reduced versican proteolysis, increased PCM, altered cell shape, enhanced α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression and increased contractility within three-dimensional collagen gels. The myofibroblast-like phenotype was associated with activation of TGFβ signaling. We tested the hypothesis that fibroblast-myofibroblast transition in Adamts5(-/-) cells resulted from versican accumulation in PCM. First, we noted that versican overexpression in human dermal fibroblasts led to increased SMA expression, enhanced contractility, and increased Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts from Vcan haploinsufficient (Vcan(hdf/+)) mice had reduced contractility relative to wild type fibroblasts. Using a genetic approach to directly test if myofibroblast transition in Adamts5(-/-) cells resulted from increased PCM versican content, we generated Adamts5(-/-);Vcan(hdf/+) mice and isolated their dermal fibroblasts for comparison with dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5(-/-) mice. In Adamts5(-/-) fibroblasts, Vcan haploinsufficiency or exogenous ADAMTS5 restored normal fibroblast contractility. These findings demonstrate that altering PCM versican content through proteolytic activity of ADAMTS5 profoundly influenced the dermal fibroblast phenotype and may regulate a phenotypic continuum between the fibroblast and its alter ego, the myofibroblast. We propose that a physiological function of ADAMTS5 in dermal fibroblasts is to maintain optimal versican content and PCM volume by continually trimming versican in hyaluronan-versican aggregates.

  18. Short communication: Characteristics of proteolytic activities of endo- and exopeptidases in alfalfa herbage and their implications for proteolysis in silage.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Guo, X S; Zhou, H; Undersander, D J; Nandety, A

    2012-08-01

    The pH optimum and thermostability of both exopeptidases and endopeptidases were investigated in this study to elucidate the possible role of plant proteases in proteolysis during ensiling of alfalfa herbage. Proteolytic activities of 4 classes of endopeptidases (i.e., serine, metallo, aspartic, and cysteine peptidase) and 5 classes of exopeptidases (i.e., aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, dipeptidase, dipeptidyl-peptidase, and tripeptidyl-peptidase) were examined within pH values of 3 to 9, and within temperatures from 20 to 90°C. Serine and metalloproteases, the principal endopeptidases that hydrolyzed most of the protein to nonprotein nitrogen in alfalfa silage, had optimum activities at pH 4. Among the major exopeptidases contributing protein degradation in ensiled alfalfa, dipeptidase and tripeptidyl-peptidase had stable activities between pH 4 and 6, and carboxypeptidase activity was optimal at pH 5. The optimum temperature for most peptidase activities was 40°C. Proteolytic activities of both endo- and exopeptidases increased with the elevation of incubating temperature from 20 to 40°C. The pH value in well-preserved alfalfa silage is often above 4.0, and the temperatures in the ensiled mass range from 25 to 40°C. Therefore, high proteolytic activities between pH 4 and 6 and the temperature range of ensiled alfalfa suggest that plant peptidases play a role in hydrolyzing protein during prolonged storage. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM
and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns
of Edam Cheese.

    PubMed

    Aljewicz, Marek; Cichosz, Grażyna; Nalepa, Beata; Kowalska, Marika

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=-0.807) and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) (R=0.775). After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87%) and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60%) and control cheese (6.24%). The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48%) but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24%) after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=-0.813) and TCA-SN/TN (R=-0.717) fractions were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the viability of probiotic counts. Water activity (a(w) ) strongly correlated with the PTA-SN/TN level (R=-0.824) and bacteria viability (R=-0.728). All of the analyzed cheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening.

  20. Fast and efficient proteolysis by microwave-assisted protein digestion using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Yao, Guoping; Qi, Dawei; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-05-15

    A fast and efficient proteolysis approach of microwave-assisted protein digestion was developed by using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica (MS) microspheres. In the work, immobilization of the enzyme onto MS microspheres was very simple and only through a one-step reaction with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO) which provides the epoxy group as a reactive spacer. Considering that the magnetic particles are excellent microwave absorbers, we developed a novel microwave-assisted digestion method based on the easily prepared trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. This novel digestion method combined the advantages of immobilized trypsin and the rapid-fashion of microwave-assisted digestion, which resulted in high digestion efficiency. BSA and myoglobin were used as model proteins to optimize the conditions of this method. Peptide fragments produced in 15 s could be confidently identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Equivalent or better digestion efficiency was observed comparing to current in-solution digestion. Besides, because of the unique magnetic responsivity, the immobilized trypsin can be isolated easily with the help of an external magnet and thus used repeatedly. High activity was obtained even after seven runs of the trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. To further verify its efficiency in proteome analysis, one reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) fraction of rat liver extract was applied. After 15 s incubation, 16 totally unique peptides corresponding to two proteins were identified. Finally, the rat liver sample was used to evaluate its worth for the application. With analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), comparable digestion efficiency was observed with typical in-solution digestion but the incubation time was largely shortened. This new microwave-assisted digestion method will hasten the application of the proteome

