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Sample records for integration chapter cis

  1. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  2. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  3. cisMEP: an integrated repository of genomic epigenetic profiles and cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), or the DNA sequences required for regulating gene expression, play the central role in biological researches on transcriptional regulation in metazoan species. Nowadays, the systematic understanding of CRMs still mainly resorts to computational methods due to the time-consuming and small-scale nature of experimental methods. But the accuracy and reliability of different CRM prediction tools are still unclear. Without comparative cross-analysis of the results and combinatorial consideration with extra experimental information, there is no easy way to assess the confidence of the predicted CRMs. This limits the genome-wide understanding of CRMs. Description It is known that transcription factor binding and epigenetic profiles tend to determine functions of CRMs in gene transcriptional regulation. Thus integration of the genome-wide epigenetic profiles with systematically predicted CRMs can greatly help researchers evaluate and decipher the prediction confidence and possible transcriptional regulatory functions of these potential CRMs. However, these data are still fragmentary in the literatures. Here we performed the computational genome-wide screening for potential CRMs using different prediction tools and constructed the pioneer database, cisMEP (cis-regulatory module epigenetic profile database), to integrate these computationally identified CRMs with genomic epigenetic profile data. cisMEP collects the literature-curated TFBS location data and nine genres of epigenetic data for assessing the confidence of these potential CRMs and deciphering the possible CRM functionality. Conclusions cisMEP aims to provide a user-friendly interface for researchers to assess the confidence of different potential CRMs and to understand the functions of CRMs through experimentally-identified epigenetic profiles. The deposited potential CRMs and experimental epigenetic profiles for confidence assessment provide experimentally testable

  4. Assessment and management of ecological integrity: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwak, Thomas J.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Assessing and understanding the impacts of human activities on aquatic ecosystems has long been a focus of ecologists, water resources managers, and fisheries scientists. While traditional fisheries management focused on single-species approaches to enhance fish stocks, there is a growing emphasis on management approaches at community and ecosystem levels. Of course, as fisheries managers shift their attention from narrow (e.g., populations) to broad organizational scales (e.g., communities or ecosystems), ecological processes and management objectives become more complex. At the community level, fisheries managers may strive for a fish assemblage that is complex, persistent, and resilient to disturbance. Aquatic ecosystem level objectives may focus on management for habitat quality and ecological processes, such as nutrient dynamics, productivity, or trophic interactions, but a long-term goal of ecosystem management may be to maintain ecological integrity. However, human users and social, economic, and political demands of fisheries management often result in a reduction of ecological integrity in managed systems, and this conflict presents a principal challenge for the modern fisheries manager. The concepts of biotic integrity and ecological integrity are being applied in fisheries science, natural resource management, and environmental legislation, but explicit definitions of these terms are elusive. Biotic integrity of an ecosystem may be defined as the capability of supporting and maintaining an integrated, adaptive community of organisms having a species composition, diversity, and functional organization comparable to that of a natural habitat of the region (Karr and Dudley 1981). Following that, ecological integrity is the summation of chemical, physical, and biological integrity. Thus, the concept of ecological integrity extends beyond fish and represents a holistic approach for ecosystem management that is especially applicable to aquatic systems. The

  5. i-cisTarget: an integrative genomics method for the prediction of regulatory features and cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Carl; Van de Sande, Bram; Potier, Delphine; Aerts, Stein

    2012-08-01

    The field of regulatory genomics today is characterized by the generation of high-throughput data sets that capture genome-wide transcription factor (TF) binding, histone modifications, or DNAseI hypersensitive regions across many cell types and conditions. In this context, a critical question is how to make optimal use of these publicly available datasets when studying transcriptional regulation. Here, we address this question in Drosophila melanogaster for which a large number of high-throughput regulatory datasets are available. We developed i-cisTarget (where the 'i' stands for integrative), for the first time enabling the discovery of different types of enriched 'regulatory features' in a set of co-regulated sequences in one analysis, being either TF motifs or 'in vivo' chromatin features, or combinations thereof. We have validated our approach on 15 co-expressed gene sets, 21 ChIP data sets, 628 curated gene sets and multiple individual case studies, and show that meaningful regulatory features can be confidently discovered; that bona fide enhancers can be identified, both by in vivo events and by TF motifs; and that combinations of in vivo events and TF motifs further increase the performance of enhancer prediction.

  6. Chapter 636, Voluntary Integration in Massachusetts. Successful Programs of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spier, Adele W.; And Others

    A statewide study was conducted to identify and describe successful voluntary school desegregation programs funded under Chapter 636, a 1974 amendment to Massachussets' Racial Imbalance Law. Programs selected were of four types: (1) school-based (elementary, middle, and high); (2) school system- or district-wide; (3) part-time and full-time…

  7. Chapter 1: Overview of the integrated landscape assessment project

    Treesearch

    Miles A. Hemstrom; Jessica E. Halofsky; F. Jack Triepke; R. James Barbour; Janine Salwasser

    2014-01-01

    Fire suppression, vegetation management activities, wildfires, grazing, climate change, and other factors result in constantly changing vegetation and habitat conditions across millions of hectares in the Western United States. In recent years, the size and number of large wildfires has grown, threatening lives, property, and ecosystem integrity. At the same time,...

