Science.gov

Sample records for integrating lys-n proteolysis

  1. Proteolysis regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integration

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ryuichi; Gunawan, Felix; Beisaw, Arica; Jimenez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Kostin, Sawa; Kawakami, Koichi; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue integrity is critical for organ formation and function. During heart development, cardiomyocytes differentiate and integrate to form a coherent tissue that contracts synchronously. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac tissue integrity are poorly understood. Here we show that proteolysis, via the E3 ubiquitin ligase ASB2, regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integrity. Cardiomyocytes in asb2b zebrafish mutants fail to terminally differentiate, resulting in reduced cardiac contractility and output. Mosaic analyses reveal a cell-autonomous requirement for Asb2b in cardiomyocytes for their integration as asb2b mutant cardiomyocytes are unable to meld into wild-type myocardial tissue. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that ASB2 negatively regulates TCF3, a bHLH transcription factor. TCF3 must be degraded for cardiomyocyte maturation, as TCF3 gain-of-function causes a number of phenotypes associated with cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Overall, our results show that proteolysis has an important role in cardiomyocyte maturation and the formation of a coherent myocardial tissue. PMID:28211472

  2. Sequencing Lys-N Proteolytic Peptides by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated.

  3. Proteolysis at a Specific Extracellular Residue Implicates Integral Membrane CLAG3 in Malaria Parasite Nutrient Channels

    PubMed Central

    Nguitragool, Wang; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Desai, Sanjay A.

    2014-01-01

    The plasmodial surface anion channel mediates uptake of nutrients and other solutes into erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites. The clag3 genes of P. falciparum determine this channel’s activity in human malaria, but how the encoded proteins contribute to transport is unknown. Here, we used proteases to examine the channel’s composition and function. While proteases with distinct specificities all cleaved within an extracellular domain of CLAG3, they produced differing degrees of transport inhibition. Chymotrypsin-induced inhibition depended on parasite genotype, with channels induced by the HB3 parasite affected to a greater extent than those of the Dd2 clone. Inheritance of functional proteolysis in the HB3×Dd2 genetic cross, DNA transfection, and gene silencing experiments all pointed to the clag3 genes, providing independent evidence for a role of these genes. Protease protection assays with a Dd2-specific inhibitor and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a variant L1115F residue on a CLAG3 extracellular loop contributes to inhibitor binding and accounts for differences in functional proteolysis. These findings indicate that surface-exposed CLAG3 is the relevant pool of this protein for channel function. They also suggest structural models for how exposed CLAG3 domains contribute to pore formation and parasite nutrient uptake. PMID:24699906

  4. In silico analysis of protein Lys-N𝜀-acetylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R. Shyama Prasad; Thelen, Jay J.; Miernyk, Ján A.

    2014-01-01

    Among post-translational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N𝜀-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. The study of Lys-acetylation of plant proteins has lagged behind studies of mammalian and microbial cells; 1000s of acetylation sites have been identified in mammalian proteins compared with only hundreds of sites in plant proteins. While most previous emphasis was focused on post-translational modifications of histones, more recent studies have addressed metabolic regulation. Being directly coupled with cellular CoA/acetyl-CoA and NAD/NADH, reversible Lys-N𝜀-acetylation has the potential to control, or contribute to control, of primary metabolism, signaling, and growth and development. PMID:25136347

  5. In-depth quantitative cardiac proteomics combining electron transfer dissociation and the metalloendopeptidase Lys-N with the SILAC mouse.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Arjen; Mohammed, Shabaz; Low, Teck Y; Zanivan, Sara; van Veen, Toon A B; Delanghe, Bernard; Heck, Albert J R

    2011-10-01

    In quantitative proteomics stable isotope labeling has progressed from cultured cells toward the total incorporation of labeled atoms or amino acids into whole multicellular organisms. For instance, the recently introduced (13)C(6)-lysine labeled SILAC mouse allows accurate comparison of protein expression directly in tissue. In this model, only lysine, but not arginine, residues are isotope labeled, as the latter may cause complications to the quantification by in vivo conversion of arginine to proline. The sole labeling of lysines discourages the use of trypsin, as not all peptides will be quantifiable. Therefore, in the initial work Lys-C was used for digestion. Here, we demonstrate that the lysine-directed protease metalloendopeptidase Lys-N is an excellent alternative. As lysine directed peptides generally yield longer and higher charged peptides, alongside the more traditional collision induced dissociation we also implemented electron transfer dissociation in a quantitative stable isotope labeling with amino acid in cell culture workflow for the first time. The utility of these two complementary approaches is highlighted by investigating the differences in protein expression between the left and right ventricle of a mouse heart. Using Lys-N and electron transfer dissociation yielded coverage to a depth of 3749 proteins, which is similar as earlier investigations into the murine heart proteome. In addition, this strategy yields quantitative information on ∼ 2000 proteins with a median coverage of four peptides per protein in a single strong cation exchange-liquid chromatography-MS experiment, revealing that the left and right ventricle proteomes are very similar qualitatively as well as quantitatively.

  6. Proteolysis in hyperthermophilic microorganisms

    DOE PAGES

    Ward, Donald E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Chang, Lara S.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Proteases are found in every cell, where they recognize and break down unneeded or abnormal polypeptides or peptide-based nutrients within or outside the cell. Genome sequence data can be used to compare proteolytic enzyme inventories of different organisms as they relate to physiological needs for protein modification and hydrolysis. In this review, we exploit genome sequence data to compare hyperthermophilic microorganisms from the euryarchaeotal genus Pyrococcus , the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus solfataricus , and the bacterium Thermotoga maritima . An overview of the proteases in these organisms is given based on those proteases that have been characterized and on putativemore » proteases that have been identified from genomic sequences, but have yet to be characterized. The analysis revealed both similarities and differences in the mechanisms utilized for proteolysis by each of these hyperthermophiles and indicated how these mechanisms relate to proteolysis in less thermophilic cells and organisms.« less

  7. Efficient proteolysis strategies based on microchip bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2013-04-26

    In proteome research, proteolysis is an important procedure prior to the mass spectrometric identification of proteins. The typical time of conventional in-solution proteolysis is as long as several hours to half a day. To enhance proteolysis efficiency, a variety of microchip bioreactors have been developed for the rapid digestion and identification of proteins in the past decade. This review mainly focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of microchip bioreactors in protein digestion. The subjects covered include microchip proteolysis systems, the immobilization of proteases in microchannels, the applications of microchip bioreactors in highly efficient proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that microchip bioreactors will become powerful tools in protein analysis and will find a wide range of applications in high-throughput protein identification.

  8. Proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, D W; McIlroy, B M; Stevenson, G T

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of lymphocytic surface immunoglobulins in guinea-pig, rabbit and man was investigated by immunofluorescence using conjugated antisera specific for immunoglobulin fragments. The cell surface IgM of guinea pig L2C leukaemic lymphocytes and rabbit blood lymphocytes was cleaved in situ at its hinge region by papain. The Fcmicron fragment remained attached to the membrane and could be stained with the appropriate anti-Fc conjugate. The surface IgD and IgM of human chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells was cleared from the cell surface by papain, as shown by reagents directed against both Fab and Fc region determinants. This could be due either to proteolytic degradation of membrane bound Fc or to initial cleavage of Ig from the membrane at some point other than the hinge region. PMID:321347

  9. Regulated proteolysis in bacterial development

    PubMed Central

    Konovalova, Anna; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Kroos, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use proteases to control three types of events temporally and spatially during processes of morphological development. These events are destruction of regulatory proteins, activation of regulatory proteins, and production of signals. While some of these events are entirely cytoplasmic, others involve intramembrane proteolysis of a substrate, trans-membrane signaling, or secretion. In some cases, multiple proteolytic events are organized into pathways, e.g., turnover of a regulatory protein activates a protease that generates a signal. We review well-studied and emerging examples, and identify recurring themes and important questions for future research. We focus primarily on paradigms learned from studies of model organisms, but we note connections to regulated proteolytic events that govern bacterial adaptation, biofilm formation and disassembly, and pathogenesis. PMID:24354618

  10. Hypothermic anesthesia attenuates postoperative proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D J; Brooks, D C; Pressler, V M; Hulton, N R; Colpoys, M F; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-01-01

    The catabolic response that commonly occurs after major operation is characterized by net skeletal muscle proteolysis and accelerated nitrogen excretion. This response was absent in patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures associated with the combination of cardiopulmonary bypass, narcotic anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade, and hypothermia. Forearm nitrogen release was 422 +/- 492 nmol/100 ml X min on the first postoperative day, approximately 25% of preoperative values (1677 +/- 411, p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and the degree of negative nitrogen balance were comparable to levels observed in nonstressed, fasting subjects. The potential role of hypothermia, high-dose fentanyl anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade in modifying the catabolic response to laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection was further evaluated in animal studies. Six hours after operation, amino acid nitrogen release from the hindquarter was 84% less than control values (p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and urea production were also reduced compared to normothermic controls. It is concluded that the combination of hypothermia, narcotic anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade attenuates the catabolic response to injury and thus may be useful in the care of critically ill surgical patients. PMID:3767477

  11. Protein dynamics and proteolysis in plant vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Müntz, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Plant cells cannot live without their vacuoles. The tissues and organs of a plant contain a wide variety of differentiated and specialized vacuoles -- even a single plant cell can possess two or more types of vacuoles. Vacuolar proteins are encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized in the cytoplasm. Their transport into the vacuolar compartment is under cytoplasmic control. Transcription seems to be a major control level for differential protein supply to the vacuoles. It is at this level that vacuole differentiation and functions are mainly integrated into cellular processes. Recycling amino acids generated by protein degradation is a major function of the vacuole. This is most evident when storage proteins are mobilized in storage tissues of generative or vegetative organs in order to nourish the embryo of germinating seeds or sprouting buds. When specific proteins are transferred to the vacuole for immediate degradation this compartment contributes to the adaptation of protein complexes in response to changes in developmental or environmental conditions. Vacuolar proteases are involved in protein degradation during reversible senescence and programmed cell death, which is also called irreversible senescence. Vacuoles contribute to defence against pathogens and herbivores by limited and unlimited proteolysis. Our present knowledge on functions and processes of vacuolar protein dynamics in plants is reviewed. Research perspectives are deduced.

  12. Squid neurofilaments. Phosphorylation and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in situ.

    PubMed

    Brown, A; Eagles, P A

    1986-10-01

    Three major polypeptides co-purify with neurofilaments from squid (Loligo forbesi) axoplasm: P60 (apparent Mr 60,000), P200 (apparent Mr 200,000) and Band 1 (apparent Mr 400,000). Anti-IFA, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope common to all classes of intermediate filaments, binds to P200 and P60. When axoplasm is incubated with [32P]Pi, the major phosphorylated polypeptides are P200 and Band 1. We have investigated Ca2+-dependent proteolysis of [32P]phosphorylated axoplasm in order to localize the major sites of phosphorylation and to probe the arrangement of the polypeptides in the filament. The proteinase preferentially cleaves P200 and Band 1, liberating the phosphorylated domains. Analysis of proteolysed filaments by electron microscopy and gel electrophoresis shows that most of P200 and Band 1 can be cleaved while still maintaining intact filaments. We suggest that P200 is initially cleaved within a single highly sensitive region, generating two major fragments called P100p (apparent Mr 100,000) and P110s (apparent Mr 110,000). P100p contains the Anti-IFA epitope and co-sediments with filaments, whereas P110s is highly phosphorylated and does not sediment with filaments. Band 1 is cleaved to produce a soluble high-Mr fragment that is phosphorylated and that represents a major portion of the undigested component, whereas P60 is relatively resistant to limited proteolysis. Thus proteolysis appears to define two major filament domains: a conserved core that forms the backbone of the filament, and a highly phosphorylated peripheral region that is not essential for filament integrity.

  13. The discovery of ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2005-01-01

    In early 1980, Irwin A. Rose, Avram Hershko, and Aaron Ciechanover published two papers in PNAS that reported the astounding observation that energy-dependent intracellular proteolysis was far more complicated than the previously accepted models of lysosomal proteolysis or the action of ATP-dependent proteases such as bacterial lon. In fact, it has turned out to be even more complicated than they could have suspected. The general model of covalently attaching a small protein as a targeting signal has proved to be every bit as important to eukaryotic cells as the better understood modifications such as phosphorylation or acetylation. The key player in this modification, a small protein called ubiquitin (APF-1 in these papers), is the founding member of a large family of proteins containing the β-grasp fold and is used as a posttranslational targeting signal to modify the structure, function, and/or localization of other proteins. The story of this discovery is a textbook example of the confluence of intellectual curiosity, unselfish collaboration, chance, luck, and preparation. PMID:16230621

  14. Highly Efficient Proteolysis Accelerated by Electromagnetic Waves for Peptide Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwen; Liu, Ting; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics will contribute greatly to the understanding of gene functions in the post-genomic era. In proteome research, protein digestion is a key procedure prior to mass spectrometry identification. During the past decade, a variety of electromagnetic waves have been employed to accelerate proteolysis. This review focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of these novel proteolysis approaches for digesting and identifying proteins. The subjects covered include microwave-accelerated protein digestion, infrared-assisted proteolysis, ultraviolet-enhanced protein digestion, laser-assisted proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that these novel proteolysis strategies accelerated by various electromagnetic waves will become powerful tools in proteome research and will find wide applications in high throughput protein digestion and identification. PMID:22379392

  15. Regulation of Proteolysis by Human Deubiquitinating Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Eletr, Ziad M.; Wilkinson, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    The post-translational attachment of one or several ubiquitin molecules to a protein generates a variety of targeting signals that are used in many different ways in the cell. Ubiquitination can alter the activity, localization, protein-protein interactions or stability of the targeted protein. Further, a very large number of proteins are subject to regulation by ubiquitin-dependent processes, meaning that virtually all cellular functions are impacted by these pathways. Nearly a hundred enzymes from five different gene families (the deubiquitinating enzymes or DUBs), reverse this modification by hydrolyzing the (iso)peptide bond tethering ubiquitin to itself or the target protein. Four of these families are thiol proteases and one is a metalloprotease. DUBs of the Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase (UCH) family act on small molecule adducts of ubiquitin, process the ubiquitin proprotein, and trim ubiquitin from the distal end of a polyubiquitin chain. Ubiquitin Specific Proteases (USP) tend to recognize and encounter their substrates by interaction of the variable regions of their sequence with the substrate protein directly, or with scaffolds or substrate adapters in multiprotein complexes. Ovarian Tumor (OTU) domain DUBs show remarkable specificity for different Ub chain linkages and may have evolved to recognize substrates on the basis of those linkages. The Josephin family of DUBs may specialize in distinguishing between polyubiquitin chains of different lengths. Finally, the JAB1/MPN+/MOV34 (JAMM) domain metalloproteases cleave the isopeptide bond near the attachment point of polyubiquitin and substrate, as well as being highly specific for the K63 poly-Ub linkage. These DUBs regulate proteolysis by: directly interacting with and co-regulating E3 ligases; altering the level of substrate ubiquitination; hydrolyzing or remodeling ubiquitinated and poly-ubiquitinated substrates; acting in specific locations in the cell and altering the localization of the target

  16. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  17. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-09-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases.

  18. Limited proteolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L; Encinas, M V; Jabalquinto, A M; Cardemil, E

    1993-08-01

    Incubation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with trypsin under native conditions cases a time-dependent loss of activity and the production of protein fragments. Cleavage sites determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses identified protease-sensitive peptide bonds between amino acid residues at positions 9-10 and 76-77. Additional fragmentation sites were also detected in a region approximately 70-80 amino acids before the carboxyl end of the protein. These results suggest that the enzyme is formed by a central compact domain comprising more than two thirds of the whole protein structure. From proteolysis experiments carried out in the presence of substrates, it could be inferred that CO2 binding specifically protects position 76-77 from trypsin action. Intrinsic fluorescence measurements demonstrated that CO2 binding induces a protein conformational change, and a dissociation constant for the enzyme CO2 complex of 8.2 +/- 0.6 mM was determined.

  19. Suppression of interleukin-33 bioactivity through proteolysis by apoptotic caspases.

    PubMed

    Lüthi, Alexander U; Cullen, Sean P; McNeela, Edel A; Duriez, Patrick J; Afonina, Inna S; Sheridan, Clare; Brumatti, Gabriela; Taylor, Rebecca C; Kersse, Kristof; Vandenabeele, Peter; Lavelle, Ed C; Martin, Seamus J

    2009-07-17

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the IL-1 family and is involved in polarization of T cells toward a T helper 2 (Th2) cell phenotype. IL-33 is thought to be activated via caspase-1-dependent proteolysis, similar to the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and IL-18, but this remains unproven. Here we showed that IL-33 was processed by caspases activated during apoptosis (caspase-3 and -7) but was not a physiological substrate for caspases associated with inflammation (caspase-1, -4, and -5). Furthermore, caspase-dependent processing of IL-33 was not required for ST2 receptor binding or ST2-dependent activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor. Indeed, caspase-dependent proteolysis of IL-33 dramatically attenuated IL-33 bioactivity in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that IL-33 does not require proteolysis for activation, but rather, that IL-33 bioactivity is diminished through caspase-dependent proteolysis within apoptotic cells. Thus, caspase-mediated proteolysis acts as a switch to dampen the proinflammatory properties of IL-33.

  20. Infrared-assisted tryptic proteolysis for peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Luyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-07-01

    In this report, infrared (IR) radiation was employed to enhance the efficiency of tryptic proteolysis for peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin in sealed transparent Eppendorf tubes were allowed to digest under an IR lamp at 37 degrees C. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were demonstrated by the digestion of BSA and myoglobin (MYO) and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with the sequence coverages of 69% (BSA) and 90% (MYO) that were much better than those obtained by conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The present IR-assisted proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  1. Regulation by proteolysis: energy-dependent proteases and their targets.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, S; Maurizi, M R

    1992-01-01

    A number of critical regulatory proteins in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are subject to rapid, energy-dependent proteolysis. Rapid degradation combined with control over biosynthesis provides a mechanism by which the availability of a protein can be limited both temporally and spatially. Highly unstable regulatory proteins are involved in numerous biological functions, particularly at the commitment steps in developmental pathways and in emergency responses. The proteases involved in energy-dependent proteolysis are large proteins with the ability to use ATP to scan for appropriate targets and degrade complete proteins in a processive manner. These cytoplasmic proteases are also able to degrade many abnormal proteins in the cell. PMID:1480111

  2. Effects of reduction and proteolysis on cashew allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Allergic reaction to cashew ingestion is frequently more severe than reaction to peanut ingestion, and food allergens are commonly resistant to digestive proteases. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of cashew proteins to proteolysis. Cashew protein extracts and purified c...

  3. Structural organization of mammalian prions as probed by limited proteolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GPI- transgenic mouse model was used to study the structure of GPI- prions. We obtained valuable information about the structure of prions by performing limited proteolysis of the GPI- prions and analyzing the results by mass spectrometry and Western blot. This information coupled with previous ...

  4. A plasma proteolysis pathway comprising blood coagulation proteases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Li, Yun; Bhattacharya, Arup; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2016-07-05

    Coagulation factors are essential for hemostasis. Here, we show that these factors also team up to degrade plasma proteins that are unrelated to hemostasis. Prolidase, SRC and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42) are used as probes. Each probe, upon entering the blood circulation, binds and activates factor XII (FXII), triggering the intrinsic and common coagulation cascades, which in turn activate factor VII, a component of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. Activated factor VII (FVIIa) rapidly degrades the circulating probes. Therefore, FXII and FVIIa serve as the sensor/initiator and executioner, respectively, for the proteolysis pathway. Moreover, activation of this pathway by one probe leads to the degradation of all three probes. Significant activation of this pathway follows tissue injury and may also occur in other disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, of which Aβ1-42 is a key driver. However, enoxaparin, a clinically used anticoagulant, inhibits the proteolysis pathway and elevates plasma levels of the probes. Enoxaparin may also mitigate potential impact of activators of the proteolysis pathway on coagulation. Our results suggest that the proteolysis pathway is important for maintaining low levels of various plasma proteins. Our finding that enoxaparin inhibits this pathway provides a means to control it. Inhibition of this pathway may facilitate the development of disease biomarkers and protein therapeutics, e.g., plasma Aβ1-42 as a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease or recombinant human prolidase as an antitumor agent.

  5. Sarcomeric thick and thin filament overlap influences postmortem proteolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction between sarcomere length (SL) and proteolysis on meat tenderness is not clear. Indeed, the extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of sarcomere le...

  6. Sarcomere Length Influences u-calpain Mediated Proteolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle shortening and postmortem proteolysis both influence beef tenderness, but their interacting effects on tenderness are relatively unknown. Inherent myofibril structure and the extent of overlap between myosin and actin filaments are hypothesized to affect the availability of substrates for deg...

  7. Sarcomere length influences postmortem proteolysis of excised bovine semitendinosus muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction between sarcomere length and postmortem proteolysis as related to meat tenderness is not clear. The extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging-induced tenderization. The objective of this study was to determin...

  8. Proteolysis in Mozzarella cheeses manufactured by different industrial processes.

    PubMed

    Costabel, L; Pauletti, M S; Hynes, E

    2007-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of stretching temperature, fat content, and time of brining on proteolysis during ripening of Mozzarella cheeses. Seventeen cheese-making experiments (batches) were carried out on an industrial scale on successive days, following the standard procedure with some modifications. Fat content of cheese milk, temperature at the stretching step, and time of brining varied from one batch to another as required by the experimental design, outlined by a surface response model. Proteolysis was assessed during ripening of samples, which was prolonged for at least 3 mo, by means of electrophoresis, nitrogen fractions, and soluble peptide mapping. The amount of soluble nitrogen at pH 4.6 was not significantly different in cheeses obtained by diverse procedures, but it increased during ripening of all samples. This result was coincident with the breakdown of alpha(s1)- and beta-caseins evidenced by electrophoresis, which reached similar extents at late stages of ripening, regardless of the cheese-making process. Multivariate analysis on soluble peptide profiles obtained by liquid chromatography also detected sample grouping according to ripening time, but did not evidence any separation caused by the cheese-making technology. We concluded that the changes in the cheese-making process assayed in this work were insufficient to produce significant differences in proteolysis of the cheeses. Ripening time had more influence on proteolysis of Mozzarella cheeses than any other assayed variable.

  9. Nanostructured microfluidic digestion system for rapid high-performance proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hao, Si-Jie; Yu, Xu; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2015-02-07

    A novel microfluidic protein digestion system with a nanostructured and bioactive inner surface was constructed by an easy biomimetic self-assembly strategy for rapid and effective proteolysis in 2 minutes, which is faster than the conventional overnight digestion methods. It is expected that this work would contribute to rapid online digestion in future high-throughput proteomics.

  10. Amelogenin “Nanorods” Formation During Proteolysis by Mmp-20

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiudong; Sun, Zhi; Ma, Ruiwen; Fan, Daming; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenin is cleaved by enamelysin (Mmp-20) soon after its secretion, and the cleavage products accumulate in specific locations during enamel formation, suggesting that parent amelogenin proteolysis is necessary for activating its functions. To investigate the precise roles of Mmp-20 and its influence on the assembly of amelogenin, an in vitro enzymatic digestion process mimicking the initial stages of amelogenin proteolysis was investigated at near-physiological conditions using recombinant porcine amelogenin (rP172) and enamelysin. Hierarchically organized nanorod structures formed during different digestion stages were detected by TEM. At the earliest stage, uniformly dispersed parent amelogenin spherical particles, mixed with some darker stained smaller spheres, and accompanying elongated chain-like nanostructures were observed. Cylindrical nanorods, which appeared to be the result of tight assembly of thin subunit cylindrical discs with thicknesses ranging from ~2.5 nm to ~6.0 nm, were formed after an hour of proteolysis. These subunit building blocks stacked to form nanorods with maximum length of ~100 nm. With the production of more cleavage products, additional morphologies spontaneously evolved from the cylindrical nanorods. Larger ball-like aggregates ultimately formed at the end of proteolysis. The uniform spherical particles, nanorods, morphological patterns evolved from nanorods, and globular aggregated microstructures were successively formed by means of co-assembly of amelogenin and its cleavage products during a comparatively slow proteolysis process. We propose that, following the C-terminal cleavage of amelogenin, co-assembly with its fragments leads to formation of nanorod structures whose properties eventually dictate the super-structural organization of enamel matrix, controlling the elongated growth of enamel apatite crystals. PMID:21840397

  11. Proteolysis of the proofreading subunit controls the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Cianchetta, Stefano; Reggiani, Luca; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2009-11-01

    The C-terminal region of the proofreading subunit (epsilon) of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is shown here to be labile and to contain the residues (identified between F187 and R213) responsible for association with the polymerase subunit (alpha). We also identify two alpha-helices of the polymerase subunit (comprising the residues E311-M335 and G339-D353, respectively) as the determinants of binding to epsilon. The C-terminal region of epsilon is degraded by the ClpP protease assisted by the GroL molecular chaperone, while other factors control the overall concentration in vivo of epsilon. Among these factors, the chaperone DnaK is of primary importance for preserving the integrity of epsilon. Remarkably, inactivation of DnaK confers to Escherichia coli inviable phenotype at 42 degrees C, and viability can be restored over-expressing epsilon. Altogether, our observations indicate that the association between epsilon and alpha subunits of DNA polymerase III depends on small portions of both proteins, the association of which is controlled by proteolysis of epsilon. Accordingly, the factors catalysing (ClpP, GroL) or preventing (DnaK) this proteolysis exert a crucial checkpoint of the assembly of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III core.

  12. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  13. Isolation and purification of versican and analysis of versican proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Foulcer, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Apte, Suneel S

    2015-01-01

    Versican is a widely distributed chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that forms large complexes with the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA). As a consequence of HA binding to its receptor CD44 and interactions of the versican C-terminal globular (G3) domain with a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, versican is a key component of well-defined networks in pericellular matrix and extracellular matrix. It is crucial for several developmental processes in the embryo and there is increasing interest in its roles in cancer and inflammation. Versican proteolysis by ADAMTS proteases is highly regulated, occurs at specific peptide bonds, and is relevant to several physiological and disease mechanisms. In this chapter, methods are described for the isolation and detection of intact and cleaved versican in tissues using morphologic and biochemical techniques. These, together with the methodologies for purification and analysis of recombinant versican and a versican fragment provided here, are likely to facilitate further progress on the biology of versican and its proteolysis.

  14. Sarcomere length influences postmortem proteolysis of excised bovine semitendinosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Weaver, A D; Bowker, B C; Gerrard, D E

    2008-08-01

    The interaction between sarcomere length and postmortem proteolysis as related to meat tenderness is not clear. The extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging-induced tenderization. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of sarcomere length on proteolytic degradation in beef. Strips from bovine semitendinosus were either stretched 40% and restrained or allowed to shorten unrestrained in an ice bath. After rigor completion, 0.6-cm cross sections were fabricated and were randomly assigned to 2, 4, 7, or 10 d of aging treatments. Myofibrils were isolated for sarcomere length determination. Samples were collected and frozen for shear force analysis, and muscle proteins were extracted for SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analyses to determine troponin T (TnT) proteolysis. Sarcomere length was greater (P < 0.01) in stretched muscle samples compared with shortened samples (2.57 vs. 1.43 microm, respectively). Correspondingly, shear force values were greater (P < 0.05) in shortened samples than stretched samples. Western blots revealed the presence of 3 major intact TnT bands that diminished with time postmortem and 4 bands (TnT degradation products) that accumulated during postmortem storage. Quantification of intact TnT showed increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis at 4 and 7 d postmortem in samples with long sarcomeres. By 10 d, only traces of the greatest molecular weight intact TnT band were evident in both shortened and stretched samples, suggesting this TnT band may be more susceptible to proteolysis than other intact TnT bands. Degradation products of TnT appeared earlier postmortem in samples with long sarcomeres. The 30-kDa TnT fragment appeared after 7 d of postmortem storage in samples with long sarcomeres but not until 10 d in muscle containing short sarcomeres. Collectively, these data show that postmortem TnT proteolysis is sarcomere length-dependent and suggest that thick

  15. Effect of processing on turkey meat quality and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Obanor, F; Morton, J D; Geesink, G H; Bickerstaffe, R

    2005-07-01

    Modern processing techniques for turkey involve rapid chilling to slow microbial growth and early deboning of the economically important breast meat. This paper shows that these 2 processes lead to significantly tougher meat with higher cooking losses. The toughening appears to be due to less extensive proteolysis and shortening of the sarcomeres. Calpains I and II and their inhibitor, calpastatin, were quantified in turkey breast. Calpain II was the more common isoform but showed no evidence of activation during aging. In contrast, calpain I and calpastatin activities declined rapidly and were no longer detected 24 h postslaughter. There was no evidence of an association between calpain activity and processing conditions.

  16. Effect of high-pressure treatment on hard cheese proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Luciana M; Bergamini, Carina; Vaudagna, Sergio R; Cuatrin, Alejandra L; Audero, Gabriela; Hynes, Erica

    2016-06-01

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment has been proposed to reduce the ripening time of cheese via modifications in the enzymatic activities or the substrate reactivity. Investigations on the effect of HHP on cheese proteolysis have been undertaken with either encouraging results or little effect according to the treatment conditions and the type of cheese, but information concerning the effect of HHP on the ripening of hard cooked cheese is still lacking. In this report, we describe the effect of HHP treatment on Reggianito cheese proteolysis. For that purpose, 1-d-old miniature cheeses (5.5-cm diameter and 6-cm height) were treated at 100 or 400MPa and 20°C for 5 or 10min, and control cheeses in the trial were not pressurized. All cheeses were ripened at 12°C during 90d. The HHP did not affect gross composition of the cheeses, but microbial load changed, especially because the starter culture count was significantly lower at the beginning of the ripening of the cheeses treated at 400MPa than in controls and cheeses treated at 100MPa. Cheeses treated at 400MPa for 10min had significantly higher plasmin activity than did the others; the residual coagulant activity was not affected by HHP. Proteolysis assessment showed that most severe treatments (400MPa) also resulted in cheeses with increased breakdown of αS1- and β-CN. In addition, nitrogen content in soluble fractions was significantly higher in cheeses treated at 400MPa, as well as soluble peptides and free AA production. Peptide profiles and individual and total content of free AA in 60-d-old treated cheese were as high as in fully ripened control cheeses (90d). Holding time had an effect only on pH-4.6-soluble nitrogen fraction and plasmin activity; cheese treated for 10min showed higher values than those treated for 5min, at both levels of pressure assayed. We concluded that HHP treatments at 400MPa applied 1d after cheesemaking increased the rate of proteolysis, leading to an

  17. Regulated specific proteolysis of the Cajal body marker protein coilin.

    PubMed

    Velma, Venkatramreddy; Broome, Hanna J; Hebert, Michael D

    2012-12-01

    Cajal bodies (CB) are subnuclear domains that contain various proteins with diverse functions including the CB marker protein coilin. In this study, we investigate the proteolytic activity of calpain on coilin. Here, we report a 28-kDa cleaved coilin fragment detected by two coilin antibodies that is cell cycle regulated, with levels that are consistently reduced during mitosis. We further show that an in vitro calpain assay with full-length or C-terminal coilin recombinant protein releases the same size cleaved fragment. Furthermore, addition of exogenous RNA to purified coilin induces proteolysis by calpain. We also report that the relative levels of this cleaved coilin fragment are susceptible to changes induced by various cell stressors, and that coilin localization is affected by inhibition or knockdown of calpain both under normal and stressed conditions. Collectively, our data suggest that coilin is subjected to regulated specific proteolysis by calpain, and this processing may play a role in the regulation of coilin activity and CB formation.

  18. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  19. Composition, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt cheese.

    PubMed

    Masotti, F; Cattaneo, S; Stuknytė, M; Battelli, G; Vallone, L; De Noni, I

    2017-03-01

    Strachitunt, a blue-veined Italian cheese, received the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label in 2014. Its unique technological feature is represented by the dual-curd method of production. Strachitunt is produced from raw bovine milk with or without the inoculation of natural starter cultures of lactic acid bacteria, and the addition of secondary cultures of mold spores is not permitted by the product specification. Physico-chemical properties, proteolysis, and volatile profile of Strachitunt were investigated in 10 cheese samples (ripened for 75 d) made throughout spring 2015 and provided by the main cheese maker. Overall, composition parameters showed a large variability among samples. Cheese was characterized by an acid paste (pH 5.46) and a lower extent of proteolysis compared with other blue-veined varieties. The main chemical groups of volatile organic compounds were alcohols and esters, whereas ketones represented only a minor component. The erratic adventitious contamination by mold spores of the cheese milk, the unique dual-curd method of cheese-making, and the large time variability between the piercing time and the end of ripening could be highlighted as the main causes of both the distinctive analytical fingerprint and the scarce standardization of this blue-veined cheese.

  20. An adaptor hierarchy regulates proteolysis during a bacterial cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kamal Kishore; Bergé, Matthieu; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Viollier, Patrick Henri; Chien, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulated protein degradation is essential. The timed destruction of crucial proteins by the ClpXP protease drives cell-cycle progression in the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Although ClpXP is active alone, additional factors are inexplicably required for cell-cycle dependent proteolysis. Here, we show that these factors constitute an adaptor hierarchy where different substrates are destroyed based on the degree of adaptor assembly. The hierarchy builds upon priming of ClpXP by the adaptor CpdR, which promotes degradation of one class of substrates and also recruits the adaptor RcdA to degrade a second class of substrates. Adding the PopA adaptor promotes destruction of a third class of substrates, while inhibiting degradation of the second class. We dissect RcdA to generate bespoke adaptors, identifying critical substrate elements needed for RcdA recognition and uncovering additional cell-cycle dependent ClpXP substrates. Our work reveals how hierarchical adaptors and primed proteases orchestrate regulated proteolysis during bacterial cell-cycle progression. PMID:26451486

  1. Methamphetamine-induced spectrin proteolysis in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Staszewski, Robert D; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2006-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant. Multiple high doses of METH cause long-term toxicity to dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) nerve terminals in the brain, as evidenced by decreases in DA and 5-HT content, decreases in tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylase activities, decreases in DA and 5-HT re-uptake sites, and nerve terminal degeneration. Multiple high doses of METH are known to elicit a rapid increase in DA release and hyperthermia. Although METH also produces a delayed and sustained rise in glutamate, no studies have shown whether METH produces structural evidence of excitotoxicity in striatum, or identified the receptors that mediate this toxicity directly, independent of alterations in METH-induced hyperthermia. These experiments investigated whether METH can cause excitotoxicity as evidenced by cytoskeletal protein breakdown in a glutamate receptor-dependent manner. METH increased calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis in the rat striatum 5 and 7 days after METH administration without affecting caspase 3-dependent spectrin breakdown. This effect was completely blocked with the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, GYKI 52466, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801. However, AMPA or NMDA receptor antagonism did not attenuate the METH-induced depletions of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Independent mechanisms involved in mediating spectrin proteolysis and DAT protein loss are discussed.

  2. Peptidomic Analysis of Rat Plasma: Proteolysis in Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Aletti, Federico; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Santamaria, Marco H; DeLano, Frank A; Kistler, Erik B; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Tedeschi, Gabriella

    2016-05-01

    It has been previously shown that intestinal proteases translocate into the circulation during hemorrhagic shock and contribute to proteolysis in distal organs. However, consequences of this phenomenon have not previously been investigated using high-throughput approaches. Here, a shotgun label-free quantitative proteomic approach was utilized to compare the peptidome of plasma samples from healthy and hemorrhagic shock rats to verify the possible role of uncontrolled proteolytic activity in shock. Plasma was collected from rats after hemorrhagic shock (HS) consisting of 2-h hypovolemia followed by 2-h reperfusion, and from healthy control (CTRL) rats. A new two-step enrichment method was applied to selectively extract peptides and low molecular weight proteins from plasma, and directly analyze these samples by tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred twenty-six circulating peptides were identified in CTRL and 295 in HS animals. Ninety-six peptides were present in both conditions; of these, 57 increased and 30 decreased in shock. In total, 256 peptides were increased or present only in HS confirming a general increase in proteolytic activity in shock. Analysis of the proteases that potentially generated the identified peptides suggests that the larger relative contribution to the proteolytic activity in shock is due to chymotryptic-like proteases. These results provide quantitative confirmation that extensive, system-wide proteolysis is part of the complex pathologic phenomena occurring in hemorrhagic shock.

  3. Plant senescence and proteolysis: two processes with one destiny

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; Santamaria, M. Estrella; González-Melendi, Pablo; Martinez, Manuel; Diaz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a complex and controlled process, essential for mobilization of nutrients from old or stressed tissues, mainly leaves, to growing or sink organs. Protein breakdown in senescing leaves involves many plastidial and nuclear proteases, regulators, different subcellular locations and dynamic protein traffic to ensure the complete transformation of proteins of high molecular weight into transportable and useful hydrolysed products. Protease activities are strictly regulated by specific inhibitors and through the activation of zymogens to develop their proteolytic activity at the right place and at the proper time. All these events associated with senescence have deep effects on the relocation of nutrients and as a consequence, on grain quality and crop yield. Thus, it can be considered that nutrient recycling is the common destiny of two processes, plant senescence and, proteolysis. This review article covers the most recent findings about leaf senescence features mediated by abiotic and biotic stresses as well as the participants and steps required in this physiological process, paying special attention to C1A cysteine proteases, their specific inhibitors, known as cystatins, and their potential targets, particularly the chloroplastic proteins as source for nitrogen recycling. PMID:27505308

  4. The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) undergoes ectodomain shedding and regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP).

    PubMed

    Houri, Nadia; Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2013-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) is a cell adhesion molecule originally characterized as a virus receptor but subsequently shown to be involved in physiological processes such as neuronal and heart development, epithelial tight junction integrity, and tumour suppression. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules and a wide variety of other cell surface proteins serves as a mechanism for protein turnover and, in some cases, cell signaling. Metalloproteases such as A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) family members cleave cell surface receptors to release their substrates' ectodomains, while the presenilin/ɣ-secretase complex mediates regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), releasing intracellular domain fragments from the plasma membrane. In the case of some substrates such as Notch and amyloid precursor protein (APP), the released intracellular domains enter the nucleus to modulate gene expression. We report that CAR ectodomain is constitutively shed from glioma cells and developing neurons, and is also shed when cells are treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. We identified ADAM10 as a sheddase of CAR using assays involving shRNA knockdown and rescue, overexpression of wild-type ADAM10 and inhibition of ADAM10 activity by addition of its prodomain. In vitro peptide cleavage, mass spectrometry and mutagenesis revealed the amino acids M224 to L227 of CAR as the site of ADAM10-mediated ectodomain cleavage. CAR also undergoes RIP by the presenilin/γ-secretase complex, and the intracellular domain of CAR enters the nucleus. Ectodomain shedding is a prerequisite for RIP of CAR. Thus, CAR belongs to the increasing list of cell surface molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding and that are substrates for ɣ-secretase-mediated RIP.

  5. Postmortem titin proteolysis is influenced by sarcomere length in bovine muscle.

    PubMed

    England, E M; Fisher, K D; Wells, S J; Mohrhauser, D A; Gerrard, D E; Weaver, A D

    2012-03-01

    The calpain protease system, in particular, μ-calpain is involved in the disassembly of specific myofibrillar proteins, resulting in tenderization of meat postmortem. Given the size, complexity, and integral nature of titin to the structure of the sarcomere, it is plausible that the length of a sarcomere may alter the susceptibility of various domains of titin to cleavage by the calpains. Therefore, we hypothesized titin degradation differs in a sarcomere-length-dependent manner in beef. After slaughter, beef carcasses were split and sides were either suspended by the Achilles tendon (normal suspension, NS) or by the aitchbone (hip suspension, HS). Immediately after suspension, samples were dissected from the LM, psoas major (PM), and semitendinosus (STN) muscles to serve as 0-d controls. After 24 h, 4 steaks were removed from each muscle and randomly assigned to 1-, 4-, 7-, or 10-d aging treatments. After the assigned aging period, myofibrils were purified for determination of sarcomere length. Warner-Bratzler shear force analysis was also performed to evaluate differences in tenderness. Muscle proteins were solubilized and subjected to SDS-VAGE (vertical agarose gel electrophoresis) to evaluate titin degradation. Sarcomere lengths differed (P < 0.0001) between contralateral muscles of NS and HS carcasses. Quantification of SDS-VAGE gels revealed less (P < 0.05) intact titin in the PM muscle of NS carcasses at each aging period compared with the PM of HS carcasses. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were detected in the disappearance of intact titin among suspension methods in the LM or STN. These data demonstrate that suspension method alters proteolysis of titin and suggest an increase in sarcomere length may contribute to the susceptibility of titin to postmortem proteolysis in beef.

  6. A novel ELISA-based diagnosis of acquired von Willebrand disease with increased VWF proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Antoine; Caron, Claudine; Vincent, Flavien; Jeanpierre, Emmanuelle; Ternisien, Catherine; Boisseau, Pierre; Zawadzki, Christophe; Fressinaud, Edith; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Hermoire, Sylvie; Paris, Camille; Lavenu-Bombled, Cécile; Veyradier, Agnès; Ung, Alexandre; Vincentelli, André; van Belle, Eric; Lenting, Peter J; Goudemand, Jenny; Susen, Sophie

    2016-05-02

    Von Willebrand disease-type 2A (VWD-2A) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) due to aortic stenosis (AS) or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) are associated with an increased proteolysis of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Analysis of VWF multimeric profile is the most sensitive way to assess such increased VWF-proteolysis. However, several technical aspects hamper a large diffusion among routine diagnosis laboratories. This makes early diagnosis and early appropriate care of increased proteolysis challenging. In this context of unmet medical need, we developed a new ELISA aiming a quick, easy and reliable assessment of VWF-proteolysis. This ELISA was assessed successively in a LVAD-model, healthy subjects (n=39), acquired TTP-patients (n=4), VWD-patients (including VWD-2A(IIA), n=22; VWD-2B, n=26; VWD-2A(IIE), n=21; and VWD-1C, n=8) and in AVWS-patients (AS, n=9; LVAD, n=9; and MGUS, n=8). A standard of VWF-proteolysis was specifically developed. Extent of VWF-proteolysis was expressed as relative percentage and as VWF proteolysis/VWF:Ag ratio. A speed-dependent increase in VWF-proteolysis was assessed in the LVAD model whereas no proteolysis was observed in TTP-patients. In VWD-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in VWD-2A(IIA) and VWD-2B and significantly decreased in VWD-2A(IIE) versus controls (p< 0.0001). In AVWS-patients, VWF-proteolysis was significantly increased in AS- and LVAD-patients compared to controls (p< 0.0001) and not detectable in MGUS-patients. A significant increase in VWF-proteolysis was detected as soon as three hours after LVAD implantation (p< 0.01). In conclusion, we describe a new ELISA allowing a rapid and accurate diagnosis of VWF-proteolysis validated in three different clinical situations. This assay represents a helpful alternative to electrophoresis-based assay in the diagnosis and management of AVWS with increased VWF-proteolysis.

  7. Ubiquitin signals proteolysis-independent stripping of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ndoja, Ada; Cohen, Robert E; Yao, Tingting

    2014-03-20

    Ubiquitination of transcription activators has been reported to regulate transcription via both proteolytic and nonproteolytic routes, yet the function of the ubiquitin (Ub) signal in the nonproteolytic process is poorly understood. By use of the heterologous transcription activator LexA-VP16 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that monoubiquitin fusion of the activator prevents stable interactions between the activator and DNA, leading to transcription inhibition without activator degradation. We identify the AAA(+) ATPase Cdc48 and its cofactors as the Ub receptor responsible for extracting the monoubiquitinated activator from DNA. Our results suggest that deubiquitination of the activator is critical for transcription activation. These findings with LexA-VP16 extend in both yeast and mammalian cells to native transcription activators Met4 and R-Smads, respectively, that are known to be oligo-ubiquitinated. The results illustrate a role for Ub and Cdc48 in transcriptional regulation and gene expression that is independent of proteolysis.

  8. [Threshold mechanism of the control of cascade proteolysis].

    PubMed

    Shcherbak, I G

    1998-05-01

    The immune lysis rate of erythrocytes vs. the concentration of particular complement components was studied. It was found that in the presence of component C1 (but not C3) and factors B and D, the cells undergo lysis after the concentration of these compounds exceeds a "threshold" value. The threshold molar concentrations of factors D and B exceeded 5- and 20-fold, respectively, that of component C1. The multiplicity and different capacities of the thresholds allow the fragmentary activation of cascade proteolysis at stretches between neighboring thresholds without the total realization of the final effect of the system (cell lysis, clot formation, etc.). The resulting peptideby-products (bypass peptides) may possess their own biological activity. It is the generation of various bioregulators that appears to be the main function of the cascade proteolytic systems functioning in the subthreshold regime.

  9. Pregabalin suppresses calcium-mediated proteolysis and improves stroke outcome.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Seon; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Son, Tae Gen; Mughal, Mohamed R; Greig, Nigel H; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-03-01

    Pregabalin, a Ca(2+) channel α(2)δ-subunit antagonist with analgesic and antiepileptic activity, reduced neuronal loss and improved functional outcome in a mouse model of focal ischemic stroke. Pregabalin administration (5-10mg/kg, i.p.) 30-90 min after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion reduced infarct volume, neuronal death in the ischemic penumbra and neurological deficits at 24h post-stroke. Pregabalin significantly decreased the amount of Ca(2+)/calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis in the cerebral cortex measured at 6h post-stroke. Together with the extensive clinical experience with pregabalin for other neurological indications, our findings suggest the potential for a therapeutic benefit of pregabalin in stroke patients.

  10. A Greek Tragedy: The Growing Complexity of Alzheimer Amyloid Precursor Protein Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Robert J; Kellett, Katherine A B; Thinakaran, Gopal; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-09-09

    Proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) liberates various fragments including the proposed initiator of Alzheimer disease-associated dysfunctions, amyloid-β. However, recent evidence suggests that the accepted view of APP proteolysis by the canonical α-, β-, and γ-secretases is simplistic, with the discovery of a number of novel APP secretases (including δ- and η-secretases, alternative β-secretases) and additional metabolites, some of which may also cause synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, various proteins have been identified that interact with APP and modulate its cleavage by the secretases. Here, we give an overview of the increasingly complex picture of APP proteolysis.

  11. [Proteolysis of semax analogues with different N-terminal amino acids by aminopeptidases].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, K V; V'iunova, T V; Nagaev, I Iu; Andreeva, L A; Alfeeva, L Iu; Miasoedov, N F

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro, Sem) and its analogues ([Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem, [Thr1]Sem, [Trp1]Sem) that are differ from semax in substitution of N-terminal Met residue were studied. It is shown that such replacement changes the rate of peptides degradation by N-aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.2, Sigma, Type VI, 9.2 units. Akt. / mg). [Ala1]Sem, [Gly1]Sem and [Thr1]Sem semax analogues proved to be more stable to proteolysis than semax (Sem), and their initial product of proteolysis is His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-5). For triptophan analogue both Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro (Sem-6) and Sem-5 product are formed in similar quantities. It is found that all investigated analogues can be used as inhibitors in Sem proteolysis.

  12. Sarcomere length influences u-calpain mediated proteolysis of troponin-T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle shortening and postmortem proteolysis are well established as mechanisms controlling beef tenderness. Inherent myofibril structure and the extent of overlap between myosin and actin filaments are hypothesized to affect the availability of substrates for degradation by calpains. The objective ...

  13. Alternating current-assisted on-plate proteolysis for MALDI-TOF MS peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Wei, Bangguo; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    In this report, alternating current-assisted on-plate proteolysis has been developed for rapid peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin were allowed to digest directly on the spots of a stainless steel MALDI plate with the assistance of low-voltage alternating current electricity. Alternating current (AC) was allowed to pass through the protein solutions via the MALDI plate and a platinum disc electrode. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were investigated by the digestion of BSA and cytochrome c (Cyt-c). It was demonstrated that AC substantially enhanced the efficiency of proteolysis and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with sequence coverages of 42% (BSA) and 77% (Cyt-c) that were comparable to those obtained by using conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for MALDI-TOF MS peptide mapping.

  14. Proteolysis of truncated hemolysin A yields a stable dimerization interface.

    PubMed

    Novak, Walter R P; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2017-03-01

    Wild-type and variant forms of HpmA265 (truncated hemolysin A) from Proteus mirabilis reveal a right-handed, parallel β-helix capped and flanked by segments of antiparallel β-strands. The low-salt crystal structures form a dimeric structure via the implementation of on-edge main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 243-263 of adjacent monomers. Surprisingly, in the high-salt structures of two variants, Y134A and Q125A-Y134A, a new dimeric interface is formed via main-chain hydrogen bonds donated by residues 203-215 of adjacent monomers, and a previously unobserved tetramer is formed. In addition, an eight-stranded antiparallel β-sheet is formed from the flap regions of crystallographically related monomers in the high-salt structures. This new interface is possible owing to additional proteolysis of these variants after Tyr240. The interface formed in the high-salt crystal forms of hemolysin A variants may mimic the on-edge β-strand positioning used in template-assisted hemolytic activity.

  15. Limited proteolysis of the nitrate reductase from spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Y; Ogura, N; Nakagawa, H

    1988-12-25

    The functional structure of assimilatory NADH-nitrate reductase from spinach leaves was studied by limited proteolysis experiments. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with trypsin, two stable products of 59 and 45 kDa were observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The fragment of 45 kDa was purified by Blue Sepharose chromatography. NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were associated with this 45-kDa fragment which contains FAD, heme, and NADH binding fragment. After incubation of purified nitrate reductase with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, two major peaks were observed by high performance liquid chromatography size exclusion gel filtration. FMNH2-nitrate reductase and reduced methyl viologen-nitrate reductase activities were associated with the first peak of 170 kDa which consists of two noncovalently associated (75-90-kDa) fragments. NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, however, was associated with the second peak which consisted of FAD and NADH binding sites. Incubation of the 45-kDa fragment with S. aureus V8 protease produced two major fragments of 28 and 14 kDa which contained FAD and heme, respectively. These results indicate that the molybdenum, heme, and FAD components of spinach nitrate reductase are contained in distinct domains which are covalently linked by exposed hinge regions. The molybdenum domain appears to be important in the maintenance of subunit interactions in the enzyme complex.

  16. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  17. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-01-01

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis. PMID:10582239

  18. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-09-29

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis.

  19. Proteolysis of bovine alpha s2-casein by chymosin.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, P L; Olson, N F; Fox, P F; Healy, A

    1994-12-01

    Proteolysis of bovine alpha s2-casein by chymosin (E. C. 3.4.23.4) in solution in 100 mM Na phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, at 30 degrees C was studied by reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC and urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Chymosin hydrolyzed alpha s2-casein in solution to eight peptides detectable by urea-PAGE. Peptides soluble in acetate buffer, pH 4.6, were isolated by RP-HPLC on a C18 column using an acetonitrile/water gradient and identified from their N-terminal amino acid sequence. The chymosin cleavage sites were at the bonds Phe88-Tyr89, Tyr95-Leu96, Gln97-Tyr98, Tyr98-Leu99, Phe163-Leu164, Phe174-Ala175 and Tyr179-Leu180. Chymosin cleavage sites were restricted to the hydrophobic regions of the molecule. The bond-type in alpha s2-casein cleaved by chymosin was in agreement with that found to be susceptible to chymosin in other caseins. The primary site of chymosin action on alpha s2-casein appeared to be at Phe88-Tyr89.

  20. Phosphorylation and proteolysis of HMGCoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.A.; Lanier, T.L.; Miller, S.J.; Gibson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    The phosphorylation of rat liver microsomal 97 kDa HMGCoA reductase (HMGR) was examined by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE using antibodies to 53 kDa HMGR. MgATP preincubation decreased expressed HMGR activity from 10.1 +/- 2.4 to 0.81 +/- 0.2 U/mg. Concomitant incorporation of TSP from el-TSP-ATP into 97 kDa HMGR protein was observed. Competitive antibody binding by affinity-purified 53 kDa HMGR showed that the 97 kDa TSP band was authentic HMGR. HMGR was reactivated and the TSP label was removed by protein phosphatase in a concentration-dependent manner: the increase in expressed/total activity ratio (E/T) correlated linearly with a decrease in 97 kDa TSP. Therefore, the E/T ratio provides a valid index of the phosphorylation state of microsomal 97 kDa HMGR. Protease cleavage patterns of HMGR mass and TSP were compared using calpain: a 52-56 kDa doublet of HMGR mass was observed in immunoblots under conditions in which only the 56 kDa band contained TSP. Further proteolysis decreased the TSP label as the 52 kDa mass product increased. The data suggest that the major phosphorylation site in 97 kDa HMGR lies between two main calpain cleavage sites in the linker region joining the cytoplasmic domain to the membrane-spanning domain of the native enzyme.

  1. Global Identification of Biofilm-Specific Proteolysis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael B.; Salcedo, Eugenia C.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Hartooni, Nairi; Gulati, Megha; Sanchez, Hiram; Takagi, Julie; Hube, Bernhard; Andes, David R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is a fungal species that is part of the normal human microbiota and also an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing mucosal and systemic infections. C. albicans cells proliferate in a planktonic (suspension) state, but they also form biofilms, organized and tightly packed communities of cells attached to a solid surface. Biofilms colonize many niches of the human body and persist on implanted medical devices, where they are a major source of new C. albicans infections. Here, we used an unbiased and global substrate-profiling approach to discover proteolytic activities produced specifically by C. albicans biofilms, compared to planktonic cells, with the goal of identifying potential biofilm-specific diagnostic markers and targets for therapeutic intervention. This activity-based profiling approach, coupled with proteomics, identified Sap5 (Candidapepsin-5) and Sap6 (Candidapepsin-6) as major biofilm-specific proteases secreted by C. albicans. Fluorogenic peptide substrates with selectivity for Sap5 or Sap6 confirmed that their activities are highly upregulated in C. albicans biofilms; we also show that these activities are upregulated in other Candida clade pathogens. Deletion of the SAP5 and SAP6 genes in C. albicans compromised biofilm development in vitro in standard biofilm assays and in vivo in a rat central venous catheter biofilm model. This work establishes secreted proteolysis as a promising enzymatic marker and potential therapeutic target for Candida biofilm formation. PMID:27624133

  2. Plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 proteolysis is increased in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helle, S I; Geisler, S; Aas, T; Paulsen, T; Holly, J M P; Lønning, P E

    2001-01-01

    Fasting blood samples were obtained before definitive surgery or biopsy in 128 patients referred to the department of surgery with suspected or manifest breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and free IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay, while IGFBP-3 proteolysis was evaluated by Western immunoblot. 12 patients had ductal carcinoma in situ benign conditions, while staging revealed metastatic disease in 15 of 16 patients with invasive cancers. IGFBP-3 proteolysis above the normal range was recorded in 19 patients with invasive cancers, but in none of the patients suffering from DCIS/benign conditions. Increased IGFBP-3 proteolysis was most frequently recorded in patients harbouring large tumours and metastatic disease (Stage I: 0/19, 0%; Stage II: 3/45, 7%, Stage III: 9/37, 24%, and Stage IV: 7/15, 47%). IGFBP-3 proteolysis was significantly higher in Stage III (P =0.01) and IV (P< 0.001) patients compared to the other stage groups (P = 0.001). IGF-I and IGF-II correlated negatively to IGFBP-3 proteolysis and age. Plasma levels of IGF-I and -II were significantly lower in patients with elevated IGFBP-3 proteolysis compared to those within the normal range. Our findings reveal alterations in the IGF-system among a substantial number of patients with large primary breast cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437405

  3. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  4. 11S Storage globulin from pumpkin seeds: regularities of proteolysis by papain.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, A S; Rudakov, S V; Kakhovskaya, I A; Shutov, A D

    2014-08-01

    Limited proteolysis of the α- and β-chains and deep cleavage of the αβ-subunits by the cooperative (one-by-one) mechanism was observed in the course of papain hydrolysis of cucurbitin, an 11S storage globulin from seeds of the pumpkin Cucurbita maxima. An independent analysis of the kinetics of the limited and cooperative proteolyses revealed that the reaction occurs in two successive steps. In the first step, limited proteolysis consisting of detachments of short terminal peptides from the α- and β-chains was observed. The cooperative proteolysis, which occurs as a pseudo-first order reaction, started at the second step. Therefore, the limited proteolysis at the first step plays a regulatory role, impacting the rate of deep degradation of cucurbitin molecules by the cooperative mechanism. Structural alterations of cucurbitin induced by limited proteolysis are suggested to generate its susceptibility to cooperative proteolysis. These alterations are tentatively discussed on the basis of the tertiary structure of the cucurbitin subunit pdb|2EVX in comparison with previously obtained data on features of degradation of soybean 11S globulin hydrolyzed by papain.

  5. Regulation of proteolysis in Bacillus subtilis: effects of calcium ions and energy poisons

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, M.B.; Hageman, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis cells carry out extensive intracellular proteolysis (k = 0.15-0.23/h) during sporulation. Protein degradation was measured in cells growing in chemically defined sporulation medium, by following the release of ( UC)-leucine from the cells during spore formation. Sodium arsenate, carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenyl hydrazone, and sodium azide strongly inhibited proteolysis without altering cell viability greatly, which suggested that bulk proteolysis in B. subtilis is energy dependent. The authors have tested the hypothesis that the energy requirement may be for pumping in CaS . When (CaS ) was < 1 x 10 W, rates of proteolysis in sporulating cells were reduced 4-8 times that in cells in calcium ion- sufficient medium. Further, omission of CaS from the medium prevented the increase in the activity of the major intracellular serine protease. However, the presence of energy poisons in the media at levels which inhibited proteolysis, had no detectable effect on the uptake of by cells (UVCa). The authors concluded that B. subtilis cells required both metabolic energy and calcium ions for normal proteolysis.