  1. In Vitro Stretch Injury Induces Time- and Severity-Dependent Alterations of STEP Phosphorylation and Proteolysis in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Mahlet N.; von Reyn, Catherine R.; Mott, Rosalind E.; Putt, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has been identified as a component of physiological and pathophysiological signaling pathways mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/calcineurin/calpain activation. Activation of these pathways produces a subsequent change in STEP isoform expression or activation via dephosphorylation. In this study, we evaluated changes in STEP phosphorylation and proteolysis in dissociated cortical neurons after sublethal and lethal mechanical injury using an in vitro stretch injury device. Sublethal stretch injury produces minimal changes in STEP phosphorylation at early time points, and increased STEP phosphorylation at 24 h that is blocked by the NMDA-receptor antagonist APV, the calcineurin-inhibitor FK506, and the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin. Lethal stretch injury produces rapid STEP dephosphorylation via NR2B-containing NMDA receptors, but not calcineurin, and a subsequent biphasic phosphorylation pattern. STEP61 expression progressively increases after sublethal stretch with no change in calpain-mediated STEP33 formation, while lethal stretch injury results in STEP33 formation via a NR2B-containing NMDA receptor pathway within 1 h of injury. Blocking calpain activation in the initial 30 min after stretch injury increases the ratio of active STEP in cells and blocks STEP33 formation, suggesting that STEP is an early substrate of calpain after mechanical injury. There is a strong correlation between the amount of STEP33 formed and the degree of cell death observed after lethal stretch injury. In summary, these data demonstrate that previously characterized pathways of STEP regulation via the NMDA receptor are generally conserved in mechanical injury, and suggest that calpain-mediated cleavage of STEP33 should be further examined as an early marker of neuronal fate after stretch injury. PMID:22435660

  2. Limited proteolysis as a tool to probe the tertiary conformation of dysferlin and structural consequences of patient missense variant L344P.

    PubMed

    Woolger, Natalie; Bournazos, Adam; Sophocleous, Reece A; Evesson, Frances J; Lek, Angela; Driemer, Birgit; Sutton, R Bryan; Cooper, Sandra T

    2017-09-13

    Dysferlin is a large transmembrane protein that plays a key role in cell membrane repair, and underlies a recessive form of inherited muscular dystrophy. Dysferlinopathy is characterized by absence or marked reduction of dysferlin protein, with 43% of reported pathogenic variants being missense variants that span the length of the dysferlin protein. The unique structure of dysferlin, with seven tandem C2-domains separated by linkers, suggest dysferlin may dynamically associate with phospholipid membranes in response to Ca2+ signaling. However, the overall conformation of the dysferlin protein is uncharacterized. To dissect the structural architecture of dysferlin, we have applied the method of limited proteolysis that allows non-specific digestion of unfolded peptides by trypsin. Using five antibodies spanning the dysferlin protein, we identified a highly reproducible jigsaw map of dysferlin fragments protected from digestion. Our data infers a modular architecture of four tertiary domains; 1) C2A which is readily removed as a solo domain, 2) mid-region C2B-C2C-Fer-DysF, commonly excised as an intact module, with sub-digestion to different fragments suggesting several dynamic folding options 3) C-terminal four C2 domain module and 4) calpain-cleaved mini-dysferlinC72, which is particularly resistant to proteolysis. Importantly, we reveal a patient missense variant L344P which largely escapes proteosomal surveillance, shows subtle but clear changes in tertiary conformation. Accompanying evidence from immunohisto-chemistry and flow cytometry, using antibodies with conformationally sensitive epitopes, supports proteolysis data. Collectively, we provide insight into the structural topology of dysferlin and show how a single missense mutation within dysferlin can exert local changes in tertiary conformation. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  3. The antigenic determinants on HIV p24 for CD4+ T cell inhibiting antibodies as determined by limited proteolysis, chemical modification, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason G; Tomer, Kenneth B; Hioe, Catarina E; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Norris, Philip J