  8. An Integrated Approach to Identifying Cis-Regulatory Modules in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Agarwal, Saurabh; Shen, Li; Shoemaker, Robert; Ren, Bing; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic genomes, it is challenging to accurately determine target sites of transcription factors (TFs) by only using sequence information. Previous efforts were made to tackle this task by considering the fact that TF binding sites tend to be more conserved than other functional sites and the binding sites of several TFs are often clustered. Recently, ChIP-chip and ChIP-sequencing experiments have been accumulated to identify TF binding sites as well as survey the chromatin modification patterns at the regulatory elements such as promoters and enhancers. We propose here a hidden Markov model (HMM) to incorporate sequence motif information, TF-DNA interaction data and chromatin modification patterns to precisely identify cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). We conducted ChIP-chip experiments on four TFs, CREB, E2F1, MAX, and YY1 in 1% of the human genome. We then trained a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify the labels of the CRMs by incorporating the sequence motifs recognized by these TFs and the ChIP-chip ratio. Chromatin modification data was used to predict the functional sites and to further remove false positives. Cross-validation showed that our integrated HMM had a performance superior to other existing methods on predicting CRMs. Incorporating histone signature information successfully penalized false prediction and improved the whole performance. The dataset we used and the software are available at http://nash.ucsd.edu/CIS/. PMID:19434238

  9. Healthy outdoor recreation: An integrated approach to linking physical activity with wellness goals. Chapter 38

    Treesearch

    Paul H. Gobster; David M. Buchner

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the shared interest of the public health and leisure fields in promoting outdoor recreation. We describe how trans disciplinary integration of research efforts across these fields can lead to a better understanding of how outdoor recreation facilities and programs can help realize a full range of health and wellness benefits....

  10. Chapter 12 ferromagnetic RF integrated devices—RF integrated noise suppressor and integrated inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrated the RF integrated noise suppressor and thin-film inductor using ferromagnetic film. The transmission parameter (S 21) of the integrated noise suppressor was compared with that of the nonintegrated noise suppressor. The magnitude of signal attenuation at the resonance point was greatly increased by the integration up to -30 and -57 dB for the 1-µm-thick and 2-µm-thick CoNbZr films, respectively. The closed magnetic circuit type GHz-drive integrated spiral inductors were fabricated with a four-turn and 380 × 380 µm2 two-port-type inductor with ground guards, which consisted of a sandwich 2-µm-thick Cu coil in between a patterned 1-µm-thick CoNbZr film. The 10/3 (line/space [µm]) designs with 2-µm-thick SiO2 insulating layers exhibited a quality factor Q = 14.7, being highest among the published data at 1 GHz.

  11. Cis-element mutated in GATA2-dependent immunodeficiency governs hematopoiesis and vascular integrity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Hsu, Amy P.; Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Wang, Jinyong; Gao, Xin; Boyer, Meghan E.; Liu, Yangang; Lee, Youngsook; Calvo, Katherine R.; Keles, Sunduz; Zhang, Jing; Holland, Steven M.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency for GATA2 causes human immunodeficiency syndromes characterized by mycobacterial infection, myelodysplasia, lymphedema, or aplastic anemia that progress to myeloid leukemia. GATA2 encodes a master regulator of hematopoiesis that is also linked to endothelial biology. Though the disease-causing mutations commonly occur in the GATA-2 DNA binding domain, we identified a patient with mycobacterial infection and myelodysplasia who had an uncharacterized heterozygous deletion in a GATA2 cis-element consisting of an E-box and a GATA motif. Targeted deletion of the equivalent murine element to yield homozygous mutant mice revealed embryonic lethality later than occurred with global Gata2 knockout, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell depletion, and impaired vascular integrity. Heterozygous mutant mice were viable, but embryos exhibited deficits in definitive, but not primitive, hematopoietic stem/progenitor activity and reduced expression of Gata2 and its target genes. Mechanistic analysis revealed disruption of the endothelial cell transcriptome and loss of vascular integrity. Thus, the composite element disrupted in a human immunodeficiency is essential for establishment of the murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment in the fetal liver and for essential vascular processes. PMID:22996659

  12. An integrative and applicable phylogenetic footprinting framework for cis-regulatory motifs identification in prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Fennell, Anne; Wang, Guanghui; Kang, Yu; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-08-09