  6. Nitric oxide inhibits calpain-mediated proteolysis of talin in skeletal muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, T. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide can inhibit cytoskeletal breakdown in skeletal muscle cells by inhibiting calpain cleavage of talin. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside prevented many of the effects of calcium ionophore on C(2)C(12) muscle cells, including preventing talin proteolysis and release into the cytosol and reducing loss of vinculin, cell detachment, and loss of cellular protein. These results indicate that nitric oxide inhibition of calpain protected the cells from ionophore-induced proteolysis. Calpain inhibitor I and a cell-permeable calpastatin peptide also protected the cells from proteolysis, confirming that ionophore-induced proteolysis was primarily calpain mediated. The activity of m-calpain in a casein zymogram was inhibited by sodium nitroprusside, and this inhibition was reversed by dithiothreitol. Previous incubation with the active site-targeted calpain inhibitor I prevented most of the sodium nitroprusside-induced inhibition of m-calpain activity. These data suggest that nitric oxide inhibited m-calpain activity via S-nitrosylation of the active site cysteine. The results of this study indicate that nitric oxide produced endogenously by skeletal muscle and other cell types has the potential to inhibit m-calpain activity and cytoskeletal proteolysis.

  7. Infrared-assisted on-plate proteolysis for MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-07-15

    In this report, infrared (IR)-assisted on-plate proteolysis has been developed for rapid peptide mapping. Protein solutions containing trypsin were allowed to digest directly on the spots of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plates under IR radiation. The feasibility and performance of the novel proteolysis approach were investigated by the digestion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c (Cyt-c). It was demonstrated that IR radiation substantially enhanced the efficiency of proteolysis and the digestion time was significantly reduced to 5 min. The digests were identified by MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry with sequence coverages of 55 (BSA) and 75% (Cyt-c) that were comparable to those obtained by using conventional in-solution tryptic digestion. The suitability of IR-assisted on-plate proteolysis to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum and casein extracted from commercially available milk sample. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  8. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, April L.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Rebeck, G. William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  9. Mass Spectrometry Guided In Situ Proteolysis to Obtain Crystals for X-ray Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Gheyi, Tarun; Rodgers, Logan; Romero, Richard; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    A strategy for increasing the efficiency of protein crystallization/structure determination with mass spectrometry has been developed. This approach combines insights from limited proteolysis/mass spectrometry and crystallization via in situ proteolysis. The procedure seeks to identify protease-resistant polypeptide chain segments from purified proteins on the time-scale of crystal formation, and subsequently crystallizing the target protein in the presence of the optimal protease at the right relative concentration. We report our experience with 10 proteins of unknown structure, two of which yielded high-resolution X-ray structures. The advantage of this approach comes from its ability to select only those structure determination candidates that are likely to benefit from application of in situ proteolysis, using conditions most likely to result in formation of a stable proteolytic digestion product suitable for crystallization.

  10. Molecular characterization of a proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Arulpandi, I; Geetha, A

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis-resistant lipases can be well exploited by industrial processes which employ both lipase and protease as biocatalysts. A proteolysis resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2 was isolated, purified and characterized earlier. The lipase was resistant to native and commercial proteases. In the present work, we have characterized the lip gene which encodes the proteolysis-resistant lipase from Bacillus pumilus SG2. The parameters and structural details of lipase were analysed. The lip gene consisted of 650 bp. The experimental molecular weight of SG2 lipase was nearly double that of its theoretical molecular weight, thus suggesting the existence of the functional lipase as a covalent dimer. The proteolytic cleavage sites of the lipase would have been made inaccessible by dimerisation, thus rendering the lipase resistant to protease.

  11. Far infrared-assisted encapsulation of filter paper strips in poly(methyl methacrylate) for proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiwen; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Filter paper strips were enclosed between two poly(methyl methacrylate) plates to fabricate paper-packed channel microchips under pressure in the presence of far infrared irradiation. After the enclosed paper strip was oxidized by periodate, trypsin was covalently immobilized in them to fabricate microfluidic proteolysis bioreactor. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by digesting BSA and lysozyme. The results were comparable to those of conventional in-solution proteolysis while the digestion time was significantly reduced to ∼18 s. The suitability of the microfluidic paper-based bioreactors to complex proteins was demonstrated by digesting human serum.

  12. Adrenodemedullation activates the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in soleus muscles from rats exposed to cold.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L H; Lustrino, D; Machado, J; Silveira, W A; Zanon, N M; Navegantes, L C; Kettelhut, I C

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that catecholamines in vivo and in vitro inhibit the activity of Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in skeletal muscles under basal conditions. In the present study we sought to investigate the role of catecholamines in regulating the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from rats acutely exposed to cold. Overall proteolysis, the activity of proteolytic systems, protein levels and gene expression of different components of the calpain system were investigated in rats submitted to adrenodemedullation (ADMX) and exposed to cold for 24 h. ADMX drastically reduced plasma epinephrine and promoted an additional increase in the overall proteolysis, which was already increased by cold exposure. The rise in the rate of protein degradation in soleus muscles from adrenodemedullated cold-exposed rats was caused by the high activity of the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis, which was associated with the generation of a 145-kDa cleaved α-fodrin fragment, a typical calpain substrate, and lower protein levels and mRNA expression of calpastatin, the endogenous calpain inhibitor. Unlike that observed for soleus muscles, the cold-induced muscle proteolysis in EDL was not affected by ADMX. In isolated soleus muscle, clenbuterol, a selective β2-adrenoceptor agonist, reduced the basal Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis and completely abolished the activation of this pathway by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. These data suggest that catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla inhibit cold-induced protein breakdown in soleus, and this antiproteolytic effect on the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system is apparently mediated through expression of calpastatin, which leads to suppression of calpain activation.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although many effects of the sympathetic nervous system on muscle physiology are known, the role of catecholamines in skeletal muscle protein metabolism has been scarcely studied. We suggest that

  13. Protein oxidation and proteolysis during storage and in vitro digestion of pork and beef patties.

    PubMed

    Rysman, Tine; Van Hecke, Thomas; Van Poucke, Christof; De Smet, Stefaan; Van Royen, Geert

    2016-10-15

    The effect of protein oxidation on proteolysis during meat digestion was investigated following storage and subsequent in vitro digestion of beef and pork patties. Protein oxidation was evaluated as thiol oxidation, total carbonylation, and specific carbonylation (α-amino adipic and γ-glutamic semialdehyde). Furthermore, 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, a hydroxylation product of phenylalanine, was identified and quantified as a new protein oxidation marker. After 7days of chilled illuminated storage (4°C), significant oxidative modifications were quantified and the oxidative degradation was continued during in vitro digestion. The observed effects were more abundant in beef patties. Protein oxidation before digestion resulted in impaired proteolysis during digestion.

  14. Energy and calcium ion dependence of proteolysis during sporulation of Bacillus subtilis cells

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, M.B.; Hageman, J.H. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have shown, with an optimized ({sup 14}C)leucine-labeling and chasing procedure, that intracellular protein degradation in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 (trpC2) is apparently energy dependent. Sodium arsenate, sodium azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrozone, and N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, at levels which did not induce appreciable lysis ({<=} 10%) over 10-h periods of sporulation, inhibited intracellular proteolysis by 13 to 93%. Exponentially growing cells acquired arsenate resistance. In contrast to earlier reports, the authors found that chloramphenicol strongly inhibited proteolysis even when added 6 h into the sporulation process. Restricting the calcium ion concentration in the medium had no effect on rates or extent of vegetative growth, strongly inhibited sporulation, and inhibited rates of proteolysis by 60% or more. Inhibitors of energy metabolism, at the same levels which inhibited proteolysis, did not affect the rate or degree of uptake of Ca{sup 2+} by cells. Restricting the Ca{sup 2+} concentration in the medium reduced by threefold of the specific activity in cells of the major intracellular serine proteinase after 12 h of sporulation. finally, cells of a mutant of B. subtilis bearing an insertionally inactivated gene for the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent intracellular proteinase-1 degraded protein in chemically defined sporulation medium at a rate indistinguishable from that of the wild-type cells for period of 8 h.

  15. Probing the structure of GPI-less PrPSc by limited proteolysis(Abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited proteolysis is a very useful tool to pinpoint flexible regions within scrapie prion protein (PrPSc), but due to carbohydrate and glysosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moieties, and limitations of the analytical techniques, until now it was impossible to characterize accurately these regions. To...

  16. Muscle type influences u-calpain mediated troponin-T proteolysis in bovine myofibrils in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of muscle type on postmortem proteolysis remains largely unexplored. Previous attempts to classify muscle tenderness based on ‘muscle type’ indicated differences in tenderness were due to variations in proteolytic enzyme levels, but failed to account for the influence of sarcomere leng...

  17. A kinetic assessment of the C. elegans amyloid disaggregation activity enables uncoupling of disassembly and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bieschke, Jan; Cohen, Ehud; Murray, Amber; Dillin, Andrew; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2009-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a common feature of late onset neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In Alzheimer's disease, misassembly of the Abeta peptide is genetically linked to proteotoxicity associated with disease etiology. A reduction in Abeta proteotoxicity is accomplished, in part, by the previously reported Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities-under partial control of heat shock factor 1, a transcription factor regulating proteostasis in the cytosol and negatively regulated by insulin growth factor signaling. Herein, we report an improved in vitro assay to quantify recombinant fibrillar Abeta disaggregation kinetics accomplished by the exogenous application of C.elegans extracts. With this assay we demonstrate that the Abeta disaggregation and proteolysis activities of C.elegans are separable. The disaggregation activity found in C.elegans preparations is more heat resistant than the proteolytic activity. Abeta disaggregation in the absence of proteolysis was found to be a reversible process. Future discovery of the molecular basis of the disaggregation and proteolysis activities offers the promise of delaying the age-onset proteotoxicity that leads to neurodegeneration in a spectrum of maladies.

  18. Hyperosmotic Stress Induces Tau Proteolysis by Caspase-3 Activation in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Santa Catalina, Marta; Caballero-Bermejo, Montaña; Argent, Ricardo; Alonso, Juan C; Cuenda, Ana; Lorenzo, María J; Centeno, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other related tauopathies. In this subset of neurodegenerative disorders, Tau auto-assembles into insoluble fibrils that accumulate in neurons as paired helical filaments (PHFs), promoting cellular dysfunction and cytotoxic effects. Growing evidence suggests that abnormal post-translational regulation, mainly hyperphosphorylation and aberrant cleavage, drives Tau to this pathological state. In this work we show that sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress promotes Tau proteolysis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The appearance of cleaved Tau was preceded by the activation of μ-calpain, the proteasome system and caspase-3. Tau proteolysis was completely prevented by caspase-3 inhibition but unaffected by neither the proteasome system nor μ-calpain activity blockade. Concomitantly, hyperosmotic stress induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells, which was efficiently avoided by the inhibition of caspase-3 activity. Altogether, our results provide the first evidence that Tau protein is susceptible to caspase-3 proteolysis under hyperosmotic stress and suggest a positive relationship between Tau proteolysis and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2781-2790, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  20. Proteolysis and microstructure of Piacentinu Ennese cheese made using different farm technologies.

    PubMed

    Fallico, V; Tuminello, L; Pediliggieri, C; Horne, J; Carpino, S; Licitra, G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide the biochemical and structural characterization of Piacentinu Ennese cheese and to evaluate the impact of different farm technologies on cheese proteolysis and microstructure. Fifteen cheeses were manufactured according to traditional technology, i.e., from raw milk and farmhouse rennet in the absence of starter culture. Pasteurized milk, commercial rennet, and starter were used for production of 20 nontraditional cheeses. Proteolysis in Piacentinu Ennese cheese was monitored during a 2- to 10-mo ripening time. Low rates of overall proteolysis were observed in cheese, as percentages of total N soluble at pH 4.6 and in 12% trichloroacetic acid were about 11.40 and 8.10%, respectively, after 10 mo of age. Patterns of primary proteolysis by urea-PAGE showed that alpha(s)-caseins were degraded to a larger extent than were beta-caseins, although a considerable amount of both caseins was still intact after 10 mo. Reversed phase-HPLC analysis of the cheese peptide fractions showed a slow decrease in the levels of hydrophobic peptides coupled to increasing levels of hydrophilic compounds as the cheese aged. The structural characteristics of Piacentinu Ennese cheese were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy after 2, 4, and 6 mo of age. The micrographs showed a sponge-like structural network with a well-distributed system of empty spaces, originally occupied by whey and fat. The microstructure changed during cheese ripening to become more compact with cavities of smaller size. Farm technology significantly affected cheese proteolysis and microstructure. Nontraditional cheeses had higher levels of pH 4.6-soluble N and showed a larger hydrolysis of alpha(s)-casein fractions by urea-PAGE analysis than did traditional cheeses. Large differences between cheese-types also concerned the patterns of secondary proteolysis. Nontraditional cheeses had higher levels of 12% trichloroacetic acid-soluble N and showed larger proportions of free

  1. Suppression of intralysosomal proteolysis aggravates structural damage and functional impairment of liver lysosomes in rats with toxic hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Korolenko, T.A.; Gavrilova, N.I.; Kurysheva, N.G.; Malygin, A.E.; Pupyshev, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper estimates the effect of lowering protein catabolism in the lysosomes on structural and functional properties of the latter during liver damage. For comparison, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which is inert relative to intralysosomal proteolysis, and which also accumulates largely in lysosomes of the kupffer cells of the liver, was used. The uptake of labeled bovine serum albuman (C 14-BSA) by the liver is shown and the rate of intralysosomal proteolysis is given 24 hours after administration of suramin an CCl/sub 4/ to rats. It is suggested that it is risky to use drugs which inhibit intralysosomal proteolysis in the treatment of patients with acute hepatitis.

  2. Global Analysis of Cellular Proteolysis by Selective Enzymatic Labeling of Protein N-Termini

    PubMed Central

    Wiita, Arun P.; Seaman, Julia E.; Wells, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis is a critical modification leading to alteration of protein function with important outcomes in many biological processes. However, for the majority of proteases, we have an incomplete understanding of both cellular substrates and downstream effects. Here, we describe detailed protocols and applications for using the rationally engineered peptide ligase, subtiligase, to specifically label and capture protein N-termini generated by proteases either induced or added to complex biological samples. This method allows identification of the protein targets as well as their precise cleavage locations. This approach has revealed >8000 proteolytic sites in healthy and apoptotic cells including >1700 caspase cleavages. One can further determine substrate preferences through rate analysis with quantitative mass spectrometry, physiological substrate specificities, and even infer the identity of proteases operating in the cell. In this chapter, we also describe how this experimental method can be generalized to investigate proteolysis in any biological sample. PMID:24974296

  3. Actin proteolysis during ripening of dry fermented sausages at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Berardo, A; Devreese, B; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Van Royen, G; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2017-04-15

    In dry fermented sausages, myofibrillar proteins undergo intense proteolysis generating small peptides and free amino acids that play a role in flavour generation. This study aimed to identify small peptides arising from actin proteolysis, as influenced by the type of processing. Two acidification profiles were imposed, in order to mimic the pH normally obtained in southern-type and northern-type dry fermented sausages. The identification of peptides was done by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in a data-independent positive mode of acquisition (LC-MS(E)). During manufacturing of the dry fermented sausages, actin was highly proteolysed, especially in nine regions of the sequence. After fermentation, 52 and 42 actin-derived peptides were identified at high and low pH, respectively, which further increased to 66 and 144 peptides, respectively, at the end of ripening. Most peptides were released at the cleavage sites of cathepsins B and D, which thus play an important role.

  4. Peptides Displayed as High Density Brush Polymers Resist Proteolysis and Retain Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for rendering peptides resistant to proteolysis by formulating them as high-density brush polymers. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by polymerizing well-established cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and showing that the resulting polymers are not only resistant to proteolysis but also maintain their ability to enter cells. The scope of this design concept is explored by studying the proteolytic resistance of brush polymers composed of peptides that are substrates for either thrombin or a metalloprotease. Finally, we demonstrate that the proteolytic susceptibility of peptide brush polymers can be tuned by adjusting the density of the polymer brush and offer in silico models to rationalize this finding. We contend that this strategy offers a plausible method of preparing peptides for in vivo use, where rapid digestion by proteases has traditionally restricted their utility. PMID:25314576

  5. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction.

  6. Proteolysis on Reggianito Argentino cheeses manufactured with natural whey cultures and selected strains of Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Hynes, E R; Bergamini, C V; Suárez, V B; Zalazar, C A

    2003-12-01

    Reggianito Argentino cheese is traditionally manufactured with whey starter cultures that provide typical and intense flavor but can cause poor quality standardization. In this study, the influence of natural and selected starters on Reggianito Argentino cheese proteolysis was investigated. Cheeses were manufactured with three strains of Lactobacillus helveticus (SF133, SF138 and SF209) cultured individually in sterile whey and used as single or mixed starters. Control cheeses were made with natural whey starter culture. Cheeses were analyzed to determine gross composition, as well as total thermophilic lactic flora. Proteolysis was assessed by N fractions, electrophoresis and liquid chromatography. Gross composition of the cheeses did not significantly differ, while viable starter cell counts were lower for cheeses made with strain SF209 alone or combined with other strains. Soluble N at pH 4.6 was the same for cheeses made with natural or selected starters, but soluble N in 12% trichloroacetic acid and 2.5% phosphotungstic acid was significantly higher in cheeses made with starters containing strain SF209. Nitrogen fractions results indicated that natural whey starter cultures could be replaced by several starters composed of the selected strains without significant changes to proteolysis patterns. Starter cultures prepared only with SF209 or with the three selected L. helveticus strains produced cheese products with significantly more proteolysis than control cheeses. Chromatographic profiles analyzed by principal components showed that three main peaks on chromatograms, presumptively identified as Tyr, Phe, and Trp, explained most of variability. Principal component scores indicated that cheese samples were grouped by ripening time, which was confirmed by linear discriminant analysis. On the contrary, samples did not cluster by Lactobacillus strain or type of starter.

  7. Alternative Surfactants for Improved Efficiency of In Situ Tryptic Proteolysis of Fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ekta; Clench, Malcolm R.; West, Andy; Marshall, Peter S.; Marshall, Nathan; Francese, Simona

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent improvements to in situ proteolysis strategies, a higher efficiency is still needed to increase both the number of peptides detected and the associated ion intensity, leading to a complete and reliable set of biomarkers for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. In the study presented here, an extract of a systematic study is illustrated investigating a range of surfactants assisting trypsin proteolytic activity. Method development was trialled on fingermarks; this specimen results from a transfer of sweat from an individual's fingertip to a surface upon contact. As sweat carries a plethora of biomolecules, including peptides and proteins, fingermarks are, potentially, a very valuable specimen for non-invasive prognostic or diagnostic screening. A recent study has demonstrated the opportunity to quickly detect peptides and small proteins in fingermarks using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Profiling (MALDI MSP). However, intact detection bears low sensitivity and does not allow species identification; therefore, a shotgun proteomic approach was employed involving in situ proteolysis. Data demonstrate that in fingermarks, further improvements to the existing method can be achieved using MEGA-8 as surfactant in higher percentages as well as combinations of different detergents. Also, for the first time, Rapigest SF, normally used in solution digestions, has been shown to successfully work also for in situ proteolysis.

  8. Ectdomain shedding and regulated intracellular proteolysis in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca-B, Pavel

    2010-12-01

    The term Ectodomain Shedding (ES) refers to extracellular domain proteolytic release from cell membrane molecules. This proteolysis is mediated mainly by matrix metalloproteases (MMP) or disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAM), although some other proteases may mediate it. Virtually, all functional categories of cell membrane molecules are subject of this kind of proteolysis, for this reason ES is involved in different cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, migration, differentiation or pathologies such as inflammation, cancer and degeneration among others. ES releases membrane molecule's extracellular domain (or ectodomain) to the extracellular milieu where it can play different biological functions. ES of transmembrane molecules also generates membrane attached terminal fragments comprising transmembrane and intracellular domains that enable their additional processing by intracellular proteases known as Regulated Intracellular Proteolysis (RIP). This second proteolytic cleavage delivers molecule's intracellular domain (ICD) that carry out intracellular functions. RIP is mediated by the group of intracellular cleaving proteases (i-CLiPs) that include presenilin from the γ-secretase complex. In the CNS the best well known ES is that of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, although many other membrane molecules expressed by cells of the CNS are also subject to ES and RIP. In this review, these molecules are summarized, and some meaningful examples are highlighted and described. In addition, ES and RIP implications in the context of cell biology are discussed. Finally, some considerations that rise from the study of ES and RIP are formulated in view of the unexpected roles of intracellular fragments.

  9. Functional and Evolutionary Analyses Identify Proteolysis as a General Mechanism for NLRP1 Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría-Smith, Joseph; Mitchell, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that initiate immune responses to infection by recruiting and activating the Caspase-1 protease. Human NLRP1 was the first protein shown to form an inflammasome, but its physiological mechanism of activation remains unknown. Recently, specific variants of mouse and rat NLRP1 were found to be activated upon N-terminal cleavage by the anthrax lethal factor protease. However, agonists for other NLRP1 variants, including human NLRP1, are not known, and it remains unclear if they are also activated by proteolysis. Here we demonstrate that two mouse NLRP1 paralogs (NLRP1AB6 and NLRP1BB6) are also activated by N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. We also demonstrate that proteolysis within a specific N-terminal linker region is sufficient to activate human NLRP1. Evolutionary analysis of primate NLRP1 shows the linker/cleavage region has evolved under positive selection, indicative of pathogen-induced selective pressure. Collectively, these results identify proteolysis as a general mechanism of NLRP1 inflammasome activation that appears to be contributing to the rapid evolution of NLRP1 in rodents and primates. PMID:27926929

  10. Collagen fibril architecture, domain organization, and triple-helical conformation govern its proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perumal, Shiamalee; Antipova, Olga; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.

    2008-06-24

    We describe the molecular structure of the collagen fibril and how it affects collagen proteolysis or 'collagenolysis.' The fibril-forming collagens are major components of all mammalian connective tissues, providing the structural and organizational framework for skin, blood vessels, bone, tendon, and other tissues. The triple helix of the collagen molecule is resistant to most proteinases, and the matrix metalloproteinases that do proteolyze collagen are affected by the architecture of collagen fibrils, which are notably more resistant to collagenolysis than lone collagen monomers. Until now, there has been no molecular explanation for this. Full or limited proteolysis of the collagen fibril is known to be a key process in normal growth, development, repair, and cell differentiation, and in cancerous tumor progression and heart disease. Peptide fragments generated by collagenolysis, and the conformation of exposed sites on the fibril as a result of limited proteolysis, regulate these processes and that of cellular attachment, but it is not known how or why. Using computational and molecular visualization methods, we found that the arrangement of collagen monomers in the fibril (its architecture) protects areas vulnerable to collagenolysis and strictly governs the process. This in turn affects the accessibility of a cell interaction site located near the cleavage region. Our observations suggest that the C-terminal telopeptide must be proteolyzed before collagenase can gain access to the cleavage site. Collagenase then binds to the substrate's 'interaction domain,' which facilitates the triple-helix unwinding/dissociation function of the enzyme before collagenolysis.

  11. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  12. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wiera, Grzegorz; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed long-term potentiation (LTP) that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:26582976

  13. Skeletal muscle proteolysis in response to short-term unloading in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, Per A.; von Walden, Ferdinand; Gustafsson, Thomas; Linnehan, Richard M.; Trappe, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is evident after muscle disuse, unloading, or spaceflight and results from decreased protein content as a consequence of decreased protein synthesis, increased protein breakdown or both. At this time, there are essentially no human data describing proteolysis in skeletal muscle undergoing atrophy on Earth or in space, primarily due to lack of valid and accurate methodology. This particular study aimed at assessing the effects of short-term unloading on the muscle contractile proteolysis rate. Eight men were subjected to 72-h unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and intramuscular interstitial levels of the naturally occurring proteolytic tracer 3-methylhistidine (3MH) were measured by means of microdialysis before and on completion of this intervention. The 3MH concentration following 72-h ULLS (2.01 ± 0.22 nmol/ml) was 44% higher (P < 0.05) than before ULLS (1.56 ± 0.20 nmol/ml). The present experimental model and the employed method determining 3MH in microdialysates present a promising tool for monitoring skeletal muscle proteolysis or metabolism of specific muscles during conditions resulting in atrophy caused by, e.g., disuse and real or simulated microgravity. This study provides evidence that the atrophic processes are evoked rapidly and within 72 h of unloading and suggests that countermeasures should be employed in the early stages of space missions to offset or prevent muscle loss during the period when the rate of muscle atrophy is the highest. PMID:18535133

  14. The role of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich domain in VWF binding and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Rens; Lane, David A; Crawley, James T B

    2015-03-19

    ADAMTS13 proteolytically regulates the platelet-tethering function of von Willebrand factor (VWF). ADAMTS13 function is dependent upon multiple exosites that specifically bind the unraveled VWF A2 domain and enable proteolysis. We carried out a comprehensive functional analysis of the ADAMTS13 cysteine-rich (Cys-rich) domain using engineered glycans, sequence swaps, and single point mutations in this domain. Mutagenesis of Cys-rich domain-charged residues had no major effect on ADAMTS13 function, and 5 out of 6 engineered glycans on the Cys-rich domain also had no effect on ADAMTS13 function. However, a glycan attached at position 476 appreciably reduced both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of Cys-rich sequences for the corresponding regions in ADAMTS1 identified a hydrophobic pocket involving residues Gly471-Val474 as being of critical importance for both VWF binding and proteolysis. Substitution of hydrophobic VWF A2 domain residues to serine in a region (residues 1642-1659) previously postulated to interact with the Cys-rich domain revealed the functional importance of VWF residues Ile1642, Trp1644, Ile1649, Leu1650, and Ile1651. Furthermore, the functional deficit of the ADAMTS13 Cys-rich Gly471-Val474 variant was dependent on these same hydrophobic VWF residues, suggesting that these regions form complementary binding sites that directly interact to enhance the efficiency of the proteolytic reaction.

  15. Proteolysis of ankyrin and of band 3 protein in chemically induced cell fusion. Ca2+ is not mandatory for fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, R D; Wickenden, C; Wynne, J; Lucy, J A

    1984-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were fused by incubation with 0.5-2 mM-chlorpromazine hydrochloride at pH 6.8-7.6. Fusogenic preparations of chlorpromazine were cloudy suspensions of microdroplets, and below pH 6.8 chlorpromazine gave clear solutions that were inactive. Unlike control cells, the lateral mobility of the intramembranous particles of the PF-fracture face of chlorpromazine-treated cells was relatively unrestricted, since the particles were partly clustered at 37 degrees C and they exhibited extensive cold-induced clustering. Ca2+ stimulated fusion, but fusion was only very weakly inhibited by EGTA (10 mM) and by N-ethylmaleimide (50 mM); pretreatment of the cells with Tos-Lys-CH2Cl (7-amino-1-chloro-3-L-tosylamidoheptan-2-one) (7.5 mM) markedly inhibited fusion. Changes in the membrane proteins of erythrocytes fused by chlorpromazine, before and after treatment with chymotrypsin to remove band 3 protein, were investigated. The several observations made indicate that the Ca2+-insensitive component of fusion is associated with degradation of ankyrin (band 2.1 protein) to band 2.3-2.6 proteins and to smaller polypeptides by a serine proteinase that is inhibited by Tos-Lys-CH2Cl, and that the component of fusion inhibited by EGTA and N-ethylmaleimide is associated with degradation of band 3 protein to band 4.5 protein by a Ca2+-activated cysteine proteinase. Proteolysis of ankyrin appeared to be sufficient to permit the chlorpromazine-induced fusion of human erythrocytes, but fusion occurred more rapidly when band 3 protein was also degraded in the presence of Ca2+. Since other cells have structures comparable with the spectrin-actin skeleton of the erythrocyte membrane, the observations reported may be relevant to the initiation of naturally occurring fusion reactions in biomembranes. It is also suggested that, should polypeptides with fusogenic properties be produced from integral and skeletal membrane proteins by endogenous proteolysis, their formation would provide

  16. Cell cycle-controlled proteolysis of a flagellar motor protein that is asymmetrically distributed in the Caulobacter predivisional cell.

    PubMed Central

    Jenal, U; Shapiro, L

    1996-01-01

    Flagellar biogenesis and release are developmental events tightly coupled to the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. A single flagellum is assembled at the swarmer pole of the predivisional cell and is released later in the cell cycle. Here we show that the MS-ring monomer FliF, a central motor component that anchors the flagellum in the cell membrane, is synthesized only in the predivisional cell and is integrated into the membrane at the incipient swarmer cell pole, where it initiates flagellar assembly. FliF is proteolytically turned over during swarmer-to-stalked cell differentiation, coinciding with the loss of the flagellum, suggesting that its degradation is coupled to flagellar release. The membrane topology of FliF was determined and a region of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain was shown to be required for the interaction with a component of the motor switch. The very C-terminal end of FliF contains a turnover determinant, required for the cell cycle-dependent degradation of the MS-ring. The cell cycle-dependent proteolysis of FliF and the targeting of FliF to the swarmer pole together contribute to the asymmetric localization of the MS-ring in the predivisional cell. Images PMID:8665847

  17. Whole-saliva proteolysis and its impact on salivary diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Thomadaki, K; Helmerhorst, E J; Tian, N; Sun, X; Siqueira, W L; Walt, D R; Oppenheim, F G

    2011-11-01

    There is growing interest in the use of human whole saliva for diagnostics and disease monitoring as an alternative to blood samples. In contrast to blood, whole saliva is a non-sterile body fluid. Proper hand-ling and storage are required to preserve the integrity of potential biomarkers. We investigated salivary autoproteolytic degradation using a variety of approaches. We determined inhibition of protease activities by monitoring the endogenous proteome. In addition, the stability of highly protease-susceptible proteins-histatin 5, statherin, and PRP1-was assessed. Experimental variables included (a) protease inhibitors, (b) salivary pH, (c) incubation temperatures, and (d) sample heating. A cocktail containing AEBSF, aprotinin, pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, leupeptin, antipain, and EDTA could not prevent histatin 5, statherin, or PRP1 degradation in whole saliva. Among the other treatments evaluated, short-term storage of freshly collected samples on ice was effective without interfering with the chemistry of the proteome. In conclusion, whole saliva contains a unique mixture of enzymes as evidenced from their resilience to protease inhibition. Analytical evidence on protein stability is needed to ensure the validity of salivary biomarker study outcomes. Analysis of the data presented will provide help and guidance for the use of saliva samples for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Whole-saliva Proteolysis and Its Impact on Salivary Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Thomadaki, K.; Helmerhorst, E.J.; Tian, N.; Sun, X.; Siqueira, W.L.; Walt, D.R.; Oppenheim, F.G.

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of human whole saliva for diagnostics and disease monitoring as an alternative to blood samples. In contrast to blood, whole saliva is a non-sterile body fluid. Proper hand-ling and storage are required to preserve the integrity of potential biomarkers. We investigated salivary autoproteolytic degradation using a variety of approaches. We determined inhibition of protease activities by monitoring the endogenous proteome. In addition, the stability of highly protease-susceptible proteins—histatin 5, statherin, and PRP1—was assessed. Experimental variables included (a) protease inhibitors, (b) salivary pH, (c) incubation temperatures, and (d) sample heating. A cocktail containing AEBSF, aprotinin, pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, leupeptin, antipain, and EDTA could not prevent histatin 5, statherin, or PRP1 degradation in whole saliva. Among the other treatments evaluated, short-term storage of freshly collected samples on ice was effective without interfering with the chemistry of the proteome. In conclusion, whole saliva contains a unique mixture of enzymes as evidenced from their resilience to protease inhibition. Analytical evidence on protein stability is needed to ensure the validity of salivary biomarker study outcomes. Analysis of the data presented will provide help and guidance for the use of saliva samples for diagnostic purposes. PMID:21917601

  19. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  20. The lumbrical muscle: a novel in situ system to evaluate adult skeletal muscle proteolysis and anticatabolic drugs for therapeutic purposes.

    PubMed

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Figueiredo, Leonardo Bruno; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    The molecular regulation of skeletal muscle proteolysis and the pharmacological screening of anticatabolic drugs have been addressed by measuring tyrosine release from prepubertal rat skeletal muscles, which are thin enough to allow adequate in vitro diffusion of oxygen and substrates. However, the use of muscle at accelerated prepubertal growth has limited the analysis of adult muscle proteolysis or that associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we established the adult rat lumbrical muscle (4/hindpaw; 8/rat) as a new in situ experimental model for dynamic measurement of skeletal muscle proteolysis. By incubating lumbrical muscles attached to their individual metatarsal bones in Tyrode solution, we showed that the muscle proteolysis rate of adult and aged rats (3-4 to 24 mo old) is 45-25% of that in prepubertal animals (1 mo old), which makes questionable the usual extrapolation of proteolysis from prepubertal to adult/senile muscles. While acute mechanical injury or 1- to 7-day denervation increased tyrosine release from adult lumbrical muscle by up to 60%, it was reduced by 20-28% after 2-h incubation with β-adrenoceptor agonists, forskolin or phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Using inhibitors of 26S-proteasome (MG132), lysosome (methylamine), or calpain (E64/leupeptin) systems, we showed that ubiquitin-proteasome is accountable for 40-50% of total lumbrical proteolysis of adult, middle-aged, and aged rats. In conclusion, the lumbrical model allows the analysis of muscle proteolysis rate from prepubertal to senile rats. By permitting eight simultaneous matched measurements per rat, the new model improves similar protocols performed in paired extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from prepubertal rats, optimizing the pharmacological screening of drugs for anticatabolic purposes.

  1. Contribution of a selected fungal population to proteolysis on dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J; Núñez, Félix; Benito, María J; Asensio, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    The proteolytic changes taking place in dry-cured hams lead to increases in free amino acids. Such free amino acids not only contribute to flavour, but also serve as precursors of volatile compounds. Several months of ripening time are required to allow the particular flavour to develop. The fungal population allowed to grow on the surface of some types of dry-cured could play a key role on proteolysis, as it has been shown for dry-cured sausages. The purpose of this work was to study the possible contribution of fungi to proteolysis in dry-cured ham. For this, a strain each of non-toxigenic Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) and Debaryomyces hansenii (Dh345), selected for their proteolytic activity on myofibrillar proteins, were inoculated as starter cultures. Changes in the high ionic strength-soluble proteins of an external muscle (adductor) revealed in only 6 months higher proteolysis in the inoculated hams when compared to non-inoculated control hams. Proteolytic strains among the wild fungal population on non-inoculated control hams prevented from obtaining similar differences at the end of processing. However, inoculation with Pg222 and Dh345 led to higher levels for most free amino acids at the external muscle in fully dry-cured hams. In addition, the concentration for some of the more polar free amino acids (i.e. Asp, Glu, Ser and Gln) in inoculated hams was higher at external than at internal (biceps femoris) muscles. These promising results deserve further studies to know the impact of a selected fungal population on the volatile compounds and sensory properties of dry-cured ham.

  2. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ushijima, Hironori; Maeda, Masatomo

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  3. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases.

    PubMed

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Wolf, Sharon G; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-09-27

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM-cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior.

  4. Deamidation, acylation and proteolysis of a model peptide in PLGA films.

    PubMed

    Houchin, M L; Heppert, K; Topp, E M

    2006-05-01

    The relative rates of deamidation, acylation and proteolysis (i.e. amide bond cleavage) were determined for a model peptide (VYPNGA) in poly (dl-lactide-co-glycolide) films. Films were stored at 70 degrees C and either 95%, 75%, 60%, 45%, 28%, or approximately 0% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C and 95% relative humidity. Peptide degradation products were identified by ESI+MS/MS and quantitated by LC/MS/MS. Extensive overlap of degradation mechanisms occurred, producing a complex mixture of products. Acylation was the dominant peptide degradation reaction (10-20% of total peptide) at early stages of PLGA hydrolysis and at intermediate relative humidity (60-45% RH). Deamidation and proteolysis were dominant (25-50% and 20-40% of total peptide, respectively) at later stages and at high relative humidity (95-75% RH). Understanding the relative rates of each peptide degradation reaction will allow for improved design of PLGA formulations that preserve the stability of peptide and protein drugs.

  5. Hepatic steatosis inhibits autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Inami, Yoshihiro; Yamashina, Shunhei; Izumi, Kousuke; Ueno, Takashi; Tanida, Isei; Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Acidification of autophagosome was blunted in steatotic hepatocytes. {yields} Hepatic steatosis did not disturb fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome. {yields} Proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes was inhibited by steatosis. {yields} Hepatic expression of cathepsin B and L was suppressed by steatosis. -- Abstract: Autophagy, one of protein degradation system, contributes to maintain cellular homeostasis and cell defense. Recently, some evidences indicated that autophagy and lipid metabolism are interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatic steatosis impairs autophagic proteolysis. Though accumulation of autophagosome is observed in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice, expression of p62 was augmented in liver from ob/ob mice more than control mice. Moreover, degradation of the long-lived protein leucine was significantly suppressed in hepatocytes isolated from ob/ob mice. More than 80% of autophagosomes were stained by LysoTracker Red (LTR) in hepatocytes from control mice; however, rate of LTR-stained autophagosomes in hepatocytes were suppressed in ob/ob mice. On the other hand, clearance of autolysosomes loaded with LTR was blunted in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice. Although fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome was not disturbed, proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes and cathepsin B and L expression of liver were suppressed in ob/ob mice. These results indicate that lipid accumulation blunts autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression.

  6. Extracellular Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein E (apoE) by Secreted Serine Neuronal Protease

    PubMed Central

    Tamboli, Irfan Y.; Heo, Dongeun; Rebeck, G. William

    2014-01-01

    Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE) is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occuring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches. PMID:24675880

  7. Distinct biological events generated by ECM proteolysis by two homologous collagenases

    PubMed Central

    Solomonov, Inna; Zehorai, Eldar; Talmi-Frank, Dalit; Shainskaya, Alla; Zhuravlev, Alina; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Visse, Robert; Levin, Yishai; Kampf, Nir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Nagase, Hideaki; Sagi, Irit

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the expression profiles of multiple and possibly redundant matrix-remodeling proteases (e.g., collagenases) differ strongly in health, disease, and development. Although enzymatic redundancy might be inferred from their close similarity in structure, their in vivo activity can lead to extremely diverse tissue-remodeling outcomes. We observed that proteolysis of collagen-rich natural extracellular matrix (ECM), performed uniquely by individual homologous proteases, leads to distinct events that eventually affect overall ECM morphology, viscoelastic properties, and molecular composition. We revealed striking differences in the motility and signaling patterns, morphology, and gene-expression profiles of cells interacting with natural collagen-rich ECM degraded by different collagenases. Thus, in contrast to previous notions, matrix-remodeling systems are not redundant and give rise to precise ECM–cell crosstalk. Because ECM proteolysis is an abundant biochemical process that is critical for tissue homoeostasis, these results improve our fundamental understanding its complexity and its impact on cell behavior. PMID:27630193

  8. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  9. The Transcription Activity of Gis1 Is Negatively Modulated by Proteasome-mediated Limited Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional response to environmental changes has to be prompt but appropriate. Previously, it has been shown that the Gis1 transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of postdiauxic shift genes in response to nutrient starvation, and this transcription regulation is dependent upon the Rim15 kinase. Here we demonstrate that the activity of Gis1 is negatively modulated by proteasome-mediated limited proteolysis. Limited degradation of Gis1 by the proteasome leads to the production of smaller variants, which have weaker transcription activities than the full-length protein. The coiled-coil domain, absent from the smaller variants, is part of the second transcription activation domain in Gis1 and is essential for both the limited proteolysis of Gis1 and its full activity. Endogenous Gis1 and its variants, regardless of their transcription capabilities, activate transcription in a Rim15-dependent manner. However, when the full-length Gis1 accumulates in cells due to overexpression or inhibition of the proteasome function, transcription activation by Gis1 is no longer solely controlled by Rim15. Together, these data strongly indicate that the function of the limited degradation is to ensure that Gis1-dependent transcription is strictly regulated by the Rim15 kinase. Furthermore, we have revealed that the kinase activity of Rim15 is essential for this regulation. PMID:20022953

  10. Huntingtin proteolysis releases non-polyQ fragments that cause toxicity through dynamin 1 dysregulation.

    PubMed

    El-Daher, Marie-Thérèse; Hangen, Emilie; Bruyère, Julie; Poizat, Ghislaine; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Pardo, Raul; Bourg, Nicolas; Souquere, Sylvie; Mayet, Céline; Pierron, Gérard; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Botas, Juan; Humbert, Sandrine; Saudou, Frédéric

    2015-09-02

    Cleavage of mutant huntingtin (HTT) is an essential process in Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Cleavage generates N-ter fragments that contain the polyQ stretch and whose nuclear toxicity is well established. However, the functional defects induced by cleavage of full-length HTT remain elusive. Moreover, the contribution of non-polyQ C-terminal fragments is unknown. Using time- and site-specific control of full-length HTT proteolysis, we show that specific cleavages are required to disrupt intramolecular interactions within HTT and to cause toxicity in cells and flies. Surprisingly, in addition to the canonical pathogenic N-ter fragments, the C-ter fragments generated, that do not contain the polyQ stretch, induced toxicity via dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and increased ER stress. C-ter HTT bound to dynamin 1 and subsequently impaired its activity at ER membranes. Our findings support a role for HTT on dynamin 1 function and ER homoeostasis. Proteolysis-induced alteration of this function may be relevant to disease.

  11. Mapping the consequence of Notch1 proteolysis in vivo with NIP-CRE.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marc; Ong, Chin-Tong; Hadland, Brandon; Huppert, Stacey; Liu, Zhenyi; Korving, Jeroen; van den Born, Maaike; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Wu, Yumei; Clevers, Hans; Kopan, Raphael

    2007-02-01

    The four highly conserved Notch receptors receive short-range signals that control many biological processes during development and in adult vertebrate tissues. The involvement of Notch1 signaling in tissue self-renewal is less clear, however. We developed a novel genetic approach N(1)IP-CRE (Notch1 Intramembrane Proteolysis) to follow, at high resolution, the descendents of cells experiencing Notch1 activation in the mouse. By combining N(1)IP-CRE with loss-of-function analysis, Notch activation patterns were correlated with function during development, self-renewal and malignancy in selected tissues. Identification of many known functions of Notch1 throughout development validated the utility of this approach. Importantly, novel roles for Notch1 signaling were identified in heart, vasculature, retina and in the stem cell compartments of self-renewing epithelia. We find that the probability of Notch1 activation in different tissues does not always indicate a requirement for this receptor and that gradients of Notch1 activation are evident within one organ. These findings highlight an underappreciated layer of complexity of Notch signaling in vivo. Moreover, NIP-CRE represents a general strategy applicable for monitoring proteolysis-dependent signaling in vivo.

  12. Huntingtin proteolysis releases non-polyQ fragments that cause toxicity through dynamin 1 dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    El-Daher, Marie-Thérèse; Hangen, Emilie; Bruyère, Julie; Poizat, Ghislaine; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Pardo, Raul; Bourg, Nicolas; Souquere, Sylvie; Mayet, Céline; Pierron, Gérard; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Botas, Juan; Humbert, Sandrine; Saudou, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage of mutant huntingtin (HTT) is an essential process in Huntington’s disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder. Cleavage generates N-ter fragments that contain the polyQ stretch and whose nuclear toxicity is well established. However, the functional defects induced by cleavage of full-length HTT remain elusive. Moreover, the contribution of non-polyQ C-terminal fragments is unknown. Using time- and site-specific control of full-length HTT proteolysis, we show that specific cleavages are required to disrupt intramolecular interactions within HTT and to cause toxicity in cells and flies. Surprisingly, in addition to the canonical pathogenic N-ter fragments, the C-ter fragments generated, that do not contain the polyQ stretch, induced toxicity via dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and increased ER stress. C-ter HTT bound to dynamin 1 and subsequently impaired its activity at ER membranes. Our findings support a role for HTT on dynamin 1 function and ER homoeostasis. Proteolysis-induced alteration of this function may be relevant to disease. PMID:26165689

  13. Protein Degradation by In-Cell Self-Assembly of Proteolysis Targeting Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective degradation of proteins by proteolysis targeting chimeras (PROTACs) offers a promising potential alternative to protein inhibition for therapeutic intervention. Current PROTAC molecules incorporate a ligand for the target protein, a linker, and an E3 ubiquitin ligase recruiting group, which bring together target protein and ubiquitinating machinery. Such hetero-bifunctional molecules require significant linker optimization and possess high molecular weight, which can limit cellular permeation, solubility, and other drug-like properties. We show here that the hetero-bifunctional molecule can be formed intracellularly by bio-orthogonal click combination of two smaller precursors. We designed a tetrazine tagged thalidomide derivative which reacts rapidly with a trans-cyclo-octene tagged ligand of the target protein in cells to form a cereblon E3 ligase recruiting PROTAC molecule. The in-cell click-formed proteolysis targeting chimeras (CLIPTACs) were successfully used to degrade two key oncology targets, BRD4 and ERK1/2. ERK1/2 degradation was achieved using a CLIPTAC based on a covalent inhibitor. We expect this approach to be readily extendable to other inhibitor-protein systems because the tagged E3 ligase recruiter is capable of undergoing the click reaction with a suitably tagged ligand of any protein of interest to elicit its degradation. PMID:28058282

  14. Natural mitochondrial proteolysis confirms transcription systematically exchanging/deleting nucleotides, peptides coded by expanded codons.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-02-07

    Protein sequences have higher linguistic complexities than human languages. This indicates undeciphered multilayered, overprinted information/genetic codes. Some superimposed genetic information is revealed by detections of transcripts systematically (a) exchanging nucleotides (nine symmetric, e.g. A<->C, fourteen asymmetric, e.g. A->C->G->A, swinger RNAs) translated according to tri-, tetra- and pentacodons, and (b) deleting mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs). Here analyses of two independent proteomic datasets considering natural proteolysis confirm independently translation of these non-canonical RNAs, also along tetra- and pentacodons, increasing coverage of putative, cryptically encoded proteins. Analyses assuming endoproteinase GluC and elastase digestions (cleavages after residues D, E, and A, L, I, V, respectively) detect additional peptides colocalizing with detected non-canonical RNAs. Analyses detect fewer peptides matching GluC-, elastase- than trypsin-digestions: artificial trypsin-digestion outweighs natural proteolysis. Results suggest occurrences of complete proteins entirely matching non-canonical, superimposed encoding(s). Protein-coding after bijective transformations could explain genetic code symmetries, such as along Rumer's transformation.

  15. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of tropomodulin isoforms leads to thin filament elongation in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Gokhin, David S; Tierney, Matthew T; Sui, Zhenhua; Sacco, Alessandra; Fowler, Velia M

    2014-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) induces sarcolemmal mechanical instability and rupture, hyperactivity of intracellular calpains, and proteolytic breakdown of muscle structural proteins. Here we identify the two sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms, Tmod1 and Tmod4, as novel proteolytic targets of m-calpain, with Tmod1 exhibiting ∼10-fold greater sensitivity to calpain-mediated cleavage than Tmod4 in situ. In mdx mice, increased m-calpain levels in dystrophic soleus muscle are associated with loss of Tmod1 from the thin filament pointed ends, resulting in ∼11% increase in thin filament lengths. In mdx/mTR mice, a more severe model of DMD, Tmod1 disappears from the thin filament pointed ends in both tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus muscles, whereas Tmod4 additionally disappears from soleus muscle, resulting in thin filament length increases of ∼10 and ∼12% in TA and soleus muscles, respectively. In both mdx and mdx/mTR mice, both TA and soleus muscles exhibit normal localization of α-actinin, the nebulin M1M2M3 domain, Tmod3, and cytoplasmic γ-actin, indicating that m-calpain does not cause wholesale proteolysis of other sarcomeric and actin cytoskeletal proteins in dystrophic skeletal muscle. These results implicate Tmod proteolysis and resultant thin filament length misspecification as novel mechanisms that may contribute to DMD pathology, affecting muscles in a use- and disease severity-dependent manner.

  16. Proteolysis of the endothelial cell protein C receptor by neutrophil proteinase 3

    PubMed Central

    VILLEGAS-MENDEZ, A; MONTES, R; AMBROSE, L R; WARRENS, A N; LAFFAN, M; LANE, D A

    2007-01-01

    Background The endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) presents protein C to the thrombin:thrombomodulin complex on the endothelium of large vessels, and enhances the generation of activated protein C (APC) and activation of protease-activated receptor-1. A previous report has demonstrated binding of soluble (s) EPCR to activated neutrophils via surface proteinase 3 (PR3). Methods We now report further characterization of this interaction. Activated neutrophils and purified PR3 both decrease endothelial cell (EC) surface EPCR, suggestive of its proteolysis. Results When added to purified recombinant sEPCR, PR3 produced multiple cleavages, with early products including 20 kDa N-terminal and C-terminal (after Lys176) fragments. The binding of active site blocked PR3 to sEPCR was studied by surface plasmon resonance. Estimates of the KD of 18.5–102 nm were obtained with heterogeneous binding, suggestive of more than a single interaction site. Conclusions This work demonstrates PR3 binding to and proteolysis of EPCR and suggests a mechanism by which anticoagulant and cell protective pathways can be down-regulated during inflammation. PMID:17459006

  17. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  18. Influence of chymosin type and curd scalding temperature on proteolysis of hard cooked cheeses.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Luciana M; Bergamini, Carina V; Pozza, Leila; Cuffia, Facundo; Candioti, Mario C; Hynes, Erica

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the type of coagulant enzyme and the curd scalding temperature on the proteolysis and residual coagulant and plasmin activities of a cooked cheese, Reggianito, in the interest of reducing ripening time. A two-factor experimental design was applied in two levels: type of coagulant enzyme, bovine chymosin or camel chymosin, and curd scalding temperature, 50 or 56 °C. The experimental treatments were applied in Reggianito cheese making experiments, and the samples were ripened for 90 d at 12 °C. Scalding temperature influenced residual coagulant activity; the cheeses cooked at 50 °C had significantly higher activity than those treated at 56 °C. In contrast, scalding temperature did not modify plasmin activity. Proteolysis was primarily affected by curd cooking temperature because chymosin-mediated hydrolysis of αs1 casein was slower in cheeses treated at 56 °C. Additionally, the nitrogen content in the cheese soluble fractions was consistently lower in the cheeses scalded at 56 °C than those cooked at 50 °C. A significant influence of the type of coagulant enzyme was observed, especially in the nitrogen fractions and peptide profiles, which demonstrated that camel chymosin was slightly less proteolytic; however, these differences were lower than those caused by the scalding temperature.

  19. Disintegrin Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 Regulates Endothelial Permeability and T Cell Transmigration by Proteolysis of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Beate; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Maretzky, Thorsten; Ludwig, Andreas; Blobel, Carl P.; Saftig, Paul; Reiss, Karina

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is the major adhesion molecule of endothelial adherens junctions. It plays an essential role in controlling endothelial permeability, vascular integrity, leukocyte transmigration, and angiogenesis. Elevated levels of soluble VE-cadherin are associated with diseases like coronary atherosclerosis. Previous data showed that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin is released by an unknown metalloprotease activity during apoptosis. In this study, we used gain of function analyses, inhibitor studies and RNA interference experiments to analyze the proteolytic release of VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that VE-cadherin is specifically cleaved by the disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM10 in its ectodomain releasing a soluble fragment and generating a carboxyterminal membrane bound stub, which is a substrate for a subsequent γ-secretase cleavage. This ADAM10-mediated proteolysis could be induced by Ca2+-influx and staurosporine treatment, indicating that ADAM10-mediated VE-cadherin cleavage contributes to the dissolution of adherens junctions during endothelial cell activation and apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, protein kinase C activation or inhibition did not modulate VE-cadherin processing. Increased ADAM10 expression was functionally associated with an increase in endothelial permeability. Remarkably, our data indicate that ADAM10 activity also contributes to the thrombin-induced decrease of endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Moreover, knockdown of ADAM10 in HUVECs as well as in T cells by small interfering RNA impaired T cell transmigration. Taken together our data identify ADAM10 as a novel regulator of vascular permeability and demonstrate a hitherto unknown function of ADAM10 in the regulation of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial cell functions and leukocyte transendothelial migration. PMID:18420943

  20. Vinculin Proteolysis Unmasks an ActA Homolog for Actin-based Shigella Motility

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Roney O.; Zeile, William; Kang, Fan; Purich, Daniel L.; Southwick, Frederick S.

    1997-01-01

    To generate the forces needed for motility, the plasma membranes of nonmuscle cells adopt an activated state that dynamically reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton. By usurping components from focal contacts and the actin cytoskeleton, the intracellular pathogens Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes use molecular mimicry to create their own actin-based motors. We raised an antibody (designated FS-1) against the FEFPPPPTDE sequence of Listeria ActA, and this antibody: (a) localized at the trailing end of motile intracellular Shigella, (b) inhibited intracellular locomotion upon microinjection of Shigella-infected cells, and (c) cross-reacted with the proteolytically derived 90-kD human vinculin head fragment that contains the Vinc-1 oligoproline sequence, PDFPPPPPDL. Antibody FS-1 reacted only weakly with full-length vinculin, suggesting that the Vinc-1 sequence in full-length vinculin may be masked by its tail region and that this sequence is unmasked by proteolysis. Immunofluoresence staining with a monoclonal antibody against the head region of vinculin (Vin 11-5) localized to the back of motile bacteria (an identical staining pattern observed with the anti-ActA FS-1 antibody), indicating that motile bacteria attract a form of vinculin containing an unmasked Vinc-1 oligoproline sequence. Microinjection of submicromolar concentrations of a synthetic Vinc-1 peptide arrested Shigella intracellular motility, underscoring the functional importance of this sequence. Western blots revealed that Shigella infection induces vinculin proteolysis in PtK2 cells and generates p90 head fragment over the same 1–3 h time frame when intracellular bacteria move within the host cell cytoplasm. We also discovered that microinjected p90, but not full-length vinculin, accelerates rates of pathogen motility by a factor of 3 ± 0.4 in Shigella-infected PtK2 cells. These experiments suggest that vinculin p90 is a rate-limiting component in actin-based Shigella motility, and that

  1. Chemical and proteolysis-derived changes during long-term storage of lactose-hydrolyzed ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) milk.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Therese; Jensen, Hanne B; Sundekilde, Ulrik K; Clausen, Morten R; Eggers, Nina; Larsen, Lotte B; Ray, Colin; Andersen, Henrik J; Bertram, Hanne C

    2014-11-19

    Proteolytic activity in milk may release bitter-tasting peptides and generate free amino terminals that react with carbohydrates, which initiate Maillard reaction. Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) heat treatment inactivates the majority of proteolytic enzymes in milk. In lactose-hydrolyzed milk a β-galactosidase preparation is applied to the milk after heat treatment, which has proteolytic side activities that may induce quality deterioration of long-term-stored milk. In the present study proteolysis, glycation, and volatile compound formation were investigated in conventional (100% lactose), filtered (60% lactose), and lactose-hydrolyzed (<1% lactose) UHT milk using reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteolysis was observed in all milk types. However, the degree of proteolysis was significantly higher in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk compared to the conventional and filtered milk. The proteins most prone to proteolysis were β-CN and αs1-CN, which were clearly hydrolyzed after approximately 90 days of storage in the lactose-hydrolyzed milk.

  2. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    DOE PAGES

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residuesmore » 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.« less

  3. The Putative O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase SPINDLY Inhibits Class I TCP Proteolysis to Promote Sensitivity to Cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Evyatar; Livne, Sivan; Kobinson-Katz, Tammy; Tal, Lior; Pri-Tal, Oded; Mosquna, Assaf; Tarkowská, Danuše; Mueller, Bruno; Tarkowski, Petr; Weiss, David

    2016-06-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SPINDLY (SPY) is a putative serine and threonine O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT). While SPY has been shown to suppress gibberellin signaling and to promote cytokinin (CK) responses, its catalytic OGT activity was never demonstrated and its effect on protein fate is not known. We previously showed that SPY interacts physically and functionally with TCP14 and TCP15 to promote CK responses. Here, we aimed to identify how SPY regulates TCP14/15 activities and how these TCPs promote CK responses. We show that SPY activity is required for TCP14 stability. Mutation in the putative OGT domain of SPY (spy-3) stimulated TCP14 proteolysis by the 26S proteasome, which was reversed by mutation in CULLIN1 (CUL1), suggesting a role for SKP, CUL1, F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase in TCP14 proteolysis. TCP14 proteolysis in spy-3 suppressed all TCP14 misexpression phenotypes, including the enhanced CK responses. The increased CK activity in TCP14/15-overexpressing flowers resulted from increased sensitivity to the hormone and not from higher CK levels. TCP15 overexpression enhanced the response of the CK-induced synthetic promoter pTCS to CK, suggesting that TCP14/15 affect early steps in CK signaling. We propose that posttranslational modification of TCP14/15 by SPY inhibits their proteolysis and that the accumulated proteins promote the activity of the CK phosphorelay cascade in developing Arabidopsis leaves and flowers.