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, mass spectrometry has been employed by more and more researchers for identifying the proteins in a macromolecular complex as well as for defining the surfaces of their binding interfaces. This characterization of protein-protein interfaces usually involves at least one of several different methodologies in addition to the actual mass spectrometry. For example, limited proteolysis is often used as a first step in defining regions of a protein that are protected from proteolysis when the protein of interest is part of a macromolecular complex. Other techniques used in conjunction with mass spectrometry for determining regions of a protein involved in protein-protein interactions include chemical modification, such as covalent cross-linking, acetylation of lysines, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, or other forms of modification. In this report, both limited proteolysis and chemical modification were combined with several mass spectrometric techniques in efforts to define the protein surface on the HIV core protein, p24, recognized by two different monoclonal human antibodies that were isolated from HIV+ patients. One of these antibodies, 1571, strongly inhibits the CD4+ T cell proliferative response to a known epitope (PEVIPMFSALSEGATP), while the other antibody, 241-D, does not inhibit as strongly. The epitopes for both of these antibodies were determined to be discontinuous and localized to the N-terminus of p24. Interestingly, the epitope recognized by the strongly inhibiting antibody, 1571, completely overlaps the T cell epitope PEVIPMFSALSEGATP, while the antibody 241-D binds to a region adjacent to the region of p24 recognized by the antibody 1571. These results suggest that, possibly due to epitope competition, antibodies produced during HIV infection can negatively affect CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity against the virus.

  4. The regulation of Cdc20 proteolysis reveals a role for APC components Cdc23 and Cdc27 during S phase and early mitosis.

    PubMed

    Prinz, S; Hwang, E S; Visintin, R; Amon, A

    1998-06-18

    In eukaryotic cells, a specialized proteolysis machinery that targets proteins containing destruction-box sequences for degradation and that uses a ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC) plays a key role in the regulation of mitosis. APC-dependent proteolysis triggers the separation of sister chromatids at the metaphase-anaphase transition and the destruction of mitotic cyclins at the end of mitosis. Recently, two highly conserved WD40-repeat proteins, Cdc20 and Cdh1/Hct1, have been identified as substrate-specific regulators for APC-dependent proteolysis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we have investigated the cell cycle regulation of Cdc20 and Cdh1/Hct1. Whereas the levels CDH1/HCT1 RNA and Cdh1/Hct1 protein are constant throughout the cell cycle, CDC20 RNA and Cdc20 protein are present only during late S phase and mitosis and Cdc20 protein is unstable throughout the entire cell cycle. The instability of Cdc20 depends on CDC23 and CDC27, which encode components of the APC. During the G1 phase, a destruction box within Cdc20 mediates its instability, but during S phase and mitosis, although Cdc20 destruction is still dependent on CDC23 and CDC27, it does not depend on the Cdc20 destruction box. There are remarkable differences in the regulation of Cdc20 and Cdh1/Hct1. Furthermore, the APC activator Cdc20 is itself a substrate of the Cdc27 have a role in the degradation of Cdc20 during S Phase and early mitosis that is not mediated by its destruction box.

  5. Inhibition of proteolysis in alfalfa silages using heat at harvest: effects on digestion in the rumen, voluntary intake and animal performance.

    PubMed

    Charmley, E; Veira, D M

    1990-07-01

    The effects of proteolysis on digestion and animal performance were studied using heat to inhibit proteolysis at ensiling. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) was ensiled either after wilting for 24 h (control; C) or after heating (100 degrees C) in a crop dehydrator for 2 min (heated; H). In Exp. 1, eight wethers, cannulated in the rumen and duodenum, were given the silages to determine the effects of heat treatment of alfalfa on the digestion of silage. In Exp. 2, growing lambs had ad libitum access to the silages to determine the effects of heat treatment on intake, animal performance and body composition. Heat treatment inhibited protease activity; protein N accounted for 33.5 and 61.3% and ammonia N 15.5 and 5.1% of total N in C and H silages, respectively. Heat treatment reduced mean post-feeding ruminal ammonia N concentration (P less than .05), ruminal pH (P less than .05) and the acetate: propionate ratio (P less than .001) in ruminal fluid. Heat treatment increased duodenal flow of non-ammonia N (P less than .05) and amino acids (P less than .05), the amount of N absorbed (P less than .05) in the small plus large intestine and also increased the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (P less than .05). In Exp. 2, although intake and gain were higher (P less than .001) for H-fed than for C-fed lambs, there were no differences (P greater than .05) in empty body composition. The results indicated that inhibition of proteolysis by heat treatment at ensiling can increase utilization of silage N within the rumen, increase voluntary intake and result in a higher rate of gain by lambs fed alfalfa silage.

  6. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuling; Hu, Lili; Zhuo, Kan

    2017-01-01

    Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM) and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections. PMID:28403192

  7. Proteolysis, NaOH and ultrasound-enhanced extraction of anticoagulant and antioxidant sulfated polysaccharides from the edible seaweed, Gracilaria birdiae.