  4. Age-related homeostatic mid-channel proteolysis of neuronal L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Ioannis E.; Abele-Henckels, Kathryn; Zhang, Wei K.; Lin, Bochao; Yu, Yong; Geyman, Larry; Ehlers, Michael D.; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A.; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuitry and brain activity depend critically on proper function of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), whose activity must be tightly controlled. We show that the main body of the pore-forming α1 subunit of neuronal L-type VGCCs, Cav1.2, is proteolytically cleaved, resulting in Cav1.2 fragment-channels that separate but remain on the plasma membrane. This “gmid-channel” proteolysis is regulated by channel activity, involves the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and causes attenuation and biophysical alterations of VGCC currents. Recombinant Cav1.2 fragment-channels mimicking the products of mid-channel proteolysis do not form active channels on their own, but when properly paired, produce currents with distinct biophysical properties. Mid-channel proteolysis increases dramatically with age and can be attenuated with an L-type VGCC blocker in vivo. Mid-channel proteolysis represents a novel form of homeostatic negative-feedback processing of VGCCs that could profoundly affect neuronal excitability, neurotransmission, neuroprotection, and calcium signaling in physiological and disease states. PMID:24908485

  5. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  6. Regulation of development and cancer by the R2B subfamily of RPTPs and the implications of proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Sonya E.L.; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2014-01-01

    The initial cloning of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) was met with excitement because of their hypothesized function in counterbalancing receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. In recent years, members of a subfamily of RPTPs with homophilic cell-cell adhesion capabilities, known as the R2B subfamily, have been shown to have functions beyond that of counteracting tyrosine kinase activity, by independently influencing cell signaling in their own right and by regulating cell adhesion. The R2B subfamily is composed of four members: PTPmu (PTPRM), PTPrho (PTPRT), PTPkappa (PTPRK), and PCP-2 (PTPRU). The effects of this small subfamily of RPTPs is far reaching, influencing several developmental processes and cancer. In fact, R2B RPTPs are predicted to be tumor suppressors and are among the most frequently mutated protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in cancer. Confounding these conclusions are more recent studies suggesting that proteolysis of the full-length R2B RPTPs result in oncogenic extracellular and intracellular protein fragments. This review discusses the current knowledge of the role of R2B RPTPs in development and cancer, with special detail given to the mechanisms and implications that proteolysis has on R2B RPTP function. We also touch upon the concept of exploiting R2B proteolysis to develop cancer imaging tools, and consider the effects of R2B proteolysis on axon guidance, perineural invasion and collective cell migration. PMID:25223585

  7. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  8. Proteolysis approach without chemical modification for a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bonds using thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Maeda, Hideaki

    2010-08-01

    Disulfide bonds in proteins are important not only for the conformational stability of the protein but also for the regulation of oxidation-reduction in signal transduction. The conventional method for the assignment of disulfide bond by chemical cleavage and/or proteolysis is a time-consuming multi-step procedure. In this study, we report a simple and rapid analysis of disulfide bond from protein digests that were prepared by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactors. The feasibility and performance of this approach were evaluated by digesting lysozyme and BSA at several temperatures. The proteins which stabilize their conformations by disulfide bonds were thermally denatured during proteolysis and were efficiently digested by the immobilized protease but not by free protease. The digests were directly analyzed by ESI-TOF MS without any purification or concentration step. All four disulfide bonds on lysozyme and 10 of 17 on BSA were assigned from the digests by the trypsin-immobilized microreactor at 50 degrees C. The procedure for proteolysis and the assignment were achieved within 2 h without any reduction and alkylation procedure. From the present results, the proteolysis approach by the thermostable protease-immobilized microreactor provides a strategy for the high-throughput analysis of disulfide bond in proteomics.

  9. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  10. Ligand binding to an allergenic lipid transfer protein enhances conformational flexibility resulting in an increase in susceptibility to gastroduodenal proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-07-26

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. As a result, such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs.

  11. Combining in situ proteolysis and mass spectrometry to crystallize Escherichia coli PgaB

    PubMed Central

    Little, Dustin J.; Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Yip, Patrick; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P. Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The periplasmic poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) de-N-acetylase PgaB from Escherichia coli was overexpressed and purified, but was recalcitrant to crystallization. Use of the in situ proteolysis technique produced crystals of PgaB, but these crystals could not be optimized for diffraction studies. By analyzing the initial crystal hits using SDS–PAGE and mass spectrometry, the boundaries of the protein species that crystallized were determined. The re-­engineered protein target crystallized reproducibly without the addition of protease and with significantly increased crystal quality. Crystals of the selenomethionine-incorporated protein exhibited the symmetry of space group P212121 and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. PMID:22750880

  12. Engineering the oxyanion hole of trypsin for promoting the reverse of proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Franke, Lars; Liebscher, Sandra; Bordusa, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Although proteases are capable of synthesizing peptide bonds via the reverse of proteolysis, they are not proficient at peptide fragment ligation. Further manipulations are needed to shift the native enzyme activity from the cleavage to the synthesis of peptides especially when longer peptides or even proteins are the target molecules of the reaction. This account reports on the synthetic potential of trypsin variants with engineered oxyanion holes mutated by proline mutations, which were designed to minimize proteolytic side reactions during peptide bond synthesis. From the six single and double proline-mutated trypsins, in particular, trypsinQ192P came out as the most promising biocatalyst enabling not only the ligation of cleavage-sensitive peptide fragments but also the selective N-terminal modification of a real protein substrate.

  13. Probing structure and function of ion channels using limited proteolysis and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Trkulja, Carolina L; Jansson, Erik T; Jardemark, Kent; Orwar, Owe

    2014-10-22

    Even though gain, loss, or modulation of ion channel function is implicated in many diseases, both rare and common, the development of new pharmaceuticals targeting this class has been disappointing, where it has been a major problem to obtain correlated structural and functional information. Here, we present a microfluidic method in which the ion channel TRPV1, contained in proteoliposomes or in excised patches, was exposed to limited trypsin proteolysis. Cleaved-off peptides were identified by MS, and electrophysiological properties were recorded by patch clamp. Thus, the structure-function relationship was evaluated by correlating changes in function with removal of structural elements. Using this approach, we pinpointed regions of TRPV1 that affect channel properties upon their removal, causing changes in current amplitude, single-channel conductance, and EC50 value toward its agonist, capsaicin. We have provided a fast "shotgun" method for chemical truncation of a membrane protein, which allows for functional assessments of various peptide regions.

  14. Mapping of radiolabeled peptides derived from proteolysis of polypeptides bound to nitrocellulose after Western blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Carrey, E.A.; Hardie, D.G.

    1986-11-01

    Sections of nitrocellulose containing bound /sup 32/P-labeled polypeptides were excised from Western blots and exhaustively digested by trypsin in order to analyze the distribution of phosphorylation sites between the products of limited proteolysis of the multifunctional protein CAD. Using the criterion of analytical isoelectric focusing, the /sup 32/P-peptides obtained by this method were found to be similar, although not identical, to peptides obtained by a more conventional digestion of trichloroacetic acid precipitates. Digestion on Western blots is more straightforward than electrophoretic elution of individual gel slices, gives better recoveries than direct digestion of gel slices, and is particularly suitable for peptide mapping of small peptides which bind to nitrocellulose but would diffuse out of polyacrylamide gels during the commonly used fixing and staining procedures.

  15. MBTPS2 mutations cause defective regulated intramembrane proteolysis in X-linked osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindert, Uschi; Cabral, Wayne A.; Ausavarat, Surasawadee; Tongkobpetch, Siraprapa; Ludin, Katja; Barnes, Aileen M.; Yeetong, Patra; Weis, Maryann; Krabichler, Birgit; Srichomthong, Chalurmpon; Makareeva, Elena N.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Leikin, Sergey; Röthlisberger, Benno; Rohrbach, Marianne; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Eyre, David R.; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Giunta, Cecilia; Marini, Joan C.; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a collagen-related bone dysplasia. We identified an X-linked recessive form of OI caused by defects in MBTPS2, which encodes site-2 metalloprotease (S2P). MBTPS2 missense mutations in two independent kindreds with moderate/severe OI cause substitutions at highly conserved S2P residues. Mutant S2P has normal stability, but impaired functioning in regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of OASIS, ATF6 and SREBP transcription factors, consistent with decreased proband secretion of type I collagen. Further, hydroxylation of the collagen lysine residue (K87) critical for crosslinking is reduced in proband bone tissue, consistent with decreased lysyl hydroxylase 1 in proband osteoblasts. Reduced collagen crosslinks presumptively undermine bone strength. Also, proband osteoblasts have broadly defective differentiation. These mutations provide evidence that RIP plays a fundamental role in normal bone development. PMID:27380894

  16. Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marina; Wolf, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.

  17. VEGFR2 Trafficking, Signaling and Proteolysis is Regulated by the Ubiquitin Isopeptidase USP8.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular function. VEGF-A binding to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates endothelial signal transduction and regulates multiple cellular responses. Activated VEGFR2 undergoes ubiquitination but the enzymes that regulate this post-translational modification are unclear. In this study, the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP8, is shown to regulate VEGFR2 trafficking, de-ubiquitination, proteolysis and signal transduction. USP8-depleted endothelial cells displayed altered VEGFR2 ubiquitination and production of a unique VEGFR2 extracellular domain proteolytic fragment caused by VEGFR2 accumulation in the endosome-lysosome system. In addition, perturbed VEGFR2 trafficking impaired VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction in USP8-depleted cells. Thus, regulation of VEGFR2 ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination has important consequences for the endothelial cell response and vascular physiology.

  18. The effect of limited proteolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin on bovine colostral IgG1.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, J H; Arzabe, F R; Ortega, F; Piñeiro, A

    1977-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of bovine colostral IgG1 by trypsin caused loss of specific antibody activity but column chromatography showed that relatively little cleavage into fragements had occurred. Polyacrlamide-agarose SDS electrophoresis of the 2-mercaptoethanol-treated digest revealed, however, that extensive cleavage of light chains had occurred even though most of the material before reduction had a mol. wt close to that of undigested IgG1. Although a Fab-type fragment was detected in the digest by immunoelectrophoresis it appeared to be only a minor component. Chymotrypsin had little effect upon either the structure or antibody activity of IgG1. These findings may explain the effect of trypsin and chymotrypsin on the bactericidal activity of colostral antibodies. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:321343

  19. Mechanisms of accelerated proteolysis in rat soleus muscle atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Kirby, Christopher; Rosenberg, Sara; Tome, Margaret; Chase, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Tischler and coworkers (Henriksen et al., 1986; Tischler et al., 1990) concerning the mechanisms of atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation was tested using rat soleus muscle from animals subjected to hindlimb suspension and denervation of muscles. The procedure included (1) measuring protein degradation in isolated muscles and testing the effects of lysosome inhibitors, (2) analyzing the lysosome permeability and autophagocytosis, (3) testing the effects of altering calcium-dependent proteolysis, and (4) evaluating in vivo the effects of various agents to determine the physiological significance of the hypothesis. The results obtained suggest that there are major differences between the mechanisms of atrophies caused by unweighting and denervation, though slower protein synthesis is an important feature common for both.

  20. Proteolysis of synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, U J; Malek, S K; Liu, L; Li, H L

    1999-10-01

    Synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, and SNAP-25 were identified in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells by Western blot analysis. Synaptobrevin-2 was localized in the lamellar bodies, and syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 were found in 0.4% Nonidet P40-soluble and -insoluble fractions, respectively, of the type II cells. When the isolated type II cells were stimulated for secretion with calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, these proteins were found to have been proteolyzed. Preincubation of cells with calpain inhibitor II (N-acetylleucylleucylmethionine), however, prevented the proteolysis. Treatment of the cell lysate with exogenous calpain resulted in a time-dependent decrease of these proteins. The data suggest that synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 are subject to proteolytic modification by activated calpain in intact type II cells stimulated for secretion.

  1. Proteolysis in microfluidic droplets: an approach to interface protein separation and peptide mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ji; Nie, Lei; Qiao, Liang; Li, Yixin; Guo, Liping; Liu, Baohong; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-08-07

    A versatile microreactor protocol based on microfluidic droplets has been developed for on-line protein digestion. Proteins separated by liquid chromatography are fractionated in water-in-oil droplets and digested in sequence. The microfluidic reactor acts also as an electrospray ionization emitter for mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides produced in the individual droplets. Each droplet is an enzymatic micro-reaction unit with efficient proteolysis due to rapid mixing, enhanced mass transfer and automated handling. This droplet approach eliminates sample loss, cross-contamination, non-specific absorption and memory effect. A protein mixture was successfully identified using the droplet-based micro-reactor as interface between reverse phase liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  2. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  3. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-12-14

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn(2+) were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  4. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the interleukin-1 receptor II by alpha-, beta-, and gamma-secretase.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Marjaux, Els; Imhof, Axel; De Strooper, Bart; Haass, Christian; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2007-04-20

    Ectodomain shedding and intramembrane proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by alpha-, beta- and gamma-secretase are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Increased proteolytic processing and secretion of another membrane protein, the interleukin-1 receptor II (IL-1R2), have also been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. IL-1R2 is a decoy receptor that may limit detrimental effects of IL-1 in the brain. At present, the proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 remains little understood. Here we show that IL-1R2 can be proteolytically processed in a manner similar to APP. IL-1R2 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells first undergoes ectodomain shedding in an alpha-secretase-like manner, resulting in secretion of the IL-1R2 ectodomain and the generation of an IL-1R2 C-terminal fragment. This fragment undergoes further intramembrane proteolysis by gamma-secretase, leading to the generation of the soluble intracellular domain of IL-1R2. Intramembrane cleavage of IL-1R2 was abolished by a highly specific inhibitor of gamma-secretase and was absent in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in gamma-secretase activity. Surprisingly, the beta-secretase BACE1 and its homolog BACE2 increased IL-1R2 secretion resulting in C-terminal fragments nearly identical to the ones generated by the alpha-secretase-like cleavage. This suggests that both proteases may act as alternative alpha-secretase-like proteases. Importantly, BACE1 and BACE2 did not cleave several other membrane proteins, demonstrating that both proteases do not contribute to general membrane protein turnover but only cleave specific proteins. This study reveals a similar proteolytic processing of IL-1R2 and APP and may provide an explanation for the increased IL-1R2 secretion observed in AD.

  5. Proteolysis mediated by cysteine cathepsins and legumain-recent advances and cell biological challenges.

    PubMed

    Brix, Klaudia; McInnes, Joseph; Al-Hashimi, Alaa; Rehders, Maren; Tamhane, Tripti; Haugen, Mads H

    2015-05-01

    Proteases play essential roles in protein degradation, protein processing, and extracellular matrix remodeling in all cell types and tissues. They are also involved in protein turnover for maintenance of homeostasis and protein activation or inactivation for cell signaling. Proteases range in function and specificity, with some performing distinct substrate cleavages, while others accomplish proteolysis of a wide range of substrates. As such, different cell types use specialized molecular mechanisms to regulate the localization of proteases and their function within the compartments to which they are destined. Here, we focus on the cysteine family of cathepsin proteases and legumain, which act predominately within the endo-lysosomal pathway. In particular, recent knowledge on cysteine cathepsins and their primary regulator legumain is scrutinized in terms of their trafficking to endo-lysosomal compartments and other less recognized cellular locations. We further explore the mechanisms that regulate these processes and point to pathological cases which arise from detours taken by these proteases. Moreover, the emerging biological roles of specific forms and variants of cysteine cathepsins and legumain are discussed. These may be decisive, pathogenic, or even deadly when localizing to unusual cellular compartments in their enzymatically active form, because they may exert unexpected effects by alternative substrate cleavage. Hence, we propose future perspectives for addressing the actions of cysteine cathepsins and legumain as well as their specific forms and variants. The increasing knowledge in non-canonical aspects of cysteine cathepsin- and legumain-mediated proteolysis may prove valuable for developing new strategies to utilize these versatile proteases in therapeutic approaches.

  6. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  7. Hemin inhibits ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in both a higher plant and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Sullivan, M.L.

    1988-05-03

    In eukaryotes, a major route for ATP-dependent protein breakdown proceeds through covalent intermediates of target proteins destined for degradation and the highly conserved, 76 amino acid protein ubiquitin. In rabbit reticulocytes, it has been shown that hemin effectively inhibits this pathway by blocking the catabolism of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Here the authors demonstrate that hemin is also an effective inhibitor of the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway in both a higher plant, oats (Avena sativa), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hemin inhibits all stages of the pathway in vitro, including ATP-dependent formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, disassembly of conjugates by ubiquitin-protein lyase(s) (or isopeptidases), and degradation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates by ATP-dependent protease(s). Using ubiquitin-/sup 125/I-lysozyme conjugates synthesized in vitro as substrates, they determined the specific effects of hemin on the rates of disassembly and degradation separately. The concentration of hemin required for half-maximal inhibition of both processes was identical in each species, approx. 60 ..mu..M in oats and approx. 50 ..mu..M in yeast. Similar inhibitory effects were observed when two hemin analogues, mesoheme or protoporphyrin IX, were employed. These results demonstrate that the effect of hemin on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is not restricted to erythroid cells and as a result hemin may be a useful tool in studies of this pathway in all eukaryotic cells. These results also question models where hemin serves as a specific negative modulator of proteolysis in erythroid cells.

  8. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. PMID:27190215

  9. Application of exopolysaccharide-producing cultures in reduced-fat Cheddar cheese: composition and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Awad, S; Hassan, A N; Halaweish, F

    2005-12-01

    Proteolysis during ripening of reduced fat Cheddar cheeses made with different exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing and nonproducing cultures was studied. A ropy strain of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris (JFR1) and capsule-forming nonropy and moderately ropy strains of Streptococcus thermophilus were used in making reduced-fat Cheddar cheese. Commercial Cheddar starter was used in making full-fat cheese. Results showed that the actual yield of cheese made with JFR1 was higher than that of all other reduced-fat cheeses. Cheese made with JFR1 contained higher moisture, moisture in the nonfat substance, and residual coagulant activity than all other reduced-fat cheeses. Proteolysis, as determined by PAGE and the level of water-soluble nitrogen, was also higher in cheese made with JFR1 than in all other cheeses. The HPLC analysis showed a significant increase in hydrophobic peptides (causing bitterness) during storage of cheese made with JFR1. Cheese made with the capsule-forming nonropy adjunct of S. thermophilus, which contained lower moisture and moisture in the nonfat substance levels and lower chymosin activity than did cheese made with JFR1, accumulated less hydrophobic peptides. In conclusion, some EPS-producing cultures produced reduced-fat Cheddar cheese with moisture in the nonfat substance similar to that in its full-fat counterpart without the need for modifying the standard cheese-making protocol. Such cultures might accumulate hydrophobic (bitter) peptides if they do not contain the system able to hydrolyze them. For making high quality reduced-fat Cheddar cheese, EPS-producing cultures should be used in conjunction with debittering strains.

  10. Effects of plant enzyme inactivation or sterilization on lipolysis and proteolysis in alfalfa silage.

    PubMed

    Ding, W R; Long, R J; Guo, X S

    2013-04-01

    This experiment studied the contribution of plant enzymes and microbial activity on lipolysis and proteolysis in ensiled alfalfa. Before ensiling, the wilted alfalfa was treated with plant enzyme inactivation by autoclaving or with sterilization by γ-ray irradiation. The treated alfalfa was then inoculated with commercial lactic acid bacteria inoculants and ensiled for 40 d. Alfalfa without treatment was ensiled as the control. The content of total fatty acid (FA) after ensiling decreased 43% in the control silage and 28% in the γ-ray-treated silage, but did not change in the autoclave-treated silage. Among the major FA (C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3), a considerable increase was observed in proportion of C16:0 in the control silage as compared with fresh alfalfa; conversely, decreases in proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 occurred during ensilage. Silage treated with γ-ray radiation at ensiling had a smaller proportion of C16:0 and greater proportions of C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 than control silage. Autoclave treatment further decreased proportions of C16:0 and most of the other FA, and increased C18:2n-6 and C18:3n-3 proportions in comparison with γ-ray treatment. Proportions of C16:0, C18:2n-6, C18:3n-3 and other detected FA (except for the proportion of C15:0) did not differ between fresh forage and autoclave-treated silage. Remarkably, smaller nonprotein nitrogen content was observed in the autoclave-treated silage compared with the γ ray-treated silage or the control silage. These results indicated that an extensive lipolysis occurred during ensiling of alfalfa, and plant enzymes played a major role in lipolysis and proteolysis.

  11. Proteolysis of Apolipoprotein A-I by Secretory Phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Jayaraman, Shobini

    2014-01-01

    In the acute phase of the inflammatory response, secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) reaches its maximum levels in plasma, where it is mostly associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL). Overexpression of human sPLA2 in transgenic mice reduces both HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) plasma levels through increased HDL catabolism by an unknown mechanism. To identify unknown PLA2-mediated activities on the molecular components of HDL, we characterized the protein and lipid products of the PLA2 reaction with HDL. Consistent with previous studies, hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids by PLA2 reduced the particle size without changing its protein composition. However, when HDL was destabilized in the presence of PLA2 by the action of cholesteryl ester transfer protein or by guanidine hydrochloride treatment, a fraction of apoA-I, but no other proteins, dissociated from the particle and was rapidly cleaved. Incubation of PLA2 with lipid-free apoA-I produced similar protein fragments in the range of 6–15 kDa, suggesting specific and direct reaction of PLA2 with apoA-I. Mass spectrometry analysis of isolated proteolytic fragments indicated at least two major cleavage sites at the C-terminal and the central domain of apoA-I. ApoA-I proteolysis by PLA2 was Ca2+-independent, implicating a different mechanism from the Ca2+-dependent PLA2-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis. Inhibition of proteolysis by benzamidine suggests that the proteolytic and lipolytic activities of PLA2 proceed through different mechanisms. Our study identifies a previously unknown proteolytic activity of PLA2 that is specific to apoA-I and may contribute to the enhanced catabolism of apoA-I in inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:24523407

  12. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  13. A serendipitous discovery that in situ proteolysis is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Corey R.; Gebauer, Damara; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang

    2006-10-01

    Proteolysis in situ by a protease secreted by a contaminating fungus is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100. The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  14. Multivariate analysis of proteolysis patterns differentiated the impact of six strains of probiotic bacteria on a semi-hard cheese.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C V; Hynes, E R; Candioti, M C; Zalazar, C A

    2009-06-01

    The individual contribution of 6 strains of probiotic bacteria (3 of Lactobacillus acidophilus and 3 of the Lactobacillus casei group) to proteolysis patterns in a semi-hard cheese was assessed. Control cheeses (without probiotics) and 2 types of experimental cheeses (with the addition of probiotics either directly to milk or by a 2-step fermentation method) were manufactured. Cheeses containing Lb. acidophilus showed the most extensive peptidolysis, which was evidenced by changes in the peptide profiles and a noticeable increase of free amino acids compared with control cheeses. The strains of the Lb. casei group showed a lower contribution to cheese peptidolysis, which consisted mainly of free amino acid increase. Two-step fermentation improved peptidolytic activity for only one of the cultures of Lb. acidophilus tested. The addition of Lb. acidophilus strains into cheese may be suitable not only for their beneficial health effect but also for their influence on secondary proteolysis, consistent with acceleration of ripening and improved flavor formation.

  15. Immobilization of trypsin on graphene oxide for microwave-assisted on-plate proteolysis combined with MALDI-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guobin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Hu, Jianhua; Yang, Pengyuan; Yang, Dong; Wei, Liming

    2012-06-21

    With an ultra-high surface area and abundant functional groups, graphene oxide (GO) provides an ideal substrate for the immobilization of trypsin. We demonstrated that trypsin could be immobilized on GO sheets assisted by polymers as molecular spacers to maintain the activity of the enzyme. And with the trypsin-linked GO as the enzyme immobilization probe, a novel microwave-assisted on-plate digestion method has been developed with subsequent analysis by MALDI-MS. The feasibility and performance of the digestion approach were demonstrated by the proteolysis of standard proteins. The results show that this novel approach substantially accelerated proteolysis and reduced the time required for traditional procedures involving on-plate enzymatic digestion and sample preparation prior to MALDI-MS analysis. The novel digestion approach is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high throughput protein identification.

  16. The YjbH Protein of Bacillus subtilis Enhances ClpXP-Catalyzed Proteolysis of Spx ▿

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Saurabh K.; Kommineni, Sushma; Henslee, Luke; Zhang, Ying; Zuber, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator Spx of Bacillus subtilis is controlled at several levels of the gene expression process. It is maintained at low concentrations during unperturbed growth by the ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Under disulfide stress, Spx concentration increases due in part to a reduction in ClpXP-catalyzed proteolysis. Recent studies of Larsson and coworkers (Mol. Microbiol. 66:669-684, 2007) implicated the product of the yjbH gene as being necessary for the proteolytic control of Spx. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid analysis and protein-protein cross-linking showed that Spx interacts with YjbH. YjbH protein was shown to enhance the proteolysis of Spx in reaction mixtures containing ClpXP protease but not ClpCP protease. An N-terminal truncated form of YjbH with a deletion of residues 1 to 24 (YjbHΔ1-24) showed no proteolysis enhancement activity. YjbH is specific for Spx as it did not accelerate proteolysis of the ClpXP substrate green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SsrA, a GFP derivative with a C-terminal SsrA tag that is recognized by ClpXP. Using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol release experiments, YjbH was found to contain zinc atoms. Zinc analysis of YjbHΔ1-24 revealed that the N-terminal histidine-rich region is indispensable for the coordination of at least one Zn atom. A Zn atom coordinated by the N-terminal region was rapidly released from the protein upon treatment with a strong oxidant. In conclusion, YjbH is proposed to be an adaptor for ClpXP-catalyzed Spx degradation, and a model of YjbH redox control involving Zn dissociation is presented. PMID:19074380

  17. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  18. The Copper Efflux Regulator CueR Is Subject to ATP-Dependent Proteolysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Kraus, Alexander; Schäkermann, Sina; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The trace element copper serves as cofactor for many enzymes but is toxic at elevated concentrations. In bacteria, the intracellular copper level is maintained by copper efflux systems including the Cue system controlled by the transcription factor CueR. CueR, a member of the MerR family, forms homodimers, and binds monovalent copper ions with high affinity. It activates transcription of the copper tolerance genes copA and cueO via a conserved DNA-distortion mechanism. The mechanism how CueR-induced transcription is turned off is not fully understood. Here, we report that Escherichia coli CueR is prone to proteolysis by the AAA(+) proteases Lon, ClpXP, and ClpAP. Using a set of CueR variants, we show that CueR degradation is not altered by mutations affecting copper binding, dimerization or DNA binding of CueR, but requires an accessible C terminus. Except for a twofold stabilization shortly after a copper pulse, proteolysis of CueR is largely copper-independent. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent proteolysis contributes to copper homeostasis in E. coli by turnover of CueR, probably to allow steady monitoring of changes of the intracellular copper level and shut-off of CueR-dependent transcription.

  19. A comparison of the folding characteristics of free and ribosome-tethered polypeptide chains using limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Khadijeh; Reuther, Julia; Deuerling, Elke; Radford, Sheena E; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of protein folding are commonly studied in vitro by denaturing/renaturing intact protein sequences. How these folding mechanisms relate to de novo folding that occurs as the nascent polypeptide emerges from the ribosome is much less well understood. Here, we have employed limited proteolysis followed by mass spectrometry analyses to compare directly free and ribosome-tethered polypeptide chains of the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain and its unfolded variant, SH3-m10. The disordered variant was found to undergo faster proteolysis than SH3. Furthermore, the trypsin cleavage patterns observed show minor, but significant, differences for the free and ribosome-bound nascent chains, with significantly fewer tryptic peptides detected in the presence of ribosome. The results highlight the utility of limited proteolysis coupled with mass spectrometry for the structural analysis of these complex systems, and pave the way for detailed future analyses by combining this technique with chemical labeling methods (for example, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, photochemical oxidation) to analyze protein folding in real time, including in the presence of additional ribosome-associated factors. PMID:25970093

  20. Cell cycle– and cell growth–regulated proteolysis of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on APC–CDH1

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Birgit Otzen; Wagener, Christian; Marinoni, Federica; Kramer, Edgar R.; Melixetian, Marina; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini; Gieffers, Christian; Matteucci, Cristian; Peters, Jan-Michael; Helin, Kristian

    2000-01-01

    CDC6 is conserved during evolution and is essential and limiting for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Human CDC6 activity is regulated by periodic transcription and CDK-regulated subcellular localization. Here, we show that, in addition to being absent from nonproliferating cells, CDC6 is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the anaphase promoting complex (APC)/cyclosome in G1. A combination of point mutations in the destruction box and KEN-box motifs in CDC6 stabilizes the protein in G1 and in quiescent cells. Furthermore, APC, in association with CDH1, ubiquitinates CDC6 in vitro, and both APC and CDH1 are required and limiting for CDC6 proteolysis in vivo. Although a stable mutant of CDC6 is biologically active, overexpression of this mutant or wild-type CDC6 is not sufficient to induce multiple rounds of DNA replication in the same cell cycle. The APC–CDH1-dependent proteolysis of CDC6 in early G1 and in quiescent cells suggests that this process is part of a mechanism that ensures the timely licensing of replication origins during G1. PMID:10995389

  1. The Copper Efflux Regulator CueR Is Subject to ATP-Dependent Proteolysis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Kraus, Alexander; Schäkermann, Sina; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-01-01

    The trace element copper serves as cofactor for many enzymes but is toxic at elevated concentrations. In bacteria, the intracellular copper level is maintained by copper efflux systems including the Cue system controlled by the transcription factor CueR. CueR, a member of the MerR family, forms homodimers, and binds monovalent copper ions with high affinity. It activates transcription of the copper tolerance genes copA and cueO via a conserved DNA-distortion mechanism. The mechanism how CueR-induced transcription is turned off is not fully understood. Here, we report that Escherichia coli CueR is prone to proteolysis by the AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpXP, and ClpAP. Using a set of CueR variants, we show that CueR degradation is not altered by mutations affecting copper binding, dimerization or DNA binding of CueR, but requires an accessible C terminus. Except for a twofold stabilization shortly after a copper pulse, proteolysis of CueR is largely copper-independent. Our results suggest that ATP-dependent proteolysis contributes to copper homeostasis in E. coli by turnover of CueR, probably to allow steady monitoring of changes of the intracellular copper level and shut-off of CueR-dependent transcription. PMID:28293558

  2. Prevention of unloading-induced atrophy by vitamin E supplementation: links between oxidative stress and soleus muscle proteolysis?

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Stéphane; Letexier, Dominique; Favier, Roland; Duchamp, Claude; Desplanches, Dominique

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to reduced activity induces skeletal muscle atrophy. Oxidative stress might contribute to muscle wasting via proteolysis activation. This study aimed to test two hypotheses in rats. Firstly, supplementation of the antioxidant vitamin E, prior and during the phase of unloading, would partly counteract unloading-induced soleus muscle atrophy. Secondly, vitamin E supplementation would decrease the rate of muscle proteolysis by reducing expression of calpains, caspase-3, -9, -12 and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1 and MAFbx). Soleus muscle atrophy (− 49%) induced by fourteen days of hindlimb unloading was reduced to only 32 % under vitamin E. Vitamin E partly prevented the decrease in type I and IIa fiber size. Supplementation increased HSP72 content, suppressed the rise in muscle level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance caused by unloading but failed to modify the lower ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione, the higher uncoupling proteins mRNA and the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase) observed after unloading. Vitamin E treatment abolished the large upregulation of caspase 9, 12 and MuRF1 transcripts in unloaded muscle and greatly decreased the upregulation of μ-calpain, caspase 3 and MAFbx mRNA. In conclusion, the protective effect of vitamin E might be due to modulation of muscle proteolysis-related genes rather than to its antioxidant function. PMID:17291986

  3. IL-1β is an innate immune sensor of microbial proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    LaRock, Christopher N.; Todd, Jordan; LaRock, Doris L.; Olson, Joshua; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a key proinflammatory cytokine that drives antimicrobial immune responses. IL-1β is aberrantly activated in autoimmune diseases, and IL-1β inhibitors are used as therapeutic agents to treat patients with certain autoimmune disorders. Review of postmarketing surveillance of patients receiving IL-1β inhibitors found a disproportionate reporting of invasive infections by group A Streptococcus (GAS). IL-1β inhibition increased mouse susceptibility to GAS infection, but IL-1β was produced independent of canonical inflammasomes. Newly synthesized IL-1β has an amino-terminal prodomain that blocks signaling activity, which is usually proteolytically removed by caspase-1, a protease activated within the inflammasome structure. In place of host caspases, the secreted GAS cysteine protease SpeB generated mature IL-1β. During invasive infection, GAS isolates may acquire pathoadaptive mutations eliminating SpeB expression to evade detection by IL-1β. Pharmacological IL-1β inhibition alleviates this selective pressure, allowing invasive infection by nonpathoadapted GAS. Thus, IL-1β is a sensor that directly detects pathogen-associated proteolysis through an independent pathway operating in parallel with host inflammasomes. Because IL-1β function is maintained across species, yet cleavage by caspases does not appear to be, detection of microbial proteases may represent an ancestral system of innate immune regulation.

  4. Cdt1 downregulation by proteolysis and geminin inhibition prevents DNA re-replication in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Li, Anatoliy; Blow, J Julian

    2005-01-26

    In late mitosis and G1, Mcm2-7 are assembled onto replication origins to 'license' them for initiation. At other cell cycle stages, licensing is inhibited, thus ensuring that origins fire only once per cell cycle. Three additional factors--the origin recognition complex, Cdc6 and Cdt1--are required for origin licensing. We examine here how licensing is regulated in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Cdt1 is downregulated late in the cell cycle by two different mechanisms: proteolysis, which occurs in part due to the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C), and inhibition by a protein called geminin. If both these regulatory mechanisms are abrogated, extracts undergo uncontrolled re-licensing and re-replication. The extent of re-replication is limited by checkpoint kinases that are activated as a consequence of re-replication itself. These results allow us to build a comprehensive model of how re-replication of DNA is prevented in Xenopus, with Cdt1 regulation being the key feature. The results also explain the original experiments that led to the proposal of a replication licensing factor.

  5. Quantitative proteomics and terminomics to elucidate the role of ubiquitination and proteolysis in adaptive immunity

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Theo; Viner, Rosa I.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is the specialized defence mechanism in vertebrates that evolved to eliminate pathogens. Specialized lymphocytes recognize specific protein epitopes through antigen receptors to mount potent immune responses, many of which are initiated by nuclear factor-kappa B activation and gene transcription. Most, if not all, pathways in adaptive immunity are further regulated by post-translational modification (PTM) of signalling proteins, e.g. phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination and proteolytic processing. The importance of PTMs is reflected by genetic or acquired defects in these pathways that lead to a dysfunctional immune response. Here we discuss the state of the art in targeted proteomics and systems biology approaches to dissect the PTM landscape specifically regarding ubiquitination and proteolysis in B- and T-cell activation. Recent advances have occurred in methods for specific enrichment and targeted quantitation. Together with improved instrument sensitivity, these advances enable the accurate analysis of often rare PTM events that are opaque to conventional proteomics approaches, now rendering in-depth analysis and pathway dissection possible. We discuss published approaches, including as a case study the profiling of the N-terminome of lymphocytes of a rare patient with a genetic defect in the paracaspase protease MALT1, a key regulator protease in antigen-driven signalling, which was manifested by elevated linear ubiquitination. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644975

  6. A unified mechanism for proteolysis and autocatalytic activation in the 20S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Eva M.; Heinemeyer, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark; Groll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the 20S proteasome is tightly regulated. The N-terminal propeptides protecting the active-site threonines are autocatalytically released only on completion of assembly. However, the trigger for the self-activation and the reason for the strict conservation of threonine as the active site nucleophile remain enigmatic. Here we use mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays to suggest that Lys33 initiates nucleophilic attack of the propeptide by deprotonating the Thr1 hydroxyl group and that both residues together with Asp17 are part of a catalytic triad. Substitution of Thr1 by Cys disrupts the interaction with Lys33 and inactivates the proteasome. Although a Thr1Ser mutant is active, it is less efficient compared with wild type because of the unfavourable orientation of Ser1 towards incoming substrates. This work provides insights into the basic mechanism of proteolysis and propeptide autolysis, as well as the evolutionary pressures that drove the proteasome to become a threonine protease. PMID:26964885

  7. Ozone, but not nitrogen dioxide, fragments elastin and increases its susceptibility to proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Winters, R S; Burnette-Vick, B A; Johnson, D A

    1994-10-01

    The effects of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on the solubility and proteolytic susceptibility of elastin were examined to better understand how these oxidant air pollutants might damage the lung. In vitro O3 exposures at pH 7.4 resulted in the complete solubilization of elastin, but NO2 had no effect on solubility. The initial solubilization rate was 65 micrograms/mumol of O3, which increased to 150 micrograms/mumol in the midregion of a sigmoidal solubilization curve. Peptide fragments of the O3-solubilized elastin ranged in size from 5 to 20 kD. The conversion of insoluble elastin into soluble fragments by O3 was not due to the destruction of desmosine crosslinks. The effect of O3 on the proteolytic susceptibility of elastin was measured using insoluble elastin recovered from exposures that resulted in 5.3%, 12.8%, and 26.3% solubilization. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) digested the remaining insoluble elastin samples 4.3, 6.0, and 9.8 times faster than unexposed elastin. In contrast, NO2-exposed elastin was no more susceptible to digestion by HNE. Ascorbate, EDTA, and uric acid reduced the proteolytic susceptibility of O3-exposed elastin, but mannitol afforded no protection. These findings indicate that the inhalation of O3 may contribute to lung disease by directly damaging elastin and by increasing its susceptibility to proteolysis, whereas NO2 probably damages lungs via alternative mechanisms.

  8. The role of limited proteolysis of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in thermoregulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, C.

    1982-01-01

    Cyclo (His-Pro) is a biologiclly active cyclic dipeptide derived from thyrotropin-releasing hormone by its limited proteolysis. We have developed a specific radioimmunoassay for this cyclic peptide and shown its presence throughout rat and monkey brains. The normal rat brain concentration of cyclo (His-Pro) ranged from 35-61 pmols/brain. The elution profiles of rat brain cyclo (His-Pro)-like immunoreactivity and synthetic radioactive cyclo (His-Pro) following gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography were similar. An analysis of the regional distribution of cyclo (His-Pro) and TRH in rat and monkey brains exhibited no apparent precursor-product relationship. Studies on the neuroanatomic sites for the thermoregulatory effects of cyclo (His-Pro) suggested that the neural loci responsible for cyclo (His-Pro)-induced hypothermia resides within POA/AHA. The endogenous levels of brain cyclo (His-Pro) were elevated when rats were made either hypothyroid by surgical thyroidectomy or forced to drink alcohol for six weeks. These studies demonstrate that cyclo (His-Pro) is present throughout the central nervous system in physiologically relevant concentrations which can be modified by appropriate physiological and pharamacological manipulations. These data in conjunction with earlier reports of multiple biological activities of exogenous cyclo (His-Pro), suggest that endogenous cyclo (His-Pro) is a biological active peptide and it may play a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator role in the central nervous system.

  9. Selective repression of MEF2 activity by PKA-dependent proteolysis of HDAC4

    PubMed Central

    Worst, Barbara C.; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Patrick, David M.; Jebessa, Zegeye; Kreusser, Michael M.; Sun, Qiang; Chen, Lan; Heft, Claudia; Katus, Hugo A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) regulates numerous gene expression programs through its signal-dependent repression of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and serum response factor (SRF) transcription factors. In cardiomyocytes, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling promotes hypertrophy and pathological remodeling, at least in part by phosphorylating HDAC4, with consequent stimulation of MEF2 activity. In this paper, we describe a novel mechanism whereby protein kinase A (PKA) overcomes CaMKII-mediated activation of MEF2 by regulated proteolysis of HDAC4. PKA induces the generation of an N-terminal HDAC4 cleavage product (HDAC4-NT). HDAC4-NT selectively inhibits activity of MEF2 but not SRF, thereby antagonizing the prohypertrophic actions of CaMKII signaling without affecting cardiomyocyte survival. Thus, HDAC4 functions as a molecular nexus for the antagonistic actions of the CaMKII and PKA pathways. These findings have implications for understanding the molecular basis of cardioprotection and other cellular processes in which CaMKII and PKA exert opposing effects. PMID:22042619

  10. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  11. The structure of infant formulas impacts their lipolysis, proteolysis and disintegration during in vitro gastric digestion.

    PubMed

    Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; De La Chevasnerie, Alix; Sams, Laura; Rousseau, Florence; Madec, Marie-Noëlle; Robert, Benoît; Deglaire, Amélie; Pezennec, Stéphane; Bouhallab, Saïd; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Milk lipids supply most of the calories necessary for newborn growth in maternal milk or infant formulas. The chemical composition of infant formulas has been optimized but not the structure of the emulsion. There is still a major difference between the native emulsions of milk fat globules and processed submicronic emulsions in infant formulas. This difference may modify the kinetics of digestion of emulsions in newborns and influence lipid metabolism. To check this, semi-dynamic gastric in vitro digestions were conducted on three matrices: a standardized milk emulsion containing native milk fat globules referred to as minimally-processed emulsion and two processed model infant formulas (homogenized or homogenized/pasteurized). Gastric conditions mimicked those reported in newborns. The minimally-processed emulsion was lipolyzed and proteolyzed slower than processed formulas. The difference in initial structure persisted during digestion. The surface of the droplets was the key parameter to control gastric lipolysis kinetics, the pattern of released fatty acids and proteolysis by faster hydrolysis of adsorbed proteins.

  12. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  13. Calpain A modulates Toll responses by limited Cactus/IκB proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fontenele, Marcio; Lim, Bomyi; Oliveira, Danielle; Buffolo, Márcio; Perlman, David H.; Schupbach, Trudi; Araujo, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent cysteine proteases of the calpain family are modulatory proteases that cleave their substrates in a limited manner. Among their substrates, calpains target vertebrate and invertebrate IκB proteins. Because proteolysis by calpains potentially generates novel protein functions, it is important to understand how this affects NFκB activity. We investigate the action of Calpain A (CalpA) on the Drosophila melanogaster IκB homologue Cactus in vivo. CalpA alters the absolute amounts of Cactus protein. Our data indicate, however, that CalpA uses additional mechanisms to regulate NFκB function. We provide evidence that CalpA interacts physically with Cactus, recognizing a Cactus pool that is not bound to Dorsal, a fly NFκB/Rel homologue. We show that proteolytic cleavage by CalpA generates Cactus fragments lacking an N-terminal region required for Toll responsiveness. These fragments are generated in vivo and display properties distinct from those of full-length Cactus. We propose that CalpA targets free Cactus, which is incorporated into and modulates Toll-responsive complexes in the embryo and immune system. PMID:23864715

  14. Proteolysis in goat "coalho" cheese supplemented with probiotic lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; de Araujo, Ana Rita Ribeiro; do Nascimento, Edilza Santos; de Matos Paz, José Eduardo; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto; Gadelha, Tatiane Santi; Pacheco, Maria Teresa Bertoldo; do Egypto Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos; de Oliveira, Maria Elieidy Gomes; Madruga, Marta Suely

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the proteolytic effects of adding isolated and combined probiotic strains to goat "coalho" cheese. The cheeses were: QS - with culture Start, composed by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris (R704); QLA - with Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5); QLP - with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (L. casei 01); QB - with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB 12); and QC, co-culture with the three probiotic microorganisms. The cheeses were analysed during 28 days of storage at 10°C. The probiotic cell count was higher than 6.5 and 7 log colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) of cheese at the 1st and 28th days of storage, respectively. The addition of co-culture influenced (p<0.01) proteolysis in the cheese and resulted in a higher content of soluble protein and release of amino acids at the 1st day after processing. However, over all 28 days, the cheese supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis in its isolated form showed the highest proteolytic activity, particularly in the hydrolysis of the alpha-s2 and kappa-casein fractions.

  15. Use of high-gradient magnetic fishing for reducing proteolysis during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Maury, Trine L; Ottow, Kim E; Brask, Jesper; Villadsen, John; Hobley, Timothy J

    2012-07-01

    Proteolysis during fermentation may have a severe impact on the yield and quality of a secreted product. In the current study, we demonstrate the use of high-gradient magnetic fishing (HGMF) as an efficient alternative to the more conventional methods of preventing proteolytic degradation. Bacitracin-linked magnetic affinity adsorbents were employed directly in a fermenter during Bacillus licheniformis cultivation to remove trace amounts of unwanted proteases. The constructed magnetic adsorbents had excellent, highly specific binding characteristics in the fermentation broth (K(d) = 1.94 micromolar; Q(max) = 222.8 mg/g), which obeyed the Langmuir isotherm and had rapid binding kinetics (equilibrium in <300 s). When applied directly in shake-flask cultures or in a 1-L fermenter and then removed by HGMF, the degradation of the model protein bovine serum albumin was stopped. The adsorbents could be recycled and reused during the same fermentation to remove freshly produced proteases, extending the life of the model protein in the fermenter. HGMF may provide an efficient method of stabilizing heterologous proteins produced in cultivation processes.

  16. ARH directs megalin to the endocytic recycling compartment to regulate its proteolysis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul; Baterina, Oscar Y; Taupin, Vanessa; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2013-07-08

    Receptors internalized by endocytosis can return to the plasma membrane (PM) directly from early endosomes (EE; fast recycling) or they can traffic from EE to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and recycle from there (slow recycling). How receptors are sorted for trafficking along these two pathways remains unclear. Here we show that autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia (ARH) is required for trafficking of megalin, a member of the LDL receptor family, from EE to the ERC by coupling it to dynein; in the absence of ARH, megalin returns directly to the PM from EE via the connecdenn2/Rab35 fast recycling pathway. Binding of ARH to the endocytic adaptor AP-2 prevents fast recycling of megalin. ARH-mediated trafficking of megalin to the ERC is necessary for γ-secretase mediated cleavage of megalin and release of a tail fragment that mediates transcriptional repression. These results identify a novel mechanism for sorting receptors for trafficking to the ERC and link ERC trafficking to regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) and expression of megalin.

  17. Effect of proteolysis of low-density serum lipoproteins on their interaction with macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanskii, I.M.; Kovaleva, G.G.; Viktorova, L.N.; Shpikiter, V.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously postulated, on the basis of changes observed in the structural stability of low-density lipoproteins during treatment with pepsin or aortic cathepsin, that enzymatic modifications may lead to potentiation of the atherogenic properties of the lipoproteins. They also reported that treatment of lipoproteins with trypsin causes an increase in their binding with aortic glycosaminoglycans and to increased degradation by fibroblasts of patients with hereditary hypercholesterolemia. Limited proteolysis of lipoproteins with pepsin facilitated their binding with fibronectin. In this paper the authors investigate the uptake and degradation of low-density lipoproteins by macrophages after their limited hydrolysis by pepsin, an analog of tissue cathepsin D. The lipoproteins were isolated from the serum of healthy blood donors by ultracentrifugation. Iodination of the proteins with I 125 was carried out by the iodine monochloride method. Uptake and retention of the labelled lipoprotein were measured with a gamma counter. The increased uptake of the proteins, partially hydrolized by pepsin, was accompanied by their more intense degradation by macrophages.

  18. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  19. RhoA Proteolysis Regulates the Actin Cytoskeleton in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Girouard, Marie-Pier; Pool, Madeline; Alchini, Ricardo; Rambaldi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA regulates the actin cytoskeleton to affect multiple cellular processes including endocytosis, migration and adhesion. RhoA activity is tightly regulated through several mechanisms including GDP/GTP cycling, phosphorylation, glycosylation and prenylation. Previous reports have also reported that cleavage of the carboxy-terminus inactivates RhoA. Here, we describe a novel mechanism of RhoA proteolysis that generates a stable amino-terminal RhoA fragment (RhoA-NTF). RhoA-NTF is detectable in healthy cells and tissues and is upregulated following cell stress. Overexpression of either RhoA-NTF or the carboxy-terminal RhoA cleavage fragment (RhoA-CTF) induces the formation of disorganized actin stress fibres. RhoA-CTF also promotes the formation of disorganized actin stress fibres and nuclear actin rods. Both fragments disrupt the organization of actin stress fibres formed by endogenous RhoA. Together, our findings describe a novel RhoA regulatory mechanism. PMID:27992599

  20. Down-Regulation of the Met Receptor Tyrosine Kinase by Presenilin-dependent Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foveau, Bénédicte; Ancot, Frédéric; Leroy, Catherine; Petrelli, Annalisa; Reiss, Karina; Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giordano, Silvia; Fafeur, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) acts through the membrane-anchored Met receptor tyrosine kinase to induce invasive growth. Deregulation of this signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and involves, in most cases, overexpression of the receptor. We demonstrate that Met is processed in epithelial cells by presenilin-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis (PS-RIP) independently of ligand stimulation. The proteolytic process involves sequential cleavage by metalloproteases and the γ-secretase complex, leading to generation of labile fragments. In normal epithelial cells, although expression of cleavable Met by PS-RIP is down-regulated, uncleavable Met displayed membrane accumulation and induced ligand-independent motility and morphogenesis. Inversely, in transformed cells, the Met inhibitory antibody DN30 is able to promote Met PS-RIP, resulting in down-regulation of the receptor and inhibition of the Met-dependent invasive growth. This demonstrates the original involvement of a proteolytic process in degradation of the Met receptor implicated in negative regulation of invasive growth. PMID:19297528

  1. Quantitative correlation between proteolysis and macro- and microautophagy in mouse hepatocytes during starvation and refeeding.

    PubMed Central

    Mortimore, G E; Hutson, N J; Surmacz, C A

    1983-01-01

    Cytoplasmic protein in hepatocytes is sequestered and degraded by two general classes of lysosomes, overt autophagic vacuoles (macroautophagy) and dense bodies (microautophagy). Volumes of the apparent space in each class that contain the internalized protein, together with estimates of cytoplasmic protein concentration, were used as a basis for predicting rates of protein degradation by the lysosomal system in livers of fed, 48-hr starved, and starved-refed mice. Assuming that the turnover of all sequestered protein is equal to that previously determined in overt autophagic vacuoles (0.087 min-1), we obtained close agreement between predicted and observed rates in the three conditions studied. The two autophagic components, though, exhibited different patterns of regulation. Microautophagy followed a downward course through starvation and into refeeding, a trend that explained fully the fall in absolute rates of protein degradation during starvation. By contrast, macroautophagy remained constant throughout starvation but was virtually abolished with refeeding. Whereas regulation of the latter can be explained largely by immediate responses to the supply of amino acids, present evidence together with results of others indicate that microsequestration could be linked to functional and quantitative alterations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Both types of regulation contributed equally to the marked suppression of proteolysis during cytoplasmic regrowth. Images PMID:6340116

  2. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A; Martin, William F; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Bevins, Charles L; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2013-05-03

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective-released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus . The predigestion of milk proteins and the consequent release of antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection.

  3. Study of proteolysis in river buffalo mozzarella cheese using a proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Petrella, G; Pati, S; Gagliardi, R; Rizzuti, A; Mastrorilli, P; la Gatta, B; Di Luccia, A

    2015-11-01

    The guarantee of the origin and quality of raw material is essential for the protection and valorization of Campana buffalo mozzarella cheese. The risk of utilization of semifinished products and stored milk in substitution for fresh milk is increasing, due to the continuous desire to reduce production costs. A proteomics approach and electrophoresis survey of retail mozzarella cheeses indicated different rates of proteolysis in the production of dairy industries. The use of fresh milk and correct cheesemaking protocol yielded only γ-caseins, which are derived from β-casein by plasmin, and para-κ-casein, which is derived from κ-casein by chymosin. The detection of abnormal hydrolysis resulting in β- and αS1-casein fragments, identified by mass spectrometry, indicates the use of stored milk or stored and pressed curd, or the reuse of unsold mozzarella cheese, to produce mozzarella. The formation of γ-caseins and other fragments during a long storage of raw materials at room or refrigeration temperature was ascribed to plasmin (endogenous milk enzyme), whereas formation of αS1-casein fragments, mainly αS1-I(6P)- and αS1-I(7P)-casein during the storage of curd was ascribed to the action of chymosin (exogenous enzyme) from rennet. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and alkaline urea-PAGE permitted us to evaluate the freshness of the raw materials used in the manufacturing of buffalo mozzarella cheese and to reveal possible inappropriate preservation.

  4. Structural changes in emulsion-bound bovine beta-lactoglobulin affect its proteolysis and immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Mauro; Miriani, Matteo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Barbiroli, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption on the surface of sub-micrometric oil droplets resulted in significant changes in the tertiary structure of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a whey protein broadly used as a food ingredient and a major food allergen. The adsorbed protein had increased sensitivity to trypsin, and increased immunoreactivity towards specific monoclonal antibodies. In spite of the extensive tryptic breakdown of emulsion-bound BLG, some sequence stretches in BLG became trypsin-insensitive upon absorption of the protein on the fat droplets. As a consequence - at contrast with free BLG - proteolysis of emulsion-bound BLG did not decrease the immunoreactivity of the protein, and some of the large peptides generated by trypsinolysis of emulsion-bound BLG were still recognizable by specific monoclonal antibodies. Structural changes occurring in emulsion-bound BLG and their consequences are discussed in comparison with those occurring when the tertiary structure of BLG is modified by lipophilic salts, by urea, or upon interaction with solid hydrophobic surfaces. Such a comparison highlights the relevance of situation-specific structural modifications, that in turn may affect physiologically relevant features of the protein.

  5. The effect of limited proteolysis by different proteases on the formation of whey protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Zhe; Xu, Hong-Hua; Ju, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Xin-Huai

    2013-01-01

    Four proteases: trypsin, protease A, pepsin, and protease M were selected to modify whey protein concentrate (WPC) at a low degree of hydrolysis (0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%) before adjusting to pH 2.0 and heating at 90°C to gain insight into the influence of proteolysis on fibril formation. The kinetics of fibril formation were performed on native and modified WPC using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy and far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy for the morphological and secondary structural analyses. The change in surface hydrophobicity and content of free sulfhydryl groups were also observed during the formation of fibrils for the native and modified WPC. The content of aggregation and thioflavin T kinetic data indicated that the ability of fibril formation was apparently different for WPC modified by the 4 proteases. Whey protein concentrate modified by trypsin aggregated more during heating and the fibril formation rate was faster than that of the native WPC. Whey protein concentrate modified by the other proteases showed slower aggregation with worse amyloid fibril morphology. Compared with the native WPC, the structure of WPC changed differently after being modified by proteases. The state of α-helix structure for modified WPC played the most important role in the formation of fibrils. Under the mild conditions used in this work, the α-helix structure of WPC modified by trypsin caused little destruction and resulted in fibrils with good morphology; the content of α-helices for WPC modified by other proteases decreased to 36.19 to 50.94%; thus, fibril formation was inhibited. In addition, it was beneficial for the modified WPC to form fibrils such that the surface hydrophobicity increased and the content of free sulfhydryl groups slightly decreased during heating.

  6. Structural inferences for the native skeletal muscle sodium channel as derived from patterns of endogenous proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, S.; Yang, J.; Barchi, R. )

    1989-08-05

    The alpha subunit (Mr approximately 260,000) of the rat skeletal muscle sodium channel is sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases during the isolation of muscle surface membrane. Antisera against synthetic oligopeptides were used to map the resultant fragments in order to identify protease-sensitive regions of the channel's structure in its native membrane environment. Antibodies to the amino terminus labeled major fragments of Mr approximately 130,000 and 90,000 and lesser amounts of other peptides as small as Mr approximately 12,000. Antisera to epitopes within the carboxyl-terminal half of the primary sequence recognized two fragments of Mr approximately 110,000 and 78,000. Individual antisera also selectively labeled smaller polypeptides in the most extensively cleaved preparations. The immunoreactivity patterns of monoclonal antibodies previously raised against the purified channel were then surveyed. The binding sites for one group of monoclonals, including several that recognize subtype-specific epitopes in the channel structure, were localized within a 12-kDa fragment near the amino terminus. The distribution of carbohydrate along the primary structure of the channel was also assessed by quantitating {sup 125}I-wheat germ agglutinin and 125I-concanavalin A binding to the proteolytic peptides. Most of the carbohydrate detected by these lectins was located between 22 and 90 kDa from the amino terminus of the protein. No lectin binding was detected to fragments arising from carboxyl-terminal half of the protein. These results were analyzed in terms of current models of sodium channel tertiary structure. In its normal membrane environment, the skeletal muscle sodium channel appears sensitive to cleavage by endogenous proteases in regions predicted to link the four repeat domains on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane while the repeat domains themselves are resistant to proteolysis.

  7. Pharmacological strategies in lung cancer-induced cachexia: effects on muscle proteolysis, autophagy, structure, and weakness.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Fermoselle, Clara; Urtreger, Alejandro J; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Diament, Miriam J; de Kier Joffé, Elisa D Bal; Sandri, Marco; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-11-01

    Cachexia is a relevant comorbid condition of chronic diseases including cancer. Inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, ubiquitin-proteasome system, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia. Currently available treatment is limited and data demonstrating effectiveness in in vivo models are lacking. Our objectives were to explore in respiratory and limb muscles of lung cancer (LC) cachectic mice whether proteasome, NF-κB, and MAPK inhibitors improve muscle mass and function loss through several molecular mechanisms. Body and muscle weights, limb muscle force, protein degradation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, signaling pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation, autophagy, contractile and functional proteins, myostatin and myogenin, and muscle structure were evaluated in the diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing cachectic mice (BALB/c), with and without concomitant treatment with NF-κB (sulfasalazine), MAPK (U0126), and proteasome (bortezomib) inhibitors. Compared to control animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of LC cachectic mice: muscle proteolysis, ubiquitinated proteins, autophagy, myostatin, protein oxidation, FoxO-1, NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, and muscle abnormalities were increased, while myosin, creatine kinase, myogenin, and slow- and fast-twitch muscle fiber size were decreased. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK, but not the proteasome system, induced in cancer cachectic animals, a substantial restoration of muscle mass and force through a decrease in muscle protein oxidation and catabolism, myostatin, and autophagy, together with a greater content of myogenin, and contractile and functional proteins. Attenuation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathway effects on muscles is beneficial in cancer-induced cachexia.

  8. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  9. Oral branched-chain amino acids decrease whole-body proteolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Williams, B. D.; Stuart, C. A.; Lane, H. W.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study reports the effects of ingesting branched-chain amino acids (leucine, valine, and isoleucine) on protein metabolism in four men. METHODS: To calculate leg protein synthesis and breakdown, we used a new model that utilized the infusion of L-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine and the sampling of the leg arterial-venous difference and muscle biopsies. In addition, protein-bound enrichments provided for the direct calculation of muscle fractional synthetic rate. Four control subjects ingested an equivalent amount of essential amino acids (threonine, methionine, and histidine) to discern the effects of branched-chain amino acid nitrogen vs the effects of essential amino acid nitrogen. Each drink also included 50 g of carbohydrate. RESULTS: Consumption of the branched-chain and the essential amino acid solutions produced significant threefold and fourfold elevations in their respective arterial concentrations. Protein synthesis and breakdown were unaffected by branched-chain amino acids, but they increased by 43% (p < .05) and 36% (p < .03), respectively, in the group consuming the essential amino acids. However, net leg balance of phenylalanine was unchanged by either drink. Direct measurement of protein synthesis by tracer incorporation into muscle protein (fractional synthetic rate) revealed no changes within or between drinks. Whole-body phenylalanine flux was significantly suppressed by each solution but to a greater extent by the branched-chain amino acids (15% and 20%, respectively) (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that branched-chain amino acid ingestion suppresses whole-body proteolysis in tissues other than skeletal muscle in normal men.

  10. Proteolysis of EphA2 converts it from a tumor suppressor to an oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    KOSHIKAWA, Naohiko; HOSHINO, Daisuke; TANIGUCHI, Hiroaki; MINEGISHI, Tomoko; TOMARI, Taizo; NAM, Sung-Ouk; AOKI, Mikiko; SUETA, Takayuki; NAKAGAWA, Takashi; MIYAMOTO, Shingo; NABESHIMA, Kazuki; WEAVER, Alissa M.; SEIKI, Motoharu

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases are considered candidate therapeutic targets in cancer, but they can exert opposing effects on cell growth. In presence of its ligands, Eph receptor EphA2 suppresses signaling by other growth factor receptors, including ErbB, whereas ligand-independent activation of EphA2 augments ErbB signaling. To deploy EphA2-targeting drugs effectively in tumors, the anti-oncogenic ligand-dependent activation state of EphA2 must be discriminated from its oncogenic ligand-independent state. Since the molecular basis for the latter is little understood, we investigated how the activation state of EphA2 can be switched in tumor tissue. We found that ligand-binding domain of EphA2 is cleaved frequently by the membrane metalloproteinase MT1-MMP, a powerful modulator of the pericellular environment in tumor cells. EphA2 immunostaining revealed a significant loss of the N-terminal portion of EphA2 in areas of tumor tissue that expressed MT1-MMP. Moreover, EphA2 phosphorylation patterns that signify ligand-independent activation were observed specifically in these areas of tumor tissue. Mechanistic experiments revealed that processing of EphA2 by MT1-MMP promoted ErbB signaling, anchorage-independent growth, and cell migration. Conversely, expression of a proteolysis-resistant mutant of EphA2 prevented tumorigenesis and metastasis of human tumor xenografts in mice. Overall, our results showed how the proteolytic state of EphA2 in tumors determines its effector function and influences its status as a candidate biomarker for targeted therapy. PMID:26130649

  11. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. I. Differential susceptibility to proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    To study the possible heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors, isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were enzymatically altered (`stripped') by exposure to pronase or papain. Pronase treatment markedly increased the percentages of PBL binding IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), while simultaneously removing or inactivating their receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG). Papain treatment markedly diminished the ability of PBL to bind both EA and aggG. Essentially identical results were obtained utilizing EA composed of either human Rh-positive type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley) or with chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit anti-CRBC IgG (CRBC-A). CRBC sensitized with Fab'2 fragments of rabbit anti-CRBC IgG were incapable of forming rosettes with normal or with pronase- or papain-stripped PBL. Pre-treatment of normal lymphocytes with aggG totally ablated their ability to rosette with EA. Incubation of pronase-stripped PBL for 18–20 hr in 5% CO2-air at 37°C resulted in diminution (to levels originally present) in the percentages of lymphocytes binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. Similar incubation of papain-stripped PBL resulted in significant reappearance of receptors binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. These results strongly suggest that: (1) lymphocyte receptors that bind EA complexes differ from those that bind aggG; (2) some lymphocytes possess cryptic receptors for EA that are expressed after proteolysis with pronase; (3) PBL having receptors for EA also have aggG receptors; and (4) there is no evidence that proteolytic stripping of PBL results in the generation of functionally different receptors for complexed IgG, since the Fc specificity of this receptor remains unchanged. PMID:737911

  12. Ubiquitinated sperm mitochondria, selective proteolysis, and the regulation of mitochondrial inheritance in mammalian embryos.

    PubMed

    Sutovsky, P; Moreno, R D; Ramalho-Santos, J; Dominko, T; Simerly, C; Schatten, G

    2000-08-01

    The strictly maternal inheritance of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in mammals is a developmental paradox promoted by an unknown mechanism responsible for the destruction of the sperm mitochondria shortly after fertilization. We have recently reported that the sperm mitochondria are ubiquitinated inside the oocyte cytoplasm and later subjected to proteolysis during preimplantation development (P. Sutovsky et al., Nature 1999; 402:371-372). Here, we provide further evidence for this process by showing that the proteolytic destruction of bull sperm mitochondria inside cow egg cytoplasm depends upon the activity of the universal proteolytic marker, ubiquitin, and the lysosomal apparatus of the egg. Binding of ubiquitin to sperm mitochondria was visualized by monospecific antibodies throughout pronuclear development and during the first embryonic divisions. The recognition and disposal of the ubiquitinated sperm mitochondria was prevented by the microinjection of anti-ubiquitin antibodies and by the treatment of the fertilized zygotes with lysosomotropic agent ammonium chloride. The postfecundal ubiquitination of sperm mitochondria and their destruction was not seen in the hybrid embryos created using cow eggs and sperm of wild cattle, gaur, thus supporting the hypothesis that sperm mitochondrion destruction is species specific. The initial ligation of ubiquitin molecules to sperm mitochondrial membrane proteins, one of which could be prohibitin, occurs during spermatogenesis. Even though the ubiquitin cross-reactivity was transiently lost from the sperm mitochondria during epididymal passage, likely as a result of disulfide bond cross-linking, it was restored and amplified after fertilization. Ubiquitination therefore may represent a mechanism for the elimination of paternal mitochondria during fertilization. Our data have important implications for anthropology, treatment of mitochondrial disorders, and for the new methods of assisted procreation, such as

  13. The selective biotin tagging and thermolysin proteolysis of chloroplast outer envelope proteins reveals information on protein topology and association into complexes.

    PubMed

    Hardré, Hélène; Kuhn, Lauriane; Albrieux, Catherine; Jouhet, Juliette; Michaud, Morgane; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of chloroplast function requires the precise localization of proteins in each of its sub-compartments. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry has allowed the inventory of proteins in thylakoid, stroma, and envelope fractions. Concerning membrane association, proteins can be either integral or peripheral or even soluble proteins bound transiently to a membrane complex. We sought a method providing information at the surface of the outer envelope membrane (OEM), based on specific tagging with biotin or proteolysis using thermolysin, a non-membrane permeable protease. To evaluate this method, envelope, thylakoid, and stroma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by immunostaining and mass spectrometry. A short selection of proteins associated to the chloroplast envelope fraction was checked after superficial treatments of intact chloroplasts. We showed that this method could allow the characterization of OEM embedded proteins facing the cytosol, as well as peripheral and soluble proteins associated via tight or lose interactions. Some stromal proteins were associated with biotinylated spots and analyzes are still needed to determine whether polypeptides were tagged prior import or if they co-migrated with OEM proteins. This method also suggests that some proteins associated with the inner envelope membrane (IEM) might need the integrity of a trans-envelope (IEM-OEM) protein complex (e.g., division ring-forming components) or at least an intact OEM partner. Following this evaluation, proteomic analyzes should be refined and the putative role of inter-membrane space components stabilizing trans-envelope complexes demonstrated. For future comprehensive studies, perspectives include the dynamic analyses of OEM proteins and IEM-OEM complexes in various physiological contexts and using virtually any other purified membrane organelle.

  14. The selective biotin tagging and thermolysin proteolysis of chloroplast outer envelope proteins reveals information on protein topology and association into complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hardré, Hélène; Kuhn, Lauriane; Albrieux, Catherine; Jouhet, Juliette; Michaud, Morgane; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A.; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of chloroplast function requires the precise localization of proteins in each of its sub-compartments. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry has allowed the inventory of proteins in thylakoid, stroma, and envelope fractions. Concerning membrane association, proteins can be either integral or peripheral or even soluble proteins bound transiently to a membrane complex. We sought a method providing information at the surface of the outer envelope membrane (OEM), based on specific tagging with biotin or proteolysis using thermolysin, a non-membrane permeable protease. To evaluate this method, envelope, thylakoid, and stroma proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and analyzed by immunostaining and mass spectrometry. A short selection of proteins associated to the chloroplast envelope fraction was checked after superficial treatments of intact chloroplasts. We showed that this method could allow the characterization of OEM embedded proteins facing the cytosol, as well as peripheral and soluble proteins associated via tight or lose interactions. Some stromal proteins were associated with biotinylated spots and analyzes are still needed to determine whether polypeptides were tagged prior import or if they co-migrated with OEM proteins. This method also suggests that some proteins associated with the inner envelope membrane (IEM) might need the integrity of a trans-envelope (IEM–OEM) protein complex (e.g., division ring-forming components) or at least an intact OEM partner. Following this evaluation, proteomic analyzes should be refined and the putative role of inter-membrane space components stabilizing trans-envelope complexes demonstrated. For future comprehensive studies, perspectives include the dynamic analyses of OEM proteins and IEM–OEM complexes in various physiological contexts and using virtually any other purified membrane organelle. PMID:24999344

  15. Daily variations in dietary lysine content alter the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Tesseraud, Sophie; Bouvarel, Isabelle; Collin, Anne; Audouin, Estelle; Crochet, Sabine; Seiliez, Iban; Leterrier, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids are known to be anabolic factors that affect protein metabolism, but the response of animals to daily amino acid changes is little understood. We aimed to test the effects of feeding birds with alternations of diets varying in lysine content on the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken muscle. Cyclic feeding programs with 2 diets, each given for 24 h during 48-h cycles, were carried out from 10 d of age. Three programs were used: 1) control treatment with continuous distribution of a complete diet containing standard medium lysine level (ML; 11.9 g/kg); 2) alternation of diets with high (HL) and low (LL) lysine levels; 3) alternation of ML and LL diets, where LL = 70%, ML = 100%, HL = 130% of standard lysine level. The Pectoralis major muscles were sampled after 2 wk of cyclic feeding. Measurements included the expression patterns of 6 genes involved in proteolysis, and mammalian target of rapamycin and Forkhead box-O transcription factor (FoxO) signaling. Cathepsin B, m-calpain, and E3 ubiquitin ligases Muscle Ring Finger-1 and Muscle Atrophy F box were significantly overexpressed in chickens transiently fed the LL diet, whereas the mRNA levels of 20S proteasome C2 subunit and ubiquitin remained unchanged. Modifications of E3 ubiquitin ligase expression can be partly explained by significant changes in FoxO phosphorylation with cyclic dietary treatments. Our results suggest timing-sensitive regulation of proteolysis in chicken muscle according to dietary treatment and a high metabolism capacity to compensate for changes in amino acid supply, which might be used for nutritional purposes.

  16. Differences in the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Saneyasu, Takaoki; Kimura, Sayaka; Inui, Mariko; Yoshimoto, Yu; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Genetic selection results in a higher growth rate and meat yield in broiler chickens than in layer chickens. We herein demonstrated differences in the effects of 24 h of fasting on the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks. The mRNA levels of proteolysis-related genes were analyzed in the pectoralis major muscle of 14-day-old chicks after 0 or 24 h of fasting. The mRNA levels of ubiquitin ligases such as atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF-1) as well as transcription factor forkhead box class O (FOXO) 1 were significantly increased by fasting in broiler and layer chicks, suggesting that the FOXO1-induced ubiquitin-proteasome system, a major proteolytic system in skeletal muscles, was activated by fasting in both chicks. The mRNA levels of atrogin-1 were significantly lower in broiler chicks than in layer chicks after fasting. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 were significantly decreased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. The mRNA levels of FOXO3 were significantly increased by fasting in layer chicks, but not in broiler chicks. Therefore, the ubiquitin-proteasome system did not appear to have been fully upregulated in broiler chicks. These results suggest that differences in the expression of genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle proteolysis between broiler and layer chicks during food deprivation are one of the causes of the high growth rate in broiler chickens.

  17. The maturational disassembly and differential proteolysis of paralogous vitellogenins in a marine pelagophil teleost: a conserved mechanism of oocyte hydration.

    PubMed

    Finn, Roderick Nigel

    2007-06-01

    A structural analysis of the differential proteolysis of vitellogenin (Vtg)-derived yolk proteins in the maturing oocytes of a marine teleost that spawns very large pelagic eggs is presented. Two full-length hepatic cDNAs (hhvtgAa and hhvtgAb) encoding paralogous vitellogenins (HhvtgAa and HhvtgAb) were cloned from nonestrogenized Atlantic halibut, and the N-termini of their subdomain structures were mapped to the oocyte and egg yolk proteins (Yps). The maturational oocyte Yp degradation products were further mapped to the free amino acid (FAA) pool in the ovulated egg. The deduced amino acid sequences conformed to the linear NH(2)-(LvH-Pv-LvL-beta'-CT)-COO(-) structure of complete teleost Vtgs. However, the Yps did not match the expected cleavage products of complete Vtgs. Specifically, the phosvitin subdomain of the HhvtgAa paralogue remains covalently attached to the lipovitellin light chain, while the phosvitin subdomain of the HhvtgAb paralogue remains covalently attached to a C-terminal fragment of the lipovitellin heavy chain (LvH). During oocyte hydration, the LvH of the HhvtgAa paralogue is disassembled and extensively degraded to FAA. In the HhvtgAb paralogue, the LvH is nicked in the C-sheet in a manner similar to that seen in lamprey and other teleosts. A small part of the C-terminal end of the LvH-Ab undergoes proteolysis to FAA, together with the phosvitin, beta' component, and much ( approximately 65%) of the lipovitellin light chain (LvL-Ab). The independently measured FAA pool in the ovulated egg corroborates that calculated from differential proteolysis of the Yps. Based on the 3:1 (HhvtgAb:HhvtgAa) Yp expression ratio, each paralogue contributes approximately equal amounts of FAA to the organic osmolyte pool of the hydrating oocyte during maturation.

  18. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter: deglycosylation and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kanner, B I; Keynan, S; Radian, R

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled gamma-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the 125I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function was examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography [Radian, R., Bendahan, A., & Kanner, B.I. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 15437-15441]. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, gamma-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  19. The splicing factor U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghee; Chung, In Kwon

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Identification of U2AF65 as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. •U2AF65 stabilizes TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. •U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4. •U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres. -- Abstract: The human telomeric protein TRF1 is a component of the six-subunit protein complex shelterin, which provides telomere protection by organizing the telomere into a high-order structure. TRF1 functions as a negative regulator of telomere length by controlling the access of telomerase to telomeres. Thus, the cellular abundance of TRF1 at telomeres should be maintained and tightly regulated to ensure proper telomere function. Here, we identify U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) auxiliary factor 65 (U2AF65), an essential pre-mRNA splicing factor, as a novel TRF1-interacting protein. U2AF65 interacts with TRF1 in vitro and in vivo and is capable of stabilizing TRF1 protein by inhibiting its ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We also found that U2AF65 interferes with the interaction between TRF1 and Fbx4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for TRF1. Depletion of endogenous U2AF65 expression by short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the stability of endogenous TRF1 whereas overexpression of U2AF65 significantly extended the half-life of TRF1. These findings demonstrate that U2AF65 plays a critical role in regulating the level of TRF1 through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, U2AF65 represents a new route for modulating TRF1 function at telomeres.

  20. The core of tau-paired helical filaments studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy and limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Martin; Barghorn, Stefan; Müller, Shirley A; Pickhardt, Marcus; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Davies, Peter; Aebi, Ueli; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2006-05-23

    In Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intracellular paired helical filaments (PHFs). The filaments formed in vivo consist mainly of full-length molecules of the six different isoforms present in adult brain. The substructure of the PHF core is still elusive. Here we applied scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and limited proteolysis to probe the mass distribution of PHFs and their surface exposure. Tau filaments assembled from the three repeat domain have a mass per length (MPL) of approximately 60 kDa/nm and filaments from full-length tau (htau40DeltaK280 mutant) have approximately 160 kDa/nm, compared with approximately 130 kDa/nm for PHFs from Alzheimer's brain. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin accelerate assembly but are not incorporated into PHFs. Limited proteolysis combined with N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of fragments reveals a protease-sensitive N-terminal half and semiresistant PHF core starting in the first repeat and reaching to the C-terminus of tau. Continued proteolysis leads to a fragment starting at the end of the first repeat and ending in the fourth repeat. PHFs from tau isoforms with four repeats revealed an additional cleavage site within the middle of the second repeat. Probing the PHFs with antibodies detecting epitopes either over longer stretches in the C-terminal half of tau or in the fourth repeat revealed that they grow in a polar manner. These data describe the physical parameters of the PHFs and enabled us to build a model of the molecular arrangement within the filamentous structures.

  1. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Lund-Palau, Helena; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization. Methods Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations), proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days) of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts) and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts) following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used. Results Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis. Conclusions A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised. PMID

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation.

  3. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  4. Solid-phase N-terminal peptide enrichment study by optimizing trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine modified proteins by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Yang, Jonathon; Zhukova, Daria; Nguen, Hamilton; Bruce, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proteolytic cleavages generate active precursor proteins by creating new N-termini in the proteins. A number of strategies recently published regarding the enrichment of original or newly formed N-terminal peptides using guanidination of lysine residues and amine reactive reagents. For effective enrichment of N-terminal peptides, the efficiency of trypsin proteolysis on homoarginine (guanidinated) modified proteins must be understood and simple and versatile solid-phase N-terminal capture strategies should be developed. Methods We present here a mass spectrometry-based study to evaluate and optimize the trypsin proteolysis on a guanidinated modified protein. Trypsin proteolysis was studied using different amount of trypsin to modified protein ratios. To capture the original N-termini, after guanidination of proteins, original N-termini were acetylated and the proteins were digested with trypsin. The newly formed N-terminal tryptic peptides were captured with a new amine reactive acid-cleavable solid-phase reagent. The original N-terminal peptides were then collected from the supernatant of the solution. Results We demonstrated a detailed study of the efficiency of enzyme trypsin on homoarginine modified proteins. We observed that the rate of hydrolysis of homoarginine residues compared to their lysine/arginine counter parts were slower but generally cleaved after an overnight digestion period depending on the protein to protease concentration ratios. Selectivity of the solid-phase N-terminal reagent was studied by enrichment of original N-terminal peptides from two standard proteins, ubiquitin and RNaseS. Conclusion We found enzyme trypsin is active in guanidinated form of protein depending on enzyme to protein concentrations, time and the proximity of arginine residues in the sequence. The novel solid-phase capture reagent also successfully enriched N-terminal peptides from the standard protein mixtures. We believe this trypsin proteolysis study on

  5. Regulated proteolysis of the alternative sigma factor SigX in Streptococcus mutans: implication in the escape from competence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SigX (σX), the alternative sigma factor of Streptococcus mutans, is the key regulator for transcriptional activation of late competence genes essential for taking up exogenous DNA. Recent studies reveal that adaptor protein MecA and the protease ClpC act as negative regulators of competence by a mechanism that involves MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX by the ClpC in S. mutans. However, the molecular detail how MecA and ClpC negatively regulate competence in this species remains to be determined. Here, we provide evidence that adaptor protein MecA targets SigX for degradation by the protease complex ClpC/ClpP when S. mutans is grown in a complex medium. Results By analyzing the cellular levels of SigX, we demonstrate that the synthesis of SigX is transiently induced by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), but the SigX is rapidly degraded during the escape from competence. A deletion of MecA, ClpC or ClpP results in the cellular accumulation of SigX and a prolonged competence state, while an overexpression of MecA enhances proteolysis of SigX and accelerates the escape from competence. In vitro protein-protein interaction assays confirm that MecA interacts with SigX via its N-terminal domain (NTD1–82) and with ClpC via its C-terminal domain (CTD123–240). Such an interaction mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex, triggering the ATP-dependent degradation of SigX in the presence of ClpP. A deletion of the N-terminal or C-terminal domain of MecA abolishes its binding to SigX or ClpC. We have also found that MecA-regulated proteolysis of SigX appears to be ineffective when S. mutans is grown in a chemically defined medium (CDM), suggesting the possibility that an unknown mechanism may be involved in negative regulation of MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX under this condition. Conclusion Adaptor protein MecA in S. mutans plays a crucial role in recognizing and targeting SigX for degradation by the protease ClpC/ClpP. Thus, Mec

  6. Calpain-Mediated Proteolysis of Talin and FAK Regulates Adhesion Dynamics Necessary for Axon Guidance.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, Patrick C; Patel, Kevin M; Gomez, Timothy M

    2017-02-08

    , and may identify areas of therapeutic intervention in disease or injury. One important signal that controls growth cones is that of local Ca(2+) transients, which control the rate and direction of axon outgrowth. We demonstrate here that Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition axon outgrowth and guidance is mediated by calpain proteolysis of the adhesion proteins talin and focal adhesion kinase. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into Ca(2+)/calpain regulation of growth cone motility and axon guidance during neuronal development.

  7. Identification of the domains of neuronal nitric oxide synthase by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, P N; Smith, D; Stammers, D K; Riveros-Moreno, V; Moncada, S; Charles, I; Boyhan, A

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (EC 1.14.13.39) binds arginine and NADPH as substrates, and FAD, FMN, tetrahydrobiopterin, haem and calmodulin as cofactors. The protein consists of a central calmodulin-binding sequence flanked on the N-terminal side by a haem-binding region, analogous to cytochrome P-450, and on the C-terminal side by a region homologous with NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase. The structure of recombinant rat brain nitric oxide synthase was analysed by limited proteolyis. The products were identified by using antibodies to defined sequences, and by N-terminal sequencing. Low concentrations of trypsin produced three fragments, similar to those in a previous report [Sheta, McMillan and Masters (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 15147-15153]: that of Mr approx. 135000 (N-terminus Gly-221) resulted from loss of the N-terminal extension (residues 1-220) unique to neuronal nitric oxide synthase. The fragments of Mr 90000 (haem region) and 80000 (reductase region, N-terminus Ala-728) were produced by cleavage within the calmodulin-binding region. With more extensive trypsin treatment, these species were shown to be transient, and three smaller, highly stable fragments of Mr 14000 (N-terminus Leu-744 within the calmodulin region), 60000 (N-terminus Gly-221) and 63000 (N-terminus Lys-856 within the FMN domain) were formed. The species of Mr approx. 60000 represents a domain retaining haem and nitroarginine binding. The two species of Mr 63000 and 14000 remain associated as a complex. This complex retains cytochrome c reductase activity, and thus is the complete reductase region, yet cleaved at Lys-856. This cleavage occurs within a sequence insertion relative to the FMN domain present in inducible nitric oxide synthase. Prolonged proteolysis treatment led to the production of a protein of Mr approx. 53000 (N-terminus Ala-953), corresponding to a cleavage between the FMN and FAD domains. The major products after chymotryptic digestion were similar to those with trypsin

  8. Substrate Recognition by the Cdh1 Destruction Box Receptor Is a General Requirement for APC/CCdh1-mediated Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Guimarães, Dimitrius Santiago P S F; Melesse, Michael; Hall, Mark C

    2016-07-22

    The anaphase-promoting complex, or cyclosome (APC/C), is a ubiquitin ligase that selectively targets proteins for degradation in mitosis and the G1 phase and is an important component of the eukaryotic cell cycle control system. How the APC/C specifically recognizes its substrates is not fully understood. Although well characterized degron motifs such as the destruction box (D-box) and KEN-box are commonly found in APC/C substrates, many substrates apparently lack these motifs. A variety of alternative APC/C degrons have been reported, suggesting either that multiple modes of substrate recognition are possible or that our definitions of degron structure are incomplete. We used an in vivo yeast assay to compare the G1 degradation rate of 15 known substrates of the APC/C co-activator Cdh1 under normal conditions and conditions that impair binding of D-box, KEN-box, and the recently identified ABBA motif degrons to Cdh1. The D-box receptor was required for efficient proteolysis of all Cdh1 substrates, despite the absence of canonical D-boxes in many. In contrast, the KEN-box receptor was only required for normal proteolysis of a subset of substrates and the ABBA motif receptor for a single substrate in our system. Our results suggest that binding to the D-box receptor may be a shared requirement for recognition and processing of all Cdh1 substrates.

  9. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations: relationship between calcium chelation and proteolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette; Brayden, David J; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Buckley, Stephen T

    2014-04-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation activity was developed and verified experimentally using an ion-selective electrode. The effects of CA, its salt (citrate, Cit) and the established permeation enhancer, lauroyl carnitine chloride (LCC) were compared by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of insulin and FD4 across Caco-2 monolayers and rat small intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Proteolytic degradation of insulin was determined in rat luminal extracts across a range of pH values in the presence of CA. CA's capacity to chelate calcium decreased ~10-fold for each pH unit moving from pH 6 to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral bioavailability since this is a weak property of CA.

  10. Effect of monoclonal antibodies on limited proteolysis of native glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Pereira, L.; Hampar, B.; Zweig, M.; Cohen, G.H.

    1982-02-01

    We examined the properties of 17 monoclonal antibodies to glycoprotein gD of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) (gD-1) and HSV-2 (gD-2). The antibodies recognized eight separate determinants of gD, based on differences in radioimmuno-precipitation and neutralization assays. The determinants were distributed as follows: three were gD-1 specific, one was gD-2 specific, and four were type common. Several type-specific and type-common determinants appeared to be involved in neutralization. We developed a procedure for examining the effect that binding of monoclonal antibody has on proteolysis of native gD-1 by Staphylococcus aureus protease V8. We showed that several different patterns of protease V8 cleavage were obtained, depending on the monoclonal antibody used. The proteolysis patterns were generally consistent with the immunological groupings. With four groups of antibodies, we found that fragments of gD-1 remained bound to antibody after V8 treatment. A 38,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies in three different groups of monoclonal antibodies. This fragment appeared to contain one type-common and two type-specific determinants. A 12,000-dalton fragment remained bound to antibodies belonging to one type-common group of monoclonal antibodies. Tryptic peptide analysis revealed that the 12,000-dalton fragment represented a portion of the 38,000-dalton fragment and was enriched in a type-common arginine tryptic peptide.

  11. Quantitative characterization of the mechanism of action and impact of a 'proteolysis-permitting' anti-PCSK9 antibody.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ryan J; Berna, Michael J; Sperry, Andrea E; Beyer, Thomas P; Wroblewski, Victor J; Schroeder, Krista M; Eacho, Patrick I

    A recent report described a novel mechanism of action for an anti-proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibody (LY3015014, or LY), wherein the antibody has improved potency and duration of action due to the PCSK9 epitope for LY binding. Unlike other antibodies, proteolysis of PCSK9 can occur when LY is bound to PCSK9. We hypothesized that this allowance of PCSK9 cleavage potentially improves LY efficiency through two pathways, namely lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 and reduced clearance of LY. A quantitative modeling approach is necessary to further understand this novel mechanism of action. We developed a mechanism-based model to characterize the relationship between antibody pharmacokinetics, PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol levels in animals, and used the model to better understand the underlying drivers for the improved efficiency of LY. Simulations suggested that the allowance of cleavage of PCSK9 resulting in a lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 is the major driver of the improved potency and durability of LY. The modeling reveals that this novel 'proteolysis-permitting' mechanism of LY is a means by which an efficient antibody can be developed with a total antibody dosing rate that is lower than the target production rate. We expect this engineering approach may be applicable to other targets and that the mathematical models presented herein will be useful in evaluating similar approaches.

  12. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yinzhong; Wan, Jun; Yang, Zhifeng; Lei, Xiling; Niu, Qi; Jiang, Lanxin; Passtoors, Willemijn M.; Zang, Aiping; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Deregulation of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) has recently been demonstrated to predominately promote survival and chemoresistance of cancer cells. Intramembrane proteolysis mediated by presenilin/γ-secretase is known to regulate the homeostasis of some RTKs. In the present study, we demonstrate that AXL, but not TYRO3 or MERTK, is efficiently and sequentially cleaved by α- and γ-secretases in various types of cancer cell lines. Proteolytic processing of AXL redirected signaling toward a secretase-mediated pathway, away from the classic, well-known, ligand-dependent canonical RTK signaling pathway. The AXL intracellular domain cleavage product, but not full-length AXL, was further shown to translocate into the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence that harbored a basic HRRKK motif. Of interest, we found that the γ-secretase–uncleavable AXL mutant caused an elevated chemoresistance in non–small-cell lung cancer cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that AXL can undergo sequential processing mediated by various proteases kept in a homeostatic balance. This newly discovered post-translational processing of AXL may provide an explanation for the diverse functions of AXL, especially in the context of drug resistance in cancer cells.—Lu, Y., Wan, J., Yang, Z., Lei, X., Niu, Q., Jiang, L., Passtoors, W. M., Zang, A., Fraering, P. C., Wu, F. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the AXL receptor kinase generates an intracellular domain that localizes in the nucleus of cancer cells. PMID:28034848

  13. Vaccinia virus A12L protein and its AG/A proteolysis play an important role in viral morphogenic transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Su Jung; Hruby, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Like the major vaccinia virus (VV) core protein precursors, p4b and p25K, the 25 kDa VV A12L late gene product (p17K) is proteolytically maturated at the conserved Ala-Gly-Ala motif. However, the association of the precursor and its cleavage product with the core of mature virion suggests that both of the A12L proteins may be required for virus assembly. Here, in order to test the requirement of the A12L protein and its proteolysis in viral replication, a conditional lethal mutant virus (vvtetOA12L) was constructed to regulate A12L expression by the presence or absence of an inducer, tetracycline. In the absence of tetracycline, replication of vvtetOA12L was inhibited by 80% and this inhibition could be overcome by transient expression of the wild-type copy of the A12L gene. In contrast, mutation of the AG/A site abrogated the ability of the transfected A12L gene to rescue, indicating that A12L proteolysis plays an important role in viral replication. Electron microscopy analysis of the A12L deficient virus demonstrated the aberrant virus particles, which were displayed by the AG/A site mutation. Thus, we concluded that the not only A12L protein but also its cleavage processing plays an essential role in virus morphogenic transition. PMID:17625005

  14. Controlled Biodegradation of Self-Assembling β-hairpin Peptide Hydrogels by Proteolysis with Matrix Metalloproteinase-13

    PubMed Central

    Giano, Michael C.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2011-01-01

    Controlled biodegradation specific to matrix metalloproteinase-13 was incorporated into the design of self-assembling β-hairpin peptide hydrogels. Degrading Peptides (DP peptides) are a series of five peptides that have varying proteolytic susceptibilities towards MMP-13. These peptides undergo environmentally triggered folding and self-assembly under physiologically relevant conditions (150 mM NaCl, pH 7.6) to form self supporting hydrogels. In the presence of enzyme, gels prepared from distinct peptides are degraded at rates that differ according to the primary sequence of the single peptide comprising the gel. Material degradation was monitored by oscillatory shear rheology over the course of 14 days, where overall degradation of the gels vary from 5% to 70%. Degradation products were analyzed by HPLC and identified by electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry. This data shows that proteolysis of the parent peptides constituting each gel occurs at the intended sequence location. DP hydrogels show specificity to MMP-13 and are only minimally cleaved by matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), another common enzyme present during tissue injury. In vitro migration assays performed with SW1353 cells show that migration rates through each gel differs according to peptide sequence, which is consistent with the proteolysis studies using exogenous MMP-13. PMID:21683437

  15. Composition, proteolysis indices and coagulating properties of ewe milk as affected by bulk tank somatic cell count.

    PubMed

    Martí-De Olives, Ana; Navarro-Ríos, María Jesús; Rubert-Alemán, Joaquín; Fernández, Nemesio; Molina, Maria Pilar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ovine bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) on composition, proteose-peptone (p-p) content and casein fractions as indicating parameters for proteolysis and coagulating properties of milk. A total of 97 samples of bulk tank milk from Manchega breed ewe flocks were grouped according to somatic cell count (SCC) into four classes: fewer than 500,000 cells/ml, from 500,000 to 10,00000 cells/ml, from 10,00000 to 15,00000 and more than 15,00000 cells/ml. The casein : protein ratio and lactose content decreased with BTSCC. Proteolysis increased with BTSCC, causing a drop in β-casein and an increase in the γ-caseins from a concentration of 500,000 cells/ml. Regarding coagulation behaviour, the rennet clotting time (RCT) and firming time (k20) rose from 10,00000-15,00000 cells/ml of milk. The results showed that the impairment of milk quality and milk ability to make cheese as affected by intramammary infection (IMI) can be inferred from the bulk tank milk of flocks with poor udder health.

  16. Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is involved in the response to flooding stress in soybean roots, independent of oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis plays an important role in the response to several environmental stresses. Here, we described the relationship of the proteolysis in the flooding stress in soybean (Glycine max L. cultivar Enrei). Immunoblot analyses were performed using antibodies against two subunits of 26S proteasome, Rpt5 and Rpn10, 20S proteasome and two subunits of COP9 signalosome (CSN), CSN4 and CSN5, to compare between flooded and untreated roots. We also examined their protein amounts in the condition of low oxygen. Moreover, crude extracts from flooded or untreated roots incubated with or without a proteasome inhibitor MG132 were analyzed by proteomics technique. We revealed that the amount of ubiquitinated proteins in soybean roots decreased after flooding treatment and increased to levels similar to controls after de-submergence. Both CSN4 and CSN5 accumulated following flooding treatment, although no significant difference was observed in proteasome. Low oxygen had no effect on the amount of ubiquitinated proteins or CSN4. By 2D-PAGE, the amount of 6 proteins changed significantly following MG132 treatment in flooding stressed plants. We conclude that the accumulation of CSN proteins might enhance the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins independent of hypoxia caused by flooding, thereby lowering their abundance during flooding stress.

  17. Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a is required for CD74 intramembrane proteolysis in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneppenheim, Janna; Hüttl, Susann; Kruchen, Anne; Fluhrer, Regina; Müller, Ingo; Saftig, Paul; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Martin, Christa L; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The invariant chain (CD74) mediates targeting of the MHCII complex to endosomal compartments, where CD74 undergoes degradation allowing MHCII to acquire peptides. We demonstrated recently that intramembrane proteolysis of the final membrane-bound N-terminal fragment (NTF) of CD74 is catalysed by Signal-peptide-peptidase-like 2a (SPPL2a) and that this process is indispensable for development and function of B lymphocytes in mice. In SPPL2a−/− mice, homeostasis of these cells is disturbed by the accumulation of the unprocessed CD74 NTF. So far, evidence for this essential role of SPPL2a is restricted to mice. Nevertheless, inhibition of SPPL2a has been suggested as novel approach to target B cells for treating autoimmunity. Here, we characterize human B cell lines with a homozygous microdeletion on chromosome 15. We demonstrate that this deletion disrupts the SPPL2a genomic locus and leads to loss of SPPL2a transcript. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with this deletion exhibit absence of SPPL2a at the protein level and show an accumulation of the CD74 NTF comparable to B cells from SPPL2a−/− mice. By this means, we present evidence that the role of SPPL2a in CD74 proteolysis is conserved in human B cells and provide support for modulation of SPPL2a activity as a therapeutic concept. PMID:25035924

  18. Effect of pulsed electric field on the proteolysis of cold boned beef M. Longissimus lumborum and M. Semimembranosus.

    PubMed

    Suwandy, Via; Carne, Alan; van de Ven, Remy; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) and ageing (3, 7, 14 and 21 days) on the shear force, protein profile, and post-mortem proteolysis of beef loins (M. Longissimus lumborum, LL) and topsides (M. Semimembranosus, SM) were investigated using a range of pulsed electric field treatments [voltages (5 and 10 kV) and frequencies (20, 50, and 90 Hz)]. PEF treatment decreased the shear force of beef LL and SM muscles by up to 19%. The reduction in the shear force in the LL was not affected by the treatment intensity whereas the reduction in the SM was dependent on PEF frequency. PEF treated beef loins showed increased proteolysis, both early post-mortem and during subsequent post-mortem storage reflected by increased degradation of troponin-T and desmin. The most prominent troponin-T degradation was found in samples treated with 5 kV-90 Hz, 10 kV-20 Hz at day 3 and day 7 post-treatment in addition to 10 kV-50 Hz in subsequent post-treatment times. The degradation of desmin in PEF treated beef loins increased with ageing time.

  19. Quantitative characterization of the mechanism of action and impact of a ‘proteolysis-permitting’ anti-PCSK9 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ryan J.; Berna, Michael J.; Sperry, Andrea E.; Schroeder, Krista M.; Eacho, Patrick I.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A recent report described a novel mechanism of action for an anti-proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibody (LY3015014, or LY), wherein the antibody has improved potency and duration of action due to the PCSK9 epitope for LY binding. Unlike other antibodies, proteolysis of PCSK9 can occur when LY is bound to PCSK9. We hypothesized that this allowance of PCSK9 cleavage potentially improves LY efficiency through two pathways, namely lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 and reduced clearance of LY. A quantitative modeling approach is necessary to further understand this novel mechanism of action. We developed a mechanism-based model to characterize the relationship between antibody pharmacokinetics, PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol levels in animals, and used the model to better understand the underlying drivers for the improved efficiency of LY. Simulations suggested that the allowance of cleavage of PCSK9 resulting in a lack of accumulation of intact PCSK9 is the major driver of the improved potency and durability of LY. The modeling reveals that this novel ‘proteolysis-permitting’ mechanism of LY is a means by which an efficient antibody can be developed with a total antibody dosing rate that is lower than the target production rate. We expect this engineering approach may be applicable to other targets and that the mathematical models presented herein will be useful in evaluating similar approaches. PMID:27981884

  20. Impact of chymosin- and plasmin-mediated primary proteolysis on the growth and biochemical activities of lactobacilli in miniature Cheddar-type cheeses.

    PubMed

    Milesi, M M; McSweeney, P L H; Hynes, E R

    2008-09-01

    Strongly proteolytic starters seem to improve the growth of nonstarter lactobacilli during cheese ripening, but no information is available on the impact of the nonmicrobial proteases usually active in cheese on their development. In the current study, the influence of chymosin- and plasmin-mediated proteolysis on the growth and biochemical activities of lactobacilli during ripening of miniature Cheddar-type cheeses, manufactured under controlled microbiological conditions, was studied. Two experiments were performed; in the first, residual chymosin activity was inhibited by the addition of pepstatin, and in the second, plasmin activity was increased by adding more enzyme, obtained in vitro through the activation of plasminogen induced by urokinase. Cheeses with or without a Lactobacillus plantarum I91 adjunct culture and with or without added pepstatin or plasmin solution were manufactured and ripened for 60 d. The addition of the adjunct culture resulted in enhancement of secondary proteolysis, evidenced by an increase in the total content of free amino acids (FAA) and modifications of the individual FAA profiles. Reduction in residual chymosin activity caused a decrease in primary and secondary proteolysis, characterized by the absence of alpha(s1)-casein hydrolysis and reduced production of peptides and FAA, respectively. The increase in plasmin activity accelerated primary proteolysis but no enhancement of secondary proteolysis was observed. Chymosin- and plasmin-mediated proteolysis did not influence the growth and biochemical activities of adventitious or adjunct lactobacilli, indicating that it is not a limiting factor for the development and proteolytic-peptidolytic activities of lactobacilli in the cheese model studied.

  1. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca(2+)-regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis.

  2. A RelA-dependent two-tiered regulated proteolysis cascade controls synthesis of a contact-dependent intercellular signal in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, Anna; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2012-04-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of precursor proteins to generate intercellular signals is a common mechanism in all cells. In Myxococcus xanthus the contact-dependent intercellular C-signal is a 17 kDa protein (p17) generated by proteolytic cleavage of the 25 kDa csgA protein (p25), and is essential for starvation-induced fruiting body formation. p25 accumulates in the outer membrane and PopC, the protease that cleaves p25, in the cytoplasm of vegetative cells. PopC is secreted in response to starvation, therefore, restricting p25 cleavage to starving cells. We focused on identifying proteins critical for PopC secretion in response to starvation. PopC secretion depends on the (p)ppGpp synthase RelA and the stringent response, and is regulated post-translationally. PopD, which is encoded in an operon with PopC, forms a soluble complex with PopC and inhibits PopC secretion whereas the integral membrane AAA+ protease FtsH(D) is required for PopC secretion. Biochemical and genetic evidence suggest that in response to starvation, RelA is activated and induces the degradation of PopD thereby releasing pre-formed PopC for secretion and that FtsH(D) is important for PopD degradation. Hence, regulated PopC secretion depends on regulated proteolysis. Accordingly, p17 synthesis depends on a proteolytic cascade including FtsH(D) -dependent degradation of PopD and PopC-dependent cleavage of p25.

  3. Proteasome-mediated Proteolysis of the Polyglutamine-expanded Androgen Receptor Is a Late Event in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (SBMA) Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Erin M.; Berger, Tamar R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R.; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a “toxic fragment” that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis. PMID:25795778

  4. Causal Relationship between Microbial Ecology Dynamics and Proteolysis during Manufacture and Ripening of Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) Cheese Canestrato Pugliese

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Calasso, Maria; Mancini, Leonardo; Ercolini, Danilo; La Storia, Antonietta; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community-level physiological profiles determined by the use of Biolog EcoPlates, and proteolysis analyses were used to characterize Canestrato Pugliese Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) cheese. The number of presumptive mesophilic lactococci in raw ewes' milk was higher than that of presumptive mesophilic lactobacilli. The numbers of these microbial groups increased during ripening, showing temporal and numerical differences. Urea-PAGE showed limited primary proteolysis, whereas the analysis of the pH 4.6-soluble fraction of the cheese revealed that secondary proteolysis increased mainly from 45 to 75 days of ripening. This agreed with the concentration of free amino acids. Raw ewes' milk was contaminated by several bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria (68%; mainly Pseudomonas), Firmicutes (30%; mainly Carnobacterium and Lactococcus), Bacteroidetes (0.05%), and Actinobacteria (0.02%). Almost the same microbial composition persisted in the curd after molding. From day 1 of ripening onwards, the phylum Firmicutes dominated. Lactococcus dominated throughout ripening, and most of the Lactobacillus species appeared only at 7 or 15 days. At 90 days, Lactococcus (87.2%), Lactobacillus (4.8%; mainly Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus sakei), and Leuconostoc (3.9%) dominated. The relative utilization of carbon sources by the bacterial community reflected the succession. This study identified strategic phases that characterized the manufacture and ripening of Canestrato Pugliese cheese and established a causal relationship between mesophilic lactobacilli and proteolysis. PMID:24771032

  5. Proteasome-mediated proteolysis of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor is a late event in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heine, Erin M; Berger, Tamar R; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E

    2015-05-15

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a "toxic fragment" that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis.

  6. Reducing fat levels in cheddar-like goat cheese: impact on proteolysis and rheological properties over 6 months of refrigerated storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low-fat goat cheeses that appeal to health conscious consumers requires information on how the reduction of fat affects the quality traits of the cheese, such as its proteolysis and rheology. Goat milk samples containing 3.6, 2.0, 1.0, and <0.5% fat were processed into full-fat (F...

  7. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  8. Immobilization of trypsin on poly(urea-formaldehyde)-coated fiberglass cores in microchip for highly efficient proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huizhi; Bao, Huimin; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-08-01

    Trypsin was covalently immobilized on poly(urea-formaldehyde)-coated fiberglass cores based on the condensation reaction between poly(urea-formaldehyde) and trypsin for efficient microfluidic proteolysis in this work. Prior to use, a piece of the trypsin-immobilized fiber was inserted into the main channel of a microchip under a magnifier to form a core-changeable bioreactor. Because trypsin was not permanently immobilized on the channel wall, the novel bioreactor was regenerable. Two standard proteins, hemoglobin (HEM) and lysozyme (LYS), were digested by the unique bioreactor to demonstrate its feasibility and performance. The interaction time between the flowing proteins and the immobilized trypsin was evaluated to be less than 10 s. The peptides in the digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS to obtain PMF. The results indicated that digestion performance of the microfluidic bioreactor was better than that of 12-h in-solution digestion.

  9. Influence of milk quality and production protocol on proteolysis and lipolysis in Monti Dauni Meridionali Caciocavallo cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, Marzia; Santillo, Antonella; Russo, Donatella Esterina; Caroprese, Mariangela; Marino, Rosaria; Sevi, Agostino

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of milk source and of cheese production protocol on proteolytic and lipolytic pattern of cheese during ripening. The study involved six dairy factories located in Monti Dauni Meridionali area of Southern Italy; three dairy factories processed the milk produced by their own cow herds, while the other three dairy factories processed the milk collected in other dairy farms located in the neighbouring area. Cow milk processed to cheese had different nutritional parameters and hygienic quality. Caciocavallo cheese showed differences in the evolution of proteolysis during ripening and in the intensity of the lipolytic process detected at the end of ripening. The main factors influencing Caciocavallo cheese features were the quality of the starting milk, differences in technological steps such as milk heating, type of starter cultures and coagulant used.

  10. A serendipitous discovery that in situ proteolysis is essential for the crystallization of yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Corey R.; Gebauer, Damara; Zhang, Hailong; Tong, Liang

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3′-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant. PMID:17012808

  11. Deregulated proteolysis by the F-box proteins SKP2 and β-TrCP: tipping the scales of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frescas, David; Pagano, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance and preservation of distinct phases during the cell cycle is a highly complex and coordinated process. It is regulated by phosphorylation — through the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) — and protein degradation, which occurs through ubiquitin ligases such as SCF (SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein) complexes and APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome). Here, we explore the functionality and biology of the F-box proteins, SKP2 (S-phase kinase-associated protein 2) and β-TrCP (β-transducin repeat-containing protein), which are emerging as important players in cancer biogenesis owing to the deregulated proteolysis of their substrates. PMID:18500245

  12. A Serendipitous Discover that in situ Proteolysis is Essential for the Crystallization of Yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p)

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel,C.; Gebauer, D.; Zhang, H.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF) complex is required for the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3'-end of messenger RNA precursors in eukaryotes. During structural studies of the 100 kDa subunit (CPSF-100, Ydh1p) of the yeast CPSF complex, it was serendipitously discovered that a solution that is infected by a fungus (subsequently identified as Penicillium) is crucial for the crystallization of this protein. Further analyses suggest that the protein has undergone partial proteolysis during crystallization, resulting in the deletion of an internal segment of about 200 highly charged and hydrophilic residues, very likely catalyzed by a protease secreted by the fungus. With the removal of this segment, yeast CPSF-100 (Ydh1p) has greatly reduced solubility and can be crystallized in the presence of a minute amount of precipitant.

  13. Impact of pasteurization of human milk on preterm newborn in vitro digestion: Gastrointestinal disintegration, lipolysis and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Samira C; Bourlieu, Claire; Ménard, Olivia; Bellanger, Amandine; Henry, Gwénaële; Rousseau, Florence; Dirson, Emelyne; Carrière, Frédéric; Dupont, Didier; Deglaire, Amélie

    2016-11-15

    Human milk feeding is an important recommendation for preterm newborns considering their vulnerability and digestive immaturity. Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30min) applied in milk banks modifies its biological quality and its microstructure. We investigated the impact of pasteurization of preterm human milk on its gastrointestinal kinetics of lipolysis, proteolysis and structural disintegration. An in vitro dynamic system was set up to simulate the gastrointestinal digestion of preterm newborns. A pool of preterm human milk was digested as raw or after Holder pasteurization. Pasteurization impacted the microstructure of undigested human milk, its gastrointestinal disintegration and tended to limit the intestinal lipolysis. Furthermore, the gastrointestinal bioaccessibility of some fatty acids was decreased by pasteurization, while the intestinal bioaccessibility of some amino acids was selectively modulated. The impact of pasteurization on the digestion of human milk may have nutritional relevance in vivo and potentially modulates preterm development and growth.

  14. MMP-13 Regulates Growth of Wound Granulation Tissue and Modulates Gene Expression Signatures Involved in Inflammation, Proteolysis, and Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Toriseva, Mervi; Laato, Matti; Carpén, Olli; Ruohonen, Suvi T.; Savontaus, Eriika; Inada, Masaki; Krane, Stephen M.; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play a pivotal role in wound healing by regulating cell-matrix interactions and availability of bioactive molecules. The role of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in granulation tissue growth was studied in subcutaneously implanted viscose cellulose sponge in MMP-13 knockout (Mmp13−/−) and wild type (WT) mice. The tissue samples were harvested at time points day 7, 14 and 21 and subjected to histological analysis and gene expression profiling. Granulation tissue growth was significantly reduced (42%) at day 21 in Mmp13−/− mice. Granulation tissue in Mmp13−/− mice showed delayed organization of myofibroblasts, increased microvascular density at day 14, and virtual absence of large vessels at day 21. Gene expression profiling identified differentially expressed genes in Mmp13−/− mouse granulation tissue involved in biological functions including inflammatory response, angiogenesis, cellular movement, cellular growth and proliferation and proteolysis. Among genes linked to angiogenesis, Adamts4 and Npy were significantly upregulated in early granulation tissue in Mmp13−/− mice, and a set of genes involved in leukocyte motility including Il6 were systematically downregulated at day 14. The expression of Pdgfd was downregulated in Mmp13−/− granulation tissue in all time points. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases Mmp2, Mmp3, Mmp9 was also significantly downregulated in granulation tissue of Mmp13−/− mice compared to WT mice. Mmp13−/− mouse skin fibroblasts displayed altered cell morphology and impaired ability to contract collagen gel and decreased production of MMP-2. These results provide evidence for an important role for MMP-13 in wound healing by coordinating cellular activities important in the growth and maturation of granulation tissue, including myofibroblast function, inflammation, angiogenesis, and proteolysis. PMID:22880047

  15. Regulation of limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 in tumor via acetylation and its role in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bhakat, Kishor K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Adeniyi, Victor F.; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Bellot, Larry J.; Feng, Dan; Mantha, Anil K.; Sinha, Mala; Qiu, Suimin; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1), a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the repair of both endogenous and drug-induced DNA damages in the genome. Unlike its E.coli counterpart Xth, mammalian APE1 has a unique N-terminal domain and possesses both DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulatory functions. Although the overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and the association of APE1 expression with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis are well documented, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter APE1 functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show the presence of full-length APE1 and N-terminal truncated isoforms of APE1 in tumor tissue samples of various cancer types. However, primary tumor tissue has higher levels of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) as well as full-length APE1 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. We found that APE1 is proteolytically cleaved by an unknown serine protease at its N-terminus following residue lysine (Lys) Lys6 and/or Lys7 and after Lys27 and Lys31 or Lys32. Acetylation of these Lys residues in APE1 prevents this proteolysis. The N-terminal domain of APE1 and its acetylation are required for modulation of the expression of hundreds of genes. Importantly, we found that AcAPE1 is essential for sustained cell proliferation. Together, our study demonstrates that increased acetylation levels of APE1 in tumor cells inhibit the limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 and thereby maintain the functions of APE1 to promote tumor cells' sustained proliferation and survival. PMID:26981776

  16. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R; Stuehr, Dennis J; Panda, Koustubh

    2016-07-19

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage.

  17. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage. PMID:27382160

  18. Andrographolide alleviates imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fenli; Tan, Tao; Tan, Yang; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xingxin; Xu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with excessive activation of toll-like receptors (TLRs), which play important roles in developing psoriasis. Targeting TLR signaling remains a challenge for treating psoriasis. Here, we found that andrographolide (Andro), a small-molecule natural product, alleviated imiquimod- but not interleukin 23 (IL-23)-induced psoriasis in mice with reducing expressions of IL-23 and IL-1β in the skin. The improvement in imiquimod-induced psoriasis by Andro was not observed in microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (MAP1LC3B) knockout mice. Furthermore, Andro inhibited mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6 and IL-1β but not CD80 and CD86 in bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a MAP1LC3B-dependent manner. In addition, Andro inhibited imiquimod-induced mRNA expressions of IL-23, IL-6, IL-1β, CD80 and CD86 in BMDCs from mice. Interestingly, Andro induced a degradation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and blocked the recruitment of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to MyD88 upon LPS stimulation in BMDCs from mice. Blockade of autophagic proteolysis using NH4Cl or MAP1LC3B(-/-) BMDCs abolished the Andro-induced MyD88 degradation. In conclusion, Andro controls activation of MyD88-dependent cytokines and alleviates psoriasis in mice via inducing autophagic proteolysis of MyD88, which could be a novel strategy to treat psoriasis.

  19. Proteolysis of calcineurin is increased in human hippocampus during mild cognitive impairment and is stimulated by oligomeric Abeta

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Baig, Irfan; LeVine, Harry; Guttmann, Rodney P; Norris, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent reports demonstrate that the activation and interaction of the protease calpain (CP) and the protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) are elevated in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the extent to which CPs and CN interact during earlier stages of disease progression remains unknown. Here, we investigated CP and CN protein levels in cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane fractions prepared from human postmortem hippocampal tissue from aged non-demented subjects, and subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The results revealed a parallel increase in CP I and the 48 kDa CN-Aα (ΔCN-Aα48) proteolytic fragment in cytosolic fractions during MCI. In primary rat hippocampal cultures, CP-dependent proteolysis and activation of CN was stimulated by application of oligomeric Aβ(1-42) peptides. Deleterious effects of Aβ on neuronal morphology were reduced by blockade of either CP or CN. NMDA-type glutamate receptors, which help regulate cognition and neuronal viability, and are modulated by CPs and CN, were also investigated in human hippocampus. Relative to controls, MCI subjects showed significantly greater proteolytic levels of the NR2B subunit. Within subjects, the extent of NR2B proteolysis was strongly correlated with the generation of ΔCN-Aα48 in the cytosol. A similar proteolytic pattern for NR2B was also observed in primary rat hippocampal cultures treated with oligomeric Aβ and prevented by inhibition of CP or CN. Together, the results demonstrate that the activation and interaction of CPs and CN are increased early in cognitive decline associated with AD and may help drive other pathologic processes during disease progression. PMID:20969723

  20. Matriptase Complexes and Prostasin Complexes with HAI-1 and HAI-2 in Human Milk: Significant Proteolysis in Lactation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Hsin; Lai, Ying-Jung J; Chou, Feng-Pai; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D; Tseng, Chun-Che; Johnson, Michael D; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Significant proteolysis may occur during milk synthesis and secretion, as evidenced by the presence of protease-protease inhibitor complex containing the activated form of the type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase and the transmembrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. In order to identify other proteolysis events that may occur during lactation, human milk was analyzed for species containing HAI-1 and HAI-2 which is closely related to HAI-1. In addition to the previously demonstrated matriptase-HAI-1 complex, HAI-1 was also detected in complex with prostasin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease. HAI-2 was also detected in complexes, the majority of which appear to be part of higher-order complexes, which do not bind to ionic exchange columns or immunoaffinity columns, suggesting that HAI-2 and its target proteases may be incorporated into special protein structures during lactation. The small proportion HAI-2 species that could be purified contain matriptase or prostasin. Human mammary epithelial cells are the likely cellular sources for these HAI-1 and HAI-2 complexes with matriptase and prostasin given that these protease-inhibitor complexes with the exception of prostasin-HAI-2 complex were detected in milk-derived mammary epithelial cells. The presence of these protease-inhibitor complexes in human milk provides in vivo evidence that the proteolytic activity of matriptase and prostasin are significantly elevated at least during lactation, and possibly contribute to the process of lactation, and that they are under tight control by HAI-1 and HAI-2.