    PubMed

    Fidelis, Gabriel Pereira; Camara, Rafael Barros Gomes; Queiroz, Moacir Fernandes; Santos Pereira Costa, Mariana Santana; Santos, Pablo Castro; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira; Costa, Leandro Silva

    2014-11-13

    The sulfated polysaccharides (SP) from the edible red seaweed, Gracilaria birdiae, were obtained using five different extraction conditions: Gracilaria birdiae 1 (GB1)-water; GB1s-water/sonication; GB1sp-water/sonication/proteolysis; GB2s-NaOH/sonication; and GB2sp-NaOH/sonication/proteolysis. The yield (g) increased in the following order: GB2sp>GB1sp>GB2s>GB1s>GB1. However, the amount of SP extracted increased in a different way: GB2sp>GB1>GB1sp>GB1s>GB2s. Infrared and electrophoresis analysis showed that all conditions extracted the same SP. In addition, monosaccharide composition showed that ultrasound promotes the extraction of polysaccharides other than SP. In the prothrombin time (PT) test, which evaluates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, none of the samples showed anticoagulant activity. While in the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test, which evaluates the intrinsic coagulation pathway, all samples showed anticoagulant activity, except GB2s. The aPTT activity decreased in the order of GB1sp>GB2sp>GB1>GB1s>GB2s. The total capacity antioxidant (TCA) of the SP was also affected by extraction condition, since GB2s and GB1 showed lower activity in comparison to the other conditions. In conclusion, the conditions of SP extraction influence their biological activities and chemical composition. The data revealed that NaOH/sonication/proteolysis was the best condition to extract anticoagulant and antioxidant SPs from Gracilaria birdiae.

  8. The C-terminal domain of the Xenopus cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27Xic1, is both necessary and sufficient for phosphorylation-independent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Li-Chiou; Zhu, Xi-Ning; Herrera, Carlos R; Tseng, Hui-Min; Pfleger, Cathie M; Block, Karen; Yew, P Renee

    2005-10-21

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, the CDK inhibitor p27(Xic1) (Xic1) inhibits DNA synthesis by negatively regulating CDK2-cyclin E. Using the frog egg extract as a model system for the study of Xic1, studies have demonstrated that Xic1 protein levels are regulated by nuclear ubiquitination and proteolysis. To characterize the molecular mechanism that regulates Xic1 turnover, we have identified the minimal sequences of Xic1 that are necessary and sufficient for its nuclear ubiquitination and degradation. Using deletion mutagenesis, our studies indicated that the C-terminal 50 amino acids of Xic1 are critical for its proteolysis beyond a role in nuclear transport. Replacement of the Xic1 C terminus with the SV40 nuclear localization sequence resulted in the nuclear localization of Xic1 but not its ubiquitination or degradation. Our deletion studies also indicated that the CDK2-cyclin binding domain of Xic1 is important for its efficient retention in the nucleus. Further deletion analyses identified at least 3 lysine residues within the Xic1 C terminus that are targeted for specific ubiquitination. Importantly, our studies demonstrated that the Xic1 C-terminal 50 amino acids can serve as a nuclear degradation signal when fused to a stable heterologous nuclear protein. Moreover, a 30-amino-acid region within the C terminus of Xic1 can serve as a nuclear ubiquitination signal. To address the role of phosphorylation on Xic1 turnover, all the potential phosphorylation sites within the C-terminal 50 amino acids of Xic1 were mutated to alanine to prevent possible phosphorylation. This resulted in a Xic1 protein that was nevertheless degraded in a manner similar to wild-type Xic1, suggesting that phosphorylation of Xic1 is not critical for its nuclear ubiquitination or proteolysis.

  9. The Role of Skp1-Cul1-F-box Ubiquitin Ligases in Src-Stimulated Estrogen Receptor Proteolysis and Estrogen Receptor Target Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    feed forward loop whereby estrogen stimulates SKP2- dependent ERa transactivation of E2F-1, which in turn induces further cyclin E and SKP2 expression to...SKP2 overexpression enhanced estrogen- induced E2F-1 and BLM expression. SKP2 knockdown impaired estrogen-stimulated ERα, SKP2, SRC3 and RNA polymerase... dependent   Several F‐box proteins contain the signature steroid hormone co‐activator motif LXXLL. To test if  SCFs regulate ERα proteolysis, a

  10. Proteolysis-Dependent Remodeling of the Tubulin Homolog FtsZ at the Division Septum in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Marissa G.; LaBreck, Christopher J.; Conti, Joseph; Camberg, Jodi L.