  1. Fibulin-3, -4, and -5 Are Highly Susceptible to Proteolysis, Interact with Cells and Heparin, and Form Multimers*

    PubMed Central

    Djokic, Jelena; Fagotto-Kaufmann, Christine; Bartels, Rainer; Nelea, Valentin; Reinhardt, Dieter P.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular short fibulins, fibulin-3, -4, and -5, are components of the elastic fiber/microfibril system and are implicated in the formation and homeostasis of elastic tissues. In this study, we report new structural and functional properties of the short fibulins. Full-length human short fibulins were recombinantly expressed in human embryonic kidney cells and purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. All three fibulins showed various levels of degradation after the purification procedure. N-terminal sequencing revealed that all three fibulins are highly susceptible to proteolysis within the N-terminal linker region of the first calcium-binding epidermal growth factor domain. Proteolytic susceptibility of the linker correlated with its length. Exposure of these fibulins to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, -7, -9, and -12 resulted in similar proteolytic fragments with MMP-7 and -12 being the most potent proteases. Fibulin-3 proteolysis was almost completely inhibited in cell culture by the addition of 25 μm doxycycline (a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor). Reducible fibulin-4 dimerization and multimerization were consistently observed by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry. Atomic force microscopy identified monomers, dimers, and multimers in purified fibulin-4 preparations with sizes of ∼10–15, ∼20–25, and ∼30–50 nm, respectively. All short fibulins strongly adhered to human fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. Although only fibulin-5 has an RGD integrin binding site, all short fibulins adhere at a similar level to the respective cells. Solid phase binding assays detected strong calcium-dependent binding of the short fibulins to immobilized heparin, suggesting that these fibulins may bind cell surface-located heparan sulfate. PMID:23782690

  2. Detection of Plasma Protease Activity Using Microsphere-Cytometry Assays with E. coli Derived Substrates: VWF Proteolysis by ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Shobhit; Lo, Chi Y.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Protease levels in human blood are often prognostic indicators of inflammatory, thrombotic or oncogenic disorders. The measurement of such enzyme activities in substrate-based assays is complicated due to the low prevalence of these enzymes and steric hindrance of the substrates by the more abundant blood proteins. To address these limitations, we developed a molecular construct that is suitable for microsphere-cytometer based assays in the milieu of human blood plasma. In this proof of principle study, we demonstrate the utility of this substrate to measure metalloprotease ADAMTS13 activity. The substrate, expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein, contains the partial A2-domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF amino acids 1594–1670) that is mutated to include a single primary amine at the N-terminus and free cysteines at the C-terminus. N-terminus fluorescence conjugation was possible using NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) chemistry. Maleimide-PEG(Polyethylene glycol)n-biotin coupling at the C-terminus allowed biotinylation with variable PEG spacer lengths. Once bound to streptavidin-bearing microspheres, the substrate fluorescence signal decreased in proportion with ADAMTS13 concentration. Whereas recombinant ADAMTS13 activity could be quantified using substrates with all PEG repeat-lengths, only the construct with the longer 77 PEG-unit could quantify proteolysis in blood plasma. Using this longer substrate, plasma ADAMTS13 down to 5% of normal levels could be detected within 30 min. Such measurements could also be readily performed under conditions resembling hyperbilirubinemia. Enzyme catalytic activity was tuned by varying buffer calcium, with lower divalent ion concentrations enhancing cleavage. Overall, the study highlights the substrate design features important for the creation of efficient proteolysis assays in the setting of human plasma. In particular, it emphasizes the need to introduce PEG spacers in plasma-based experiments, a design attribute commonly

  3. In vivo effect of an antilipolytic drug (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole) on autophagic proteolysis and autophagy-related gene expression in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, Alessio; Ventruti, Annamaria; Cavallini, Gabriella; Masini, Matilde; Vittorini, Simona; Chantret, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-02-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway induced by starvation, inhibited by nutrients, that is responsible for degradation of long-lived proteins and altered cell organelles. This process is involved in cell maintenance could be induced by antilipolytic drugs and may have anti-aging effects [A. Donati, The involvement of macroautophagy in aging and anti-aging interventions, Mol. Aspects Med. 27 (2006) 455-470]. We analyzed the effect of an intraperitoneal injection of an antilipolytic agent (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole, DMP, 12 mg/kg b.w.), that mimics nutrient shortage on autophagy and expression of autophagic genes in the liver of male 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley albino rats. Autophagy was evaluated by observing electron micrographs of the liver autophagosomal compartment and by monitoring protein degradation assessed by the release of valine into the bloodstream. LC3 gene expression, whose product is one of the best known markers of autophagy, was also monitored. As expected, DMP decreased the plasma levels of free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin and increased autophagic vacuoles and proteolysis. DMP treatment caused an increase in the expression of the LC3 gene although this occurred later than the induction of authophagic proteolysis caused by DMP. Glucose treatment rescued the effects caused by DMP on glucose and insulin plasma levels and negatively affected the rate of autophagic proteolysis, but did not suppress the positive regulatory effect on LC3 mRNA levels. In conclusion, antilipolytic drugs may induce both autophagic proteolysis and higher expression of an autophagy-related gene and the effect on autophagy gene expression might not be secondary to the stimulation of autophagic proteolysis.

  4. In vivo effect of an antilipolytic drug (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole) on autophagic proteolysis and autophagy-related gene expression in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessio; Ventruti, Annamaria; Cavallini, Gabriella; Masini, Matilde; Vittorini, Simona; Chantret, Isabelle; Codogno, Patrice; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-02-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular pathway induced by starvation, inhibited by nutrients, that is responsible for degradation of long-lived proteins and altered cell organelles. This process is involved in cell maintenance could be induced by antilipolytic drugs and may have anti-aging effects [A. Donati, The involvement of macroautophagy in aging and anti-aging interventions, Mol. Aspects Med. 27 (2006) 455-470]. We analyzed the effect of an intraperitoneal injection of an antilipolytic agent (3,5'-dimethylpyrazole, DMP, 12mg/kg b.w.), that mimics nutrient shortage on autophagy and expression of autophagic genes in the liver of male 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley albino rats. Autophagy was evaluated by observing electron micrographs of the liver autophagosomal compartment and by monitoring protein degradation assessed by the release of valine into the bloodstream. LC3 gene expression, whose product is one of the best known markers of autophagy, was also monitored. As expected, DMP decreased the plasma levels of free fatty acids, glucose, and insulin and increased autophagic vacuoles and proteolysis. DMP treatment caused an increase in the expression of the LC3 gene although this occurred later than the induction of authophagic proteolysis caused by DMP. Glucose treatment rescued the effects caused by DMP on glucose and insulin plasma levels and negatively affected the rate of autophagic proteolysis, but did not suppress the positive regulatory effect on LC3 mRNA levels. In conclusion, antilipolytic drugs may induce both autophagic proteolysis and higher expression of an autophagy-related gene and the effect on autophagy gene expression might not be secondary to the stimulation of autophagic proteolysis.

  5. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 regulates proteolysis of centromeric histone H3 variant Cse4 and prevents its mislocalization to euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Fulp, Alyona; Lawrimore, Josh; Au, Wei-Chun; Pasupala, Nagesh; Levy-Myers, Reuben; Warren, Jack; Strunnikov, Alexander; Baker, Richard E.; Kerscher, Oliver; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2016-01-01

    Centromeric histone H3, CENP-ACse4, is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. Stringent regulation of cellular levels of CENP-ACse4 restricts its localization to centromeres. Mislocalization of CENP-ACse4 is associated with aneuploidy in yeast and flies and tumorigenesis in human cells; thus defining pathways that regulate CENP-A levels is critical for understanding how mislocalization of CENP-A contributes to aneuploidy in human cancers. Previous work in budding yeast shows that ubiquitination of overexpressed Cse4 by Psh1, an E3 ligase, partially contributes to proteolysis of Cse4. Here we provide the first evidence that Cse4 is sumoylated by E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in vivo and in vitro. Ubiquitination of Cse4 by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 plays a critical role in proteolysis of Cse4 and prevents mislocalization of Cse4 to euchromatin under normal physiological conditions. Accumulation of sumoylated Cse4 species and increased stability of Cse4 in slx5∆ strains suggest that sumoylation precedes ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4. Slx5-mediated Cse4 proteolysis is independent of Psh1, since slx5∆ psh1∆ strains exhibit higher levels of Cse4 stability and mislocalization than either slx5∆ or psh1∆ strains. Our results demonstrate a role for Slx5 in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4 to prevent its mislocalization and maintain genome stability. PMID:26960795

  6. Biochemical features of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor CD97 related to its auto-proteolysis and HeLa cell attachment activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Yun; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lin-Lin; Liu, Kai-Wen; Tang, Yu-Bo; Zhang, Min; Tan, Min-Jia; Cheng, Shan-Mei; Xu, Ye-Chun; Yang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Song, Gao-Jie; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    CD97 belongs to the adhesion GPCR family characterized by a long ECD linked to the 7TM via a GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) and plays important roles in modulating cell migration and invasion. CD97 (EGF1-5) is a splicing variant of CD97 that recognizes a specific ligand chondroitin sulfate on cell membranes and the extracellular matrix. The aim of this study was to elucidate the extracellular molecular basis of the CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in protein expression, auto-proteolysis and cell adhesion, including epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain, GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain, as well as GPS mutagenesis and N-glycosylation. Both wild-type (WT) CD97-ECD and its truncated, GPS mutated, PNGase F-deglycosylated, and N-glycosylation site mutated forms were expressed and purified. The auto-proteolysis of the proteins was analyzed with Western blotting and SDS-PAGE. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and molecular modeling were used to determine a structural profile of the properly expressed receptor. Potential N-glycosylation sites were identified using MS and were modulated with PNGase F digestion and glyco-site mutations. A flow cytometry-based HeLa cell attachment assay was used for all aforementioned CD97 variants to elucidate the molecular basis of CD97-HeLa interactions. A unique concentration-dependent GPS auto-proteolysis was observed in CD97 EGF1-5 isoform with the highest concentration (4 mg/mL) per sample was self-cleaved much faster than the lower concentration (0.1 mg/mL), supporting an intermolecular mechanism of auto-proteolysis that is distinct to the reported intramolecular mechanism for other CD97 isoforms. N-glycosylation affected the auto-proteolysis of CD97 EGF1-5 isoform in a similar way as the other previously reported CD97 isoforms. SAXS data for WT and deglycosylated CD97ECD revealed a spatula-like shape with GAIN and EGF domains constituting the body and handle, respectively. Structural modeling indicated a potential interaction

  7. Branched-chain amino acids and arginine supplementation attenuates skeletal muscle proteolysis induced by moderate exercise in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Mizuno, M; Mizuno, T; Dilling-Hansen, B; Lahoz, A; Bertelsen, V; Münster, H; Jordening, H; Hamada, K; Doi, T

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of a single oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) with Arg on skeletal muscle protein metabolism during moderate exercise in young individuals. Eight healthy volunteers (4 males and 4 females, means +/- SEM, 26 +/- 1 yrs, 177.8 +/- 3.7 cm, 72.6 +/- 3.9 kg) were studied in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial. The subjects performed 3 bouts of 20-min cycling exercise (5-min break between each bout) at 126 +/- 13 W corresponding to 50 % of the maximal work intensity. A single oral supplement of either a BCAA drink containing 2 g of BCAA and 0.5 g of Arg or an isocaloric placebo drink was given at 10 min of the 1st exercise bout. Both arterial and venous blood samples were simultaneously taken from the radial artery and the femoral vein, respectively. Blood flow in the femoral artery was determined using the ultrasound Doppler technique. The blood sampling and blood flow measurements were performed at rest, every 10 min during each exercise bout. Net balance of BCAA and Phe across the leg muscles were measured by the arteriovenous difference method. The BCAA ingestion resulted in increases in both the plasma BCAA concentration and BCAA uptake into the working leg. The Phe release from the leg during exercise significantly increased as compared to the basal level in the placebo trial (0.97 +/- 0.28 vs. 0.23 +/- 0.22 micromol/min, p < 0.05). In the BCAA trial, the cumulative Phe release from the leg during the 3rd exercise bout was significantly lower than that in the placebo trial (5.0 +/- 7.4 vs. 35.9 +/- 13.2 micromol/25 min, p < 0.05). These results suggest that endurance exercise at moderate intensity enhances proteolysis in working muscles, and a single oral intake of 2 g of BCAA with Arg at onset of exercise effectively suppresses exercise-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis.

  8. Proteolysis, fermentation efficiency, and in vitro ruminal digestion of peanut stover ensiled with raw or heated corn.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-M J

    2005-08-01

    Peanut stover (PS) is similar to full-bloom alfalfa hay in chemical composition. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of adding raw or heated corn meal to PS at ensiling on silage N components, fermentation acids, and digestion by ruminal microorganisms. The PS was collected after harvesting of peanuts and ensiled immediately without and with addition of raw or heated corn meal (100 g/kg of fresh weight). Corn was added to PS so that the initial mixture would contain adequate dry matter (DM) (approximately 30%) and additional nonfiber carbohydrate to enhance silage fermentation. After 8 wk of silo fermentation, corn-treated silages contained less structural carbohydrates but more non-fiber carbohydrates compared with the untreated control. A shift from hemicellulose to nonfiber carbohydrate use during silage fermentation was evident by corn treatment. Additional corn at ensiling resulted in silage N with less water-soluble N, protein N, nonprotein N, nonprotein nonammonia N (peptides plus amino acids), and ammonia N. Based on changes in soluble nonprotein N before and after ensiling, the amount of proteolysis was approximately 66% for control silage and was nearly 40% lower in response to corn treatment. Adding corn increased silage lactic acid, but both acetic and propionic acids decreased. These changes were reflected in the lower pH and higher fermentation efficiency with corn-treated silages. More DM was digested and greater amounts of volatile fatty acids, except for branched-chain acids, were produced in vitro by ruminal microorganisms with corn-treated silages. In addition, incubations with silage treated with heated corn contained higher concentrations of acetic and propionic acids compared with raw corn. In vitro ammonia accumulation per unit of DM digested was lower for corn treatments than the control, and for heated corn vs. raw corn-treated silage. These results indicate that supplementation of either raw or heated corn on PS at

  9. Analysis of the extreme diversity of salivary alpha-amylase isoforms generated by physiological proteolysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Punyadeera, Chamindie; Cooper-White, Justin J; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2012-12-12

    Saliva is a crucial biofluid for oral health and is also of increasing importance as a non-invasive source of disease biomarkers. Salivary alpha-amylase is an abundant protein in saliva, and changes in amylase expression have been previously associated with a variety of diseases and conditions. Salivary alpha-amylase is subject to a high diversity of post-translational modifications, including physiological proteolysis in the oral cavity. Here we developed methodology for rapid sample preparation and non-targeted LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of saliva from healthy subjects and observed an extreme diversity of alpha-amylase proteolytic isoforms. Our results emphasize the importance of consideration of post-translational events such as proteolysis in proteomic studies, biomarker discovery and validation, particularly in saliva.

  10. Advances in nanomaterial-based microwaves and infrared wave-assisted tryptic digestion for ultrafast proteolysis and rapid detection by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical/chemical properties of nanomaterials have significant impacts in electromagnetic waves (microwave and infrared waves)-assisted tryptic digestion approaches by using them as heat absorbers to expedite digestion and as affinity probes to enrich digested proteins prior to MALDI-MS analysis. We review recent developments in electromagnetic waves (microwaves and infrared waves)-assisted proteolysis using nanomaterials as heat absorbers and as affinity probes for analysis of digested proteins in MALDI-MS. New trends in ultrafast proteolysis (nonphosphoproteins- lysozyme, cytochrome c, myoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA); phosphoproteins- α- and β- caseins) using nanomaterials based microwaves and infrared (IR) waves assisted digestion approaches for rapid identification of digested proteins in the MALDI-MS.

  11. Prediction of exposure degree diagram and sites of limited proteolysis in globular proteins as an approach to computer-aided design of protein bioregulators with prolonged action.

    PubMed

    Rodionov, M A; Galaktionov, S G; Akhrem, A A

    1987-11-02

    In order to prolong the lifetime of protein bioregulators in blood it is possible to engineer analogs with protected sites of limited proteolysis. To determine the sites, primarily accessible to trypsin-like proteases, a computer procedure has been developed, including a prediction algorithm, to produce the residue diagram of a globular protein and a discriminant algorithm to determine the sites most liable to proteolysis. The accuracy of prediction of amino acid residue exposure is characterised by correlation coefficients between experimental and theoretical exposure values, the coefficients being about 0.7 as calculated for 10 globular proteins. The classification of Arg and Lys residues into two groups, susceptible or insusceptible to protease, has an error percentage of about 25.

  12. GSK-3β Targets Cdc25A for Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteolysis and GSK-3β Inactivation Correlates with Cdc25A Overproduction in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tiebang; Wei, Yongkun; Chiang, Yu-Chi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Hung, Mien-Chie; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Summary The Cdc25A phosphatase positively regulates cell cycle transitions; is degraded by the proteosome throughout interphase and in response to stress; and is overproduced in human cancers. The kinases targeting Cdc25A for proteolysis during early cell cycle phases have not been identified and mechanistic insight into the cause of Cdc25A overproduction in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) phosphorylates Cdc25A to promote its proteolysis in early cell cycle phases. Phosphorylation by GSK-3β requires priming of Cdc25A and this can be catalyzed by polo-like kinase 3 (Plk-3). Importantly, a strong correlation between Cdc25A overproduction and GSK-3β inactivation was observed in human tumor tissues indicating that GSK-3β inactivation may account for Cdc25A overproduction in a subset of human tumors. PMID:18167338

  13. Lon-Mediated Proteolysis of the FeoC Protein Prevents Salmonella enterica from Accumulating the Fe(II) Transporter FeoB under High-Oxygen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunkeun; Lee, Hwiseop

    2014-01-01

    The Salmonella Feo system consists of the FeoA, FeoB, and FeoC proteins and mediates ferrous iron [Fe(II)] import. FeoB is an inner membrane protein that, along with contributions from two small hydrophilic proteins, FeoA and FeoC, transports Fe(II). We previously reported that FeoC binds to and protects the FeoB transporter from FtsH-mediated proteolysis. In the present study, we report proteolytic regulation of FeoC that occurs in an oxygen-dependent fashion. While relatively stable under low-oxygen conditions, FeoC was rapidly degraded by the Lon protease under high-oxygen conditions. The putative Fe-S cluster of FeoC seemed to function as an oxygen sensor to control FeoC stability, as evidenced by the finding that mutation of the putative Fe-S cluster-binding site greatly increased FeoC stability under high-oxygen conditions. Salmonella ectopically expressing the feoB and feoC genes was able to accumulate FeoB and FeoC only under low-oxygen conditions, suggesting that FeoC proteolysis prevents Salmonella from accumulating the FeoB transporter under high-oxygen conditions. Finally, we propose that Lon-mediated FeoC proteolysis followed by FtsH-mediated FeoB proteolysis helps Salmonella to avoid uncontrolled Fe(II) uptake during the radical environmental changes encountered when shifting from low-iron anaerobic conditions to high-iron aerobic conditions. PMID:25313398

  14. Combinatory use of cell-free protein expression, limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry for the high-throughput protein domain identification.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Chen, Siyuan; Ge, Heng

    2014-02-21

    The structural domains of proteins have often been identified through the use of limited proteolysis. In structural genomics studies, it is necessary to carry this out in a high-throughput manner. Here, we constructed a novel high-throughput system, which consists of cell-free protein expression and one-step affinity purification, followed by limited proteolysis using a unique new method, referred to "on beads method". All these steps were carried out on 96-well plate formats and completed in two days, even by manual handling. The merits of the new method versus the conventional one are as follows: (1) experimental times are reduced, (2) the sample preparation for limited proteolysis experiments is simplified, and (3) both protein purification and limited digestion can be performed "in situ" on the same sample plate. This preparation method is therefore suitable for highly automated, proteolytic analyses coupled to mass spectrometry techniques at a micro-scale protein expression level. The resulting protease-resistant fragments were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS and protein domains of 34 mouse cDNA products were identified with this system.

  15. Mildly Acidic Conditions Eliminate Deamidation Artifact during Proteolysis: Digestion with Endoprotease Glu-C at pH 4.5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanshan; Moulton, Kevin Ryan; Auclair, Jared Robert; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Common yet often overlooked, deamidation of peptidyl asparagine (Asn or N) generates aspartic acid (Asp or D) or isoaspartic acid (isoAsp or isoD). Being a spontaneous, non-enzymatic protein post-translational modification, deamidation artifact can be easily introduced during sample preparation, especially proteolysis where higher-order structures are removed. This artifact not only complicates the analysis of bona fide deamidation but also affects a wide range of chemical and enzymatic processes; for instance, the newly generated Asp and isoAsp residues may block or introduce new proteolytic sites, and also convert one Asn peptide into multiple species that affect quantification. While the neutral to mildly basic conditions for common proteolysis favor deamidation, mildly acidic conditions markedly slow down the process. Unlike other commonly used endoproteases, Glu-C remains active under mildly acid conditions. As such, as demonstrated herein, deamidation artifact during proteolysis was effectively eliminated by simply performing Glu-C digestion at pH 4.5 in ammonium acetate, a volatile buffer that is compatible with mass spectrometry. Moreover, nearly identical sequence specificity was observed at both pH’s (8.0 for ammonium bicarbonate), rendering Glu-C as effective at pH 4.5. In summary, this method is generally applicable for protein analysis as it requires minimal sample preparation and uses the readily available Glu-C protease. PMID:26748652

  16. Effect of curd washing level on proteolysis and functionality of low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with galactose-fermenting culture.

    PubMed

    Osaili, Tareq M; Ayyash, Mutamed M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Shaker, Reyad R; Shah, Nagendra P

    2010-06-01

    The effect of curd washing on functional properties of low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with galactose-fermenting culture was investigated. A total of 4 curd washing levels (0%, 10%, 25%, 50% wt/wt) were used during low-moisture mozzarella cheese manufacture, and cheeses were stored for 63 d at 4 degrees C and the influence of curd washing on proteolysis and functionality of low-moisture mozzarella cheese were examined. Curd washing had a significant effect on moisture and ash contents. In general, moisture contents increased and ash contents decreased with increased curd washing levels. Low-moisture mozzarella cheese made with 10% curd washing levels showed higher proteolysis, meltability, and stretchability during storage than other experimental cheeses. In general, galactose contents decreased during storage; however, cheeses made with 25% and 50% curd washing levels had lower galactose contents than those with control or 10%. L-values (browning) decreased and proteolysis increased in low-moisture mozzarella cheeses during storage.

  17. Changes of proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheese as affected by adjunct culture and ripening temperature.

    PubMed

    Sahingil, Didem; Hayaloglu, Ali A; Kirmaci, Huseyin A; Ozer, Barbaros; Simsek, Osman

    2014-11-01

    The effects of use of adjunct cultures (Lactobacillus helveticus and Lb. casei) and ripening temperatures (6 or 12 °C) on proteolysis and angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in white-brined cheeses were investigated during 120 d ripening. Proteolysis was monitored by urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (urea-PAGE) and reversed phase-HPLC (RP-HPLC) of water-insoluble and -soluble fractions of the cheeses, respectively. Urea-PAGE patterns of the samples revealed that the intensities of the bands representing casein fractions decreased in the experimental cheeses, being more pronounced in the cheeses made with adjunct cultures. Similarly, peptide profiles and the concentrations of individual and total free amino acids were influenced by both the adjunct cultures and ripening temperatures. The ACE-inhibitory activity of the water-soluble extracts of the cheeses were higher in the cheeses made using adjunct cultures (especially Lb. helveticus) and ripened at 12 °C. The ACE-inhibitory activity did not decrease during ripening. The contribution of Lb. helveticus to the development of proteolysis and ACE-inhibitory peptide activities were higher than that of Lb. casei. To conclude, the use of Lb. helveticus as adjunct culture in white-brined cheese and ripening at 12 °C would be recommended to obtain white-brined cheese with high ACE-I-inhibitory peptides activity and higher levels of preoteolysis.

  18. Proteolysis and sensory properties of dry-cured bacon as affected by the partial substitution of sodium chloride with potassium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haizhou; Zhang, Yingyang; Long, Men; Tang, Jing; Yu, Xiang; Wang, Jiamei; Zhang, Jianhao

    2014-03-01

    Quadriceps femoris muscle samples (48) from 24 pigs were processed into dry-cured bacon. This study investigated the influence of partial substitution of sodium chloride (NaCl) with potassium chloride (KCl) on proteolysis and sensory properties of dry-cured bacon. Three salt treatments were considered, namely, I (100% NaCl), II (60% NaCl, 40% KCl), and III (30% NaCl, 70% KCl). No significant differences were observed among treatments in the proteolysis, which was reflected by SDS-PAGE, proteolysis index, amino acid nitrogen, and peptide nitrogen contents. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the moisture content between control and treatment II, whereas the moisture content in treatment III was significantly higher (p<0.05) in comparison with control (treatment I). The sensory analysis indicated that it was possible to reduce NaCl by 40% without adverse effects on sensory properties, but 70% replacement of NaCl with KCl resulted in bacon with less hardness and saltiness and higher (p<0.05) juiciness and bitterness.

  19. YjbH-Enhanced Proteolysis of Spx by ClpXP in Bacillus subtilis Is Inhibited by the Small Protein YirB (YuzO)▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kommineni, Sushma; Garg, Saurabh K.; Chan, Chio Mui; Zuber, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Spx protein of Bacillus subtilis is a global regulator of the oxidative stress response. Spx concentration is controlled at the level of proteolysis by the ATP-dependent protease ClpXP and a substrate-binding protein, YjbH, which interacts with Spx. A yeast two-hybrid screen was carried out using yjbH as bait to uncover additional substrates or regulators of YjbH activity. Of the several genes identified in the screen, one encoded a small protein, YirB (YuzO), which elevated Spx concentration and activity in vivo when overproduced from an isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible yirB construct. Pulldown experiments using extracts of B. subtilis cells producing a His-tagged YirB showed that native YjbH interacts with YirB in B. subtilis. Pulldown experiments using affinity-tagged Spx showed that YirB inhibited YjbH interaction with Spx. In vitro, YjbH-mediated proteolysis of Spx by ClpXP was inhibited by YirB. The activity of YirB is similar to that of the antiadaptor proteins that were previously shown to reduce proteolysis of a specific ClpXP substrate by interacting with a substrate-binding protein. PMID:21378193

  20. Effect of proteolysis and calcium equilibrium on functional properties of natural cheddar cheese during ripening and the resultant processed cheese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoying; Luo, Jie; Guo, Huiyuan; Zeng, Steve S; Ren, Fazheng

    2011-04-01

    The changes in proteolysis, calcium (Ca) equilibrium, and functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses during ripening and the resultant processed cheeses were investigated. For natural Cheddar cheeses, the majority of the changes in pH 4.6 soluble nitrogen as a percentage of total nitrogen (pH 4.6 SN/TN) and the soluble Ca content occurred in the first 90 d of ripening, and subsequently, the changes were slight. During ripening, functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses changed, that is, hardness decreased, meltability was improved, storage modulus at 70 °C (G'T=70) decreased, and the maximum tan delta (TDmax) increased. Both pH 4.6 SN/TN and the soluble Ca were correlated with changes in functional properties of natural Cheddar cheeses during ripening. Kendall's partial correlation analysis indicated that pH 4.6 SN/TN was more significantly correlated with changes in hardness and TDmax. For processed cheeses manufactured from natural Cheddar cheeses with different ripening times, the soluble Ca content did not show significant difference, and the trends of changes in hardness, meltability, G'T=70, and TDmax were similar to those of natural Cheddar cheeses. Kendall's partial correlation analysis suggested that only pH 4.6 SN/TN was significantly correlated with the changes in functional properties of processed cheeses.

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptor protects proliferating cell nuclear antigen from cullin 4A protein-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yuan-Hung; Ho, Po-Chun; Wang, Shao-Chun

    2012-08-03

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component for DNA synthesis upon growth stimulation. It has been shown that phosphorylation of PCNA at Tyr-211 by the EGF receptor (EGFR) protects PCNA from polyubiquitylation and degradation, whereas blocking phosphorylation induces ubiquitylation-mediated degradation of the chromatin-bound, but not the -unbound, PCNA, and suppresses cell proliferation. However, the ubiquitin E3 ligase linking growth signaling to the proteolysis of PCNA and the underlying regulatory mechanism remain to be identified. Here we show that, in the absence of Tyr-211 phosphorylation, PCNA is subject to polyubiquitylation at Lys-164 by the CUL4A E3 ligase, resulting in the degradation of PCNA. Mutation of Lys-164 to arginine prevents PCNA ubiquitylation and rescues the degradation of the K164R/Y211F PCNA double mutant. Activation of EGFR inhibits the interaction of PCNA with CUL4A, whereas inhibition of EGFR leads to increased CUL4A-PCNA interaction and CUL4A-dependent ubiquitin-mediated degradation of PCNA. Substitution of endogenous PCNA with the Y211F mutant PCNA conveys enhanced sensitization to EGFR inhibition. Our findings identify CUL4A as the ubiquitin ligase linking the down-regulation of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase to the nuclear DNA replication machinery in cancer cells.

  2. The proteolysis of mitotic cyclins in mammalian cells persists from the end of mitosis until the onset of S phase.

    PubMed Central

    Brandeis, M; Hunt, T

    1996-01-01

    We have studied how the cell cycle-specific oscillations of mitotic B-type cyclins are generated in mouse fibroblasts. A reporter enzyme comprising the N-terminus of a B-type cyclin fused to bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) was degraded at the end of mitosis like endogenous cyclins. Point mutations in the destruction box of this construct completely abolished its mitotic instability. When the destructible reporter was driven by the cyclin B2 promoter, CAT activity mimicked the oscillations in the level of the endogenous cyclin B2. These oscillations were largely conserved when the reporter was transcribed constitutively from the SV40 promoter. Pulse-chase experiments or addition of the proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and ALLN showed that cyclin synthesis continued after the end of mitosis. The destruction box-specific degradation of cyclins normally ceases at the onset of S phase, and is active in fibroblasts arrested in G0 and in differentiated C2 myoblasts. We were able to reproduce this proteolysis in vitro in extracts of synchronized cells. Extracts of G1 cells degraded cyclin B1 whereas p27Kip1 was stable, in contrast, cyclin B1 remained stable and p27Kip1 was degraded in extracts of S phase cells. Images PMID:8895573

  3. Selective Oma1 Protease-mediated Proteolysis of Cox1 Subunit of Cytochrome Oxidase in Assembly Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Jeong, Mi-Young; Watts, Talina; Ferris, Elliott; Winge, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    Stalled biogenesis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) complex results in degradation of subunits containing redox cofactors. The conserved Oma1 metalloproteinase mediates facile Cox1 degradation in cells lacking the Coa2 assembly factor, but not in a series of other mutants stalled in CcO maturation. Oma1 is activated in coa2Δ cells, but the selective Cox1 degradation does not arise merely from its activation. Oma1 is also active in cells with dysfunctional mitochondria and cox11Δ cells impaired in CcO maturation, but this activation does not result in Oma1-mediated Cox1 degradation. The facile and selective degradation of Cox1 in coa2Δ cells, relative to other CcO assembly mutants, is likely due to impaired hemylation and subsequent misfolding of the subunit. Specific Cox1 proteolysis in coa2Δ cells arises from a combination of Oma1 activation and a susceptible conformation of Cox1. PMID:22219186

  4. Enhancement of myofibrillar proteolysis following infusion of amino acid mixture correlates positively with elevation of core body temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Ippei; Mikura, Mayumi; Nishimura, Masuhiro; Doi, Masako; Kawano, Yuichi; Nakayama, Mitsuo

    2008-12-01

    Administration of an amino acid (AA) mixture stimulates muscle protein synthesis and elevates core body temperature (T(b)), as characteristically found under anesthetic conditions. We tested the hypothesis that not only AA given, but also AA produced by degradation of endogenous muscular protein are provided for muscle protein synthesis, which is further reflected in T(b) modifications. Rats were intravenously administered an AA mixture or saline in combination with the anesthetic propofol or lipid emulsion. We measured plasma 3-methylhistidine (MeHis) concentrations as an index of myofibrillar protein degradation, rectal temperature and mRNA expression of atrogin-1, MuRF-1 and ubiquitin in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of rats following 3 h infusion of test solutions. T(b) did not differ significantly between conscious groups, but was higher in the AA group than in the saline group among anesthetized rats. Plasma MeHis concentrations were higher in the AA group than in the saline group under both conditions. Plasma MeHis levels correlated positively with T(b) of rats under both conditions. AA administration decreased mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and ubiquitin in gastrocnemius muscle and all mRNA levels in soleus muscle. These results suggest that AA administration enhances myofibrillar protein degradation and that the change is a determinant of T(b) modification by AA administration. However, the mechanisms underlying AA administration-associated enhancement of myofibrillar proteolysis remains yet to be determined.

  5. Sustained Induction of Collagen Synthesis by TGF-β Requires Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis of CREB3L1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyue; Lee, Ching-En; Denard, Bray; Ye, Jin

    2014-01-01

    CREB3L1 (cAMP response element binding protein 3-like 1), a transcription factor synthesized as a membrane-bound precursor and activated through Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP), is essential for collagen production by osteoblasts during bone development. Here, we show that TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β), a cytokine known to stimulate production of collagen during wound healing and fibrotic diseases, induces proteolytic activation of CREB3L1 in human A549 cells. This activation results from inhibition of expression of TM4SF20 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 20), which normally inhibits RIP of CREB3L1. Cleavage of CREB3L1 releases its NH2-terminal domain from membranes, allowing it to enter the nucleus where it binds to Smad4 to activate transcription of genes encoding proteins required for assembly of collagen-containing extracellular matrix. Our findings raise the possibility that inhibition of RIP of CREB3L1 could prevent excess deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic diseases. PMID:25310401

  6. Hyperosmotic Shock Engages Two Positive Feedback Loops through Caspase-3-dependent Proteolysis of JNK1-2 and Bid*

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jicheng; Ben Messaoud, Nabil; López, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperosmotic shock induces early calpain activation, Smac/DIABLO release from the mitochondria, and p38/JNK activation in Xenopus oocytes. These pathways regulate late cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Here, we show that JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 are activated early by osmostress, and sustained activation of both isoforms accelerates the apoptotic program. When caspase-3 is activated, JNK1-2 is proteolyzed at Asp-385 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity, thereby creating a positive feedback loop. Expression of Bcl-xL markedly reduces hyperosmotic shock-induced apoptosis. In contrast, expression of Bid induces rapid caspase-3 activation, even in the absence of osmostress, which is blocked by Bcl-xL co-expression. In these conditions a significant amount of Bid in the cytosol is mono- and bi-ubiquitinated. Caspase-3 activation by hyperosmotic shock induces proteolysis of Bid and mono-ubiquitinated Bid at Asp-52 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation, and thus creating a second positive feedback loop. Revealing the JNK isoforms and the loops activated by osmostress could help to design better treatments for human diseases caused by perturbations in fluid osmolarity. PMID:26511318

  7. Glutathione peroxidase 3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppresses non-enzymatic proteolysis of glutamine synthetase in an activity-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Phil Young; Kho, Chang Won; Lee, Do Hee; Kang, Sunghyun; Kang, Seongman; Lee, Sang Chul; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Park, Sung Goo

    2007-10-19

    Glutathione peroxidase 3 (Gpx3) is ubiquitously expressed and is important antioxidant enzyme in yeast. It modulates the activities of redox-sensitive thiol proteins, particularly those involved in signal transduction pathway and protein translocation. Through immunoprecipitation/two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IP-2DE), MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and a pull down assay, we found glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) as a candidate interacting protein with Gpx3. GS is a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism and ammonium assimilation. It has been known that GS is non-enzymatically cleaved by ROS generated by MFO (thiol/ Fe(3+)/O(2) mixed-function oxidase) system. In this study, it is demonstrated that GS interacts with Gpx3 through its catalytic domain both in vivo and in vitro regardless of redox state. In addition, Gpx3 helps to protect GS from inactivation and degradation via oxidative stress in an activity-independent manner. Based on the results, it is suggested that Gpx3 protects GS from non-enzymatic proteolysis, thereby contributing to cell homeostasis when cell is exposed to oxidative stress.

  8. In situ proteolysis, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a VHH that binds listeria internalin B.

    PubMed

    Huh, Ian; Gene, Robert; Kumaran, Jyothi; MacKenzie, C Roger; Brooks, Cory L

    2014-11-01

    The variable region of camelid heavy-chain antibodies produces the smallest known antibody fragment with antigen-binding capability (a VHH). The VHH R303 binds internalin B (InlB), a virulence factor expressed by the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. InlB is critical for initiation of Listeria infection, as it binds a receptor (c-Met) on epithelial cells, triggering the entry of bacteria into host cells. InlB is surface-exposed and is required for virulence, hence a VHH targeting InlB has potential applications for pathogen detection or therapeutic intervention. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction of R303 are reported. Crystals of R303 were obtained following in situ proteolysis with trypsin. Gel filtration and SDS-PAGE revealed that trypsin removed the C-terminal tag region of R303, facilitating crystal formation. Crystals of R303 diffracted to 1.3 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=46.4, b=31.2, c=74.8 Å, β=93.8°. The crystals exhibited a Matthews coefficient of 1.95 Å3 Da(-1) with two molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  9. The ETS protein MEF is regulated by phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis via the protein-ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hedvat, Cyrus V; Mao, Shifeng; Zhu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Jinjuan; Nguyen, Hoang; Koff, Andrew; Nimer, Stephen D

    2006-04-01

    MEF is an ETS-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activating activity that affects hematopoietic stem cell behavior and is required for normal NK cell and NK T-cell development. The MEF (also known as ELF4) gene is repressed by several leukemia-associated fusion transcription factor proteins (PML-retinoic acid receptor alpha and AML1-ETO), but it is also activated by retroviral insertion in several cancer models. We have previously shown that cyclin A-dependent phosphorylation of MEF largely restricts its activity to the G(1) phase of the cell cycle; we now show that MEF is a short-lived protein whose expression level also peaks during late G(1) phase. Mutagenesis studies show that the rapid turnover of MEF in S phase is dependent on the specific phosphorylation of threonine 643 and serine 648 at the C terminus of MEF by cdk2 and on the Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex SCF(Skp2), which targets MEF for ubiquitination and proteolysis. Overexpression of MEF drives cells through the G(1)/S transition, thereby promoting cell proliferation. The tight regulation of MEF levels during the cell cycle contributes to its effects on regulating cell cycle entry and cell proliferation.

  10. Proteolysis of chloroplast proteins is responsible for accumulation of free amino acids in dark-treated tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiyong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Sihua; Zeng, Lanting; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2017-03-22

    Shade management (dark treatment) on tea (Camellia sinensis) plants is a common approach to improve free amino acids in raw materials of tea leaves. However, the reason for amino acid accumulation in dark-treated tea leaves is still unknown. In the present study, dark treatment significantly increased content of free amino acids and reduced content of soluble proteins in tea leaves. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed that most enzymes involved in biosyntheses of amino acids were down-accumulated by dark treatment. Chloroplast numbers reduced in dark-treated leaves and the content of soluble proteins reduced in the chloroplasts isolated from dark-treated leaves compared to control. These suggest that proteolysis of chloroplast proteins contributed to amino acid accumulation in dark-treated leaves. Two chloroplasts proteases, ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit 3 and protease Do-like 2, were up-accumulated in dark-treated leaves. This study firstly elucidated the mechanism of accumulation of amino acids in dark-treated tea leaves.

  11. A Brucella spp. Protease Inhibitor Limits Antigen Lysosomal Proteolysis, Increases Cross-Presentation, and Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Tkach, Mercedes; Sabbione, Florencia; Bruno, Laura; Carabajal, Marianela V; Berguer, Paula M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Schillaci, Roxana; Trevani, Analía S; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the unlipidated (U) outer membrane protein (Omp) 19 from Brucella spp. is a competitive inhibitor of human cathepsin L. U-Omp19 inhibits lysosome cathepsins and APC-derived microsome activity in vitro and partially inhibits lysosomal cathepsin L activity within live APCs. Codelivery of U-Omp19 with the Ag can reduce intracellular Ag digestion and increases Ag half-life in dendritic cells (DCs). U-Omp19 retains the Ag in Lamp-2(+) compartments after its internalization and promotes a sustained expression of MHC class I/peptide complexes in the cell surface of DCs. Consequently, U-Omp19 enhances Ag cross-presentation by DCs to CD8(+) T cells. U-Omp19 s.c. delivery induces the recruitment of CD11c(+)CD8α(+) DCs and monocytes to lymph nodes whereas it partially limits in vivo Ag proteolysis inside DCs. Accordingly, this protein is able to induce CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo against codelivered Ag. Antitumor responses were elicited after U-Omp19 coadministration, increasing survival of mice in a murine melanoma challenge model. Collectively, these results indicate that a cysteine protease inhibitor from bacterial origin could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against tumors.

  12. Hyperosmotic Shock Engages Two Positive Feedback Loops through Caspase-3-dependent Proteolysis of JNK1-2 and Bid.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jicheng; Ben Messaoud, Nabil; López, José M

    2015-12-18

    Hyperosmotic shock induces early calpain activation, Smac/DIABLO release from the mitochondria, and p38/JNK activation in Xenopus oocytes. These pathways regulate late cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Here, we show that JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 are activated early by osmostress, and sustained activation of both isoforms accelerates the apoptotic program. When caspase-3 is activated, JNK1-2 is proteolyzed at Asp-385 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activity, thereby creating a positive feedback loop. Expression of Bcl-xL markedly reduces hyperosmotic shock-induced apoptosis. In contrast, expression of Bid induces rapid caspase-3 activation, even in the absence of osmostress, which is blocked by Bcl-xL co-expression. In these conditions a significant amount of Bid in the cytosol is mono- and bi-ubiquitinated. Caspase-3 activation by hyperosmotic shock induces proteolysis of Bid and mono-ubiquitinated Bid at Asp-52 increasing the release of cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation, and thus creating a second positive feedback loop. Revealing the JNK isoforms and the loops activated by osmostress could help to design better treatments for human diseases caused by perturbations in fluid osmolarity.

  13. Effect of high pressure homogenisation of milk on cheese yield and microbiology, lipolysis and proteolysis during ripening of Caciotta cheese.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, Rosalba; Vannini, Lucia; Patrignani, Francesca; Iucci, Luciana; Vallicelli, Melania; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    The principal aim of this work was to compare Caciotta cheeses obtained from cow milk previously subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH) at 100 MPa with those produced from raw (R) or heat-treated (P) cow milk. HPH had both direct and indirect effects on cheese characteristics and their evolution during ripening. In particular, HPH treatment of milk induced a significant increase of the cheese yield; moreover, it affected the microbial ecology of both curd and cheese. Compared with the thermal treatment, the HPH treatment resulted in a decrease of about one log cfu/g of yeast and lactobacilli cell loads of the curd. The initial milk treatment also affected the evolution over time and the levels attained at the end of ripening of all the microbial groups studied. In fact, lactobacilli, microstaphylococci and yeast cell loads remained at lower levels in the cheeses obtained from HPH milk with respect to the other cheese types over the whole ripening period. Moreover, HPH of milk induced marked and extensive lipolysis. Cheeses from HPH milk showed the presence of high amounts of free fatty acids immediately after brining. The electrophoretic patterns of the different cheese types showed that Caciotta made from HPH-treated milk was characterized by a more extensive and faster proteolysis as well as a significant modification of its volatile molecule profile. The results obtained and the sensory analysis indicated that HPH treatment of milk was able to differentiate Caciotta cheese or to modify its ripening patterns.

  14. Regulated proteolysis of Trop2 drives epithelial hyperplasia and stem cell self-renewal via β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Goldstein, Andrew S; Cai, Houjian; Drake, Justin M; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2012-10-15

    The cell surface protein Trop2 is expressed on immature stem/progenitor-like cells and is overexpressed in many epithelial cancers. However the biological function of Trop2 in tissue maintenance and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that Trop2 is a regulator of self-renewal, proliferation, and transformation. Trop2 controls these processes through a mechanism of regulated intramembrane proteolysis that leads to cleavage of Trop2, creating two products: the extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. The intracellular domain of Trop2 is released from the membrane and accumulates in the nucleus. Heightened expression of the Trop2 intracellular domain promotes stem/progenitor self-renewal through signaling via β-catenin and is sufficient to initiate precursor lesions to prostate cancer in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrate that loss of β-catenin or Trop2 loss-of-function cleavage mutants abrogates Trop2-driven self-renewal and hyperplasia in the prostate. These findings suggest that heightened expression of Trop2 is selected for in epithelial cancers to enhance the stem-like properties of self-renewal and proliferation. Defining the mechanism of Trop2 function in self-renewal and transformation is essential to identify new therapeutic strategies to block Trop2 activation in cancer.

  15. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  16. Effect of limited proteolysis in the 8th loop of the barrel and of antibodies on porcine pancreas amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, V; Payan, F; Ajandouz, E H; Svensson, B; Haser, R; Marchis-Mouren, G

    1991-11-15

    The porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase is a (beta/alpha)8-barrel protein, containing domains A and B (peptide sequence 1-403) and a distinct C-domain (peptide sequence 404-496). Separation of the terminal C-domain from the A and B domains has been attempted by limited proteolysis in the hinge region. Subtilisin was found to hydrolyse amylase between residues 369 and 370 situated in the loop between the eighth beta-strand and alpha-helix. The cleaved amylase was isolated by chromatofocusing and found to retain about 60% of the activity of the native enzyme, while the isolated fragments were inactive. Antigen binding fragments prepared from polyclonal antibodies to native amylase and the CNBr-fragment P1 (peptide sequence 395-496) respectively, were tested for influence on the enzyme activity. Antibodies directed against P1 had no effect whereas antibodies against the peptide sequence 1-394 and amylase respectively inhibited hydrolysis of substrates having four or more glucose residues but not of shorter oligomaltosides. Crystallographic analysis revealed that changes in the region of residue 369 might affect the conformation of the active site as well as of a second binding site. This site, located on the enzyme surface, is proposed to be required for the hydrolysis of larger substrates.

  17. Therapeutic effects of remediating autophagy failure in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease by enhancing lysosomal proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Wesson, Daniel W; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Yang, Austin J; Wilson, Donald A; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M; Nixon, Ralph A

    2011-07-01

    The extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain has revealed a major defect: in the proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates. Autophagy failure contributes on several levels to AD pathogenesis and has become an important therapeutic target for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We recently observed broad therapeutic effects of stimulating autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD that exhibits defective proteolytic clearance of autophagic substrates, robust intralysosomal amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular β-amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits. By genetically deleting the lysosomal cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin B (CstB), to selectively restore depressed cathepsin activities, we substantially cleared Aβ, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates from autolysosomes/lysosomes and rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, as well as reduced total Aβ40/42 levels and extracellular amyloid deposition, highlighting the underappreciated importance of the lysosomal system for Aβ clearance. Most importantly, lysosomal remediation prevented the marked learning and memory deficits in TgCRND8 mice. Our findings underscore the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in AD and demonstrate the value of reversing this dysfunction as an innovative therapeautic strategy for AD.

  18. Limited Proteolysis Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling Reveals Conformational Changes in Protein (Pseudo)kinases upon Binding Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Michela; Stes, Elisabeth; Vandermarliere, Elien; Arora, Rohit; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; van Heerde, Erika; Zubarev, Roman; Bonnet, Pascal; Linders, Joannes T M; Jacoby, Edgar; Brehmer, Dirk; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-10-02

    Likely due to conformational rearrangements, small molecule inhibitors may stabilize the active conformation of protein kinases and paradoxically promote tumorigenesis. We combined limited proteolysis with stable isotope labeling MS to monitor protein conformational changes upon binding of small molecules. Applying this method to the human serine/threonine kinase B-Raf, frequently mutated in cancer, we found that binding of ATP or its nonhydrolyzable analogue AMP-PNP, but not ADP, stabilized the structure of both B-Raf(WT) and B-Raf(V600E). The ATP-competitive type I B-Raf inhibitor vemurafenib and the type II inhibitor sorafenib stabilized the kinase domain (KD) but had distinct effects on the Ras-binding domain. Stabilization of the B-Raf(WT) KD was confirmed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results are further supported by cellular assays in which we assessed cell viability and phosphorylation profiles in cells expressing B-Raf(WT) or B-Raf(V600E) in response to vemurafenib or sorafenib. Our data indicate that an overall stabilization of the B-Raf structure by specific inhibitors activates MAPK signaling and increases cell survival, helping to explain clinical treatment failure. We also applied our method to monitor conformational changes upon nucleotide binding of the pseudokinase KSR1, which holds high potential for inhibition in human diseases.

  19. Secretion and Proteolysis of Heterologous Proteins Fused to the Escherichia coli Maltose Binding Protein in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguo; Leung, Wilson; Yon, Amy; Nguyen, John; Perez, Vincent C.; Vu, Jane; Giang, William; Luong, Linda T.; Phan, Tracy; Salazar, Katherine A.; Gomez, Seth R.; Au, Colin; Xiang, Fan; Thomas, David W.; Franz, Andreas H.; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P.

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP) has been utilized as a translational fusion partner to improve the expression of foreign proteins made in E. coli. When located N-terminal to its cargo protein, MBP increases the solubility of intracellular proteins and improves the export of secreted proteins in bacterial systems. We initially explored whether MBP would have the same effect in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, a popular eukaryotic host for heterologous protein expression. When MBP was fused as an N-terminal partner to several C-terminal cargo proteins expressed in this yeast, proteolysis occurred between the two peptides, and MBP reached the extracellular region unattached to its cargo. However, in two of three instances, the cargo protein reached the extracellular region as well, and its initial attachment to MBP enhanced its secretion from the cell. Extensive mutagenesis of the spacer region between MBP and its C-terminal cargo protein could not inhibit the cleavage although it did cause changes in the protease target sites in the fusion proteins, as determined by mass spectrometry. Taken together, these results suggested that an uncharacterized P. pastoris protease attacked at different locations in the region C-terminal of the MBP domain, including the spacer and cargo regions, but the MBP domain could still act to enhance the secretion of certain cargo proteins. PMID:20230898

  20. SsrA-mediated tagging and proteolysis of LacI and its role in the regulation of lac operon.

    PubMed

    Abo, T; Inada, T; Ogawa, K; Aiba, H

    2000-07-17

    SsrA RNA of Escherichia coli, also known as 10Sa RNA or tmRNA, acts both as tRNA and mRNA when ribosomes are paused at the 3' end of an mRNA lacking a stop codon. This process, referred to as trans-translation, leads to the addition of a short peptide tag to the C-terminus of the incomplete nascent polypeptide. The tagged polypeptide is then degraded by C-terminal-specific proteases. Here, we focused on endogenous targets for the SsrA system and on a potential regulatory role of SsrA RNA. First, we show that trans-translation events occur frequently in normally growing E. COLI: cells. More specifically, we report that the lacI mRNA encoding Lac repressor (LacI) is a specific natural target for trans-translation. The binding of LacI to the lac operators results in truncated lacI mRNAs that are, in turn, recognized by the SsrA system. The SsrA-mediated tagging and proteolysis of LacI appears to play a role in cellular adaptation to lactose availability by supporting a rapid induction of lac operon expression.

  1. Influence of the Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM
and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 on Proteolysis Patterns
of Edam Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Cichosz, Grażyna; Nalepa, Beata; Kowalska, Marika

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to determine the viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 in Edam cheese as well as the effect of probiotic bacteria on paracasein proteolysis and changes in the water activity during ripening. The use of probiotics L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM in Edam cheese slightly changed its chemical composition, but the change was not significant. The pH values were significantly correlated with the changes in Lactobacillus count (R=–0.807) and the level of phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) (R=0.775). After 10 weeks of ripening, the highest level of trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen compounds in total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) was observed in the cheese containing L. rhamnosus HN001 (11.87%) and slightly lower level in the cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (7.60%) and control cheese (6.24%). The highest level of PTA-SN/TN fraction was noted in cheese containing L. acidophilus NCFM (3.48%) but the lowest level was observed in control cheese (2.24%) after ten weeks of ripening. The changes in the levels of PTA-SN/TN (R=–0.813) and TCA-SN/TN (R=–0.717) fractions were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the viability of probiotic counts. Water activity (aw) strongly correlated with the PTA-SN/TN level (R=–0.824) and bacteria viability (R=–0.728). All of the analyzed cheeses were characterized by high counts of L. rhamnosus HN001 and L. acidophilus NCFM during ten weeks of ripening. PMID:27904317

  2. Fast and efficient proteolysis by microwave-assisted protein digestion using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Yao, Guoping; Qi, Dawei; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-05-15

    A fast and efficient proteolysis approach of microwave-assisted protein digestion was developed by using trypsin-immobilized magnetic silica (MS) microspheres. In the work, immobilization of the enzyme onto MS microspheres was very simple and only through a one-step reaction with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO) which provides the epoxy group as a reactive spacer. Considering that the magnetic particles are excellent microwave absorbers, we developed a novel microwave-assisted digestion method based on the easily prepared trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. This novel digestion method combined the advantages of immobilized trypsin and the rapid-fashion of microwave-assisted digestion, which resulted in high digestion efficiency. BSA and myoglobin were used as model proteins to optimize the conditions of this method. Peptide fragments produced in 15 s could be confidently identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. Equivalent or better digestion efficiency was observed comparing to current in-solution digestion. Besides, because of the unique magnetic responsivity, the immobilized trypsin can be isolated easily with the help of an external magnet and thus used repeatedly. High activity was obtained even after seven runs of the trypsin-immobilized MS microspheres. To further verify its efficiency in proteome analysis, one reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) fraction of rat liver extract was applied. After 15 s incubation, 16 totally unique peptides corresponding to two proteins were identified. Finally, the rat liver sample was used to evaluate its worth for the application. With analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS), comparable digestion efficiency was observed with typical in-solution digestion but the incubation time was largely shortened. This new microwave-assisted digestion method will hasten the application of the proteome

  3. Lipolysis and proteolysis profiles of fresh artisanal goat cheese made with raw milk with 3 different fat contents.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Macías, D; Morales-Delanuez, A; Moreno-Indias, I; Hernández-Castellano, L E; Mendoza-Grimón, V; Castro, N; Argüello, A

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the proteolysis and lipolysis profiles in goat cheese made in the Canary Islands (Spain) using raw milk with 3 different fat contents (0.5, 1.5, and 5%) and ripened for 1, 7, 14, and 28 d. β-Casein was the most abundant protein in all cheeses and at all ripening times. Quantitative analysis showed a general decrease in caseins as ripening progressed, and degradation rates were higher for α(S1)-casein than for β-casein and α(S2)-casein. Furthermore, the degradation rate during the experimental time decreased with lower fat contents. The α(S2)-casein and α(S1)-casein levels that remained in full-fat and reduced-fat cheeses were less than those in low-fat cheese. In contrast, β-casein also showed degradation along with ripening, but differences in degradation among the 3 cheese types were not significant at 28 d. The degradation products increased with the ripening time in all cheeses, but they were higher in full-fat cheese than in reduced-fat and low-fat cheeses. The free fatty acid concentration per 100g of cheese was higher in full-fat cheese than in reduced- and low-fat cheese; however, when the results were expressed as milligrams of free fatty acids per gram of fat in cheese, then lipolysis occurred more rapidly in low-fat cheese than in reduced- and full-fat cheeses. These results may explain the atypical texture and off-flavors found in low-fat goat cheeses, likely the main causes of non-acceptance.

  4. Conformational changes in the NS3 protease from hepatitis C virus strain Bk monitored by limited proteolysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Orrù, S.; Dal Piaz, F.; Casbarra, A.; Biasiol, G.; De Francesco, R.; Steinkühler, C.; Pucci, P.

    1999-01-01

    Conformational changes occurring within the NS3 protease domain from the hepatitis C virus Bk strain (NS3(1-180)) under different physico-chemical conditions either in the absence or in the presence of its cofactor Pep4A were investigated by limited proteolysis experiments. Because the surface accessibility of the protein is affected by conformational changes, when comparative experiments were carried out on NS3(1-180) either at different glycerol concentrations or in the presence of Pep4A, differential peptide maps were obtained from which protein regions involved in the structural changes could be inferred. The surface topology of isolated NS3(1-180) in solution was essentially consistent with the crystal structure of the protein with the N-terminal segment showing a high conformational flexibility. At higher glycerol concentration, the protease assumed a more compact structure showing a decrease in the accessibility of the N-terminal segment that either was forced to interact with the protein or originate intermolecular interactions with neighboring molecules. Binding of the cofactor Pep4A caused the displacement of the N-terminal arm from the protein moiety, leading this segment to again adopt an open and flexible conformation, thus suggesting that the N-terminus of the protease contributes only marginally to the stability of the complex. The observed conformational changes might be directly correlated with the activation mechanism of the protease by either the cosolvent or the cofactor peptide because they lead to tighter packing of the substrate binding site. PMID:10422832

  5. Antioxidant activity of bovine alpha lactalbumin Maillard products and evaluation of their in vitro gastro-duodenal digestive proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Joubran, Yousef; Moscovici, Alice; Lesmes, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Food processing offers various pathways to tailor food functionality and digestibility. This work sought to study the impact of thermally-induced Maillard reaction between bovine alpha-lactalbumin (α-la) and fructose or fructo-oligosacchrides on physicochemical properties, antioxidant capacity and in vitro digestive fate under simulated adult and infant conditions. Colloidal stability (measured by DLS) was decreased as a result of the Maillard glycation, while antioxidant capacity (determined by FRAP) and surface hydrophobicity (H0 measurements) were elevated. Semi-dynamic in vitro digestion of Maillard conjugates revealed a mixed trend as a result of postulated competing effects of glycation on α-la's susceptibility to proteolysis; steric hindrance accompanied by protein unfolding could hinder or promote the availability of enzymatic cleavage sites. Results also showed thermal processing altered the digestive breakdown profile of α-la under infant conditions contrary to negligible effects observed under adult conditions. Evaluation of the antioxidant capacity during digestion (via DPPH assay) revealed that adult digesta possessed increased antioxidant activity throughout the gastric phase compared to infant digesta, whereas infant digesta of conjugates exhibited an increase in antioxidant capacity in the duodenum compared to adult. Moreover, during infant digestion of conjugates, an increase in antioxidant capacity was observed in the later stages of the digestion. Overall, this work demonstrates that controlled thermal processing of bovine α-la could potentially modulate its functionality and digestibility, particularly as it pertains to its ability to interfere with oxidative reactions in the lumen, possibly through the generation of bioactive peptides.

  6. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  7. HtrC Is Involved in Proteolysis of YpeB during Germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Bernhards, Casey B.; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn2+ or Ca2+ ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation. PMID:25384476

  8. Pericellular versican regulates the fibroblast-myofibroblast transition: a role for ADAMTS5 protease-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Noriko; Carrino, David A; Lauer, Mark E; Vasanji, Amit; Wylie, James D; Nelson, Courtney M; Apte, Suneel S

    2011-09-30

    The cell and its glycosaminoglycan-rich pericellular matrix (PCM) comprise a functional unit. Because modification of PCM influences cell behavior, we investigated molecular mechanisms that regulate PCM volume and composition. In fibroblasts and other cells, aggregates of hyaluronan and versican are found in the PCM. Dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5(-/-) mice, which lack a versican-degrading protease, ADAMTS5, had reduced versican proteolysis, increased PCM, altered cell shape, enhanced α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) expression and increased contractility within three-dimensional collagen gels. The myofibroblast-like phenotype was associated with activation of TGFβ signaling. We tested the hypothesis that fibroblast-myofibroblast transition in Adamts5(-/-) cells resulted from versican accumulation in PCM. First, we noted that versican overexpression in human dermal fibroblasts led to increased SMA expression, enhanced contractility, and increased Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, dermal fibroblasts from Vcan haploinsufficient (Vcan(hdf/+)) mice had reduced contractility relative to wild type fibroblasts. Using a genetic approach to directly test if myofibroblast transition in Adamts5(-/-) cells resulted from increased PCM versican content, we generated Adamts5(-/-);Vcan(hdf/+) mice and isolated their dermal fibroblasts for comparison with dermal fibroblasts from Adamts5(-/-) mice. In Adamts5(-/-) fibroblasts, Vcan haploinsufficiency or exogenous ADAMTS5 restored normal fibroblast contractility. These findings demonstrate that altering PCM versican content through proteolytic activity of ADAMTS5 profoundly influenced the dermal fibroblast phenotype and may regulate a phenotypic continuum between the fibroblast and its alter ego, the myofibroblast. We propose that a physiological function of ADAMTS5 in dermal fibroblasts is to maintain optimal versican content and PCM volume by continually trimming versican in hyaluronan-versican aggregates.

  9. HtrC is involved in proteolysis of YpeB during germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    PubMed

    Bernhards, Casey B; Chen, Yan; Toutkoushian, Hannah; Popham, David L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endospores can remain dormant for decades yet can respond to nutrients, germinate, and resume growth within minutes. An essential step in the germination process is degradation of the spore cortex peptidoglycan wall, and the SleB protein in Bacillus species plays a key role in this process. Stable incorporation of SleB into the spore requires the YpeB protein, and some evidence suggests that the two proteins interact within the dormant spore. Early during germination, YpeB is proteolytically processed to a stable fragment. In this work, the primary sites of YpeB cleavage were identified in Bacillus anthracis, and it was shown that the stable products are comprised of the C-terminal domain of YpeB. Modification of the predominant YpeB cleavage sites reduced proteolysis, but cleavage at other sites still resulted in loss of full-length YpeB. A B. anthracis strain lacking the HtrC protease did not generate the same stable YpeB products. In B. anthracis and Bacillus subtilis htrC mutants, YpeB was partially stabilized during germination but was still degraded at a reduced rate by other, unidentified proteases. Purified HtrC cleaved YpeB to a fragment similar to that observed in vivo, and this cleavage was stimulated by Mn(2+) or Ca(2+) ions. A lack of HtrC did not stabilize YpeB or SleB during spore formation in the absence of the partner protein, indicating other proteases are involved in their degradation during sporulation.

  10. Proteolysis, NaOH and ultrasound-enhanced extraction of anticoagulant and antioxidant sulfated polysaccharides from the edible seaweed, Gracilaria birdiae.

    PubMed

    Fidelis, Gabriel Pereira; Camara, Rafael Barros Gomes; Queiroz, Moacir Fernandes; Santos Pereira Costa, Mariana Santana; Santos, Pablo Castro; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira; Costa, Leandro Silva

    2014-11-13

    The sulfated polysaccharides (SP) from the edible red seaweed, Gracilaria birdiae, were obtained using five different extraction conditions: Gracilaria birdiae 1 (GB1)-water; GB1s-water/sonication; GB1sp-water/sonication/proteolysis; GB2s-NaOH/sonication; and GB2sp-NaOH/sonication/proteolysis. The yield (g) increased in the following order: GB2sp>GB1sp>GB2s>GB1s>GB1. However, the amount of SP extracted increased in a different way: GB2sp>GB1>GB1sp>GB1s>GB2s. Infrared and electrophoresis analysis showed that all conditions extracted the same SP. In addition, monosaccharide composition showed that ultrasound promotes the extraction of polysaccharides other than SP. In the prothrombin time (PT) test, which evaluates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, none of the samples showed anticoagulant activity. While in the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test, which evaluates the intrinsic coagulation pathway, all samples showed anticoagulant activity, except GB2s. The aPTT activity decreased in the order of GB1sp>GB2sp>GB1>GB1s>GB2s. The total capacity antioxidant (TCA) of the SP was also affected by extraction condition, since GB2s and GB1 showed lower activity in comparison to the other conditions. In conclusion, the conditions of SP extraction influence their biological activities and chemical composition. The data revealed that NaOH/sonication/proteolysis was the best condition to extract anticoagulant and antioxidant SPs from Gracilaria birdiae.

  11. The antigenic determinants on HIV p24 for CD4+ T cell inhibiting antibodies as determined by limited proteolysis, chemical modification, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason G; Tomer, Kenneth B; Hioe, Catarina E; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Norris, Philip J

    2006-11-01

    In the last decade, mass spectrometry has been employed by more and more researchers for identifying the proteins in a macromolecular complex as well as for defining the surfaces of their binding interfaces. This characterization of protein-protein interfaces usually involves at least one of several different methodologies in addition to the actual mass spectrometry. For example, limited proteolysis is often used as a first step in defining regions of a protein that are protected from proteolysis when the protein of interest is part of a macromolecular complex. Other techniques used in conjunction with mass spectrometry for determining regions of a protein involved in protein-protein interactions include chemical modification, such as covalent cross-linking, acetylation of lysines, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, or other forms of modification. In this report, both limited proteolysis and chemical modification were combined with several mass spectrometric techniques in efforts to define the protein surface on the HIV core protein, p24, recognized by two different monoclonal human antibodies that were isolated from HIV+ patients. One of these antibodies, 1571, strongly inhibits the CD4+ T cell proliferative response to a known epitope (PEVIPMFSALSEGATP), while the other antibody, 241-D, does not inhibit as strongly. The epitopes for both of these antibodies were determined to be discontinuous and localized to the N-terminus of p24. Interestingly, the epitope recognized by the strongly inhibiting antibody, 1571, completely overlaps the T cell epitope PEVIPMFSALSEGATP, while the antibody 241-D binds to a region adjacent to the region of p24 recognized by the antibody 1571. These results suggest that, possibly due to epitope competition, antibodies produced during HIV infection can negatively affect CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity against the virus.

  12. Proteolysis-Dependent Remodeling of the Tubulin Homolog FtsZ at the Division Septum in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Marissa G.; LaBreck, Christopher J.; Conti, Joseph; Camberg, Jodi L.

    2017-01-01

    During bacterial cell division a dynamic protein structure called the Z-ring assembles at the septum. The major protein in the Z-ring in Escherichia coli is FtsZ, a tubulin homolog that polymerizes with GTP. FtsZ is degraded by the two-component ATP-dependent protease ClpXP. Two regions of FtsZ, located outside of the polymerization domain in the unstructured linker and at the C-terminus, are important for specific recognition and degradation by ClpXP. We engineered a synthetic substrate containing green fluorescent protein (Gfp) fused to an extended FtsZ C-terminal tail (residues 317–383), including the unstructured linker and the C-terminal conserved region, but not the polymerization domain, and showed that it is sufficient to target a non-native substrate for degradation in vitro. To determine if FtsZ degradation regulates Z-ring assembly during division, we expressed a full length Gfp-FtsZ fusion protein in wild type and clp deficient strains and monitored fluorescent Z-rings. In cells deleted for clpX or clpP, or cells expressing protease-defective mutant protein ClpP(S97A), Z-rings appear normal; however, after photobleaching a region of the Z-ring, fluorescence recovers ~70% more slowly in cells without functional ClpXP than in wild type cells. Gfp-FtsZ(R379E), which is defective for degradation by ClpXP, also assembles into Z-rings that recover fluorescence ~2-fold more slowly than Z-rings containing Gfp-FtsZ. In vitro, ClpXP cooperatively degrades and disassembles FtsZ polymers. These results demonstrate that ClpXP is a regulator of Z-ring dynamics and that the regulation is proteolysis-dependent. Our results further show that FtsZ-interacting proteins in E. coli fine-tune Z-ring dynamics. PMID:28114338

  13. Nutrient-regulated proteolysis of MrpC halts expression of genes important for commitment to sporulation during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Ramya; Kroos, Lee

    2014-08-01

    Starved Myxococcus xanthus cells glide to aggregation centers and form fruiting bodies in which rod-shaped cells differentiate into ovoid spores. Commitment to development was investigated by adding nutrients at specific times after starvation and determining whether development halted or proceeded. At 24 h poststarvation, some rod-shaped cells were committed to subsequent shape change and to becoming sonication-resistant spores, but nutrients caused partial disaggregation of fruiting bodies. By 30 h poststarvation, 10-fold more cells were committed to becoming sonication-resistant spores, and compact fruiting bodies persisted after nutrient addition. During the critical period of commitment around 24 to 30 h poststarvation, the transcription factors MrpC and FruA cooperatively regulate genes important for sporulation. FruA responds to short-range C-signaling, which increases as cells form fruiting bodies. MrpC was found to be highly sensitive to nutrient-regulated proteolysis both before and during the critical period of commitment to sporulation. The rapid turnover of MrpC upon nutrient addition to developing cells halted expression of the dev operon, which is important for sporulation. Regulated proteolysis of MrpC appeared to involve ATP-independent metalloprotease activity and may provide a mechanism for monitoring whether starvation persists and halting commitment to sporulation if nutrients reappear.

  14. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-04-29

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  15. Decreased rate of protein synthesis, caspase-3 activity, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Batistela, Emanuele; Pereira, Mayara Peron; Siqueira, Juliany Torres; Paula-Gomes, Silvia; Zanon, Neusa Maria; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Navegantes, Luiz Carlos Carvalho; Kettelhut, Isis C; Andrade, Claudia Marlise Balbinotti; Kawashita, Nair Honda; Baviera, Amanda Martins

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the rates of both protein synthesis and breakdown, and the activation of intracellular effectors that control these processes in soleus muscles from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet for 15 days. The mass and the protein content, as well as the rate of protein synthesis, were decreased in the soleus from LPHC-fed rats. The availability of amino acids was diminished, since the levels of various essential amino acids were decreased in the plasma of LPHC-fed rats. Overall rate of proteolysis was also decreased, explained by reductions in the mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, ubiquitin conjugates, proteasome activity, and in the activity of caspase-3. Soleus muscles from LPHC-fed rats showed increased insulin sensitivity, with increased levels of insulin receptor and phosphorylation levels of AKT, which probably explains the inhibition of both the caspase-3 activity and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The fall of muscle proteolysis seems to represent an adaptive response that contributes to spare proteins in a condition of diminished availability of dietary amino acids. Furthermore, the decreased rate of protein synthesis may be the driving factor to the lower muscle mass gain in growing rats fed the LPHC diet.

  16. Fully validated LCMS bioanalysis of Bevacizumab in human plasma using nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Noriko; Umino, Yukari; Aoki, Chikage; Yamane, Naoe; Hamada, Akinobu; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis is the Fab-selective limited proteolysis by making use the difference of protease nanoparticle diameter (200 nm) and antibody resin pore diameter (100 nm). In this report, we have demonstrated that the full validation for Bevacizumab bioanalysis in human plasma using nSMOL. The immunoglobulin fraction was collected by Protein A resin from plasma, then nSMOL reaction was performed using the FG nanoparticle-immobilized trypsin under the nondenaturing physiological condition at 50 °C for 6 h. After removal of resin and nanoparticles, the signature peptide of Bevacizumab complementarity-determining region (CDR) and internal standard P14R were simultaneously quantified by LCMS multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). This nSMOL method quantification of Bevacizumab showed sensitivity of 0.146 μg/ml and linearity of 0.146-300 μg/ml. The intra- and inter-assay precision of lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), low quality control (LQC), middle quality control (MQC), and high quality control (HQC) was 7.94-15.2% and 14.6%, 7.15-13.5% and 11.7%, 2.63-6.47% and 5.83%, and 3.09-4.35% and 4.45%, respectively. These results indicate that nSMOL is also significant method for Bevacizumab bioanalysis in human plasma.

  17. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  18. Nutrient-Regulated Proteolysis of MrpC Halts Expression of Genes Important for Commitment to Sporulation during Myxococcus xanthus Development

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Ramya

    2014-01-01

    Starved Myxococcus xanthus cells glide to aggregation centers and form fruiting bodies in which rod-shaped cells differentiate into ovoid spores. Commitment to development was investigated by adding nutrients at specific times after starvation and determining whether development halted or proceeded. At 24 h poststarvation, some rod-shaped cells were committed to subsequent shape change and to becoming sonication-resistant spores, but nutrients caused partial disaggregation of fruiting bodies. By 30 h poststarvation, 10-fold more cells were committed to becoming sonication-resistant spores, and compact fruiting bodies persisted after nutrient addition. During the critical period of commitment around 24 to 30 h poststarvation, the transcription factors MrpC and FruA cooperatively regulate genes important for sporulation. FruA responds to short-range C-signaling, which increases as cells form fruiting bodies. MrpC was found to be highly sensitive to nutrient-regulated proteolysis both before and during the critical period of commitment to sporulation. The rapid turnover of MrpC upon nutrient addition to developing cells halted expression of the dev operon, which is important for sporulation. Regulated proteolysis of MrpC appeared to involve ATP-independent metalloprotease activity and may provide a mechanism for monitoring whether starvation persists and halting commitment to sporulation if nutrients reappear. PMID:24837289

  19. IKK-induced NF-κB1 p105 proteolysis is critical for B cell antibody responses to T cell–dependent antigen

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Visekruna, Alexander; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Janzen, Julia; Zillwood, Rachel; Tarlinton, David M.; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of IκB kinase (IKK)–induced proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105 in B cells was investigated using Nfkb1SSAA/SSAA mice, in which this NF-κB signaling pathway is blocked. Nfkb1SSAA mutation had no effect on the development and homeostasis of follicular mature (FM) B cells. However, analysis of mixed bone marrow chimeras revealed that Nfkb1SSAA/SSAA FM B cells were completely unable to mediate T cell–dependent antibody responses. Nfkb1SSAA mutation decreased B cell antigen receptor (BCR) activation of NF-κB in FM B cells, which selectively blocked BCR stimulation of cell survival and antigen-induced differentiation into plasmablasts and germinal center B cells due to reduced expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and IRF4, respectively. In contrast, the antigen-presenting function of FM B cells and their BCR-induced migration to the follicle T cell zone border, as well as their growth and proliferation after BCR stimulation, were not affected. All of the inhibitory effects of Nfkb1SSAA mutation on B cell functions were rescued by normalizing NF-κB activation genetically. Our study identifies critical B cell-intrinsic functions for IKK-induced NF-κB1 p105 proteolysis in the antigen-induced survival and differentiation of FM B cells, which are essential for T-dependent antibody responses. PMID:25225457

  20. βTrCP-Mediated Proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105 Requires Phosphorylation of p105 Serines 927 and 932

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerie; Janzen, Julia; Fischer, Gregory Zvi; Soneji, Yasmina; Beinke, Sören; Salmeron, Andres; Allen, Hamish; Hay, Ronald T.; Ben-Neriah, Yinon; Ley, Steven C.

    2003-01-01

    NF-κB1 p105 functions both as a precursor of NF-κB1 p50 and as a cytoplasmic inhibitor of NF-κB. Following the stimulation of cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), the IκB kinase (IKK) complex rapidly phosphorylates NF-κB1 p105 on serine 927 in the PEST region. This phosphorylation is essential for TNF-α to trigger p105 degradation, which releases the associated Rel/NF-κB subunits to translocate into the nucleus and regulate target gene transcription. Serine 927 resides in a conserved motif (Asp-Ser927-Gly-Val-Glu-Thr-Ser932) homologous to the IKK target sequence in IκBα. In this study, TNF-α-induced p105 proteolysis was revealed to additionally require the phosphorylation of serine 932. Experiments with IKK1−/− and IKK2−/− double knockout embryonic fibroblasts demonstrate that the IKK complex is essential for TNF-α to stimulate phosphorylation on p105 serines 927 and 932. Furthermore, purified IKK1 and IKK2 can each phosphorylate a glutathione S-transferase-p105758-967 fusion protein on both regulatory serines in vitro. IKK-mediated p105 phosphorylation generates a binding site for βTrCP, the receptor subunit of an SCF-type ubiquitin E3 ligase, and depletion of βTrCP by RNA interference blocks TNF-α-induced p105 ubiquitination and proteolysis. Phosphopeptide competition experiments indicate that βTrCP binds p105 more effectively when both serines 927 and 932 are phosphorylated. Interestingly, however, βTrCP affinity for the IKK-phosphorylated sequence on p105 is substantially lower than that on IκBα. Thus, it appears that reduced p105 recruitment of βTrCP and subsequent ubiquitination may contribute to delayed p105 proteolysis after TNF-α stimulation relative to that for IκBα. PMID:12482991

  1. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  2. Proteolysis of Xenopus Cip-type CDK inhibitor, p16Xic2, is regulated by PCNA binding and CDK2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell division is positively regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) partnered with cyclins and negatively regulated by CDK inhibitors. In the frog, Xenopus laevis, three types of CDK inhibitors have been described: p27Xic1 (Xic1) which shares sequence homology with both p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 from mammals, p16Xic2 (Xic2) which shares sequence homology with p21Cip1, and p17Xic3 (Xic3) which shares sequence homology with p27Kip1. While past studies have demonstrated that during DNA polymerase switching, Xic1 is targeted for protein turnover dependent upon DNA, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), and the ubiquitin ligase CRL4Cdt2, little is known about the processes that regulate Xic2 or Xic3. Methods We used the Xenopus interphase egg extract as a model system to examine the regulation of Xic2 by proteolysis and phosphorylation. Results Our studies indicated that following primer synthesis during the initiation of DNA replication, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis and that Cdt2 can promote Xic2 turnover. Additionally, during interphase, Xic2 is phosphorylated by CDK2 at Ser-98 and Ser-131 in a DNA-independent manner, inhibiting Xic2 turnover. In the presence of double-stranded DNA ends, Xic2 is also phosphorylated at Ser-78 and Ser-81 by a caffeine-sensitive kinase, but this phosphorylation does not alter Xic2 turnover. Conversely, in the presence or absence of DNA, Xic3 was stable in the Xenopus interphase egg extract and did not exhibit a shift indicative of phosphorylation. Conclusions During interphase, Xic2 is targeted for DNA- and PCNA-dependent proteolysis that is negatively regulated by CDK2 phosphorylation. During a response to DNA damage, Xic2 may be alternatively regulated by phosphorylation by a caffeine-sensitive kinase. Our studies suggest that the three types of Xenopus CDK inhibitors, Xic1, Xic2, and Xic3 appear to be uniquely regulated which may reflect their specialized roles during cell

  3. Proteolysis of the class II-associated invariant chain generates a peptide binding site in intracellular HLA-DR molecules. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 1991. 88: 3150-3154.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-08-01

    HLA-DR molecules are heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins that associate intracellularly with a polypeptide known as the invariant (I) chain. Shortly before expression of the HLA-DR αβ dimer on the cell surface, however the I chain is removed from the intracellular αβI complex by a mechanism thought to involve proteolysis . In this report, we show that treatment of purified αβI with the cysteine proteinase cathepsin B results in the specific proteolysis of the HLA-DR-associated I chain in vitro. As a consequence of this, the I chain is removed and free αβ dimers are released from αβI. Although αβI fails to bind an immunogenic peptide, the released αβ dimers acquire the ability to bind the peptide after proteolysis of the I chain. These results suggest that the I chain inhibits immunogenic peptide binding to αβI early during intracellular transport and demonstrate that proteolysis is likely to be the in vivo mechanism of I chain removal.

  4. Arsenite reduces insulin secretion in rat pancreatic {beta}-cells by decreasing the calcium-dependent calpain-10 proteolysis of SNAP-25

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea; Burns, Anna L.; Salazar, Ana Maria; Sordo, Monserrat; Hiriart, Marcia; Cebrian, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2008-09-15

    An increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been consistently observed among residents of high arsenic exposure areas. We have previously shown that in rat pancreatic {beta}-cells, low arsenite doses impair the secretion of insulin without altering its synthesis. To further study the mechanism by which arsenite reduces insulin secretion, we evaluated the effects of arsenite on the calcium-calpain pathway that triggers insulin exocytosis in RINm5F cells. Cell cycle and proliferation analysis were also performed to complement the characterization. Free [Ca{sup 2+}]i oscillations needed for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were abated in the presence of subchronic low arsenite doses (0.5-2 {mu}M). The global activity of calpains increased with 2 {mu}M arsenite. However, during the secretion of insulin stimulated with glucose (15.6 mM), 1 {mu}M arsenite decreased the activity of calpain-10, measured as SNAP-25 proteolysis. Both proteins are needed to fuse insulin granules with the membrane to produce insulin exocytosis. Arsenite also induced a slowdown in the {beta} cell line proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, reflected by a reduction of dividing cells and in their arrest in G2/M. Data obtained showed that one of the mechanisms by which arsenite impairs insulin secretion is by decreasing the oscillations of free [Ca{sup 2+}]i, thus reducing calcium-dependent calpain-10 partial proteolysis of SNAP-25. The effects in cell division and proliferation observed with arsenite exposure can be an indirect consequence of the decrease in insulin secretion.

  5. The proteolysis adaptor, NblA, is essential for degradation of the core pigment of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complex.

    PubMed

    Sendersky, Eleonora; Kozer, Noga; Levi, Mali; Moizik, Michael; Garini, Yuval; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2015-09-01

    The cyanobacterial light-harvesting complex, the phycobilisome, is degraded under nutrient limitation, allowing the cell to adjust light absorbance to its metabolic capacity. This large light-harvesting antenna comprises a core complex of the pigment allophycocyanin, and rod-shaped pigment assemblies emanating from the core. NblA, a low-molecular-weight protein, is essential for degradation of the phycobilisome. NblA mutants exhibit high absorbance of rod pigments under conditions that generally elicit phycobilisome degradation, implicating NblA in degradation of these pigments. However, the vast abundance of rod pigments and the substantial overlap between the absorbance spectra of rod and core pigments has made it difficult to directly associate NblA with proteolysis of the phycobilisome core. Furthermore, lack of allophycocyanin degradation in an NblA mutant may reflect a requirement for rod degradation preceding core degradation, and does not prove direct involvement of NblA in proteolysis of the core pigment. Therefore, in this study, we used a mutant lacking phycocyanin, the rod pigment of Synechococcus elongatusPCC7942, to examine whether NblA is required for allophycocyanin degradation. We demonstrate that NblA is essential for degradation of the core complex of the phycobilisome. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy provided in situ evidence for the interaction of NblA with allophycocyanin, and indicated that NblA interacts with allophycocyanin complexes that are associated with the photosynthetic membranes. Based on these data, as well as previous observations indicating interaction of NblA with phycobilisomes attached to the photosynthetic membranes, we suggest a model for sequential phycobilisome disassembly by NblA.

  6. Proteolysis of the Human DNA Polymerase Delta Smallest Subunit p12 by μ-Calpain in Calcium-Triggered Apoptotic HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    You, Chao; Qian, Yuanxia; Gao, Jing; Liu, Peng; Chen, Huiqing; Song, Huifang; Chen, Yan; Chen, Keping; Zhou, Yajing

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of p12 subunit of human DNA polymerase delta (Pol δ) that results in an interconversion between Pol δ4 and Pol δ3 forms plays a significant role in response to replication stress or genotoxic agents triggered DNA damage. Also, the p12 is readily degraded by human calpain in vitro. However, little has been done for the investigation of its degree of participation in any of the more common apoptosis. Here, we first report that the p12 subunit is a substrate of μ-calpain. In calcium-triggered apoptotic HeLa cells, the p12 is degraded at 12 hours post-induction (hpi), restored thereafter by 24 hpi, and then depleted again after 36 hpi in a time-dependent manner while the other three subunits are not affected. It suggests a dual function of Pol δ by its interconversion between Pol δ4 and Pol δ3 that is involved in a novel unknown apoptosis mechanism. The proteolysis of p12 could be efficiently blocked by both calpain inhibitor ALLN and proteasome inhibitor MG132. In vitro pull down and co-immunoprecipitation assays show that the μ-calpain binds to p12 through the interaction of μ-calpain with Pol δ other three subunits, not p12 itself, and PCNA, implying that the proteolysis of p12 by μ-calpain might be through a Pol δ4/PCNA complex. The p12 cleavage sites by μ-calpain are further determined as the location within a 16-amino acids peptide 28-43 by in vitro cleavage assays. Thus, the p12/Pol δ is a target as a nuclear substrate of μ-calpain in a calcium-triggered apoptosis and appears to be a potential marker in the study of the chemotherapy of cancer therapies. PMID:24691096

  7. Pathogen-mediated proteolysis of the cell death regulator RIPK1 and the host defense modulator RIPK2 in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, Andrés G; Barth, Kenneth; Papadopoulos, George; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2012-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic agent of periodontal disease that is associated with other human chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. The ability of P. gingivalis to invade and persist within human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) has been postulated to contribute to a low to moderate chronic state of inflammation, although how this is specifically achieved has not been well defined. In this study, we demonstrate that P. gingivalis infection of HAEC resulted in the rapid cleavage of receptor interacting protein 1 (RIPK1), a mediator of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1 (TNF-R1)-induced cell activation or death, and RIPK2, a key mediator of both innate immune signaling and adaptive immunity. The cleavage of RIPK1 or RIPK2 was not observed in cells treated with apoptotic stimuli, or cells stimulated with agonists to TNF-R1, nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor 1(NOD1), NOD2, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) or TLR4. P. gingivalis-induced cleavage of RIPK1 and RIPK2 was inhibited in the presence of a lysine-specific gingipain (Kgp) inhibitor. RIPK1 and RIPK2 cleavage was not observed in HAEC treated with an isogenic mutant deficient in the lysine-specific gingipain, confirming a role for Kgp in the cleavage of RIPK1 and RIPK2. Similar proteolysis of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was observed. We also demonstrated direct proteolysis of RIPK2 by P. gingivalis in a cell-free system which was abrogated in the presence of a Kgp-specific protease inhibitor. Our studies thus reveal an important role for pathogen-mediated modification of cellular kinases as a potential strategy for bacterial persistence within target host cells, which is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation, a hallmark of pathogen-mediated chronic inflammatory disorders.

  8. Calpain- and caspase-mediated alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis in rat cerebrocortical neuronal cultures after ecstasy or methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Matthew W; Zheng, Wenrong; Kobeissy, Firas H; Cheng Liu, Ming; Hayes, Ronald L; Gold, Mark S; Larner, Stephen F; Wang, Kevin K W

    2007-08-01

    Abuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or Ecstasy) and methamphetamine (Meth or Speed) is a growing international problem with an estimated 250 million users of psychoactive drugs worldwide. It is important to demonstrate and understand the mechanism of neurotoxicity so potential prevention and treatment therapies can be designed. In this study rat primary cerebrocortical neuron cultures were challenged with MDMA and Meth (1 or 2 mM) for 24 and 48 h and compared to the excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The neurotoxicity of these drugs, as assessed by microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and immunoblot, was shown to be both dose- and time-dependent. Immunoblot analysis using biomarkers of cell death showed significant proteolysis of both alphaII-spectrin and tau proteins. Breakdown products of alphaII-spectrin (SBDPs) of 150, 145, and 120 kDa and tau breakdown products (TBDPs) of 45, 32, 26, and 14 kDa were observed. The use of the protease inhibitors calpain inhibitor SJA6017 and caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk and Z-D-DCB, attenuated drug-induced alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis. The calpain inhibitor reduced the calpain-induced breakdown products SBDP145 and TBDP14, but there was an offset increase in the caspase-mediated breakdown products SBDP120 and TBDP45. The caspase inhibitors, on the other hand, decreased SBDP120 and TBDP45. These data suggest that both MDMA and Meth trigger concerted proteolytic attacks of the structural proteins by both calpain and caspase family of proteases. The ability of the protease inhibitors to reduce the damage caused by these drugs suggests that the treatment arsenal could include similar drugs as possible tools to combat the drug-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

  9. Proteolysis of SNAP-25 isoforms by botulinum neurotoxin types A, C, and E: domains and amino acid residues controlling the formation of enzyme-substrate complexes and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, V V; Yoshino, K; Jahnz, M; Dörries, C; Bade, S; Nauenburg, S; Niemann, H; Binz, T

    1999-01-01

    Tetanus toxin and the seven serologically distinct botulinal neurotoxins (BoNT/A to BoNT/G) abrogate synaptic transmission at nerve endings through the action of their light chains (L chains), which proteolytically cleave VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)/synaptobrevin, SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa), or syntaxin. BoNT/C was reported to proteolyze both syntaxin and SNAP-25. Here, we demonstrate that cleavage of SNAP-25 occurs between Arg198 and Ala199, depends on the presence of regions Asn93 to Glu145 and Ile156 to Met202, and requires about 1,000-fold higher L chain concentrations in comparison with BoNT/A and BoNT/E. Analyses of the BoNT/A and BoNT/E cleavage sites revealed that changes in the carboxyl-terminal residues, in contrast with changes in the amino-terminal residues, drastically impair proteolysis. A proteolytically inactive BoNT/A L chain mutant failed to bind to VAMP/synaptobrevin and syntaxin, but formed a stable complex (KD = 1.9 x 10(-7) M) with SNAP-25. The minimal essential domain of SNAP-25 required for cleavage by BoNT/A involves the segment Met146-Gln197, and binding was optimal only with full-length SNAP-25. Proteolysis by BoNT/E required the presence of the domain Ile156-Asp186. Murine SNAP-23 was cleaved by BoNT/E and, to a reduced extent, by BoNT/A, whereas human SNAP-23 was resistant to all clostridial L chains. Lys185Asp or Pro182Arg mutations of human SNAP-23 induced susceptibility toward BoNT/E or toward both BoNT/A and BoNT/E, respectively.

  10. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the virulence activator TcpP in Vibrio cholerae is initiated by the tail-specific protease (Tsp).

    PubMed

    Teoh, Wei Ping; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae uses a multiprotein transcriptional regulatory cascade to control expression of virulence factors cholera toxin and toxin-co-regulated pilus. Two proteins in this cascade are ToxR and TcpP - unusual membrane-localized transcription factors with relatively undefined periplasmic domains and transcription activator cytoplasmic domains. TcpP and ToxR function with each other and two other membrane-localized proteins, TcpH and ToxS, to activate transcription of toxT, encoding the direct activator of toxin and pilus genes. Under some conditions, TcpP is degraded in a two-step proteolytic pathway known as regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), thereby inactivating the cascade. The second step in this proteolytic pathway involves the zinc metalloprotease YaeL; V. cholerae cells lacking YaeL accumulate a truncated yet active form of TcpP termed TcpP*. We hypothesized that a protease acting prior to YaeL degrades TcpP to TcpP*, which is the substrate of YaeL. In this study, we demonstrate that a C-terminal protease called Tsp degrades TcpP to form TcpP*, which is then acted upon by YaeL. We present evidence that TcpH and Tsp serve to protect full-length TcpP from spurious proteolysis by YaeL. Cleavage by Tsp occurs in the periplasmic domain of TcpP and requires residues TcpPA172 and TcpPI174 for wild-type activity.

  11. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  12. Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of SRSF5 Splicing Factor Intriguingly Co-occurs with SRSF5 mRNA Upregulation during Late Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Breig, Osman; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    SR proteins exhibit diverse functions ranging from their role in constitutive and alternative splicing, to virtually all aspects of mRNA metabolism. These findings have attracted growing interest in deciphering the regulatory mechanisms that control the tissue-specific expression of these SR proteins. In this study, we show that SRSF5 protein decreases drastically during erythroid cell differentiation, contrasting with a concomitant upregulation of SRSF5 mRNA level. Proteasome chemical inhibition provided strong evidence that endogenous SRSF5 protein, as well as protein deriving from stably transfected SRSF5 cDNA, are both targeted to proteolysis as the cells undergo terminal differentiation. Consistently, functional experiments show that overexpression of SRSF5 enhances a specific endogenous pre-mRNA splicing event in proliferating cells, but not in differentiating cells, due to proteasome-mediated targeting of both endogenous and transfection-derived SRSF5. Further investigation of the relationship between SRSF5 structure and its post-translation regulation and function, suggested that the RNA recognition motifs of SRSF5 are sufficient to activate pre-mRNA splicing, whereas proteasome-mediated proteolysis of SRSF5 requires the presence of the C-terminal RS domain of the protein. Phosphorylation of SR proteins is a key post-translation regulation that promotes their activity and subcellular availability. We here show that inhibition of the CDC2-like kinase (CLK) family and mutation of the AKT phosphorylation site Ser86 on SRSF5, have no effect on SRSF5 stability. We reasoned that at least AKT and CLK signaling pathways are not involved in proteasome-induced turnover of SRSF5 during late erythroid development. PMID:23536862

  13. In-capillary enrichment, proteolysis and separation using capillary electrophoresis with discontinuous buffers: application on proteins with moderately acidic and basic isoelectric points.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Chandra A; Yeung, Ken K-C

    2009-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry and capillary-format separation continue to improve the sensitivity of protein analysis. Of equal importance is the miniaturization of sample pretreatment such as enrichment and proteolysis. In a previous report (Nesbitt et al., Electrophoresis, 2008, 29, 466-474), nanoliter-volume protein enrichment, tryptic digestion, and partial separation was demonstrated in capillary electrophoresis followed by MALDI mass spectral analysis. A discontinuous buffer system, consisting of ammonium (pH 10) and acetate (pH 4), was used to create a pH junction inside the capillary, trapping a protein with a neutral isoelectric point, myoglobin (pI 7.2). Moreover, co-enrichment of myoglobin with trypsin led to an in-capillary digestion. In this paper, the ability of this discontinuous buffer system to perform similar in-capillary sample pretreatment on proteins with moderately acidic and basic pI was studied and reported. Lentil lectin (pI 8.6) and a multi-phosphorylated protein, beta-casein (pI 5.1), were selected as model proteins. In addition to the previously shown tryptic digestion, proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N was also performed. Digestion of these acidic and basic pI proteins produced a few peptides with extreme pI values lying outside the trapping range of the discontinuous buffer. An alteration in the peptide trapping procedure was made to accommodate these analytes. Offline MALDI mass spectral analysis confirmed the presence of the expected peptides. The presented miniaturized sample pretreatment methodology was proven to be applicable on proteins with a moderately wide range of pI. Flexibility in the choice of protease was also evident.

  14. Insulin does not stimulate muscle protein synthesis during increased plasma branched-chain amino acids alone but still decreases whole body proteolysis in humans.

    PubMed

    Everman, Sarah; Meyer, Christian; Tran, Lee; Hoffman, Nyssa; Carroll, Chad C; Dedmon, William L; Katsanos, Christos S

    2016-10-01

    Insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis when the levels of total amino acids, or at least the essential amino acids, are at or above their postabsorptive concentrations. Among the essential amino acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) have the primary role in stimulating muscle protein synthesis and are commonly sought alone to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in humans. Fourteen healthy young subjects were studied before and after insulin infusion to examine whether insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis in relation to the availability of BCAA alone. One half of the subjects were studied in the presence of postabsorptive BCAA concentrations (control) and the other half in the presence of increased plasma BCAA (BCAA). Compared with that prior to the initiation of the insulin infusion, fractional synthesis rate of muscle protein (%/h) did not change (P > 0.05) during insulin in either the control (0.04 ± 0.01 vs 0.05 ± 0.01) or the BCAA (0.05 ± 0.02 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01) experiments. Insulin decreased (P < 0.01) whole body phenylalanine rate of appearance (μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), indicating suppression of muscle proteolysis, in both the control (1.02 ± 0.04 vs 0.76 ± 0.04) and the BCAA (0.89 ± 0.07 vs 0.61 ± 0.03) experiments, but the change was not different between the two experiments (P > 0.05). In conclusion, insulin does not stimulate muscle protein synthesis in the presence of increased circulating levels of plasma BCAA alone. Insulin's suppressive effect on proteolysis is observed independently of the levels of circulating plasma BCAA.

  15. Limited proteolysis and sequence analysis of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli. Cleavage sites and domains in the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase components.

    PubMed Central

    Packman, L C; Perham, R N

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli were investigated by limited proteolysis. Trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase were used to excise the three lipoyl domains from the E2p component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the single lipoyl domain from the E2o component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The principal sites of action of these enzymes on each E2 chain were determined by sequence analysis of the isolated lipoyl fragments and of the truncated E2p and E2o chains. Each of the numerous cleavage sites (12 in E2p, six in E2o) fell within similar segments of the E2 chains, namely stretches of polypeptide rich in alanine, proline and/or charged amino acids. These regions are clearly accessible to proteinases of Mr 24,000-28,000 and, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, some of them have previously been implicated in facilitating domain movements by virtue of their conformational flexibility. The limited proteolysis data suggest that E2p and E2o possess closer architectural similarities than would be predicted from inspection of their amino acid sequences. As a result of this work, an error was detected in the sequence of E2o inferred from the previously published sequence of the encoding gene, sucB. The relevant peptides from E2o were purified and sequenced by direct means; an amended sequence is presented. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3297046

  16. Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) is involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of p27Kip1 in response to UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2011-05-01

    Damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) is a conserved protein component of the damaged DNA binding protein complex (DDB) that recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates the nucleotide excision repair process. DDB1 is also part of an E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex that targets a variety of substrates for proteolysis including the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). The mechanism regulating the trafficking of DDB1 and its relationship with UV irradiation is not known, although cell cycle progression is implicated in the molecular machinery driving DDB1 into the nucleus. We evaluated the involvement of DDB1 in ubiquitination of the cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) in response to UV irradiation. First, we observed that low and high doses of UV irradiation exert different effects on p27(Kip1) protein levels. Indeed, low but not high UV doses induced p27(Kip1) protein proteolysis in several human cell lines and UV-dependent degradation is dominant over other genotoxic agents such as cisplatin. We also demonstrate that p27(Kip1) reduction is not due to transcriptional regulation and that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 affects p27(Kip1) degradation. We observed that at low UV doses the decrease in p27(Kip1) nuclear protein related with DDB1 translocation into the nucleus; conversely, high doses of UV-induced p27(Kip1) accumulation and unchanged level of DDB1. The knockdown of DDB1 or Skp2 prevents UV-induced degradation of p27(Kip1) suggesting that DDB1 is essential to regulation of p27(kip1) turnover after a mild DNA damage. Our findings support the concept that DDB1 contributes to the activation of DNA repair mechanisms and could be a key factor in regulating the cell cycle in response to UV-induced DNA damage. Although the temporal order with which DDB1 contributes to ubiquitination of p27(Kip1) or initiates the nucleotide excision repair process remains to be established, our results represent a major step towards clarifying these issues.

  17. Functional Characterization of Rpn3 Uncovers a Distinct 19S Proteasomal Subunit Requirement for Ubiquitin-Dependent Proteolysis of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bailly, Eric; Reed, Steven I.

    1999-01-01

    By selectively eliminating ubiquitin-conjugated proteins, the 26S proteasome plays a pivotal role in a large variety of cellular regulatory processes, particularly in the control of cell cycle transitions. Access of ubiquitinated substrates to the inner catalytic chamber within the 20S core particle is mediated by the 19S regulatory particle (RP), whose subunit composition in budding yeast has been recently elucidated. In this study, we have investigated the cell cycle defects resulting from conditional inactivation of one of these RP components, the essential non-ATPase Rpn3/Sun2 subunit. Using temperature-sensitive mutant alleles, we show that rpn3 mutations do not prevent the G1/S transition but cause a metaphase arrest, indicating that the essential Rpn3 function is limiting for mitosis. rpn3 mutants appear severely compromised in the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several physiologically important proteasome substrates. Thus, RPN3 function is required for the degradation of the G1-phase cyclin Cln2 targeted by SCF; the S-phase cyclin Clb5, whose ubiquitination is likely to involve a combination of E3 (ubiquitin protein ligase) enzymes; and anaphase-promoting complex targets, such as the B-type cyclin Clb2 and the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Our results indicate that the Pds1 degradation defect of the rpn3 mutants most likely accounts for the metaphase arrest phenotype observed. Surprisingly, but consistent with the lack of a G1 arrest phenotype in thermosensitive rpn3 strains, the Cdk inhibitor Sic1 exhibits a short half-life regardless of the RPN3 genotype. In striking contrast, Sic1 turnover is severely impaired by a temperature-sensitive mutation in RPN12/NIN1, encoding another essential RP subunit. While other interpretations are possible, these data strongly argue for the requirement of distinct RP subunits for efficient proteolysis of specific cell cycle regulators. The potential implications of these data are discussed in the context of possible Rpn3

  18. Effects of dietary protein supply on caseins, whey proteins, proteolysis and renneting properties in milk from cows grazing clover or N fertilized grass.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, J E; Ostersen, S; Justesen, N C; Aaes, O

    1999-05-01

    The objective of this work was to examine whether variation in the amino acid supply to cows could be a reason for the reduced casein content and poorer renneting properties of milk that often occur in late summer, or whether these effects are related to proteolysis in the raw milk. In a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design, we investigated the effects of sward (clover v. rye-grass) and supplementary feed with a high or low level of rumen-soluble N or of rumen undegradable protein on milk protein composition during the grazing season. A total of 32 Danish Holstein cows were included in the experiment. Milk protein and casein contents and the ratios casein N:total N and casein:true protein were at a minimum in late summer, whereas the contents of urea, non-protein N and whey protein were higher during this period. These seasonal effects were unrelated to either the type of supplementary feed or the type of sward; neither were they clearly related to proteolysis, although casein: true protein was related to the proteose peptone content. The results indicated that whey proteins other than alpha-lactalbumin or beta-lactoglobulin accounted for the higher proportion or concentration of whey protein in late summer. Based on a principal component analysis including variables such as citric acid, lactose and non-protein N, we suggest that the cows' energy supply during this period may be a critical factor in determining the milk protein composition, although our results were not conclusive. There was an interaction between the supplement of rumen undegradable protein and type of sward. When clover was grazed, a high supplement increased the concentrations of protein and casein in milk and the kappa-casein: total casein ratio. When rye-grass was grazed, the opposite response was found, and overall milk protein yield was not affected. The very low N content of clover in early summer reduced milk protein and casein protein during this period.

  19. Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome–Dependent Proteolysis of Human Cyclin a Starts at the Beginning of Mitosis and Is Not Subject to the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Geley, Stephan; Kramer, Edgar; Gieffers, Christian; Gannon, Julian; Peters, Jan-Michael; Hunt, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin A is a stable protein in S and G2 phases, but is destabilized when cells enter mitosis and is almost completely degraded before the metaphase to anaphase transition. Microinjection of antibodies against subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) or against human Cdc20 (fizzy) arrested cells at metaphase and stabilized both cyclins A and B1. Cyclin A was efficiently polyubiquitylated by Cdc20 or Cdh1-activated APC/C in vitro, but in contrast to cyclin B1, the proteolysis of cyclin A was not delayed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. The degradation of cyclin B1 was accelerated by inhibition of the spindle assembly checkpoint. These data suggest that the APC/C is activated as cells enter mitosis and immediately targets cyclin A for degradation, whereas the spindle assembly checkpoint delays the degradation of cyclin B1 until the metaphase to anaphase transition. The “destruction box” (D-box) of cyclin A is 10–20 residues longer than that of cyclin B. Overexpression of wild-type cyclin A delayed the metaphase to anaphase transition, whereas expression of cyclin A mutants lacking a D-box arrested cells in anaphase. PMID:11285280

  20. SpeB proteolysis with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing for the characterization of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of reference and biosimilar Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zichuan; Perrault, Ronel; Zhao, Yun; Ding, Julia

    2016-05-01

    The charge variations of therapeutic monoclonal antibody reveal important information of the post-translational modifications that may potentially impact the potency and safety of pharmaceutical products, especially during the evaluation of biosimilarity of therapeutic proteins. In this work, a novel SpeB-based proteolysis strategy coupling with imaged capillary isoelectric focusing was developed for the determination of domain-specific charge heterogeneities of innovator and generic Rituximab drug products from United States, European and Indian markets. It was observed that innovator Rituximab from the United States and Europe share highly similar peak distributions and charge heterogeneities with 26.2-26.6% Fc/2, 28.9-29.3% LC and 44.4-44.5% Fd peak areas detected, respectively, while multiple basic variations of Fc/2 and less acidic LC and Fd species were found from generic Rituximab from India with 20.9% Fc/2, 32.3% LC and 46.9% Fd peak areas detected. It was also demonstrated that structural changes caused by Carboxypeptidase B treatment and deamidation study at pH extremes could be sensitively captured with the established method, with the results further indicating that the generic product's basic variations of Fc/2 were un-cleaved Lysine residues, while the lack of certain acidic peaks on LC and Fd probably was due to the lower level of deamidation. This new strategy could become a useful tool to reveal domain-specific charge heterogeneities profiles of a variety of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in regulated environments.

  1. Latent and active polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in red clover (Trifolium pratense) and use of a low PPO mutant to study the role of PPO in proteolysis reduction.

    PubMed

    Winters, Ana L; Minchin, Frank R; Michaelson-Yeates, Terry P T; Lee, Michael R F; Morris, Phillip

    2008-04-23

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in leaf extracts of wild type (WT) red clover and a mutant line expressing greatly reduced levels of PPO (LP red clover) has been characterized. Both latent and active forms of PPO were present, with the latent being the predominant form. PPO enzyme and substrate (phaselic acid) levels fluctuated over a growing season and were not correlated. Protease activation of latent PPO was demonstrated; however, the rate was too low to have an immediate effect following extraction. A novel, more rapid PPO activation mechanism by the enzyme's own substrate was identified. Rates of protein breakdown and amino acid release were significantly higher in LP red clover extracts compared with WT extracts, with 20 versus 6% breakdown of total protein and 1.9 versus 0.4 mg/g FW of free amino acids released over 24 h, respectively. Inclusion of ascorbic acid increased the extent of protein breakdown. Free phenol content decreased during a 24 h incubation of WT red clover extracts, whereas protein-bound phenol increased and high molecular weight protein species were formed. Inhibition of proteolysis occurred during wilting and ensilage of WT compared with LP forage (1.9 vs 5 and 17 vs 21 g/kg of DM free amino acids for 24 h wilted forage and 90 day silage, respectively). This study shows that whereas constitutive red clover PPO occurs predominantly in the latent form, this fraction can contribute to reducing protein breakdown in crude extracts and during ensilage.

  2. The D-Box-activating domain (DAD) is a new proteolysis signal that stimulates the silent D-Box sequence of Aurora-A.

    PubMed

    Castro, Anna; Vigneron, Suzanne; Bernis, Cyril; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Prigent, Claude; Lorca, Thierry

    2002-12-01

    We have demonstrated previously that Xenopus Aurora-A is degraded at late mitosis by the APC/Fizzy-Related in a D-Box-dependent manner. Here we demonstrate that, although Aurora-B possesses the same D-Box as Aurora-A, Aurora-B is not degraded by this ubiquitin ligase. We have constructed a chimera Aurora-A/B with the N-terminus of Aurora-A and the C-terminus of Aurora-B and we have examined its degradation by APC/Fizzy-Related. We demonstrate that the N-terminus of Aurora-A confers degradation capacity on the C-terminus of Aurora-B and that this feature is blocked by mutation of the conserved D-Box sequence. We characterize the minimal degradation signal at the N-terminus of Aurora-A and demonstrate that its deletion blocks the degradation of this protein by APC/Fizzy-Related. Thus, we conclude that two different degradation signals are required for proteolysis of Aurora-A. The first one, which we designated D-Box-activating domain, within the N-terminal domain of Aurora-A confers the functionality to the second, a silent D-Box, present within the C-terminus of the kinase.

  3. The D-Box-activating domain (DAD) is a new proteolysis signal that stimulates the silent D-Box sequence of Aurora-A

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Anna; Vigneron, Suzanne; Bernis, Cyril; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Prigent, Claude; Lorca, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that Xenopus Aurora-A is degraded at late mitosis by the APC/Fizzy-Related in a D-Box-dependent manner. Here we demonstrate that, although Aurora-B possesses the same D-Box as Aurora-A, Aurora-B is not degraded by this ubiquitin ligase. We have constructed a chimera Aurora-A/B with the N-terminus of Aurora-A and the C-terminus of Aurora-B and we have examined its degradation by APC/Fizzy-Related. We demonstrate that the N-terminus of Aurora-A confers degradation capacity on the C-terminus of Aurora-B and that this feature is blocked by mutation of the conserved D-Box sequence. We characterize the minimal degradation signal at the N-terminus of Aurora-A and demonstrate that its deletion blocks the degradation of this protein by APC/Fizzy-Related. Thus, we conclude that two different degradation signals are required for proteolysis of Aurora-A. The first one, which we designated D-Box-activating domain, within the N-terminal domain of Aurora-A confers the functionality to the second, a silent D-Box, present within the C-terminus of the kinase. PMID:12446569

  4. tmRNAs that encode proteolysis-inducing tags are found in all known bacterial genomes: A two-piece tmRNA functions in Caulobacter

    PubMed Central

    Keiler, Kenneth C.; Shapiro, Lucy; Williams, Kelly P.

    2000-01-01

    A general mechanism in bacteria to rescue stalled ribosomes and to clear the cell of incomplete polypeptides involves an RNA species, tmRNA (SsrA), which functions as both a tRNA and an mRNA. This RNA encodes a peptide tag that is incorporated at the end of the aberrant polypeptide and targets it for proteolysis. We have identified a circularly permuted version of the tmRNA gene in α-proteobacteria as well as in a lineage of cyanobacteria. The genes in these two groups seem to have arisen from two independent permutation events. As a result of the altered genetic structure, these tmRNAs are composed of two distinct RNA molecules. The mature two-piece tmRNAs are predicted to have a tRNA-like domain and an mRNA-like domain similar to those of standard one-piece tmRNAs, with a break located in the loop containing the tag reading frame. A related sequence was found in the mitochondrial genome of Reclinomonas americana, but only the tRNA-like portion is retained. Although several sequence and structural motifs that are conserved among one-piece tmRNAs have been lost, the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus produces a functional two-piece tmRNA. PMID:10884408

  5. The effects of age, energy and protein intake on protein turnover and the expression of proteolysis-related genes in the broiler breeder hen.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, Ricardo D; Salas, Catalina; England, Judy; Cerrate, Sandro; Coon, Craig N

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the changes that occur to proteolysis and related genes due to age, protein, and energy intake in high-yield broiler breeder hens (Gallus gallus). Cobb 700 broiler breeders were randomly assigned to one of six diets in a 2×3 factorial fashion. Two levels of energy (390 and 450 kcal/day) and three levels of protein (22, 24, and 26 g CP/day) were utilized. Protein turnover was determined in the left pectoralis at 22, 26, 31 and 44 weeks. Relative mRNA expression of calpain 2 (CAPN2), proteasome C2 subunit (PSMA1), and F box protein 32 (FBXO32) were determined via RT-PCR at 20, 25, and 44 weeks. Contrasts indicate fractional synthesis rate (FSR) and FBXO32 increase to a maximum at 25-26 weeks and a decrease thereafter. A significant drop in PSMA1 and FBXO32 was observed between 25 and 44 weeks and matched the decrease observed in FBR. No differences were detected in the levels of fractional synthesis and degradation, or the expression of CAPN2, PSMA1, and FBXO32, due to protein or energy intake. In summary, protein turnover was upregulated during the transition into sexual maturity and decreased thereafter. The observed changes in degradation appeared to be mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  6. Proteolysis of integrin alpha5 and beta1 subunits involved in retinoic acid-induced apoptosis in human hepatoma Hep3B cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S L; Cheng, C C; Shi, Y R; Chiang, C W

    2001-06-26

    Our previous report demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces detachment and death under serum starvation in several human tumor cell lines. In this study, we examined the influence of cell-extracellular matrix interaction on the ability of ATRA to induce apoptosis. Plating of human hepatoma Hep3B cells onto poly-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-coated plates in the absence of serum resulted in the acceleration of ATRA-induced apoptosis. In contrast, ATRA-induced apoptosis was significantly suppressed by plating cells onto Matrigel-coated plates but not suppressed by culturing onto collagen-, laminin-, vitronectin-, or fibronectin-coated plates. Exogenously added soluble collagen, laminin, fibronectin, vitronectin or Matrigel failed to suppress ATRA-induced apoptosis. Results from the adhesion assay indicated that the cell attachment to fibronectin was significantly inhibited by ATRA. Treatment with perturbing antibody against integrin alpha5 or beta1 subunits resulted in promotion of ATRA-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the proteolytic cleavage of alpha5beta1 integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) proteins is linked to the early phase of the ATRA-induced apoptotic process. Furthermore, ATRA-induced detachment, death, and cleavage of alpha5beta1 integrin and FAK were drastically suppressed by plating cells onto Matrigel-coated plates. These findings provide evidence that abrogation of cell adhesion, through proteolysis of alpha5beta1 integrin and FAK, is closely linked to ATRA-induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells.

  7. Proteolysis, lipolysis, volatile compounds, texture, and flavor of Hispánico cheese made using frozen ewe milk curds pressed for different times.

    PubMed

    Picon, A; Gaya, P; Fernández-García, E; Rivas-Cañedo, A; Avila, M; Nuñez, M

    2010-07-01

    Hispánico cheese is manufactured in Spain from a mixture of cow and ewe milk. Production of ewe milk varies throughout the year, with a peak in spring and a valley in summer and autumn. To overcome this seasonal shortage, curd from spring ewe milk may be frozen and used for cheese manufacture some months later. In the present work, ewe milk curds pressed for 15, 60, or 120 min were held at -24 degrees C for 4 mo, thawed, cut to 1-mm pieces, and mixed with fresh cow milk curd for the manufacture of experimental Hispánico cheeses. Control cheese was made from a mixture of pasteurized cow and ewe milk in the same (80:20) proportion. Cheeses, made in duplicate experiments, were analyzed throughout a 60-d ripening period. No significant differences between cheeses were found for lactic acid bacteria counts, dry matter content, hydrophilic peptides, 47 out of 68 vol.tile compounds, texture, and flavor characteristics. On the other hand, differences of minor practical significance between experimental and control cheeses, unrelated to the use of frozen ewe milk curd or the pressing time of ewe milk curd, were found for pH value, aminopeptidase activity, proteolysis, hydrophobic peptides, free amino acids, free fatty acids, and the remaining 21 vol.tile compounds. It may be concluded that the use of frozen ewe milk curd in the manufacture of Hispánico cheese does not alter its main characteristics.

  8. Controlled Proteolysis Activates the Plasma Membrane Ca2+ Pump of Higher Plants (A Comparison with the Effect of Calmodulin in Plasma Membrane from Radish Seedlings).

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, F.; Carnelli, A.; De Michelis, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of calmodulin and of controlled trypsin treatments on the activity of the Ca2+ pump were investigated in plasma membrane purified from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. Treatment of the plasma membrane with ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA), which removed about two-thirds of the plasma membrane-associated calmodulin, markedly increased the stimulation of the Ca2+ pump by calmodulin. In EDTA-treated plasma membrane, stimulation by calmodulin of the Ca2+ pump activity was maximal at low free Ca2+ (2-5 [mu]M) and decreased with the increase of free Ca2+ concentration. The Ca2+ pump activity was stimulated also by a controlled treatment of the plasma membrane with trypsin: the effect of trypsin treatment depended on the concentration of both trypsin and plasma membrane proteins and on the duration of incubation. Stimulation of the Ca2+ pump activity by trypsin treatment of the plasma membrane was similar to that induced by calmodulin both in extent and in dependence on the free Ca2+ concentration in the assay medium. Moreover, the Ca2+ pump of trypsin-treated plasma membrane was insensitive to further stimulation by calmodulin, suggesting that limited proteolysis preferentially cleaves a regulatory domain of the enzyme that is involved in its activation by calmodulin. PMID:12231945

  9. Specific proteolysis of native alanine racemases from Salmonella typhimurium: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of the clipped two-domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Galakatos, N.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1987-12-15

    Native DadB and Alr alanine racemases (M/sub r/ 39,000) from Salmonella typhimurium are proteolyzed at homologous positions by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin, trypsin, and subtilisin to generate in all cases two nonoverlapping polypeptides of M/sub r/ 28,000 and 11,000. Under nondenaturing conditions, chymotryptic digest results in an associated form of the two fragments which possesses 3% of the original catalytic activity, incorporates 0.76 equiv of the mechanism-based inactivator ..beta..-chloro-(/sup 14/C)-D-alanine, and exhibits a UV circular dichroism profile identical with that of native enzyme. Protein sequence analysis of the denatured chymotryptic fragments indicates the presence of a tetrapeptide interdomain hinge (DadB, residues 254-257; Alr, residues 256-259) that is attacked at both ends during proteolysis. Under the previously employed digest conditions, NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/-reduced DadB holoenzyme is resistant to ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin and trypsin and is labile only toward subtilisin. These data suggest that the hinge structure is essential for a catalytically efficient enzyme species and is sensitive to active site geometry. The sequence at the hinge region is also conserved in alanine racemases from Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Immobilization of trypsin in the layer-by-layer coating of graphene oxide and chitosan on in-channel glass fiber for microfluidic proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huimin; Chen, Qiwen; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2011-12-21

    In this report, trypsin was immobilized in the layer-by-layer (LBL) coating of graphene oxide (GO) and chitosan on a piece of glass fiber to fabricate microchip bioreactor for efficient proteolysis. LBL deposition driven by electrostatic forces easily took place on the surface of the glass fiber, providing mild environmental conditions so that the denaturation and autolysis of the immobilized trypsin was minimized. Prior to use, a piece of the prepared trypsin-immobilized glass fiber was inserted into the channel of a microchip to form a core-changeable bioreactor. The novel GO-based bioreactor can be regenerated by changing its fiber core. The feasibility and performance of the unique bioreactor were demonstrated by the tryptic digestion of bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin and the digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 10 s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The digestion performance of the core-changeable GO-based microchip bioreactor was comparable to that of 12-h in-solution tryptic digestion. The novel microchip bioreactor is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification.