    2017-01-01

    During bacterial cell division a dynamic protein structure called the Z-ring assembles at the septum. The major protein in the Z-ring in Escherichia coli is FtsZ, a tubulin homolog that polymerizes with GTP. FtsZ is degraded by the two-component ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Two regions of FtsZ, located outside of the polymerization domain in the unstructured linker and at the C-terminus, are important for specific recognition and degradation by ClpXP. We engineered a synthetic substrate containing green fluorescent protein (Gfp) fused to an extended FtsZ C-terminal tail (residues 317–383), including the unstructured linker and the C-terminal conserved region, but not the polymerization domain, and showed that it is sufficient to target a non-native substrate for degradation in vitro. To determine if FtsZ degradation regulates Z-ring assembly during division, we expressed a full length Gfp-FtsZ fusion protein in wild type and clp deficient strains and monitored fluorescent Z-rings. In cells deleted for clpX or clpP, or cells expressing protease-defective mutant protein ClpP(S97A), Z-rings appear normal; however, after photobleaching a region of the Z-ring, fluorescence recovers ~70% more slowly in cells without functional ClpXP than in wild type cells. Gfp-FtsZ(R379E), which is defective for degradation by ClpXP, also assembles into Z-rings that recover fluorescence ~2-fold more slowly than Z-rings containing Gfp-FtsZ. In vitro, ClpXP cooperatively degrades and disassembles FtsZ polymers. These results demonstrate that ClpXP is a regulator of Z-ring dynamics and that the regulation is proteolysis-dependent. Our results further show that FtsZ-interacting proteins in E. coli fine-tune Z-ring dynamics. PMID:28114338

  11. Effects of fibre type and structure of longissimus lumborum (Ll), biceps femoris (Bf) and semimembranosus (Sm) deer muscles salting with different Nacl addition on proteolysis index and texture of dry-cured meats.

    PubMed

    Żochowska-Kujawska, J

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the effect of fibre type and structure as well as NaCl level on the proteolysis index and texture parameters observed in dry-cured meats produced from individual deer muscles. The biceps femoris, semimembranosus and longissimus lumborum muscles were cut from deer main elements, shaped into blocks by trimming off the edges, cured by adding 4, 6 and 8% of salt (w/w) and dried in a ripening chamber for 29days. The results indicated that deer dry-cured muscles with higher percentage of red fibres (type I) showed higher texture parameters, proteolysis index as well as lower moisture losses than muscles with higher amount of white fibres (type IIB). Dry-cured deer muscles with lower NaCl content showed higher values of proteolysis index and lower hardness, cohesiveness, springiness, and chewiness, as well as lower changes in structure elements. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  13. Nutrient-Regulated Proteolysis of MrpC Halts Expression of Genes Important for Commitment to Sporulation during Myxococcus xanthus Development

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Ramya

    2014-01-01

    Starved Myxococcus xanthus cells glide to aggregation centers and form fruiting bodies in which rod-shaped cells differentiate into ovoid spores. Commitment to development was investigated by adding nutrients at specific times after starvation and determining whether development halted or proceeded. At 24 h poststarvation, some rod-shaped cells were committed to subsequent shape change and to becoming sonication-resistant spores, but nutrients caused partial disaggregation of fruiting bodies. By 30 h poststarvation, 10-fold more cells were committed to becoming sonication-resistant spores, and compact fruiting bodies persisted after nutrient addition. During the critical period of commitment around 24 to 30 h poststarvation, the transcription factors MrpC and FruA cooperatively regulate genes important for sporulation. FruA responds to short-range C-signaling, which increases as cells form fruiting bodies. MrpC was found to be highly sensitive to nutrient-regulated proteolysis both before and during the critical period of commitment to sporulation. The rapid turnover of MrpC upon nutrient addition to developing cells halted expression of the dev operon, which is important for sporulation. Regulated proteolysis of MrpC appeared to involve ATP-independent metalloprotease activity and may provide a mechanism for monitoring whether starvation persists and halting commitment to sporulation if nutrients reappear. PMID:24837289

  14. Calpastatin-mediated inhibition of calpains in the mouse brain prevents mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis, nuclear localization and aggregation, relieving Machado-Joseph disease.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ana T; Gonçalves, Nélio; Koeppen, Arnulf; Déglon, Nicole; Kügler, Sebastian; Duarte, Carlos Bandeira; Pereira de Almeida, Luís

    2012-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease is the most frequently found dominantly-inherited cerebellar ataxia. Over-repetition of a CAG trinucleotide in the MJD1 gene translates into a polyglutamine tract within the ataxin 3 protein, which upon proteolysis may trigger Machado-Joseph disease. We investigated the role of calpains in the generation of toxic ataxin 3 fragments and pathogenesis of Machado-Joseph disease. For this purpose, we inhibited calpain activity in mouse models of Machado-Joseph disease by overexpressing the endogenous calpain-inhibitor calpastatin. Calpain blockage reduced the size and number of mutant ataxin 3 inclusions, neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. By reducing fragmentation of ataxin 3, calpastatin overexpression modified the subcellular localization of mutant ataxin 3 restraining the protein in the cytoplasm, reducing aggregation and nuclear toxicity and overcoming calpastatin depletion observed upon mutant ataxin 3 expression. Our findings are the first in vivo proof that mutant ataxin 3 proteolysis by calpains mediates its translocation to the nucleus, aggregation and toxicity and that inhibition of calpains may provide an effective therapy for Machado-Joseph disease.