  11. Calpain-mediated proteolysis of polycystin-1 C-terminus induces JAK2 and ERK signal alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunho; Kang, Ah-Young; Ko, Ah-ra; Park, Hayne Cho; So, Insuk; Park, Jong Hoon; Cheong, Hae Il; Hwang, Young-Hwan; and others

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a hereditary renal disease caused by mutations in PKD1 (85%) or PKD2 (15%), is characterized by the development of gradually enlarging multiple renal cysts and progressive renal failure. Polycystin-1 (PC1), PKD1 gene product, is an integral membrane glycoprotein which regulates a number of different biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell polarity, and tubulogenesis. PC1 is a target of various proteolytic cleavages and proteosomal degradations, but its role in intracellular signaling pathways remains poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrated that PC1 is a novel substrate for μ- and m-calpains, which are calcium-dependent cysteine proteases. Overexpression of PC1 altered both Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signals, which were independently regulated by calpain-mediated PC1 degradation. They suggest that the PC1 function on JAK2 and ERK signaling pathways might be regulated by calpains in response to the changes in intracellular calcium concentration. - Highlights: • Polycystin-1 is a target of ubiquitin-independent degradation by calpains. • The PEST domain is required for calpain-mediated degradation of polycystin-1. • Polycystin-1 may independently regulate JAK2 and ERK signaling pathways.

  12. Gauge Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    convergence theorems. Lebesgue developed his theory of measure and integration to address these shortcomings. His integral is more powerful in the...This relatively recent integral possesses the intuitive description of the Riemann integral, with the power of the Lebesgue integral. The purpose of this...strong convergence theorems. Lebesgue developed his theory of measure and integration to address these shortcomings. His integral is more powerful in the

  13. Integrated Means Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odegard, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operation of the Cessna Pilot Center (CPC) flight training systems. The program is based on a series of integrated activities involving stimulus, response, reinforcement and association components. Results show that the program can significantly reduce in-flight training time. (CP)

  14. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P < 0.05) and was restored after rehabilitation. EAA-induced mTORC1 signalling and protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P < 0.05). Although both groups had blunted mTORC1 signalling, increased REDD2 and MURF1 mRNA after bedrest, only older adults had reduced EAA-induced protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that older adults are more susceptible than young persons to muscle loss after short-term bed rest. This may be partially explained by a combined suppression of protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults. Key points Five days of bed rest resulted in a reduction in leg lean mass and strength in older adults. After bed rest, older (but not younger) adults had reduced amino acid

  15. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-09-15

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P < 0.05) and was restored after rehabilitation. EAA-induced mTORC1 signalling and protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P < 0.05). Although both groups had blunted mTORC1 signalling, increased REDD2 and MURF1 mRNA after bedrest, only older adults had reduced EAA-induced protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P < 0.05). We conclude that older adults are more susceptible than young persons to muscle loss after short-term bed rest. This may be partially explained by a combined suppression of protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults.

  16. SILAC-Pulse Proteolysis: A Mass Spectrometry-Based Method for Discovery and Cross-Validation in Proteome-Wide Studies of Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Jagat; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-12-01

    Reported here is the use of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and pulse proteolysis (PP) for detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions on the proteomic scale. The incorporation of SILAC into PP enables the PP technique to be used for the unbiased detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions in complex biological mixtures (e.g., cell lysates) without the need for prefractionation. The SILAC-PP technique is demonstrated in two proof-of-principle experiments using proteins in a yeast cell lysate and two test ligands including a well-characterized drug, cyclosporine A (CsA), and a non-hydrolyzable adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue, adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The well-known tight-binding interaction between CsA and cyclophilin A was successfully detected and quantified in replicate analyses, and a total of 33 proteins from a yeast cell lysate were found to have AMP-PNP-induced stability changes. In control experiments, the method's false positive rate of protein target discovery was found to be in the range of 2.1% to 3.6%. SILAC-PP and the previously reported stability of protein from rates of oxidation (SPROX) technique both report on the same thermodynamic properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. However, they employ different probes and mass spectrometry-based readouts. This creates the opportunity to cross-validate SPROX results with SILAC-PP results, and vice-versa. As part of this work, the SILAC-PP results obtained here were cross-validated with previously reported SPROX results on the same model systems to help differentiate true positives from false positives in the two experiments.

  17. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  18. Aspergillus Oryzae S2 α-Amylase Domain C Involvement in Activity and Specificity: In Vivo Proteolysis, Molecular and Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sahnoun, Mouna; Jemli, Sonia; Trabelsi, Sahar; Ayadi, Leila; Bejar, Samir

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Aspergillus oryzae strain S2 had produced two α-amylase isoforms named AmyA and AmyB. The apparent molecular masses revealed by SDS-PAGE were 50 and 42 kDa, respectively. Yet AmyB has a higher catalytic efficiency. Based on a monitoring study of the α-amylase production in both the presence and absence of different protease inhibitors, a chymotrypsin proteolysis process was detected in vivo generating AmyB. A. oryzae S2 α-amylase gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed nine exons, eight introns and an encoding open reading frame of 1500 bp corresponding to AmyA isoform. The amino-acid sequence analysis revealed aY371 potential chymotrypsin cleaving site, likely to be the AmyB C-Terminal end and two other potential sites at Y359, and F379. A zymogram with a high acrylamide concentration was used. It highlighted two other closed apparent molecular mass α-amylases termed AmyB1 and AmyB2 reaching40 kDa and 43 kDa. These isoforms could be possibly generated fromY359, and F379secondary cut, respectively. The molecular modeling study showed that AmyB preserved the (β/α)8 barrel domain and the domain B but lacked the C-terminal domain C. The contact map analysis and the docking studies strongly suggested a higher activity and substrate binding affinity for AmyB than AmyA which was previously experimentally exhibited. This could be explained by the easy catalytic cleft accessibility. PMID:27101008

  19. C-Terminally fused affinity Strep-tag II is removed by proteolysis from recombinant human erythropoietin expressed in transgenic tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Kittur, Farooqahmed S.; Lalgondar, Mallikarjun; Hung, Chiu-Yueh; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Asialo-erythropoietin (asialo-EPO), a desialylated form of EPO, is a potent tissue-protective agent. Recently, we and others have exploited a low cost plant-based expression system to produce recombinant human asialo-EPO (asialo-rhuEPOP). To facilitate purification from plant extracts, Strep-tag II was engineered at the C-terminus of EPO. Although asialo-rhuEPOP was efficiently expressed in transgenic tobacco plants, affinity purification based on Strep-tag II did not result in the recovery of the protein. In this study, we investigated the stability of Strep-tag II tagged asialo-rhuEPOP expressed in tobacco plants to understand whether this fused tag is cleaved or inaccessible. Sequencing RT-PCR products confirmed that fused DNA sequences encoding Strep-tag II were properly transcribed, and three-dimensional protein structure model revealed that the tag must be fully accessible. However, Western blot analysis of leaf extracts and purified asialo-rhuEPOP revealed that the Strep-tag II was absent on the protein. Additionally, no peptide fragment containing Strep-tag II was identified in the LC-MS/MS analysis of purified protein further supporting that the affinity tag was absent on asialo-rhuEPOP. However, Strep-tag II was detected on asialo-rhuEPOP that was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting that the Strep-tag II is removed during protein secretion or extraction. These findings together with recent reports that C-terminally fused Strep-tag II or IgG Fc domain are also removed from EPO in tobacco plants, suggest that its C-terminus may be highly susceptible to proteolysis in tobacco plants. Therefore, direct fusion of purification tags at the C-terminus of EPO should be avoided while expressing it in tobacco plants. PMID:25504272

  20. Effects of FlAsH/Tetracysteine (TC) tag on PrP proteolysis and PrPres formation by TC-scanning

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Yuzuru; Hohsfield, Lindsay A.; Hollister, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    The FlAsH/tetracysteine (FlAsH/TC) tag is a powerful tool for fluorescent labeling of proteins. However, even small tags such as FlAsH/TC could alter the behavior of the tagged proteins, especially if the insertion occurs at internal sites. Defining the influence of FlAsH/TC on nearby protein-protein interactions might aid in selecting appropriate positions for internal TC insertions and allow the exploitation of serial FlAsH/TC insertions (TC-scanning) as a probe to characterize sites of protein-protein interaction. To explore this application in the context of substrate-protease interactions, we analyzed the effect of FlAsH/TC insertions on proteolysis of cellular prion protein (PrPsen) in in vitro reactions and generation of the C1 metabolic fragment of PrPsen in live neuroblastoma cells. The influence of FlAsH/TC insertion was evaluated by TC-scanning across the cleavage sites of each protease. The results showed that FlAsH/TC inhibited protease cleavage only within limited ranges of the cleavage sites that varied from about 1 to 6 residues-wide depending on the protease, providing an estimate of the PrP residues interacting with each protease. TC-scanning was also used to probe a different type of protein-protein interaction, the conformational conversion of FlAsH-PrPsen to the prion disease-associated isoform, PrPres. PrP constructs with FlAsH/TC insertions at residues 90–96 but not 97–101 were converted to FlAsH-PrPres, identifying a boundary separating loosely versus compactly folded regions of PrPres. Our observations demonstrate that TC-scanning with the FlAsH/TC tag can be a versatile method for probing protein-protein interactions and folding processes. PMID:23943295

  1. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction.

    PubMed

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema.

  2. Oxidative and proteolysis-related parameters of skeletal muscle from hamsters with experimental pulmonary emphysema: a comparison between papain and elastase induction

    PubMed Central

    Brunnquell, Cláudia R; Vieira, Nichelle A; Sábio, Laís R; Sczepanski, Felipe; Cecchini, Alessandra L; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether emphysema induced by elastase or papain triggers the same effects on skeletal muscle, related to oxidative stress and proteolysis, in hamsters. For this purpose, we evaluated pulmonary lesions, body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total and oxidized glutathiones, chemiluminescence stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide and carbonyl proteins), chymotrypsin-like and calpain-like proteolytic activities and muscle fibre cross-sectional area in the gastrocnemius muscles of emphysemic hamsters. Two groups of animals received different intratracheal inductions of experimental emphysema: by 40 mg/ml papain (EP) or 5.2 IU/100 g animal (EE) elastase (n = 10 animals/group). The control group received intratracheal instillation of 300 μl sterile NaCl 0.9%. Compared with the control group, the EP group had reduced muscle weight (18.34%) and the EE group had increased muscle weight (8.37%). Additionally, tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence, carbonylated proteins and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were all elevated in the EP group compared to the CS group, while total glutathione was decreased compared to the EE group. The EE group showed more fibres with increased cross-sectional areas and increased calpain-like activity. Together, these data show that elastase and papain, when used to induce experimental models of emphysema, lead to different speeds and types of adaptation. These findings provide more information on choosing a suitable experimental model for studying skeletal muscle adaptations in emphysema. PMID:26102076

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that a Ubiquitin-Mediated Proteolysis Pathway Is Important for Primary and Secondary Hair Follicle Development in Cashmere Goats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhu-qing; Fu, Shao-yin; Tarekegn, Getinet Mekuriaw; Bai, Xue; Bai, Yong-sheng; Li, Heng; Zhang, Wen-guang

    2016-01-01

    Background The fleece of cashmere goats contains two distinct populations of fibers, a short and fine non-medullated insulating cashmere fiber and a long and coarse medullated guard hair. The former is produced by secondary follicles (SFs) and the later by primary follicles (PFs). Evidence suggests that the induction of PFs and SFs may require different signaling pathways. The regulation of BMP2/4 signaling by noggin and Edar signaling via Downless genes are essential for the induction of SFs and PFs, respectively. However, these differently expressed genes of the signaling pathway cannot directly distinguish between the PFs and SFs. Results In this study, we selected RNA samples from 11 PFs and 7 SFs that included 145,525 exons. The pathway analysis of 4512 differentially expressed exons revealed that the most statistically significant metabolic pathway was related to the ubiquitin–mediated proteolysis pathway (UMPP) (P<3.32x 10−7). In addition, the 51 exons of the UMPP that were differentially expressed between the different types of hair follicle (HFs) were compared by cluster analysis. This resulted in the PFs and SFs being divided into two classes. The expression level of two selected exons was analyzed by qRT-PCR, and the results indicated that the expression patterns were consistent with the deep sequencing results obtained by RNA-Seq. Conclusions Based on the comparative transcriptome analysis of 18 HFs from cashmere goats, a large number of differentially expressed exons were identified using a high-throughput sequencing approach. This study suggests that UMPP activation is a prominent signaling pathway for distinguishing the PFs and SFs of cashmere goats. It is also a meaningful contribution to the theoretical basis of the biological study of the HFs of cashmere goats and other mammals. PMID:27695037

  4. Multiple vitellogenins and product yolk proteins in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Molecular characterization, quantification in plasma, liver and ovary, and maturational proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozlem; Prat, Francisco; Ibáñez, A Jose; Köksoy, Sadi; Amano, Haruna; Sullivan, Craig V

    2016-01-01

    Three complete vitellogenin (Vtg) polypeptides of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), an acanthomorph teleost spawning pelagic eggs in seawater, were deduced from cDNA and identified as VtgAa, VtgAb and VtgC based on current Vtg nomenclature and phylogeny. Label free quantitative mass spectrometry verified the presence of the three sea bass Vtgs or their product yolk proteins (YPs) in liver, plasma and ovary of postvitellogenic females. As evidenced by normalized spectral counts, VtgAb-derived protein was 2- to 5-fold more abundant, depending on sample type, than for VtgAa, while VtgC-derived protein was less abundant, albeit only 3-fold lower than for VtgAb in the ovary. Western blotting with Vtg type-specific antisera raised against corresponding gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins (Lvs) detected all three types of sea bass Vtg in the blood plasma of gravid females and/or estrogenized males and showed that all three forms of sea bass Lv undergo limited partial degradation during oocyte maturation. The comparatively high levels of VtgC-derived YPs in fully-grown oocytes and the maturational proteolysis of all three types of Lv differ from what has been reported for other teleosts spawning pelagic eggs in seawater but are similar to recent findings for two species of North American Moronidae, the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana), which spawn pelagic and demersal eggs, respectively in fresh water. Together with the high Vtg sequence homologies and virtually identical structural features of each type of Vtg between species, these findings indicate that the moronid multiple Vtg systems do not substantially vary with reproductive environment.

  5. Loss of peripheral protection in pancreatic islets by proteolysis-driven impairment of VTCN1 (B7-H4) presentation is associated with the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Radichev, Ilian A.; Maneva-Radicheva, Lilia V.; Amatya, Christina; Salehi, Maryam; Parker, Camille; Ellefson, Jacob; Burn, Paul; Savinov, Alexei Y.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific activation of T cells is an essential process in the control of effector immune responses. Defects in T cell activation, particularly in the co-stimulation step, have been associated with many autoimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Recently, we demonstrated that the phenotype of impaired negative co-stimulation, due to reduced levels of V-set domain-containing T cell activation inhibitor-1 (VTCN1) protein on antigen-presenting cells, is shared between diabetes-susceptible NOD mice and human T1D patients. Here, we show that a similar process takes place in the target organ, as both α and β cells within pancreatic islets gradually lose their VTCN1 protein during autoimmune diabetes development despite the up-regulation of the VTCN1 gene. Diminishment of functional islet cells' VTCN1 is caused by the active proteolysis by metalloproteinase NRD1 and leads to the significant induction of proliferation and cytokine production by diabetogenic T cells. Inhibition of NRD1 activity, on the other hand, stabilizes VTCN1 and dulls the anti-islet T cell responses. Therefore, we suggest a general endogenous mechanism of defective VTCN1 negative co-stimulation, which affects both lymphoid and peripheral target tissues during T1D progression and results in aggressive anti-islet T cell responses. This mechanism is tied to up-regulation of NRD1 expression and likely acts in two synergistic proteolytic modes: cell-intrinsic intracellular and cell-extrinsic systemic. Our results highlight an importance of VTCN1 stabilization on cell surfaces for the restoration of altered balance of immune control during T1D. PMID:26773144

  6. Lipopolysaccharide Activation of the TPL-2/MEK/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade Is Regulated by IκB Kinase-Induced Proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105†

    PubMed Central

    Beinke, S.; Robinson, M. J.; Hugunin, M.; Ley, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    The MEK kinase TPL-2 (also known as Cot) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in macrophages and consequent upregulation of genes involved in innate immune responses. In resting cells, TPL-2 forms a stoichiometric complex with NF-κB1 p105, which negatively regulates its MEK kinase activity. Here, it is shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of primary macrophages causes the release of both long and short forms of TPL-2 from p105 and that TPL-2 MEK kinase activity is restricted to this p105-free pool. Activation of TPL-2, MEK, and ERK by LPS is also demonstrated to require proteasome-mediated proteolysis. p105 is known to be proteolysed by the proteasome following stimulus-induced phosphorylation of two serines in its PEST region by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex. Expression of a p105 point mutant, which is not susceptible to signal-induced proteolysis, in RAW264.7 macrophages impairs LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and its subsequent activation of MEK. Furthermore, expression of wild-type but not mutant p105 reconstitutes LPS stimulation of MEK and ERK phosphorylation in primary NF-κB1-deficient macrophages. Consistently, pharmacological blockade of IKK inhibits LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and TPL-2 activation. These data show that IKK-induced p105 proteolysis is essential for LPS activation of TPL-2, thus revealing a novel function of IKK in the regulation of the ERK MAP kinase cascade. PMID:15485931

  7. Integrating Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCATA Journal for Art Teachers, 1991

    1991-01-01

    These articles focus on art as a component of interdisciplinary integration. (1) "Integrated Curriculum and the Visual Arts" (Anna Kindler) considers various aspects of integration and implications for art education. (2) "Integration: The New Literacy" (Tim Varro) illustrates how the use of technology can facilitate…

  8. Inhibitors of metalloendopeptidase EC 3.4.24.15 and EC 3.4.24.16 stabilized against proteolysis by the incorporation of beta-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Steer, David; Lew, Rebecca; Perlmutter, Patrick; Smith, A Ian; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2002-09-03

    The enzyme EC 3.4.24.15 (EP 24.15) is a zinc metalloendopeptidase whose precise function in vivo remains unknown but is thought to participate in the regulated metabolism of a number of specific neuropeptides. The lack of stable and selective inhibitors has hindered the determination of the exact function of EP 24.15. Of the limited number of EP 24.15 inhibitors that have been developed, N-[1-(R,S)-carboxy-3-phenylpropyl]-Ala-Ala-Tyr-p-aminobenzoate (CFP) is the most widely studied. CFP is a potent and specific inhibitor, but it is unstable in vivo due to cleavage between the alanine and tyrosine residues by the enzyme neprilysin (EP 24.11). This cleavage by EP 24.11 generates a potent inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme, thereby limiting the use of CFP for in vivo studies. To develop specific inhibitors of EP 24.15 that are resistant to in vitro and potentially in vivo proteolysis by EP 24.11, this study incorporated beta-amino acids replacing the Ala-Tyr scissile alpha-amino acids of CFP. Both C2 and C3 substituted beta-amino acids were synthesized and substituted at the EP 24.11 scissile Ala-Tyr bond. Significant EP 24.15 inhibitory activity was observed with some of the beta-amino acid containing analogues. Moreover, binding to EP 24.11 was eliminated, thus rendering all analogues containing beta-amino acids resistant to degradation by EP 24.11. Selective inhibition of either EP 24.15 or EP 24.16 was also observed with some analogues. The results demonstrated the use of beta-amino acids in the design of inhibitors of EP 24.15 and EP 24.16 with K(i)'s in the low micromolar range. At the same time, these analogues were resistant to cleavage by the related metalloendopeptidase EP 24.11, in contrast to the alpha-amino acid based parent peptide. This study has therefore clearly shown the potential of beta-amino acids in the design of stable enzyme inhibitors and their use in generating molecules with selectivity between closely related enzymes.

  9. Where do the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes ('systemic enzyme therapy') come from? Microbial proteolysis as a possible starting point.

    PubMed

    Biziulevicius, Gediminas A

    2006-01-01

    Enteric-coated proteolytic enzyme preparations like Wobenzym and Phlogenzym are widely used for the so-called 'systemic enzyme therapy' both in humans and animals. Numerous publications reveal that oral proteolytic enzymes are able to stimulate directly the activity of immune competent cells as well as to increase efficiency of some of their products. But origins of the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes are still unclear. The hypothesis described here suggests that it may be proteolysis of intestinal microorganisms that makes the immune competent cells to work in the immunostimulatory manner. The hypothesis was largely formed by several scientific observations: First, microbial lysis products (lipopolysaccharides, muropeptides and other peptidoglycan fragments, beta-glucans, etc.) are well known for their immunostimulatory action. Second, a normal human being hosts a mass of intestinal microorganisms equivalent to about 1 kg. The biomass (mainly due to naturally occurring autolysis) continuously supplies the host's organism with immunostimulatory microbial cell components. Third, the immunostimulatory effects resulting from the oral application of exogenously acting antimicrobial (lytic) enzyme preparations, such as lysozyme and lysosubtilin, are likely to be a result of the action of microbial lysis products. Fourth, cell walls of most microorganisms contain a considerable amount of proteins/peptides, a possible target for exogenous proteolytic enzymes. In fact, several authors have already shown that a number of proteases possess an ability to lyse the microbial cells in vitro. Fifth, the pretreatment of microbial cells (at least of some species) in vitro with proteolytic enzymes makes them more sensitive to the lytic action of lysozyme and, otherwise, pretreatment with lysozyme makes them more susceptible to proteolytic degradation. Sixth, exogenous proteases, when in the intestines, may participate in final steps of food-protein digestion

  10. Dynamic regulation of platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF-D) activity and extracellular spatial distribution by matriptase-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2015-04-03

    The oncogenic roles of PDGF-D and its proteolytic activator, matriptase, have been strongly implicated in human prostate cancer. Latent full-length PDGF-D (FL-D) consists of a CUB domain, a growth factor domain (GFD), and the hinge region in between. Matriptase processes the FL-D dimer into a GFD dimer (GFD-D) in a stepwise manner, involving generation of a hemidimer (HD), an intermediate product containing one FL-D subunit and one GFD subunit. Although the HD is a pro-growth factor that can be processed into the GFD-D by matriptase, the HD can also act as a dominant-negative ligand that prevents PDGF-B-mediated β-PDGF receptor activation in fibroblasts. The active GFD-D can be further cleaved into a smaller and yet inactive form if matriptase-mediated proteolysis persists. Through mutagenesis and functional analyses, we found that the R(340)R(341)GR(343)A (P4-P1/P1') motif within the GFD is the matriptase cleavage site through which matriptase can deactivate PDGF-D. Comparative sequence analysis based on the published crystal structure of PDGF-B predicted that the matriptase cleavage site R(340)R(341)GR(343)A is within loop III of the GFD, a critical structural element for its binding with the β-PDGF receptor. Interestingly, we also found that matriptase processing regulates the deposition of PDGF-D dimer species into the extracellular matrix (ECM) with increased binding from the FL-D dimer, to the HD, and to the GFD-D. Furthermore, we provide evidence that R(340)R(341)GR(343)A within the GFD is critical for PDGF-D deposition and binding to the ECM. In this study, we report a structural element crucial for the biological function and ECM deposition of PDGF-D and provide molecular insight into the dynamic functional interplay between the serine protease matriptase and PDGF-D.

  11. Dietary-induced changes of muscle growth rate in pigs: effects on in vivo and postmortem muscle proteolysis and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, L; Therkildsen, M; Riis, B; Sørensen, M T; Oksbjerg, N; Purslow, P P; Ertbjerg, P

    2002-11-01

    The effects of various growth rates in pigs induced by four different feeding strategies on the activity of the calpain system and on postmortem (PM) muscle proteolysis and tenderness development were studied. An increased growth rate may be caused by an increased protein turnover, which results in up-regulated levels of proteolytic enzymes in vivo that, in turn, possibly will affect PM tenderness development. It can be hypothesized that increased proteolytic activity pre-slaughter will increase the PM tenderization rate. From postnatal d 28 to d 90 (phase 1) the pigs were divided into two groups, given either ad libitum (A) or restricted (R, 60% of ad libitum) access to feed. The two groups were then divided into two subgroups, given either restricted or ad libitum access to feed from d 91 to slaughter at d 165 (phase 2). Measurements of the activity of mu-calpain, m-calpain, and calpastatin; concentrations of total collagen and the percent of soluble collagen; and RNA, DNA, and elongation factor-2 where made at slaugther. Myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI) was determined at slaughter and 24 h PM. Warner-Braztler shear force was determined 1 d and 4 d PM. Pigs fed restricted diets in phase 1 and fed ad libitum in phase 2 (RA pigs) had increased growth rates in the last phase compared to pigs fed ad libitum during both phase 1 and phase 2 (AA pigs). The increased growth rate (compensatory growth) was followed by an increased proteolytic potential (mu-calpain:calpastatin ratio), increased MFI values, and higher tenderization rates. There was a positive correlation between the activities of m-calpain and growth rates (r = 0.35, P = 0.03), and between RNA levels and growth rates (r = 0.43, P = 0.006). The proposed hypothesis is largely supported by the results. The activities of both mu- and m-calpain at slaughter were highest in fast-growing pigs. The calpain activity was highest in RA pigs, which in turn also had the fastest growth rates prior tslaughter among

  12. Effect of sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium salt cations on pH, proteolysis, organic acids, and microbial populations during storage of full-fat Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    McMahon, D J; Oberg, C J; Drake, M A; Farkye, N; Moyes, L V; Arnold, M R; Ganesan, B; Steele, J; Broadbent, J R

    2014-01-01

    Sodium reduction in cheese can assist in reducing overall dietary Na intake, yet saltiness is an important aspect of cheese flavor. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of partial substitution of Na with K on survival of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and nonstarter LAB (NSLAB), pH, organic acid production, and extent of proteolysis as water-soluble nitrogen (WSN) and protein profiles using urea-PAGE, in Cheddar cheese during 9mo of storage. Seven Cheddar cheeses with molar salt contents equivalent to 1.7% salt but with different ratios of Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations were manufactured as well as a low-salt cheese with 0.7% salt. The 1.7% salt cheeses had a mean composition of 352g of moisture/kg, 259g of protein/kg and 50% fat-on-dry-basis, and 17.5g of salt/kg (measured as Cl(-)). After salting, a faster initial decrease in cheese pH occurred with low salt or K substitution and it remained lower throughout storage. No difference in intact casein levels or percentage WSN levels between the various cheeses was observed, with the percentage WSN increasing from 5% at d 1 to 25% at 9mo. A greater decrease in intact αs1-casein than β-casein was detected, and the ratio of αs1-casein (f121-199) to αs1-casein could be used as an index of ripening. Typical changes in bacteria microflora occurred during storage, with lactococci decreasing gradually and NSLAB increasing. Lowering the Na content, even with K replacement, extended the crossover time when NSLAB became dominant. The crossover time was 4.5mo for the control cheese and was delayed to 5.2, 6.0, 6.1, and 6.2mo for cheeses with 10, 25, 50, and 75% K substitution. Including 10% Mg or Ca, along with 40% K, further increased crossover time, whereas the longest crossover time (7.3mo) was for low-salt cheese. By 9mo, NSLAB levels in all cheeses had increased from initial levels of ≤10(2) to approximately 10(6)cfu/g. Lactococci remained at 10(6) cfu/g in the low-salt cheese even after 9mo of storage. The propionic acid

  13. Pulmonary emphysema and proteolysis. 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.C.; Mittman, C. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 selections. Some of the titles are: Evaluation of Parenteral Administration of Recombinant DNA Produced Alpha-1-Antitrypsin to Primates; Properties of Mutant Forms of Alpha-1-Proteinase Inhibitor Prepared by Recombinant DNA Technology; Natural and Genetically Engineered Proteinase Inhibitors as Protective Agents against Connective Tissue Damage in an in Vitro System; and Structure, Genomic Organization and Tissue Distribution of Human Secretary Leukocyte-Protease Inhibitor (SLPI): A Potent Inhibitor of Neutrophil Elastase.

  14. Pulmonary emphysema and proteolysis: 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.C.; Mittman, C. )

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with the topic of pulmonary emphysema. Included are the following chapters: Abnormality of secretion of Z Alpha-1-antitrypsin, Proteases, antiproteases, and oxidants in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, Alveolar Leukocytes and protease responses with continuous vs. intermittent exposures to NO{sub 2}.

  15. Proteolysis in Plastids of Arabidopsis Thaliana: Functional Analysis of ClpS1,2,T and their Physical and Genetic Interactions with the ClpPR Protease Core Complex and Clp Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    van Wijk, Klaas

    2009-01-12

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles required for plant growth and biomass production. They synthesize many essential secondary metabolites (e.g. hormones, isoprenoids, amino acids, etc.) and house the photosynthetic apparatus needed for conversion of light energy and CO2 into chemical energy [in the form of reduced carbohydrates, ATP and NADPH]. Thus chloroplasts are essential for life on earth and essential for production of bioenergy. Formation and maintenance of a functional chloroplast requires an extensive investment in the biogenesis and homeostasis apparatus. Protease and proteolysis play a critical role in these processes, with the Clp gene family being particularly central. Proteolysis of proteins and protein complexes in plastids is poorly understood, and is not only critical for biogenesis, adaptation and maintenance but is also important for plant development. Several years ago, the vanWijk lab identified a large and relatively abundant ClpP/R/S complex, along with ClpC1,C2 and ClpD chaperones and a putative Clp affinity modulator in plastids. So far, no substrate recognition mechanism has been determined for any Clp complex in plants. The purpose of this grant was to initiate functional analysis of three members of the Clp family.

  16. Integration, Resegregation and Integration Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, William A.

    Recent increases in black migration to the suburbs and the continuing existence of discrimination in housing have emphasized the issues of integration and resegregation in suburban municipalities. To prevent resegregation, many integrated municipalities have adopted integration maintenance measures such as efforts to inform people that racial…

  17. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M

    2015-07-31

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148).

  18. Integration-independent Transgenic Huntington Disease Fragment Mouse Models Reveal Distinct Phenotypes and Life Span in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Robert; DeGiacomo, Francesco; Holcomb, Jennifer; Bonner, Akilah; Ring, Karen L.; Zhang, Ningzhe; Zafar, Khan; Weiss, Andreas; Lager, Brenda; Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W.; Chen, Sylvia; Kwak, Seung; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The cascade of events that lead to cognitive decline, motor deficits, and psychiatric symptoms in patients with Huntington disease (HD) is triggered by a polyglutamine expansion in the N-terminal region of the huntingtin (HTT) protein. A significant mechanism in HD is the generation of mutant HTT fragments, which are generally more toxic than the full-length HTT. The protein fragments observed in human HD tissue and mouse models of HD are formed by proteolysis or aberrant splicing of HTT. To systematically investigate the relative contribution of the various HTT protein proteolysis events observed in vivo, we generated transgenic mouse models of HD representing five distinct proteolysis fragments ending at amino acids 171, 463, 536, 552, and 586 with a polyglutamine length of 148. All lines contain a single integration at the ROSA26 locus, with expression of the fragments driven by the chicken β-actin promoter at nearly identical levels. The transgenic mice N171-Q148 and N552-Q148 display significantly accelerated phenotypes and a shortened life span when compared with N463-Q148, N536-Q148, and N586-Q148 transgenic mice. We hypothesized that the accelerated phenotype was due to altered HTT protein interactions/complexes that accumulate with age. We found evidence for altered HTT complexes in caspase-2 fragment transgenic mice (N552-Q148) and a stronger interaction with the endogenous HTT protein. These findings correlate with an altered HTT molecular complex and distinct proteins in the HTT interactome set identified by mass spectrometry. In particular, we identified HSP90AA1 (HSP86) as a potential modulator of the distinct neurotoxicity of the caspase-2 fragment mice (N552-Q148) when compared with the caspase-6 transgenic mice (N586-Q148). PMID:26025364

  19. Integrated Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinovitz, Stewart

    1987-01-01

    A strategy for integrated data and voice networks implemented at the University of Michigan is described. These networks often use multi-technologies, multi-vendors, and multi-transmission media that will be fused into a single integrated network. Transmission media include twisted-pair wire, coaxial cable, fiber optics, and microwave. (Author/MLW)

  20. Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnanakan, Ken

    2012-01-01

    This book upholds the idea of learning and education as a means to individual development and social empowerment. It presents a holistic picture, looking at learning as an integral part of one's social and physical life. Strongly differing from existing classroom perspectives, the book analyses integrated learning at its broadest possible…

  1. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  2. Leucine modulates the effect of Walker factor, a proteolysis-inducing factor-like protein from Walker tumours, on gene expression and cellular activity in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Estela Maria; Salomão, Emilianne Miguel; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2013-10-01

    Cancer-cachexia causes severe weight loss, particularly from the wasting of skeletal muscle, which occurs due to increased protein catabolism and/or decreased protein synthesis. The muscle protein degradation observed in cancer patients is mediated by a specific cytokine, proteolysis-inducing factor (PIF), which is produced by the tumour. This protein increases the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway activity, and the synthesis of muscle protein in these patients can be affected by several factors, including nutrient-related signalling. Some nutrients, such as leucine, can decrease the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway activity and increase the skeletal muscle protein content in cachectic animals. In this study, we investigated the effects of leucine on cell viability, morphology, functional proteasome activity, enzymatic activity, and protein synthesis and degradation in C2C12 myotubes exposed to the proteolysis-inducing factor (PIF)-like protein purified from Walker tumour-bearing rats. Walker factor (WF) had no cytotoxic effects on myotube cells and morphological characteristics were not altered in the presence of WF and/or leucine. However, increased alkaline phosphatase activity was observed. At higher WF concentrations, chymotrypsin-like activity, cathepsin B activity and 20S proteasome gene expression increased. Treating myotubes with leucine before exposure to WF causes leads to a decrease in proteasome activity as well as the activity of chymotrypsin and cathepsin enzymes. Total protein synthesis decreased in WF-treated cells concomitantly as protein degradation increased. After leucine exposure, the observed effects of WF were minimal or even reverted in some cases. Taken together, these results suggest an important modulatory effect for leucine on the effects of WF in C2C12 myotube cells.

  3. Validated LC-MS/MS analysis of immune checkpoint inhibitor Nivolumab in human plasma using a Fab peptide-selective quantitation method: nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Noriko; Shimada, Takashi; Terakado, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-06-15

    We previously reported the nano-surface and molecular-orientation limited (nSMOL) proteolysis, which is a novel method for selective quantitation of monoclonal antibody Fab. The nSMOL strategy is a Fab-selective limited proteolysis which utilizes the size difference between the protease nanoparticle (200nm) and the antibody resin pore (100nm). Here, we applied this method to a fully validated LCMS analysis of Nivolumab in human plasma. The immunoglobulin fraction was collected using Protein A resin, which was then followed by nSMOL reaction using the FG nanoparticle surface-immobilized trypsin under a nondenaturing physiological condition at 50°C for 7h. After removal of resin and nanoparticles by filter centrifugation, signature peptides were separated using the ODS column liquid chromatography. The signature peptide ASGITFSNSGMHWVR from Nivolumab complementarity-determining region (CDR) and the P14R internal standard were simultaneously quantified by multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) LCMS, with parent m/z 550.8>fragment m/z 661.5 (y11 2+). The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of Nivolumab using the nSMOL method was 0.977μg/ml, with a linear dynamic range of from 0.977 to 250μg/ml. The intra- and inter-assay precision of LLOQ, low quality control (LQC), middle quality control (MQC), and high quality control (HQC) were 7.56-17.9% and 15.6%, 6.99-9.25% and 7.51%, 2.51-8.85% and 8.01%, and 4.78-7.33% and 6.75%, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the nSMOL bioanalysis can be utilized as a reliable method for clinical pharmacokinetic studies of Nivolumab and other antibody drugs.

  4. Integrative psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2008-09-01

    The main purposes of the article are to present the history of integration in psychotherapy, the reasons of the development integrative approaches, and the approaches to integration in psychotherapy. Three approaches to integration in psychotherapy exist: theoretical integration, theoretical eclecticism, and common factors in different psychotherapeutic trends. In integrative psychotherapy, the basic epistemology, theory, and clinical practice are based on the phenomenology, field theory, holism, dialogue, and co-creation of dialogue in the therapeutic relationship. The main criticism is that integrative psychotherapy suffers from confusion and many unresolved controversies. It is difficult to theoretically and methodologically define the clinically applied model that is based on such a different epistemological and theoretical presumptions. Integrative psychotherapy is a synthesis of humanistic psychotherapy, object relations theory, and psychoanalytical self psychology. It focuses on the dynamics and potentials of human relationships, with a goal of changing the relations and understanding internal and external resistances. The process of integrative psychotherapy is primarily focused on the developmental-relational model and co-creation of psychotherapeutic relationship as a single interactive event, which is not unilateral, but rather a joint endeavor by both the therapist and the patient/client. The need for a relationship is an important human need and represents a process of attunement that occurs as a response to the need for a relationship, a unique interpersonal contact between two people. If this need is not met, it manifests with the different feelings and various defenses. To meet this need, we need to have another person with whom we can establish a sensitive, attuned relationship. Thus, the therapist becomes this person who tries to supplement what the person did not receive. Neuroscience can be a source of integration through different therapies. We

  5. Integrated diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunthausen, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently completed projects in which advanced diagnostic concepts were explored and/or demonstrated are summarized. The projects begin with the design of integrated diagnostics for the Army's new gas turbine engines, and advance to the application of integrated diagnostics to other aircraft subsystems. Finally, a recent project is discussed which ties together subsystem fault monitoring and diagnostics with a more complete picture of flight domain knowledge.

  6. Feedback Integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Dong Eui; Jiménez, Fernando; Perlmutter, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    A new method is proposed to numerically integrate a dynamical system on a manifold such that the trajectory stably remains on the manifold and preserves the first integrals of the system. The idea is that given an initial point in the manifold we extend the dynamics from the manifold to its ambient Euclidean space and then modify the dynamics outside the intersection of the manifold and the level sets of the first integrals containing the initial point such that the intersection becomes a unique local attractor of the resultant dynamics. While the modified dynamics theoretically produces the same trajectory as the original dynamics, it yields a numerical trajectory that stably remains on the manifold and preserves the first integrals. The big merit of our method is that the modified dynamics can be integrated with any ordinary numerical integrator such as Euler or Runge-Kutta. We illustrate this method by applying it to three famous problems: the free rigid body, the Kepler problem and a perturbed Kepler problem with rotational symmetry. We also carry out simulation studies to demonstrate the excellence of our method and make comparisons with the standard projection method, a splitting method and Störmer-Verlet schemes.

  7. Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

  8. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  9. The Integrated Hazard Analysis Integrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Massie, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Hazard analysis addresses hazards that arise in the design, development, manufacturing, construction, facilities, transportation, operations and disposal activities associated with hardware, software, maintenance, operations and environments. An integrated hazard is an event or condition that is caused by or controlled by multiple systems, elements, or subsystems. Integrated hazard analysis (IHA) is especially daunting and ambitious for large, complex systems such as NASA s Constellation program which incorporates program, systems and element components that impact others (International Space Station, public, International Partners, etc.). An appropriate IHA should identify all hazards, causes, controls and verifications used to mitigate the risk of catastrophic loss of crew, vehicle and/or mission. Unfortunately, in the current age of increased technology dependence, there is the tendency to sometimes overlook the necessary and sufficient qualifications of the integrator, that is, the person/team that identifies the parts, analyzes the architectural structure, aligns the analysis with the program plan and then communicates/coordinates with large and small components, each contributing necessary hardware, software and/or information to prevent catastrophic loss. As viewed from both Challenger and Columbia accidents, lack of appropriate communication, management errors and lack of resources dedicated to safety were cited as major contributors to these fatalities. From the accident reports, it would appear that the organizational impact of managers, integrators and safety personnel contributes more significantly to mission success and mission failure than purely technological components. If this is so, then organizations who sincerely desire mission success must put as much effort in selecting managers and integrators as they do when designing the hardware, writing the software code and analyzing competitive proposals. This paper will discuss the necessary and

  10. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  11. Information Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation introduces the concept of Information Integrity, which is the detection and possible correction of information manipulation by any intermediary node in a communication system. As networks continue to grow in complexity, information theoretic security has failed to keep pace. As a result many parties whom want to communicate,…

  12. Integrated nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua Chun

    2013-02-19

    Despite significant advancements in catalysis research, the prevailing catalyst technology remains largely an art rather than a science. Rapid development in the fields of nanotechnology and materials chemistry in the past few decades, however, provides us with a new capacity to re-examine existing catalyst design and processing methods. In recent years, "nanocatalysts" has become a term often used by the materials chemistry and catalysis community. It refers to heterogeneous catalysts at nanoscale dimensions. Similar to homogeneous catalysts, freestanding (unsupported) nanocatalysts are difficult to separate after use. Because of their small sizes, they are also likely to be cytotoxic and pose a threat to the environment and therefore may not be practical for industrial use. On the other hand, if they are supported on ordinary catalyst carriers, the nanocatalysts would then revert to act as conventional heterogeneous catalysts, since chemists have known active metal clusters or oxide particles in the nanoscale regime long before the nanotechnology era. To resolve this problem, we need new research directions and synthetic strategies. Important advancements in catalysis research now allow chemists to prepare catalytic materials with greater precision. By controlling particle composition, structure, shape, and dimension, researchers can move into the next phase of catalyst development if they can bridge these old and new technologies. In this regard, one way seems to be to integrate active nanostructured catalysts with boundary-defined catalyst supports that are "not-so-nano" in dimension. However, these supports still have available hierarchical pores and cavity spaces. In principle, these devices keep the essence of traditional "catalyst-plus-support" type systems. They also have the advantages of nanoscale engineering, which involves both high level design and integration processes in their fabrication. Besides this, the active components in these devices are

  13. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  14. Oral Administration of Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) and Honey Improves the Host Body Composition and Modulates Proteolysis Through Reduction of Tumor Progression and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tomasin, Rebeka; de Andrade, Rafael Siqueira; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress has a dual role in cancer; it is linked with tumorigenic events and host wasting, as well as senescence and apoptosis. Researchers have demonstrated the importance of coadjuvant therapies in cancer treatment, and Aloe vera and honey have immunomodulatory, anticancer, and antioxidant properties. The preventive and therapeutic effects of Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) and honey in tumor progression and host wasting were analyzed in Walker 256 carcinoma-bearing rats. The animals were distributed into the following groups: C=control-untreated, W=tumor-untreated, WA=treated after tumor induction, A=control-treated, AW=treated before tumor induction, and AWA=treated before and after tumor induction. Proteolysis and oxidative stress were analyzed in the tumor, liver, muscle, and myocardial tissues. The results suggest that the Aloe vera and honey treatment affect the tumor and host by different mechanisms; the treatment-modulated host wasting and cachexia, whereas it promoted oxidative stress and damage in tumor tissues, particularly in a therapeutic context (WA).

  15. Regulation of haemolysin (VvhA) production by ferric uptake regulator (Fur) in Vibrio vulnificus: repression of vvhA transcription by Fur and proteolysis of VvhA by Fur-repressive exoproteases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jeong-A; Lee, Mi-Ae; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2013-05-01

    VvhA produced by Vibrio vulnificus exhibits cytolytic activity to human cells including erythrocytes. Since haemolysis by VvhA may provide iron for bacterial growth and pathogenicity, we investigated the expression of VvhA to elucidate the regulatory roles of Fur, a major transcription factor controlling iron-homeostasis. Fur repressed the transcription of vvhBA operon via binding to the promoter region. However, haemolysin content and haemolytic activity were lowered in cell-free supernatant of fur mutant. This discrepancy between the levels of vvhA transcript and VvhA protein in fur mutant was caused by exoproteolytic activities of the elastase VvpE and another metalloprotease VvpM, which were also regulated by Fur. vvpE gene expression was repressed by Fur via binding to the Fur-box homologous region. Regulation of VvpM expression by Fur did not occur at the level of vvpM transcription. In vitro proteolysis assays showed that both proteases efficiently degraded VvhA. In addition, the extracellular levels of VvhA were higher in culture supernatants of vvpE or vvpM mutants than in the wild type. Thus this study demonstrates that Fur regulates haemolysin production at the transcription level of the vvhBA operon and at the post-translation level by regulating the expressions of two VvhA-degrading exoproteases, VvpE and VvpM.

  16. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  17. Mitotic lifecycle of chromosomal 3xHMG-box proteins and the role of their N-terminal domain in the association with rDNA loci and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Antosch, Martin; Schubert, Veit; Holzinger, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Grasser, Klaus D

    2015-12-01

    The high mobility group (HMG)-box is a DNA-binding domain characteristic of various eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. 3xHMG-box proteins (containing three copies of the HMG-box domain and a unique basic N-terminal domain) are specific for plants and the Arabidopsis genome encodes two versions termed 3xHMG-box1 and 3xHMG-box2, whose expression is cell cycle-dependent, peaking during mitosis. Here, we analysed in detail the spatiotemporal expression, subcellular localisation and chromosome association of the Arabidopsis thaliana 3xHMG-box proteins. Live cell imaging and structured illumination microscopy revealed that the expression of the 3xHMG-box proteins is induced in late G2 phase of the cell cycle and upon nuclear envelope breakdown in prophase they rapidly associate with the chromosomes. 3xHMG-box1 associates preferentially with 45S rDNA loci and the basic N-terminal domain is involved in the targeting of rDNA loci. Shortly after mitosis the 3xHMG-box proteins are degraded and an N-terminal destruction-box mediates the proteolysis. Ectopic expression/localisation of 3xHMG-box1 in interphase nuclei results in reduced plant growth and various developmental defects including early bolting and abnormal flower morphology. The remarkable conservation of 3xHMG-box proteins within the plant kingdom, their characteristic expression during mitosis, and their striking association with chromosomes, suggest that they play a role in the organisation of plant mitotic chromosomes.

  18. Degradation of the proto-oncogene product p39mos is not necessary for cyclin proteolysis and exit from meiotic metaphase: requirement for a Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent event.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Galas, S; Fesquet, D; Devault, A; Cavadore, J C; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Exit from M phase, which requires cyclin degradation, is prevented from occurring in unfertilized eggs of vertebrates arrested at second meiotic metaphase due to a cytostatic factor recently identified as p39mos, the product of the proto-oncogene c-mos. Calpain can destroy both p39mos and cyclin in vitro in extracts prepared from metaphase-arrested Xenopus eggs, but only when free Ca2+ concentration is raised to the millimolar range. When free Ca2+ concentration is raised for only 30 s to the micromolar range, as occurs in physiological conditions after fertilization, cyclin degradation is induced, byt p39mos is not degraded. Cyclin proteolysis at micromolar free Ca2+, is not inhibited by calpastatin, and therefore does not involve calpain. A cyclin mutant modified in the destruction box is found to be resistant at micromolar, but not millimolar free Ca2+, suggesting that the ubiquitin pathway mediates cyclin degradation at micromolar Ca2+ concentration whereas calpain is involved at the millimolar level. A synthetic peptide which binds Ca(2+)-calmodulin with high affinity suppresses cyclin degradation at micromolar but not millimolar free Ca2+, and this only when it is present in the extract during the first 30 s after raising free Ca2+ concentration. The inhibition of the cyclin degradation pathway by the Ca(2+)-calmodulin binding peptide can be overcome by adding calmodulin. These results strongly suggest that a Ca(2+)-calmodulin process is required as an early event following fertilization to release the cyclin degradation pathway from inhibition in metaphase-arrested eggs. In contrast, p39mos degradation is not required. Images PMID:1829675

  19. Evaluating Simultaneous Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong, Harris

    2012-01-01

    Many integrals require two successive applications of integration by parts. During the process, another integral of similar type is often invoked. We propose a method which can integrate these two integrals simultaneously. All we need is to solve a linear system of equations.

  20. (67/68)Ga-labeling agent that liberates (67/68)Ga-NOTA-methionine by lysosomal proteolysis of parental low molecular weight polypeptides to reduce renal radioactivity levels.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Tomoya; Rokugawa, Takemi; Kinoshita, Mai; Nemoto, Souki; Fransisco Lazaro, Guerra Gomez; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Arano, Yasushi

    2014-11-19

    The renal localization of gallium-67 or gallium-68 ((67/68)Ga)-labeled low molecular weight (LMW) probes such as peptides and antibody fragments constitutes a problem in targeted imaging. Wu et al. previously showed that (67)Ga-labeled S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (SCN-Bz-NOTA)-conjugated methionine ((67)Ga-NOTA-Met) was rapidly excreted from the kidney in urine following lysosomal proteolysis of the parental (67)Ga-NOTA-Bz-SCN-disulfide-stabilized Fv fragment (Bioconjugate Chem., (1997) 8, 365-369). In the present study, a new (67/68)Ga-labeling reagent for LMW probes that liberates (67/68)Ga-NOTA-Met was designed, synthesized, and evaluated using longer-lived (67)Ga in order to reduce renal radioactivity levels. We employed a methionine-isoleucine (MI) dipeptide bond as the cleavable linkage. The amine residue of MI was coupled with SCN-Bz-NOTA for (67)Ga-labeling, while the carboxylic acid residue of MI was derivatized to maleimide for antibody conjugation in order to synthesize NOTA-MI-Mal. A Fab fragment of the anti-Her2 antibody was thiolated with iminothiolane, and NOTA-MI-Mal was conjugated with the antibody fragment by maleimide-thiol chemistry. The Fab fragment was also conjugated with SCN-Bz-NOTA (NOTA-Fab) for comparison. (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab was obtained at radiochemical yields of over 95% and was stable in murine serum for 24 h. In the biodistribution study using normal mice, (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab registered significantly lower renal radioactivity levels from 1 to 6 h postinjection than those of (67)Ga-NOTA-Fab. An analysis of urine samples obtained 6 h after the injection of (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab showed that the majority of radioactivity was excreted as (67)Ga-NOTA-Met. In the biodistribution study using tumor-bearing mice, the tumor to kidney ratios of (67)Ga-NOTA-MI-Fab were 4 times higher (6 h postinjection) than those of (67)Ga-NOTA-Fab. Although further studies including the structure of radiometabolites and

  1. Transpeptidation during the analytical proteolysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Canova-Davis, E; Kessler, T J; Ling, V T

    1991-07-01

    Since peptide mapping with proteolytic enzymes such as trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease is a powerful tool for the characterization of proteins, investigators should be cognizant of possible artifacts due to the technique itself. This article describes the identification of minor peaks found in the maps of recombinant human relaxin and insulin-like growth factor I as transpeptidation products. Both proteins have some homology to insulin with relaxin being composed of two chains designated A and B, while insulin-like growth factor I is composed of a single polypeptide chain. Digestion of relaxin with trypsin at pH 7.2 yields two peptides, T2,3(A10-18) and T7(B10-13), linked together by a disulfide bond. An unexpected component at a 10% level was identified to be the T2-T7 peptide pair where T3(ArgA18) has formed a peptide bond with the amino-terminal LeuB10 of the T7 peptide. It was also observed that the digestion of insulin-like growth factor I with V8 protease normally yields two peptides V4(13-20) and V9(59-70) linked by a disulfide bridge. A minor peak at a 1 to 2% level was identified to be a single polypeptide resulting from the formation of a peptide bond between the amino-terminal Met59 of V9 and the carboxyl-terminal Asp20 of V4, with the disulfide bond intact. These transpeptidation products were isolated by reversed-phase HPLC and identified using amino-terminal sequence and mass spectrometric analyses.

  2. SnapShot: Cartography of Intramembrane Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Siniša

    2016-12-15

    Intramembrane proteases hydrolyze peptide bonds within the cell membrane as the decision-making step of various signaling pathways or during general proteostasis. Although initially thought to be rare, fourteen proteases from four superfamilies are now known to be distributed among nearly every membrane compartment of a human cell. Each protease is endowed with specific enzymatic properties that determine both substrate choice and outcome.

  3. Identification of Genes Regulated by Proteolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Drosophila protein interaction domains are scattered throughout the melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans (Table 1; Fig. two groups indicating that...marker for breast cancer and there is evidence that Fbw7 is mutated in human cancer, consistent with the possibility that it is a tumor suppressor. We...analysis of point mutations in Fbw7 found in human cancer 9 In our previous report, we described our identification of Fbw7 as the F-box protein

  4. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    PubMed

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  5. Thermionic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    MacRoberts, M.; Brown, D.R.; Dooley, R.; Lemons, R.; Lynn, D.; McCormick, B.; Mombourquette, C.; Sinah, D.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic integrated circuits combine vacuum-tube technology with integrated-circuit techniques to form integrated vacuum circuits. These circuits are capable of extended operation in both high-temperature and high-radiation environments.

  6. Inhibition of Matriptase Activity Results in Decreased Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Integrity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pászti-Gere, E.; McManus, S.; Meggyesházi, N.; Balla, P.; Gálfi, P.; Steinmetzer, T.

    2015-01-01

    Barrier dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases implies enhanced paracellular flux and lowered transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) causing effective invasion of enteropathogens or altered intestinal absorption of toxins and drug compounds. To elucidate the role of matriptase-driven cell surface proteolysis in the maintenance of intestinal barrier function, the 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitor, MI-432 was used on porcine IPEC-J2 cell monolayer. Studies with two fluorescent probes revealed that short (2 h) treatment with MI-432 caused an altered distribution of oxidative species between intracellular and extracellular spaces in IPEC-J2 cells. This perturbation was partially compensated when administration of inhibitor continued for up to 48 h. Significant decrease in TER between apical and basolateral compartments of MI-432-treated IPEC-J2 cell monolayers proved that matriptase is one of the key effectors in the maintenance of barrier integrity. Changes in staining pattern of matriptase and in localization of the junctional protein occludin were observed suggesting that inhibition of matriptase by MI-432 can also exert an effect on paracellular gate opening via modulation of tight junctional protein assembly. This study confirms that non-tumorigenic IPEC-J2 cells can be used as an appropriate small intestinal model for the in vitro characterization of matriptase-related effects on intestinal epithelium. These findings demonstrate indirectly that matriptase plays a pivotal role in the development of barrier integrity; thus matriptase dysfunction can facilitate the occurence of leaky gut syndrome observed in intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:26488575

  7. Modular Integrated Secretory System Engineering in Pichia pastoris To Enhance G-Protein Coupled Receptor Expression.

    PubMed

    Claes, Katrien; Vandewalle, Kristof; Laukens, Bram; Laeremans, Toon; Vosters, Olivier; Langer, Ingrid; Parmentier, Marc; Steyaert, Jan; Callewaert, Nico

    2016-10-21

    Membrane protein research is still hampered by the generally very low levels at which these proteins are naturally expressed, necessitating heterologous expression. Protein degradation, folding problems, and undesired post-translational modifications often occur, together resulting in low expression levels of heterogeneous protein products that are unsuitable for structural studies. We here demonstrate how the integration of multiple engineering modules in Pichia pastoris can be used to increase both the quality and the quantity of overexpressed integral membrane proteins, with the human CXCR4 G-protein coupled receptor as an example. The combination of reduced proteolysis, enhanced ER folding capacity, GlycoDelete-based N-Glycan trimming, and nanobody-based fold stabilization improved the expression of this GPCR in P. pastoris from a low expression level of a heterogeneously glycosylated, proteolyzed product to substantial quantities (2-3 mg/L shake flask culture) of a nonproteolyzed, homogeneously glycosylated proteoform. We expect that this set of tools will contribute to successful expression of more membrane proteins in a quantity and quality suitable for functional and structural studies.

  8. Sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation of the Escherichia coli transcription activator SoxS: identification of the SoxS residues critical to proteolysis and specific inhibition of in vitro degradation by a peptide comprised of the N-terminal 21 amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ishita M; Wolf, Richard E

    2006-03-31

    When Escherichia coli encounter redox-cycling compounds that endogenously generate superoxide, the cell's defense response is initiated by the de novo synthesis of SoxS, which then activates transcription of the genes of the SoxRS regulon. Recently, we showed that after the oxidative stress is relieved, the SoxRS system resets by an active process wherein SoxS synthesis ceases and the intrinsically unstable SoxS protein is rapidly degraded, primarily by Lon protease. Here, we use deletion mutants and a library of alanine-stretch mutants of the entire protein to identify the SoxS features responsible for Lon-dependent proteolysis in vivo. We found that the 17 amino acid residues at the SoxS N terminus play the primary role in protease recognition and that the addition of the N-terminal 21 residues of SoxS to the otherwise stable green fluorescent protein is sufficient to signal the chimera for Lon-dependent degradation. With a minimal in vitro degradation system, we confirm the intrinsic instability of SoxS and the sequence requirements for Lon-dependent degradation. Lastly, we demonstrate that the addition of a peptide comprised of the 21 N-terminal amino acid residues of SoxS is able to inhibit specifically the in vitro proteolysis of SoxS.