  15. IKK-induced NF-κB1 p105 proteolysis is critical for B cell antibody responses to T cell–dependent antigen

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Visekruna, Alexander; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Janzen, Julia; Zillwood, Rachel; Tarlinton, David M.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of IκB kinase (IKK)–induced proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105 in B cells was investigated using Nfkb1SSAA/SSAA mice, in which this NF-κB signaling pathway is blocked. Nfkb1SSAA mutation had no effect on the development and homeostasis of follicular mature (FM) B cells. However, analysis of mixed bone marrow chimeras revealed that Nfkb1SSAA/SSAA FM B cells were completely unable to mediate T cell–dependent antibody responses. Nfkb1SSAA mutation decreased B cell antigen receptor (BCR) activation of NF-κB in FM B cells, which selectively blocked BCR stimulation of cell survival and antigen-induced differentiation into plasmablasts and germinal center B cells due to reduced expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and IRF4, respectively. In contrast, the antigen-presenting function of FM B cells and their BCR-induced migration to the follicle T cell zone border, as well as their growth and proliferation after BCR stimulation, were not affected. All of the inhibitory effects of Nfkb1SSAA mutation on B cell functions were rescued by normalizing NF-κB activation genetically. Our study identifies critical B cell-intrinsic functions for IKK-induced NF-κB1 p105 proteolysis in the antigen-induced survival and differentiation of FM B cells, which are essential for T-dependent antibody responses. PMID:25225457

  16. In vitro toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate on rat liver hepatocytes: probability of distructive binding to CYP 2E1 and involvement of cellular proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Khansari, Mehdi Rajabnia; Yousefsani, Bahareh Sadat; Kobarfard, Farzad; Faizi, Mehrdad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-08-25

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), an anthropogenic fluorosurfactant, is one of the most common global pollutants. PFOS is used in various consumer products to provide soil, oil, and water resistance to materials used in clothing, upholstery, and food packaging. PFOS is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to mammalian species. In this study, the cellular mechanisms involved in PFOS hepatotoxicity were evaluated. For this purpose, we determined oxidative stress markers including cell lysis, ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential decrease, lysosomal membrane leakiness, and cellular proteolysis. Our results demonstrated that PFOS liver cytotoxicity was associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation in isolated rat hepatocytes. Incubation of hepatocytes with PFOS caused rapid depletion of hepatocyte glutathione (GSH), an important marker of cellular oxidative stress. Most of the PFOS-induced GSH depletion could be attributed to the expulsion of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). PFOS hepatotoxicity was inhibited by antioxidants and ROS scavengers, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore sealing agents, and endocytosis inhibitors. Our results suggest that PFOS hepatotoxicity might be the result of oxidative stress-induced lysosomal membrane leakiness and cellular proteolysis in rat hepatocytes.

  17. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  18. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-04-29

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  19. Nutrient-regulated proteolysis of MrpC halts expression of genes important for commitment to sporulation during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Ramya; Kroos, Lee

    2014-08-01

    Starved Myxococcus xanthus cells glide to aggregation centers and form fruiting bodies in which rod-shaped cells differentiate into ovoid spores. Commitment to development was investigated by adding nutrients at specific times after starvation and determining whether development halted or proceeded. At 24 h poststarvation, some rod-shaped cells were committed to subsequent shape change and to becoming sonication-resistant spores, but nutrients caused partial disaggregation of fruiting bodies. By 30 h poststarvation, 10-fold more cells were committed to becoming sonication-resistant spores, and compact fruiting bodies persisted after nutrient addition. During the critical period of commitment around 24 to 30 h poststarvation, the transcription factors MrpC and FruA cooperatively regulate genes important for sporulation. FruA responds to short-range C-signaling, which increases as cells form fruiting bodies. MrpC was found to be highly sensitive to nutrient-regulated proteolysis both before and during the critical period of commitment to sporulation. The rapid turnover of MrpC upon nutrient addition to developing cells halted expression of the dev operon, which is important for sporulation. Regulated proteolysis of MrpC appeared to involve ATP-independent metalloprotease activity and may provide a mechanism for monitoring whether starvation persists and halting commitment to sporulation if nutrients reappear.