  9. Lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 (LIMP-2/SCARB2) is a substrate of cathepsin-F, a cysteine protease mutated in type-B-Kufs-disease.

    PubMed

    Peters, Judith; Rittger, Andrea; Weisner, Rebecca; Knabbe, Johannes; Zunke, Friederike; Rothaug, Michelle; Damme, Markus; Berkovic, Samuel F; Blanz, Judith; Saftig, Paul; Schwake, Michael

    2015-02-13

    The lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 (LIMP-2/SCARB2) has been identified as a receptor for enterovirus 71 uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-independent lysosomal trafficking of the acid hydrolase β-glucocerebrosidase. Here we show that LIMP-2 undergoes proteolytic cleavage mediated by lysosomal cysteine proteases. Heterologous expression and in vitro studies suggest that cathepsin-F is mainly responsible for the lysosomal processing of wild-type LIMP-2. Furthermore, examination of purified lysosomes revealed that LIMP-2 undergoes proteolysis in vivo. Mutations in the gene encoding cathepsin-F (CTSF) have recently been associated with type-B-Kufs-disease, an adult form of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. In this study we show that disease-causing cathepsin-F mutants fail to cleave LIMP-2. Our findings provide evidence that LIMP-2 represents an in vivo substrate of cathepsin-F with relevance for understanding the pathophysiology of type-B-Kufs-disease.

  10. Relations Between Hyperelliptic Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S.; Perelomov, A.

    A simple property of the integrals over the hyperelliptic surfaces of arbitrary genus is observed. Namely, the derivatives of these integrals with respect to the branching points are given by the linear combination of the same integrals. We check that this property is responsible for the solution to the level zero Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equation given in terms of hyperelliptic integrals.

  11. Slimplectic Integrators: Variational Integrators for Nonconservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David

    2016-05-01

    Symplectic integrators are widely used for long-term integration of conservative astrophysical problems due to their ability to preserve the constants of motion; however, they cannot in general be applied in the presence of nonconservative interactions. Here we present the “slimplectic” integrator, a new type of numerical integrator that shares many of the benefits of traditional symplectic integrators yet is applicable to general nonconservative systems. We utilize a fixed-time-step variational integrator formalism applied to a newly developed principle of stationary nonconservative action (Galley, 2013, Galley et al 2014). As a result, the generalized momenta and energy (Noether current) evolutions are well-tracked. We discuss several example systems, including damped harmonic oscillators, Poynting-Robertson drag, and gravitational radiation reaction, by utilizing our new publicly available code to demonstrate the slimplectic integrator algorithm. Slimplectic integrators are well-suited for integrations of systems where nonconservative effects play an important role in the long-term dynamical evolution. As such they are particularly appropriate for cosmological or celestial N-body dynamics problems where nonconservative interactions, e.g., gas interactions or dissipative tides, can play an important role.

  12. Information integration without awareness.

    PubMed

    Mudrik, Liad; Faivre, Nathan; Koch, Christof

    2014-09-01

    Information integration and consciousness are closely related, if not interdependent. But, what exactly is the nature of their relation? Which forms of integration require consciousness? Here, we examine the recent experimental literature with respect to perceptual and cognitive integration of spatiotemporal, multisensory, semantic, and novel information. We suggest that, whereas some integrative processes can occur without awareness, their scope is limited to smaller integration windows, to simpler associations, or to ones that were previously acquired consciously. This challenges previous claims that consciousness of some content is necessary for its integration; yet it also suggests that consciousness holds an enabling role in establishing integrative mechanisms that can later operate unconsciously, and in allowing wider-range integration, over bigger semantic, spatiotemporal, and sensory integration windows.

  13. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  14. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD).

  15. Integrated design of integral liquid fuel ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liangxian; Yang, Jianxin; Ma, Jia; Liu, Jingchun

    1993-04-01

    Integrated design of integral liquid fuel ramjet (ILFR) is regarded as a system of the combination of missile and ILFR, which aims at obtaining the optimum performance of the system and optimizing the parameters of both missile and ramjet. In this paper, supersonic cruise missile of medium range is taken as a calculation example. In accordance with the features of integrated ramjet, the integrated design of missile and integral ramjet are discussed here. Missile configuration and ramjet parameters are optimized and then the maximum range is obtained based on two typical cases in medium and low height cruising. Some problems related to choosing missile and ramjet parameters are also, discussed and analyzed for application in different cruise heights.

  16. Alternative and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ... Alternative & Integrative Medicine Clinical Trials GBM AGILE TTFields – Optune™ Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their ...

  17. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  18. Discovering Integrals with Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexopoulos, John; Barb, Cynthia

    2001-01-01

    Presents problems to find the integrals of logarithmic and inverse trigonometric functions early in the calculus sequence by using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and the concept of area, and without the use of integration by parts. (Author/ASK)

  19. Two Related Parametric Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2007-01-01

    Two related sequences of definite integrals are considered. By mixing hand-work, computer algebra system assistance and websurfing, fine connections can be studied between integrals and a couple of interesting sequences of integers. (Contains 4 tables.)

  20. Boolean integral calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Tapia, Moiez A.; Bennett, A. Wayne

    1988-01-01

    The concept of Boolean integration is developed, and different Boolean integral operators are introduced. Given the changes in a desired function in terms of the changes in its arguments, the ways of 'integrating' (i.e. realizing) such a function, if it exists, are presented. The necessary and sufficient conditions for integrating, in different senses, the expression specifying the changes are obtained. Boolean calculus has applications in the design of logic circuits and in fault analysis.

  1. Integrated Modeling Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Summer 1979). WMSI Working Paper No. 291A. 173 Dyer , J. and R. Sarin. "Measurable Multiattribute Value Functions," Operations Research. 27:4 (July...J. McCall. "Expected Utility Maximizing Job Search," Chapter 7 of Studies in the Economics of Search, 1979, North-Holland. WMSI Working Paper No. 274...model integration, solver integration, and integration of various utilities . Model integration is further divided into four subtypes based on a four-level

  2. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  3. Enumeration of Integral Tetrahedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Sascha

    2007-09-01

    We determine the number of integral tetrahedra with diameter d, up to isomorphism, for all d<=1000, via computer enumeration. We give an algorithm that enumerates the integral tetrahedra with diameter at most d in O(d^5) time and an algorithm that can check the canonicity of a given integral tetrahedron with at most 6 integer comparisons. For the number of isomorphism classes of integral 4x4 matrices with diameter d fulfilling the triangle inequalities we derive an exact formula.

  4. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  5. Optimizing Computer Technology Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon-Marable, Elizabeth; Valentine, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand what optimal computer technology integration looks like in adult basic skills education (ABSE). One question guided the research: How is computer technology integration best conceptualized and measured? The study used the Delphi method to map the construct of computer technology integration and…

  6. Sledge-Hammer Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahner, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Integration (here visualized as a pounding process) is mathematically realized by simple transformations, successively smoothing the bounding curve into a straight line and the region-to-be-integrated into an area-equivalent rectangle. The relationship to Riemann sums, and to the trapezoid and midpoint methods of numerical integration, is…

  7. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  8. Parametric Differentiation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Parametric differentiation and integration under the integral sign constitutes a powerful technique for calculating integrals. However, this topic is generally not included in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. In this note, we give a comprehensive review of this approach, and show how it can be systematically used to evaluate most of the…

  9. Integrating Writing and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Brad; Monroe, Eula Ewing

    2011-01-01

    Teachers often find it difficult to integrate writing and mathematics while honoring the integrity of both disciplines. In this article, the authors present two levels of integration that teachers may use as a starting point. The first level, writing without revision, can be worked into mathematics instruction quickly and readily. The second…

  10. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  11. Effect of Recombinant Prophenin 2 on the Integrity and Viability of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Flores, J. L.; Rodriguez, M. C.; Gastelum Arellanez, A.; Alvarez-Morales, A.; Avila, E. E.

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis, which is associated with preterm child delivery, low birth weight, and an increased risk of infection by human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus following exposure. Several reports have established increasing numbers of trichomoniasis cases resistant to metronidazole, the agent used for treatment, and it is therefore important to identify new therapeutic alternatives. Previously, our group reported the effect of tritrpticin, a synthetic peptide derived from porcine prophenin, on T. vaginalis; however, the hemolytic activity of this small peptide complicates its possible use as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we report that the propeptide and the processed peptide of prophenin 2 (cleaved with hydroxylamine) affected the integrity and growth of T. vaginalis and that pro-prophenin 2 displays some resistance to proteolysis by T. vaginalis proteinases at 1 h. Its effect on T. vaginalis as well as its low hemolytic activity and short-time stability to parasite proteinases makes prophenin 2 an interesting candidate for synergistic or alternative treatment against T. vaginalis. PMID:25815316

  12. Connective tissue integrity is lost in vitamin B-6-deficient chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, P. G.; Yamauchi, M.; Mahuren, J. D.; Coburn, S. P.; Muniz, O. E.; Howell, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to characterize further the connective tissue disorder produced by pyridoxine (vitamin B-6) deficiency, as previously evidenced by electron microscopy. Following the second post-natal week, fast growing male chicks were deprived of pyridoxine for a 1-mo period. Six weeks post-natally, blood concentrations in the experimental deficiency group had declined to deficiency levels as registered by low concentrations of pyridoxal phosphate (coenzyme form) in erythrocytes, but did not reach levels associated with neurological symptoms. Light microscopic study showed abnormalities in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissues. Collagen cross-links and the aldehyde contents were not significantly lower in cartilage and tendon collagens of vitamin B-6-deficient animals than in age-matched controls; also, their proteoglycan degrading protease and collagenase activities measured in articular cartilages were not greater. Thus, proteolysis was an unlikely alternative mechanism to account for the loss of connective tissue integrity. These results point to the need for further investigation into adhesive properties of collagen associated proteoglycans or other proteins in vitamin B-6-deficient connective tissue.

  13. Effect of recombinant prophenin 2 on the integrity and viability of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Flores, J L; Rodriguez, M C; Gastelum Arellanez, A; Alvarez-Morales, A; Avila, E E

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the causal agent of trichomoniasis, which is associated with preterm child delivery, low birth weight, and an increased risk of infection by human papilloma virus and human immunodeficiency virus following exposure. Several reports have established increasing numbers of trichomoniasis cases resistant to metronidazole, the agent used for treatment, and it is therefore important to identify new therapeutic alternatives. Previously, our group reported the effect of tritrpticin, a synthetic peptide derived from porcine prophenin, on T. vaginalis; however, the hemolytic activity of this small peptide complicates its possible use as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we report that the propeptide and the processed peptide of prophenin 2 (cleaved with hydroxylamine) affected the integrity and growth of T. vaginalis and that pro-prophenin 2 displays some resistance to proteolysis by T. vaginalis proteinases at 1 h. Its effect on T. vaginalis as well as its low hemolytic activity and short-time stability to parasite proteinases makes prophenin 2 an interesting candidate for synergistic or alternative treatment against T. vaginalis.

  14. An Integrated Model of the Transcriptome of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalari, Krishna R.; Necela, Brian M.; Tang, Xiaojia; Thompson, Kevin J.; Lau, Melissa; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Anderson, S. Keith; Sun, Zhifu; Baheti, Saurabh; Carr, Jennifer M.; Baker, Tiffany R.; Barman, Poulami; Radisky, Derek C.; Joseph, Richard W.; McLaughlin, Sarah A.; Chai, High-seng; Camille, Stephan; Rossell, David; Asmann, Yan W.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Perez, Edith A.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal in these analyses was to use genomic features from a test set of primary breast tumors to build an integrated transcriptome landscape model that makes relevant hypothetical predictions about the biological and/or clinical behavior of HER2-positive breast cancer. We interrogated RNA-Seq data from benign breast lesions, ER+, triple negative, and HER2-positive tumors to identify 685 differentially expressed genes, 102 alternatively spliced genes, and 303 genes that expressed single nucleotide sequence variants (eSNVs) that were associated with the HER2-positive tumors in our survey panel. These features were integrated into a transcriptome landscape model that identified 12 highly interconnected genomic modules, each of which represents a cellular processes pathway that appears to define the genomic architecture of the HER2-positive tumors in our test set. The generality of the model was confirmed by the observation that several key pathways were enriched in HER2-positive TCGA breast tumors. The ability of this model to make relevant predictions about the biology of breast cancer cells was established by the observation that integrin signaling was linked to lapatinib sensitivity in vitro and strongly associated with risk of relapse in the NCCTG N9831 adjuvant trastuzumab clinical trial dataset. Additional modules from the HER2 transcriptome model, including ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, TGF-beta signaling, RHO-family GTPase signaling, and M-phase progression, were linked to response to lapatinib and paclitaxel in vitro and/or risk of relapse in the N9831 dataset. These data indicate that an integrated transcriptome landscape model derived from a test set of HER2-positive breast tumors has potential for predicting outcome and for identifying novel potential therapeutic strategies for this breast cancer subtype. PMID:24223926

  15. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-01

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity. PMID:28134787

  16. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-26

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  17. Faces of integration

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul; Sullivan, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Theme Two central themes permeate this paper—the interplay between structure and agency in integration processes and the extent to which this is mediated through sensemaking by individual actors. Case study The empirical base for the paper is provided by case study research from Wales which draws on examples of different types of integration in health and social care. The individual case studies highlight different interpretations of integration set against a background of the resources involved, processes employed and outcomes achieved. Discussion A wide ranging discussion exposes the complex interplay and dynamics between structural factors and the manner in which they enable or constrain integration, and individual actors realising their potential agency through leadership, professionalism and boundary spanning to influence outcomes. The importance of structure and agency complementing each other to determine effective integration is emphasised, together with the scope that is available for interpretation and meaning by individual actors within the contested discourse of integration. PMID:20087420

  18. SEMP Integration Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-24

    Prabhu R. 2000. Development of a methodology for selecting criteria and indicators of sustainable forest management: A case study on participatory ...integration framework development efforts focused on two dilemmas—integrating across field studies and relating science and practice. We summarize results from...areas, than to ecologically meaningful boundaries. 5. Discussion We sought to develop a consensus-based framework to guide the integration of varied

  19. Integrated Sensitivity Analysis Workflow

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman-Hill, Ernest J.; Hoffman, Edward L.; Gibson, Marcus J.; Clay, Robert L.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a crucial element of rigorous engineering analysis, but performing such an analysis on a complex model is difficult and time consuming. The mission of the DART Workbench team at Sandia National Laboratories is to lower the barriers to adoption of advanced analysis tools through software integration. The integrated environment guides the engineer in the use of these integrated tools and greatly reduces the cycle time for engineering analysis.

  20. Path Integrals and Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2014-03-01

    1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Principles: 2. The mathematical structure of quantum mechanics; 3. Operators; 4. The Feynman path integral; 5. Hamiltonian mechanics; 6. Path integral quantization; Part II. Stochastic Processes: 7. Stochastic systems; Part III. Discrete Degrees of Freedom: 8. Ising model; 9. Ising model: magnetic field; 10. Fermions; Part IV. Quadratic Path Integrals: 11. Simple harmonic oscillators; 12. Gaussian path integrals; Part V. Action with Acceleration: 13. Acceleration Lagrangian; 14. Pseudo-Hermitian Euclidean Hamiltonian; 15. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian: Jordan blocks; 16. The quartic potential: instantons; 17. Compact degrees of freedom; Index.

  1. Avionics systems integration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stech, George; Williams, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A very dramatic and continuing explosion in digital electronics technology has been taking place in the last decade. The prudent and timely application of this technology will provide Army aviation the capability to prevail against a numerically superior enemy threat. The Army and NASA have exploited this technology explosion in the development and application of avionics systems integration technology for new and future aviation systems. A few selected Army avionics integration technology base efforts are discussed. Also discussed is the Avionics Integration Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) that NASA has established at Langley for research into the integration and validation of avionics systems, and evaluation of advanced technology in a total systems context.

  2. Designing for STEM Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berland, Leema K.

    2013-01-01

    We are increasingly seeing an emphasis on STEM integration in high school classrooms such that students will learn and apply relevant math and science content while simultaneously developing engineering habits of mind. However, research in both science education and engineering education suggests that this goal of truly integrating STEM is rife…

  3. Integration by Hyperbolic Substitution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics teachers constantly encourage their students to think independently. The study of integration in calculus provides an excellent opportunity to encourage inventive investigation. In contrast to differentiation, which is predominately mechanical, integration is a more creative process. One such possibility is offered by the study of the…

  4. Integration in Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sworder, Steven C.

    This paper presents an application of integration to the field of hydraulics. An integral relation for the time required to drop the fluid contained in a cylindrical tank from one level to another using a hole in the tank wall is derived. Procedures for constructing the experimental equipment and procedures for determining the coefficient of…

  5. Hermeneutics of Integrative Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Un-chol

    This paper examines and compares the formation processes and structures of three types of integrative knowledge that in general represent natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. These three types can be observed, respectively, in the philosophies of Michael Polanyi, Jurgen Habermas, and Paul Ricoeur. These types of integrative knowledge…

  6. Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    The Systems Integration (SI) subprogram works closely with industry, universities, and the national laboratories to overcome technical barriers to the large-scale deployment of solar technologies. To support these goals, the subprogram invests primarily in four areas: grid integration, technology validation, solar resource assessment, and balance of system development.

  7. Intelligent test integration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sztipanovits, J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J.; Kawamura, K.; Purves, B.; Williams, R.; Biglari, H.

    1988-01-01

    A new test technology is described which was developed for space system integration. The ultimate purpose of the system is to support the automatic generation of test systems in real time, distributed computing environments. The Intelligent Test Integration System (ITIS) is a knowledge based layer above the traditional test system components which can generate complex test configurations from the specification of test scenarios.

  8. Integrity in Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Banta, Trudy W.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for integrity in practice and theory has been part of the evolution of student personnel work all the way back to the turn of the 20th century. This chapter seeks to take stock of the question of integrity in relation to one of the core knowledge bases used by those engaged in student affairs work today--student development. The authors…

  9. Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    The Systems Integration (SI) subprogram works closely with industry, universities, and the national laboratories to overcome technical barriers to the large-scale deployment of solar technologies. To support these goals, the subprogram invests primarily in four areas: grid integration, technology validation, solar resource assessment, and balance of system development.

  10. System integration report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Korein, J. D.; Meyer, C.; Manoochehri, K.; Rovins, J.; Beale, J.; Barr, B.

    1985-01-01

    Several areas that arise from the system integration issue were examined. Intersystem analysis is discussed as it relates to software development, shared data bases and interfaces between TEMPUS and PLAID, shaded graphics rendering systems, object design (BUILD), the TEMPUS animation system, anthropometric lab integration, ongoing TEMPUS support and maintenance, and the impact of UNIX and local workstations on the OSDS environment.

  11. ESPC Integrated Skill Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    monitoring systems for gauging performance of the ESPC. This is an integral part of the overall ESPC goal of developing a global coupled system between...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ESPC Integrated Skill Diagnostics Maria Flatau Naval...quantitative skill metrics to assess the advancements in the Earth System Prediction Capability (ESPC). This work will also implement automated

  12. An Integrated Teaching Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Marie R.; Seiferth, Berniece B.

    This integrated teaching module provides elementary and junior high school teachers with a "hands-on" approach to studying the Anasazi Indian. Emphasis is on creative exploration that focuses on integrating art, music, poetry, writing, geography, dance, history, anthropology, sociology, and archaeology. Replicas of artifacts,…

  13. Integrated Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, Gary; Stone, Paul; Holtery, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The Integrated Modeling Environment (IME) is a software system that establishes a centralized Web-based interface for integrating people (who may be geographically dispersed), processes, and data involved in a common engineering project. The IME includes software tools for life-cycle management, configuration management, visualization, and collaboration.

  14. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.

  15. Academic Research Integration System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surugiu, Iula; Velicano, Manole

    2008-01-01

    This paper comprises results concluding the research activity done so far regarding enhanced web services and system integration. The objective of the paper is to define the software architecture for a coherent framework and methodology for enhancing existing web services into an integrated system. This document presents the research work that has…

  16. Integrating Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Provides an overview of the complete National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) model, and includes brief descriptions of the modules with which the Integrating Module interacts. The emphasis and focus, however, is on the structure and function of the Integrating Module of NEMS.

  17. The Fresnel Integrals Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    This note presents another elementary method to evaluate the Fresnel integrals. It is interesting to see that this technique is also strong enough to capture a number of pairs of parameter integrals. The main ingredients of the method are the consideration of some related derivatives and linear differential equations.

  18. Integrated Marketing Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Integration has become a cliche in enrollment management and student services circles. The term is used to describe everything from integrated marketing to seamless services. Often, it defines organizational structures, processes, student information systems, and even communities. In Robert Sevier's article in this issue of "College and…

  19. Linear integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T.

    This book is intended to be used as a textbook in a one-semester course at a variety of levels. Because of self-study features incorporated, it may also be used by practicing electronic engineers as a formal and thorough introduction to the subject. The distinction between linear and digital integrated circuits is discussed, taking into account digital and linear signal characteristics, linear and digital integrated circuit characteristics, the definitions for linear and digital circuits, applications of digital and linear integrated circuits, aspects of fabrication, packaging, and classification and numbering. Operational amplifiers are considered along with linear integrated circuit (LIC) power requirements and power supplies, voltage and current regulators, linear amplifiers, linear integrated circuit oscillators, wave-shaping circuits, active filters, DA and AD converters, demodulators, comparators, instrument amplifiers, current difference amplifiers, analog circuits and devices, and aspects of troubleshooting.

  20. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  1. Integrated terahertz optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guozhen; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-11-01

    Currently, terahertz (THz) optical systems are based on bulky free-space optics. This is due to the lack of a common platform onto which different THz components, e.g., source, waveguide, modulator and detector, can be monolithically integrated. With the development of THz quantum cascade laser (QCL), it has been realized that the QCL chip may be such a platform for integrated THz photonics. Here, we report our recent works where the THz QCL is integrated with passive or optoelectronic components. They are: 1) integrated graphene modulator with THz QCL achieving 100% modulation depth and fast speed; 2) phase-locked THz QCL with integrated plasmonic waveguide and subwavelength antennas realizing dynamically widely tunable polarizations.

  2. Integrated assessment briefs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Integrated assessment can be used to evaluate and clarify resource management policy options and outcomes for decision makers. The defining characteristics of integrated assessment are (1) focus on providing information and analysis that can be understood and used by decision makers rather than for merely advancing understanding and (2) its multidisciplinary approach, using methods, styles of study, and considerations from a broader variety of technical areas than would typically characterize studies produced from a single disciplinary standpoint. Integrated assessment may combine scientific, social, economic, health, and environmental data and models. Integrated assessment requires bridging the gap between science and policy considerations. Because not everything can be valued using a single metric, such as a dollar value, the integrated assessment process also involves evaluating trade-offs among dissimilar attributes. Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recognized the importance and value of multidisciplinary approaches to solving environmental problems early on and have pioneered the development of tools and methods for integrated assessment over the past three decades. Major examples of ORNL`s experience in the development of its capabilities for integrated assessment are given.

  3. GMRES and integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, C.T.; Xue, Z.Q.

    1994-12-31

    Many discretizations of integral equations and compact fixed point problems are collectively compact and strongly convergent in spaces of continuous functions. These properties not only lead to stable and convergent approximations but also can be used in the construction of fast multilevel algorithms. Recently the GMRES algorithm has become a standard coarse mesh solver. The purpose of this paper is to show how the special properties of integral operators and their approximations are reflected in the performance of the GMRES iteration and how these properties can be used to strengthen the norm in which convergence takes place. The authors illustrate these ideas with composite Gauss rules for integral equations on the unit interval.

  4. On Quantum Integrable Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, Viatcheslav; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Many quantum integrable systems are obtained using an accelerator physics technique known as Ermakov (or normalized variables) transformation. This technique was used to create classical nonlinear integrable lattices for accelerators and nonlinear integrable plasma traps. Now, all classical results are carried over to a nonrelativistic quantum case. In this paper we have described an extension of the Ermakov-like transformation to the Schroedinger and Pauli equations. It is shown that these newly found transformations create a vast variety of time dependent quantum equations that can be solved in analytic functions, or, at least, can be reduced to time-independent ones.

  5. Space Station design integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the top Program level design integration process which involves the integration of a US Space Station manned base that consists of both US and international Elements. It explains the form and function of the Program Requirements Review (PRR), which certifies that the program is ready for preliminary design, the Program Design Review (PDR), which certifies the program is ready to start the detail design, and the Critical Design Review (CDR), which certifies that the program is completing a design that meets the Program objectives. The paper also discusses experience, status to date, and plans for continued system integration through manufacturing, testing and final verification of the Space Station system performance.

  6. The Integration Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Verkuyten, Maykel

    2016-01-01

    The integration paradox refers to the phenomenon of the more highly educated and structurally integrated immigrants turning away from the host society, rather than becoming more oriented toward it. This article provides an overview of the empirical evidence documenting this paradox in the Netherlands. In addition, the theoretical arguments and the available findings about the social psychological processes involved in this paradox are considered. The existing evidence for the integration paradox and what might explain it form the basis for making suggestion for future theoretical work and empirical research, and for discussing possible policy implications. PMID:27152028

  7. Vehicle/engine integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. P.; Vinopal, T. J.; Florence, D. E.; Michel, R. W.; Brown, J. R.; Bergeron, R. P.; Weldon, V. A.

    1984-04-01

    VEHICLE/ENGINE Integration Issues are explored for orbit transfer vehicles (OTV's). The impact of space basing and aeroassist on VEHICLE/ENGINE integration is discussed. The AOTV structure and thermal protection subsystem weights were scaled as the vehicle length and surface was changed. It is concluded that for increased allowable payload lengths in a ground-based system, lower length-to-diameter (L/D) is as important as higher mixture ration (MR) in the range of mid L/D ATOV's. Scenario validity, geometry constraints, throttle levels, reliability, and servicing are discussed in the context of engine design and engine/vehicle integration.

  8. PEV Integration with Renewables (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, T.

    2014-06-18

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on integrating plug-in electric vehicles with the grid and using renewable energy to charge the grid. The Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) and Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) are addressing the opportunities and technical requirements for vehicle grid integration that will increase marketability and lead to greater petroleum reduction.

  9. Photorefractive Integrators and Correlators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    The use of photorefractive crystals as optically addressed time integrating spatial light modulators in acousto - optic signal processing applications...adaptive acousto - optic processor. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using photorefractives for such applications.... Photorefractive, Acousto - optic processor.

  10. ALHAT Integration and Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project integration and testing takes place at NASA Langley Research Center. The ALHAT project is a multi-center initiative to enable vari...

  11. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  12. Integrated Science Assessments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Integrated Science Assessments are reports that represent a concise evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science for reviewing the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for the six principal pollutants.

  13. Wellbore Integrity Network

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, James W.; Bachu, Stefan

    2012-06-21

    In this presentation, we review the current state of knowledge on wellbore integrity as developed in the IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme's Wellbore Integrity Network. Wells are one of the primary risks to the successful implementation of CO{sub 2} storage programs. Experimental studies show that wellbore materials react with CO{sub 2} (carbonation of cement and corrosion of steel) but the impact on zonal isolation is unclear. Field studies of wells in CO{sub 2}-bearing fields show that CO{sub 2} does migrate external to casing. However, rates and amounts of CO{sub 2} have not been quantified. At the decade time scale, wellbore integrity is driven by construction quality and geomechanical processes. Over longer time-scales (> 100 years), chemical processes (cement degradation and corrosion) become more important, but competing geomechanical processes may preserve wellbore integrity.

  14. Integrating the Ormerod Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Neville

    1983-01-01

    Programs in three British schools that have attempted to integrate physically and multiply handicapped children into regular classes are described. Remedial teachers were used to support the regular teacher and provide advice on physical and learning problems. (CL)

  15. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  16. Integrated Flywheel Technology, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R. (Editor); Rodriguez, G. E. (Editor); Groom, N. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion included: technology assessment of the integrated flywheel systems, potential of system concepts, identification of critical areas needing development and, to scope and define an appropriate program for coordinated activity.

  17. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  18. Integrating Forensic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funkhouser, John; Deslich, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the implementation of forensic science in an integrated curriculum and discusses the advantages of this approach. Lists the forensic science course syllabi studied in three high schools. Discusses the unit on polymers in detail. (YDS)

  19. Building an Integrated Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Myrtle T.; Greenberg, Marvin

    1974-01-01

    Article described a plan to develop integrated study through music activities. Students learned to become more independent learners while concentrating on more complex and creative activities. (Author/RK)

  20. ELECTRONIC INTEGRATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Englemann, R.H.

    1963-08-20

    An electronic integrating circuit using a transistor with a capacitor connected between the emitter and collector through which the capacitor discharges at a rate proportional to the input current at the base is described. Means are provided for biasing the base with an operating bias and for applying a voltage pulse to the capacitor for charging to an initial voltage. A current dividing diode is connected between the base and emitter of the transistor, and signal input terminal means are coupled to the juncture of the capacitor and emitter and to the base of the transistor. At the end of the integration period, the residual voltage on said capacitor is less by an amount proportional to the integral of the input signal. Either continuous or intermittent periods of integration are provided. (AEC)

  1. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  2. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  3. Retroviral DNA Integration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  4. Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behar, Joseph V.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Integrated Exposure Assessment Monitoring is the coordination of environmental (air, water, land, and crops) monitoring networks to collect systematically pollutant exposure data for a specific receptor, usually man. (Author/BB)

  5. Aviation Data Integration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Windrem, May; Patel, Hemil; Keller, Richard

    2003-01-01

    During the analysis of flight data and safety reports done in ASAP and FOQA programs, airline personnel are not able to access relevant aviation data for a variety of reasons. We have developed the Aviation Data Integration System (ADIS), a software system that provides integrated heterogeneous data to support safety analysis. Types of data available in ADIS include weather, D-ATIS, RVR, radar data, and Jeppesen charts, and flight data. We developed three versions of ADIS to support airlines. The first version has been developed to support ASAP teams. A second version supports FOQA teams, and it integrates aviation data with flight data while keeping identification information inaccessible. Finally, we developed a prototype that demonstrates the integration of aviation data into flight data analysis programs. The initial feedback from airlines is that ADIS is very useful in FOQA and ASAP analysis.

  6. Streamlining Payload Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lufkin, Susan N.

    2010-01-01

    Payload integration onto space transport vehicles and the International Space Station (ISS) is a complex process. Yet, cargo transport is the sole reason for any space mission, be it for ferrying humans, science, or hardware. As the largest such effort in history, the ISS offers a wide variety of payload experience. However, for any payload to reach the Space Station under the current process, Payload Developers face a list of daunting tasks that go well beyond just designing the payload to the constraints of the transport vehicle and its stowage topology. Payload customers are required to prove their payload s functionality, structural integrity, and safe integration - including under less than nominal situations. They must also plan for or provide training, procedures, hardware labeling, ground support, and communications. In addition, they must deal with negotiating shared consumables, integrating software, obtaining video, and coordinating the return of data and hardware. All the while, they must meet export laws, launch schedules, budget limits, and the consensus of more than 12 panel and board reviews. Despite the cost and infrastructure overhead, payload proposals have increased. Just in the span from FY08 to FY09, the NASA Payload Space Station Support Office budget rose from $78M to $96M in attempt to manage the growing manifest, but the potential number of payloads still exceeds available Payload Integration Management manpower. The growth has also increased management difficulties due to the fact that payloads are more frequently added to a flight schedule late in the flow. The current standard ISS template for payload integration from concept to payload turn-over is 36 months, or 18 months if the payload already has a preliminary design. Customers are increasingly requiring a turn-around of 3 to 6-months to meet market needs. The following paper suggests options for streamlining the current payload integration process in order to meet customer schedule

  7. 2014 SRP Integration Transcript

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    HRP's mission is to reduce the risks to human health and performance during long-duration spaceflight. The HRP Integrated Research Plan (IRP) contains the research plans for the 32 risks that require research to characterize and mitigate. From its inception the "integrate" aspect of the IRP has denoted the integrated nature of risks to human health and performance. Even though each risk in the IRP has its own research plan and is tracked separately, the interrelated nature of health and performance requires that they be addressed in an integrative or holistic fashion so that the connectedness of physiological systems within the human body and the integrated response to spaceflight can be addressed. Common characteristics of the spaceflight environment include altered gravity, atmospheres, and light/dark cycles; space radiation; isolation; noise; and periods of high or low workload. Long-term exposure to this unique environment produces a suite of physiological effects such as stress; vision, neurocognitive, and anthropometric changes; circadian misalignment; fluid shifts; cardiovascular deconditioning; immune dysregulation; and altered nutritional requirements. Expanding cross-disciplinary integrative approaches that synthesize concepts or data from two or more disciplines would improve the identification and characterization risk factors, and enable the development of countermeasures relevant to multiple risks. Cross-disciplinary approaches might also help to illuminate problem areas that may arise when a countermeasure adversely impacts risks other than those which it was developed to mitigate, or to identify groupings of physiological changes that are likely to occur that may impact the overall risk posture. In 2014 HRP embarked on a pilot study that combined four SRPs (and 12 HRP risks) - Behavioral Health, Sensorimotor, Cardiovascular, and Bone/Muscle - specifically to discuss cross-disciplinary integration. The points outlined below were suggested to seed the

  8. Integrated avionics reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alikiotis, Dimitri

    1988-01-01

    The integrated avionics reliability task is an effort to build credible reliability and/or performability models for multisensor integrated navigation and flight control. The research was initiated by the reliability analysis of a multisensor navigation system consisting of the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Long Range Navigation system (Loran C), and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Markov reliability models were developed based on system failure rates and mission time.

  9. NPS AUV Integrated Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    147 3. GRAPHIC OBJECT MODEI’QUSING OBJECTFILE FORMAT (cIF)...................... ........... 149. APPENDIX -C. NPS, AUV SONAR CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM...Monterey Bay .. 15 Figure 2.8 Graphics simulation for NPS AUV sonar visualization .......... 15’ Figure 3.1 Integrated simulator network physical...3.11 Integrated simulation display of AUV minefield searh ........ 39 Figure4.1 NPS AUV sonar beam profiles in the NPS pool .......... 43 Figure 42 NPS

  10. The Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; Freiere deCarvalho, Mary; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) are to develop an integrated, quantified, evidence-based decision support tool useful to crew health and mission planners and to help align science, technology, and operational activities intended to optimize crew health, safety, and mission success. Presentation slides address scope and approach, beneficiaries of IMM capabilities, history, risk components, conceptual models, development steps, and the evidence base. Space adaptation syndrome is used to demonstrate the model's capabilities.

  11. IDC Integrated Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, David J.; Harris, James M.

    2014-12-01

    This is the IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 project Integrated Master Plan (IMP). The IMP presents the major accomplishments planned over time to re-engineer the IDC system. The IMP and the associate Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) are used for planning, scheduling, executing, and tracking the project technical work efforts. REVISIONS Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Re- engineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  12. Integrated support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruneau, Stephen D.; Campbell, John T.; Struven, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    This Major Qualifying Project is part of the Advanced Space Design Program at WPI. The goal is to design a support structure for a NASA GetAway Special experimental canister. The payload integration, weight, volume, and structural integrity of the canister as specified by NASA guidelines were studied. The end result is a complete set of design drawings with interface drawings and data to specify the design and leave a base on which the next group can concentrate.

  13. Imagery Integration Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Tracy; Melendrez, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The Human Exploration Science Office (KX) provides leadership for NASA's Imagery Integration (Integration 2) Team, an affiliation of experts in the use of engineering-class imagery intended to monitor the performance of launch vehicles and crewed spacecraft in flight. Typical engineering imagery assessments include studying and characterizing the liftoff and ascent debris environments; launch vehicle and propulsion element performance; in-flight activities; and entry, landing, and recovery operations. Integration 2 support has been provided not only for U.S. Government spaceflight (e.g., Space Shuttle, Ares I-X) but also for commercial launch providers, such as Space Exploration Technologies Corporation (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corporation, servicing the International Space Station. The NASA Integration 2 Team is composed of imagery integration specialists from JSC, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), who have access to a vast pool of experience and capabilities related to program integration, deployment and management of imagery assets, imagery data management, and photogrammetric analysis. The Integration 2 team is currently providing integration services to commercial demonstration flights, Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), and the Space Launch System (SLS)-based Exploration Missions (EM)-1 and EM-2. EM-2 will be the first attempt to fly a piloted mission with the Orion spacecraft. The Integration 2 Team provides the customer (both commercial and Government) with access to a wide array of imagery options - ground-based, airborne, seaborne, or vehicle-based - that are available through the Government and commercial vendors. The team guides the customer in assembling the appropriate complement of imagery acquisition assets at the customer's facilities, minimizing costs associated with market research and the risk of purchasing inadequate assets. The NASA Integration 2 capability simplifies the process of securing one

  14. Candidate gene networks and blood biomarkers of methamphetamine-associated psychosis: an integrative RNA-sequencing report

    PubMed Central

    Breen, M S; Uhlmann, A; Nday, C M; Glatt, S J; Mitt, M; Metsalpu, A; Stein, D J; Illing, N

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation, course and treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-associated psychosis (MAP) are similar to that observed in schizophrenia (SCZ) and subsequently MAP has been hypothesized as a pharmacological and environmental model of SCZ. However, several challenges currently exist in diagnosing MAP accurately at the molecular and neurocognitive level before the MAP model can contribute to the discovery of SCZ biomarkers. We directly assessed subcortical brain structural volumes and clinical parameters of MAP within the framework of an integrative genome-wide RNA-Seq blood transcriptome analysis of subjects diagnosed with MAP (N=10), METH dependency without psychosis (MA; N=10) and healthy controls (N=10). First, we identified discrete groups of co-expressed genes (that is, modules) and tested them for functional annotation and phenotypic relationships to brain structure volumes, life events and psychometric measurements. We discovered one MAP-associated module involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis downregulation, enriched with 61 genes previously found implicated in psychosis and SCZ across independent blood and post-mortem brain studies using convergent functional genomic (CFG) evidence. This module demonstrated significant relationships with brain structure volumes including the anterior corpus callosum (CC) and the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, a second MAP and psychoticism-associated module involved in circadian clock upregulation was also enriched with 39 CFG genes, further associated with the CC. Subsequently, a machine-learning analysis of differentially expressed genes identified single blood-based biomarkers able to differentiate controls from methamphetamine dependents with 87% accuracy and MAP from MA subjects with 95% accuracy. CFG evidence validated a significant proportion of these putative MAP biomarkers in independent studies including CLN3, FBP1, TBC1D2 and ZNF821 (RNA degradation), ELK3 and SINA3 (circadian clock) and PIGF and

  15. Candidate gene networks and blood biomarkers of methamphetamine-associated psychosis: an integrative RNA-sequencing report.

    PubMed

    Breen, M S; Uhlmann, A; Nday, C M; Glatt, S J; Mitt, M; Metsalpu, A; Stein, D J; Illing, N

    2016-05-10

    The clinical presentation, course and treatment of methamphetamine (METH)-associated psychosis (MAP) are similar to that observed in schizophrenia (SCZ) and subsequently MAP has been hypothesized as a pharmacological and environmental model of SCZ. However, several challenges currently exist in diagnosing MAP accurately at the molecular and neurocognitive level before the MAP model can contribute to the discovery of SCZ biomarkers. We directly assessed subcortical brain structural volumes and clinical parameters of MAP within the framework of an integrative genome-wide RNA-Seq blood transcriptome analysis of subjects diagnosed with MAP (N=10), METH dependency without psychosis (MA; N=10) and healthy controls (N=10). First, we identified discrete groups of co-expressed genes (that is, modules) and tested them for functional annotation and phenotypic relationships to brain structure volumes, life events and psychometric measurements. We discovered one MAP-associated module involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis downregulation, enriched with 61 genes previously found implicated in psychosis and SCZ across independent blood and post-mortem brain studies using convergent functional genomic (CFG) evidence. This module demonstrated significant relationships with brain structure volumes including the anterior corpus callosum (CC) and the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, a second MAP and psychoticism-associated module involved in circadian clock upregulation was also enriched with 39 CFG genes, further associated with the CC. Subsequently, a machine-learning analysis of differentially expressed genes identified single blood-based biomarkers able to differentiate controls from methamphetamine dependents with 87% accuracy and MAP from MA subjects with 95% accuracy. CFG evidence validated a significant proportion of these putative MAP biomarkers in independent studies including CLN3, FBP1, TBC1D2 and ZNF821 (RNA degradation), ELK3 and SINA3 (circadian clock) and PIGF and

  16. UCSC Data Integrator and Variant Annotation Integrator

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, Angie S.; Raney, Brian J.; Speir, Matthew L.; Rhead, Brooke; Casper, Jonathan; Karolchik, Donna; Kuhn, Robert M.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Two new tools on the UCSC Genome Browser web site provide improved ways of combining information from multiple datasets, optionally including the user's own custom track data and/or data from track hubs. The Data Integrator combines columns from multiple data tracks, showing all items from the first track along with overlapping items from the other tracks. The Variant Annotation Integrator is tailored to adding functional annotations to variant calls; it offers a more restricted set of underlying data tracks but adds predictions of each variant's consequences for any overlapping or nearby gene transcript. When available, it optionally adds additional annotations including effect prediction scores from dbNSFP for missense mutations, ENCODE regulatory summary tracks and conservation scores. Availability and implementation: The web tools are freely available at http://genome.ucsc.edu/ and the underlying database is available for download at http://hgdownload.cse.ucsc.edu/. The software (written in C and Javascript) is available from https://genome-store.ucsc.edu/ and is freely available for academic and non-profit usage; commercial users must obtain a license. Contact: angie@soe.ucsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26740527

  17. Integrating the Integrators - A Roadmap to Success

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Craig Stott; Conner, Craig C

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management's (DOE-EM) investments in science and technology, as well as science and technology investments associated with other parts of the DOE are aimed at meeting the Departments cleanup goals. These investments, primarily focused on EM's cleanup mission, comprise the Environmental Quality Research and Development (R&D) portfolios. Synchronizing EM's Cleanup Project Managers (operations facility and process owners throughout the DOE complex) operational needs with EM R&D including the extensive work of the six Focus Areas (major thrust areas within DOE-EM) has been a continuing challenge. This recent initiative to better integrate the R&D program is in response to evolving needs within the Department to apply proven system engineering methods to clarify requirements and define EM's process to effectively orchestrate their R&D Program. To optimize this partnership, DOE-EM's Integration Program is successfully unifying the operational needs with the R&D as described in this paper.

  18. Integrating the Integrators - A Roadmap to Success

    SciTech Connect

    C. Conner; C. Olson

    1999-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management's (DOE-EM) investments in science and technology, as well as science and technology investments associated with other parts of the DOE are aimed at meeting the Departments cleanup goals. These investments, primarily focused on EM's cleanup mission, comprise the Environmental Quality Research and Development (R&D) portfolios. Synchronizing EM's Cleanup Project Managers (operations facility and process owners throughout the DOE complex) operational needs with EM R&D including the extensive work of the six Focus Areas (major thrust areas within DOE-EM) has been a continuing challenge. This recent initiative to better integrate the R&D program is in response to evolving needs within the Department to apply proven systems engineering methods to clarify requirements and define EM's process to effectively orchestrate their R&D Program. To optimize this partnership, DOE-EM's Integration Program is successfully unifying the operational needs with the R&D as described in this paper.

  19. Identification of candidate angiogenic inhibitors processed by matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) in cell-based proteomic screens: disruption of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/heparin affin regulatory peptide (pleiotrophin) and VEGF/Connective tissue growth factor angiogenic inhibitory complexes by MMP-2 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Dean, Richard A; Butler, Georgina S; Hamma-Kourbali, Yamina; Delbé, Jean; Brigstock, David R; Courty, José; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) exert both pro- and antiangiogenic functions by the release of cytokines or proteolytically generated angiogenic inhibitors from extracellular matrix and basement membrane remodeling. In the Mmp2-/- mouse neovascularization is greatly reduced, but the mechanistic aspects of this remain unclear. Using isotope-coded affinity tag labeling of proteins analyzed by multidimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry we explored proteome differences between Mmp2-/- cells and those rescued by MMP-2 transfection. Proteome signatures that are hallmarks of proteolysis revealed cleavage of many known MMP-2 substrates in the cellular context. Proteomic evidence of MMP-2 processing of novel substrates was found. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6, follistatin-like 1, and cystatin C protein cleavage by MMP-2 was biochemically confirmed, and the cleavage sites in heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP; pleiotrophin) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequenced by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. MMP-2 processing of HARP and CTGF released vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from angiogenic inhibitory complexes. The cleaved HARP N-terminal domain increased HARP-induced cell proliferation, whereas the HARP C-terminal domain was antagonistic and decreased cell proliferation and migration. Hence the unmasking of cytokines, such as VEGF, by metalloproteinase processing of their binding proteins is a new mechanism in the control of cytokine activation and angiogenesis.

  20. Integrated Budget Office Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushing, Douglas A.; Blakeley, Chris; Chapman, Gerry; Robertson, Bill; Horton, Allison; Besser, Thomas; McCarthy, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    The Integrated Budget Office Toolbox (IBOT) combines budgeting, resource allocation, organizational funding, and reporting features in an automated, integrated tool that provides data from a single source for Johnson Space Center (JSC) personnel. Using a common interface, concurrent users can utilize the data without compromising its integrity. IBOT tracks planning changes and updates throughout the year using both phasing and POP-related (program-operating-plan-related) budget information for the current year, and up to six years out. Separating lump-sum funds received from HQ (Headquarters) into separate labor, travel, procurement, Center G&A (general & administrative), and servicepool categories, IBOT creates a script that significantly reduces manual input time. IBOT also manages the movement of travel and procurement funds down to the organizational level and, using its integrated funds management feature, helps better track funding at lower levels. Third-party software is used to create integrated reports in IBOT that can be generated for plans, actuals, funds received, and other combinations of data that are currently maintained in the centralized format. Based on Microsoft SQL, IBOT incorporates generic budget processes, is transportable, and is economical to deploy and support.

  1. Integrated work management system.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Edward J., Jr.; Henry, Karen Lynne

    2010-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories develops technologies to: (1) sustain, modernize, and protect our nuclear arsenal (2) Prevent the spread of weapons of mass destruction; (3) Provide new capabilities to our armed forces; (4) Protect our national infrastructure; (5) Ensure the stability of our nation's energy and water supplies; and (6) Defend our nation against terrorist threats. We identified the need for a single overarching Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) that would enable us to focus on customer missions and improve FMOC processes. Our team selected highly configurable commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software with out-of-the-box workflow processes that integrate strategic planning, project management, facility assessments, and space management, and can interface with existing systems, such as Oracle, PeopleSoft, Maximo, Bentley, and FileNet. We selected the Integrated Workplace Management System (IWMS) from Tririga, Inc. Facility Management System (FMS) Benefits are: (1) Create a single reliable source for facility data; (2) Improve transparency with oversight organizations; (3) Streamline FMOC business processes with a single, integrated facility-management tool; (4) Give customers simple tools and real-time information; (5) Reduce indirect costs; (6) Replace approximately 30 FMOC systems and 60 homegrown tools (such as Microsoft Access databases); and (7) Integrate with FIMS.

  2. Integration and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Miller, Randolph A.; Musen, Mark A.; Hersh, William R.

    2000-01-01

    The vision of integrating information—from a variety of sources, into the way people work, to improve decisions and process—is one of the cornerstones of biomedical informatics. Thoughts on how this vision might be realized have evolved as improvements in information and communication technologies, together with discoveries in biomedical informatics, and have changed the art of the possible. This review identified three distinct generations of “integration” projects. First-generation projects create a database and use it for multiple purposes. Second-generation projects integrate by bringing information from various sources together through enterprise information architecture. Third-generation projects inter-relate disparate but accessible information sources to provide the appearance of integration. The review suggests that the ideas developed in the earlier generations have not been supplanted by ideas from subsequent generations. Instead, the ideas represent a continuum of progress along the three dimensions of workflow, structure, and extraction. PMID:10730596

  3. Integrated building design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanguinetti, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    For many years, building design has been a very linear process with owners speaking to architects who then design building shells that they pass along to sub-consultants who must fit their systems into the allotted spaces. While this process has some advantages, it provides little opportunity to optimize systems based on such factors as energy use or occupant comfort. This presentation will focus on the evolution and implications of integrated building design, a method that has provided greater opportunities for interaction between design disciplines and with building users early on in the design process. Integration has resulted in buildings that are more sustainable than typical buildings and that can respond better to the needs of the owner and users. Examples of the application of the process and the resulting buildings will be presented from the view of a design engineer with experience of both processes. Specifically, the potential contribution of an acoustical consultant in the integrated process will be explored.

  4. Simulation integration with confidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelich, Tom; Stalcup, Bruce W.

    1999-07-01

    Current financial, schedule and risk constraints mandate reuse of software components when building large-scale simulations. While integration of simulation components into larger systems is a well-understood process, it is extremely difficult to do while ensuring that the results are correct. Illgen Simulation Technologies Incorporated and Litton PRC have joined forces to provide tools to integrate simulations with confidence. Illgen Simulation Technologies has developed an extensible and scaleable, n-tier, client- server, distributed software framework for integrating legacy simulations, models, tools, utilities, and databases. By utilizing the Internet, Java, and the Common Object Request Brokering Architecture as the core implementation technologies, the framework provides built-in scalability and extensibility.

  5. CAM - Geometric systems integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, G. C.

    The integration of geometric and nongeometric information for efficient use of CAM is examined. Requirements for engineering drawings requested by management are noted to involve large volumes of nongeometric data to define the materials and quantity variables which impinge on the required design, so that the actual design may be the last and smaller step in the CAM process. Geometric classification and coding are noted to offer an alpha/numeric identifier for integrating the engineering design, manufacturing, and quality assurance functions. An example is provided of a turbine gear part coding in terms of polycode and monocode displays, showing a possible covering of more than 10 trillion features. Software is stressed as the key to integration of company-wide data.

  6. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  7. Double integrated laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    The layout of integrated optical system compromising the basis of proposed solution of double laser interferometer composed of two integrated Michelson's interferometers is presented and shortly discussed. Such an integrated system is designed for work with two lasers of different wavelength. It may serve for mapping surfaces and deformations of objects under investigation with the use of simultaneous recording of two mutually orthogonal gratings, each one composed of equidistant, parallel interference fringes projected onto the surface of such an object. The picture resulting two-coloured is recorded with the digital camera and may be used for obtaining these maps and deformations directly or in the indirect way after suitable digital processing applied to each colour component separately.

  8. Reflections on 'autistic integrity'.

    PubMed

    Russell, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Autism, particularly its moderate to severe forms, has prompted considerable scientific study and clinical involvement because the associated behaviours imply disconnections with valued features of a 'good' life, such as close relationships, enjoyment, and adaptability. Proposed causes of autism involve potent philosophical concepts including consciousness, identity, mind, and relationality. The concept of autistic integrity is used by Barnbaum in The Ethics of Autism: Among Them, But Not of Them to help provide moral justification to stop efforts to cure adults with autism, especially if the cause is presumed to be a lack of a theory of mind.(1) This article has two goals: (1) to apply four familiar definitions or characterizations of integrity to the case of moderate to severe autism, and (2) to examine whether autistic integrity does provide the moral justification Barnbaum seeks.

  9. Ideal Integrating Bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; DiPirro, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new "ideal integrator" bolometer as a prototype for a new generation of sensitive, flexible far-IR detectors suitable for use in large arrays. The combination of a non-dissipative sensor coupled with a fast heat switch provides breakthrough capabilities in both sensitivity and operation. The bolometer temperature varies linearly with the integrated infrared power incident on the detector, and may be sampled intermittently without loss of information between samples. The sample speed and consequent dynamic range depend only on the heat switch reset cycle and can be selected in software. Between samples, the device acts as an ideal integrator with noise significantly lower than resistive bolometers. Since there is no loss of information between samples, the device is well-suited for large arrays. A single SQUID readout could process an entire column of detectors, greatly reducing the complexity, power requirements, and cost of readout electronics for large pixel arrays.

  10. Broadband Integrated Transmittances (BITS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Roger E.; Berrick, Stephen W.

    1995-02-01

    Broadband Integrated Transmittances (BITS) is an EOSAEL module that calculates transmittance for systems with broad spectral response. Path-integrated concentration data from COMBIC, other EOSAEL modules, or user models are used as input for BITS. The primary function of BITS is to provide rigorous transmittance calculations for broadband systems, replacing the Beer-Lambert law used in most obscuration models. To use BITS, the system detector, filters, optics, and source spectral functions must be defined. The spectral transmittances of the atmosphere and mass extinction coefficient spectral data for the obscurant are also required. The output consists of transmittance as a function of concentration length for Beer's law and band-integrated computation methods. The theory of the model, a description of the module organization, and an operations guide that provides input and output in EOSAEL format are provided in this user's guide. Example uses for BITS are also included.

  11. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  12. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  13. NASA Integrated Network COOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Michael L.; Wright, Nathaniel; Tai, Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Natural disasters, terrorist attacks, civil unrest, and other events have the potential of disrupting mission-essential operations in any space communications network. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) is in the process of studying options for integrating the three existing NASA network elements, the Deep Space Network, the Near Earth Network, and the Space Network, into a single integrated network with common services and interfaces. The need to maintain Continuity of Operations (COOP) after a disastrous event has a direct impact on the future network design and operations concepts. The SCaN Integrated Network will provide support to a variety of user missions. The missions have diverse requirements and include anything from earth based platforms to planetary missions and rovers. It is presumed that an integrated network, with common interfaces and processes, provides an inherent advantage to COOP in that multiple elements and networks can provide cross-support in a seamless manner. The results of trade studies support this assumption but also show that centralization as a means of achieving integration can result in single points of failure that must be mitigated. The cost to provide this mitigation can be substantial. In support of this effort, the team evaluated the current approaches to COOP, developed multiple potential approaches to COOP in a future integrated network, evaluated the interdependencies of the various approaches to the various network control and operations options, and did a best value assessment of the options. The paper will describe the trade space, the study methods, and results of the study.

  14. Structural model integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Lahey, R. S.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the practical aspects and problems of ensuring the integrity of a structural model are discussed, as well as the steps which have been taken in the NASTRAN system to assure that these checks can be routinely performed. Model integrity as used applies not only to the structural model but also to the loads applied to the model. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that when dealing with substructure analysis, all of the checking procedures discussed should be applied at the lowest level of substructure prior to any coupling.

  15. Integrated Safety Analysis Tiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Carla; McNairy, Lisa; Wetherholt, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Commercial partnerships and organizational constraints, combined with complex systems, may lead to division of hazard analysis across organizations. This division could cause important hazards to be overlooked, causes to be missed, controls for a hazard to be incomplete, or verifications to be inefficient. Each organization s team must understand at least one level beyond the interface sufficiently enough to comprehend integrated hazards. This paper will discuss various ways to properly divide analysis among organizations. The Ares I launch vehicle integrated safety analyses effort will be utilized to illustrate an approach that addresses the key issues and concerns arising from multiple analysis responsibilities.

  16. Integrated Inertial/gps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Paul; Vangraas, Frank

    1990-01-01

    The presence of failures in navigation sensors can cause the determination of an erroneous aircraft state estimate, which includes position, attitude, and their derivatives. Aircraft flight control systems rely on sensor inputs to determine the aircraft state. In the case of integrated Inertial/NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS), sensor failures could occur in the on-board inertial sensors or in the GPS measurements. The synergistic use of both GPS and the Inertial Navigation System (INS) allows for highly reliable fault detection and isolation of sensor failures. Integrated Inertial/GPS is a promising technology for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and the return and landing of a manned space vehicle.

  17. Integrated system design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The primary objective of the integrated system test phase is to demonstrate the commercial potential of a coal fueled diesel engine in its actual operating environment. The integrated system in this project is defined as a coal fueled diesel locomotive. This locomotive, shown on drawing 41D715542, is described in the separate Concept Design Report. The test locomotive will be converted from an existing oil fueled diesel locomotive in three stages, until it nearly emulates the concept locomotive. Design drawings of locomotive components (diesel engine, locomotive, flatcar, etc.) are included.

  18. Integrating with integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, M. A.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Our central claim is that signaling by integrins provides a mechanism by which signals generated in response to adhesion, soluble hormones, and mechanical forces can interact. Such interactions permit cells to integrate these different classes of external stimuli and hence to orchestrate an efficient response. This integrating function of integrins is likely to be essential for much of development and physiology, as well as complex pathologies such as cancer. Understanding in detail how these signals are transduced and processed is likely to be an important area of research in the near future.

  19. Integrated photonics research, 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, Yaron

    1994-06-01

    Summaries of papers from the Integrated Photonics Research Topical Meeting, March 22-24, 1993, in Palm Springs, California are presented. Sessions include Novel Material and Devices, Time Domain Methods, Photonic Circuits and Lightwave Reception, III-V Semiconductor Switches and Modulators, Wavelength Selective Components, Optical Waveguide Simulators, Optical Switching, Silica on Silicon, Nonlinear Wave Propagation, Semiconductor Lasers, LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 Devices, Beam Propagation Methods, Photonic Integrated Circuits and Applications, Semiconductor Device Modeling, Waveguide Frequency Conversion, and Spatial and Temporal Solitons.

  20. Integrated biogas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaratunga, M.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated biogas systems as alternatives to fossil fuels in Sri Lanka are considered from standpoints of population growth, land availability, and employment opportunities. Agricultural practices would be improved by use of chemical fertilizers, and health/nutrition problems be alleviated by using biogas systems. Fuel for cooking and rural industries will become more easily available; water weeds, such as water hyacinth and salvinia which pose a threat to waterways and rice paddy lands could be used for the production of biogas and fertilizers. A concept of an integrated biogas system comprising photosynthesis and anaerobic degradation processes to produce food and energy is presented.