  20. Proteolysis of Xenopus Cip-type CDK inhibitor, p16Xic2, is regulated by PCNA binding and CDK2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell division is positively regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) partnered with cyclins and negatively regulated by CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, three types of CDK inhibitors have been described: p27Xic1 (Xic1) which shares sequence homology with both p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 from mammals, p16Xic2 (Xic2) which shares sequence homology with p21Cip1, and p17Xic3 (Xic3) which shares sequence homology with p27Kip1. While past studies have demonstrated that during DNA polymerase switching, Xic1 is targeted for protein turnover dependent upon DNA, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), and the ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2, little is known about the processes that regulate Xic2 or Xic3. Methods We used the Xenopus interphase egg extract as a model system to examine the regulation of Xic2 by proteolysis and phosphorylation. Results Our studies indicated that following primer synthesis during the initiation of DNA replication, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and that Cdt2 can promote Xic2 turnover. Additionally, during interphase, Xic2 is phosphorylated by CDK2 at Ser-98 and Ser-131 in a DNA-independent manner, inhibiting Xic2 turnover. In the presence of double-stranded DNA ends, Xic2 is also phosphorylated at Ser-78 and Ser-81 by a caffeine-sensitive kinase, but this phosphorylation does not alter Xic2 turnover. Conversely, in the presence or absence of DNA, Xic3 was stable in the Xenopus interphase egg extract and did not exhibit a shift indicative of phosphorylation. Conclusions During interphase, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent proteolysis that is negatively regulated by CDK2 phosphorylation. During a response to DNA damage, Xic2 may be alternatively regulated by phosphorylation by a caffeine-sensitive kinase. Our studies suggest that the three types of Xenopus CDK inhibitors, Xic1, Xic2, and Xic3 appear to be uniquely regulated which may reflect their specialized roles during cell

  1. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  2. βTrCP-Mediated Proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105 Requires Phosphorylation of p105 Serines 927 and 932

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerie; Janzen, Julia; Fischer, Gregory Zvi; Soneji, Yasmina; Beinke, Sören; Salmeron, Andres; Allen, Hamish; Hay, Ronald T.; Ben-Neriah, Yinon; Ley, Steven C.

    2003-01-01

    NF-κB1 p105 functions both as a precursor of NF-κB1 p50 and as a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NF-κB. Following the stimulation of cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), the IκB kinase (IKK) complex rapidly phosphorylates NF-κB1 p105 on serine 927 in the PEST region. This phosphorylation is essential for TNF-α to trigger p105 degradation, which releases the associated Rel/NF-κB subunits to translocate into the nucleus and regulate target gene transcription. Serine 927 resides in a conserved motif (Asp-Ser927-Gly-Val-Glu-Thr-Ser932) homologous to the IKK target sequence in IκBα. In this study, TNF-α-induced p105 proteolysis was revealed to additionally require the phosphorylation of serine 932. Experiments with IKK1−/− and IKK2−/− double knockout embryonic fibroblasts demonstrate that the IKK complex is essential for TNF-α to stimulate phosphorylation on p105 serines 927 and 932. Furthermore, purified IKK1 and IKK2 can each phosphorylate a glutathione S-transferase-p105758-967 fusion protein on both regulatory serines in vitro. IKK-mediated p105 phosphorylation generates a binding site for βTrCP, the receptor subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, and depletion of βTrCP by RNA interference blocks TNF-α-induced p105 ubiquitination and proteolysis. Phosphopeptide competition experiments indicate that βTrCP binds p105 more effectively when both serines 927 and 932 are phosphorylated. Interestingly, however, βTrCP affinity for the IKK-phosphorylated sequence on p105 is substantially lower than that on IκBα. Thus, it appears that reduced p105 recruitment of βTrCP and subsequent ubiquitination may contribute to delayed p105 proteolysis after TNF-α stimulation relative to that for IκBα. PMID:12482991

  3. Proteolysis of the class II-associated invariant chain generates a peptide binding site in intracellular HLA-DR molecules. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1991. 88: 3150-3154.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-08-01

    HLA-DR molecules are heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins that associate intracellularly with a polypeptide known as the invariant (I) chain. Shortly before expression of the HLA-DR αβ dimer on the cell surface, however the I chain is removed from the intracellular αβI complex by a mechanism thought to involve proteolysis . In this report, we show that treatment of purified αβI with the cysteine proteinase cathepsin B results in the specific proteolysis of the HLA-DR-associated I chain in vitro. As a consequence of this, the I chain is removed and free αβ dimers are released from αβI. Although αβI fails to bind an immunogenic peptide, the released αβ dimers acquire the ability to bind the peptide after proteolysis of the I chain. These results suggest that the I chain inhibits immunogenic peptide binding to αβI early during intracellular transport and demonstrate that proteolysis is likely to be the in vivo mechanism of I chain removal.

  4. Chemically Induced Degradation of Sirtuin 2 (Sirt2) by a Proteolysis Targeting Chimera (PROTAC) Based on Sirtuin Rearranging Ligands (SirReals).

    PubMed

    Schiedel, Matthias; Herp, Daniel; Hammelmann, Sören; Swyter, Sören; Lehotzky, Attila; Robaa, Dina; Oláh, Judit; Ovádi, Judit; Sippl, Wolfgang; Jung, Manfred

    2017-04-17

    Here we report the development of a proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC) based on the combination of the unique features of the sirtuin rearranging ligands (SirReals) as highly potent and isotype-selective Sirt2 inhibitors with thalidomide, a bona fide cereblon ligand. For the first time, we report the formation of a PROTAC by Cu(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition of a thalidomide-derived azide to an alkynylated inhibitor. This thalidomide-derived azide as well as the highly versatile linking strategy can be readily adapted to alkynylated ligands of other targets. In HeLa cells, our SirReal-based PROTAC induced isotype-selective Sirt2 degradation that results in the hyperacetylation of the microtubule network coupled with enhanced process elongation. Thus, our SirReal-based PROTAC is the first example of a probe that is able to chemically induce the degradation of an epigenetic eraser protein.

  5. Influence of pig rennet on proteolysis, organic acids content and microbiota of Pecorino di Farindola, a traditional Italian ewe's raw milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Patrignani, Francesca; Manetta, Anna Chiara; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Corsetti, Aldo; Martino, Giuseppe; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2015-05-15

    The use of pig rennet is very ancient and in Italy is only applied in the manufacture of Pecorino di Farindola cheese. In order to evaluate the key role of this rennet in the establishment of peculiar features of Pecorino di Farindola, cheeses made from raw ewes' milk using calf (A) and kid (B) rennets were compared to those produced with pig (C) rennet. The use of pig rennet for Pecorino di Farindola cheese making confers physico-chemical and proteolytic characteristics that differentiate it from cheeses produced with other coagulants. However, no microbiological differences were observed. Chesses made with pig and kid rennets were characterised by higher proteolysis after 7 days of ripening. The content of isovaleric and propionic acids at the end of ripening was correlated with the presence of propionibacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An anti-peptide antibody that recognizes a neo-antigen in the CR1 stump remaining on erythrocytes after proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J E; Harrison, R A; Barker, P J; Lachmann, P J

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies of erythrocyte CR1 levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other diseases with in vivo complement activation have led to the conclusion that CR1 levels fall because of loss of CR1 from erythrocytes by proteolysis--predominantly in the liver. In order to measure the existence of proteolysed CR1 remnants on erythrocytes an antibody was raised to a peptide corresponding to the CR1 sequence between the proximal standard consensus repeat (SCR) and the transmembrane segment. This antipeptide antibody recognizes a neo-antigen found on trypsinized erythrocytes which has been demonstrated to represent the 'CR1-stump'. The anti-'CR1-stump' antiserum detects proteolysed CR1 on the ex vivo erythrocytes of a patient with cold haemolytic antibody disease (CHAD). However, higher affinity antibodies will be needed to make anti-CR1-stump a satisfactory diagnostic reagent.

  7. An anti-peptide antibody that recognizes a neo-antigen in the CR1 stump remaining on erythrocytes after proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, J E; Harrison, R A; Barker, P J; Lachmann, P J

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies of erythrocyte CR1 levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other diseases with in vivo complement activation have led to the conclusion that CR1 levels fall because of loss of CR1 from erythrocytes by proteolysis--predominantly in the liver. In order to measure the existence of proteolysed CR1 remnants on erythrocytes an antibody was raised to a peptide corresponding to the CR1 sequence between the proximal standard consensus repeat (SCR) and the transmembrane segment. This antipeptide antibody recognizes a neo-antigen found on trypsinized erythrocytes which has been demonstrated to represent the 'CR1-stump'. The anti-'CR1-stump' antiserum detects proteolysed CR1 on the ex vivo erythrocytes of a patient with cold haemolytic antibody disease (CHAD). However, higher affinity antibodies will be needed to make anti-CR1-stump a satisfactory diagnostic reagent. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1370772

  8. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  9. Calpain- and caspase-mediated alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis in rat cerebrocortical neuronal cultures after ecstasy or methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Matthew W; Zheng, Wenrong; Kobeissy, Firas H; Cheng Liu, Ming; Hayes, Ronald L; Gold, Mark S; Larner, Stephen F; Wang, Kevin K W

    2007-08-01

    Abuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or Ecstasy) and methamphetamine (Meth or Speed) is a growing international problem with an estimated 250 million users of psychoactive drugs worldwide. It is important to demonstrate and understand the mechanism of neurotoxicity so potential prevention and treatment therapies can be designed. In this study rat primary cerebrocortical neuron cultures were challenged with MDMA and Meth (1 or 2 mM) for 24 and 48 h and compared to the excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The neurotoxicity of these drugs, as assessed by microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and immunoblot, was shown to be both dose- and time-dependent. Immunoblot analysis using biomarkers of cell death showed significant proteolysis of both alphaII-spectrin and tau proteins. Breakdown products of alphaII-spectrin (SBDPs) of 150, 145, and 120 kDa and tau breakdown products (TBDPs) of 45, 32, 26, and 14 kDa were observed. The use of the protease inhibitors calpain inhibitor SJA6017