    Phylogenetic footprinting is an important computational technique for identifying cis-regulatory motifs in orthologous regulatory regions from multiple genomes, as motifs tend to evolve slower than their surrounding non-functional sequences. Its application, however, has several difficulties for optimizing the selection of orthologous data and reducing the false positives in motif prediction. Here we present an integrative phylogenetic footprinting framework for accurate motif predictions in prokaryotic genomes (MP(3)). The framework includes a new orthologous data preparation procedure, an additional promoter scoring and pruning method and an integration of six existing motif finding algorithms as basic motif search engines. Specifically, we collected orthologous genes from available prokaryotic genomes and built the orthologous regulatory regions based on sequence similarity of promoter regions. This procedure made full use of the large-scale genomic data and taxonomy information and filtered out the promoters with limited contribution to produce a high quality orthologous promoter set. The promoter scoring and pruning is implemented through motif voting by a set of complementary predicting tools that mine as many motif candidates as possible and simultaneously eliminate the effect of random noise. We have applied the framework to Escherichia coli k12 genome and evaluated the prediction performance through comparison with seven existing programs. This evaluation was systematically carried out at the nucleotide and binding site level, and the results showed that MP(3) consistently outperformed other popular motif finding tools. We have integrated MP(3) into our motif identification and analysis server DMINDA, allowing users to efficiently identify and analyze motifs in 2,072 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes. The performance evaluation indicated that MP(3) is effective for predicting regulatory motifs in prokaryotic genomes. Its application may enhance

  13. Haemophilia care in India: innovations and integrations by various chapters of Haemophilia Federation of India (HFI).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, K; Shetty, S; Sahu, D

    2010-01-01

    Care of persons with haemophilia (PWH) in western countries is the responsibility of the government of those countries with or without funding from health insurers. Haemophilia societies in western countries work as pressure groups to ensure better care, and they disseminate information on the disease and some of the societies even support medical research for haemophilia care. In India, Haemophilia Federation of India (HFI) was established in 1982 with few haemophilia families and sympathizers of their cause; subsequently more than 65 chapters involving more than 12 500 PWH came up under HFI. HFI and its constituent chapters are unique in the world in the sense that they are not only trying to involve state and federal government to take responsibility for delivering haemophilia care, but they are also using various innovative and integrative techniques to deliver haemophilia care to PWH themselves, till the time federal and state governments of the country make suitable arrangement for their care. In this study, several of these approaches are discussed with the understanding that 80% of worlds' haemophilia population needs similar help, and the national haemophilia organizations (NMO) of various developing countries will find some of the approaches useful and adaptable to their own circumstances.

  14. Conjugative Transfer and cis-Mobilization of a Genomic Island by an Integrative and Conjugative Element of Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Puymège, Aurore; Bertin, Stéphane; Chuzeville, Sarah; Guédon, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Putative integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), i.e., genomic islands which could excise, self-transfer by conjugation, and integrate into the chromosome of the bacterial host strain, were previously identified by in silico analysis in the sequenced genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae (M. Brochet et al., J. Bacteriol. 190:6913–6917, 2008). We investigated here the mobility of the elements integrated into the 3′ end of a tRNALys gene. Three of the four putative ICEs tested were found to excise but only one (ICE_515_tRNALys) was found to transfer by conjugation not only to S. agalactiae strains but also to a Streptococcus pyogenes strain. Transfer was observed even if recipient cell already carries a related resident ICE or a genomic island flanked by attL and attR recombination sites but devoid of conjugation or recombination genes (CIs-Mobilizable Element [CIME]). The incoming ICE preferentially integrates into the 3′ end of the tRNALys gene (i.e., the attR site of the resident element), leading to a CIME-ICE structure. Transfer of the whole composite element CIME-ICE was obtained, showing that the CIME is mobilizable in cis by the ICE. Therefore, genomic islands carrying putative virulence genes but lacking the mobility gene can be mobilized by a related ICE after site-specific accretion. PMID:23275243

  15. Conjugative transfer and cis-mobilization of a genomic island by an integrative and conjugative element of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Puymège, Aurore; Bertin, Stéphane; Chuzeville, Sarah; Guédon, Gérard; Payot, Sophie

    2013-03-01

    Putative integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), i.e., genomic islands which could excise, self-transfer by conjugation, and integrate into the chromosome of the bacterial host strain, were previously identified by in silico analysis in the sequenced genomes of Streptococcus agalactiae (M. Brochet et al., J. Bacteriol. 190:6913-6917, 2008). We investigated here the mobility of the elements integrated into the 3' end of a tRNA(Lys) gene. Three of the four putative ICEs tested were found to excise but only one (ICE_515_tRNA(Lys)) was found to transfer by conjugation not only to S. agalactiae strains but also to a Streptococcus pyogenes strain. Transfer was observed even if recipient cell already carries a related resident ICE or a genomic island flanked by attL and attR recombination sites but devoid of conjugation or recombination genes (CIs-Mobilizable Element [CIME]). The incoming ICE preferentially integrates into the 3' end of the tRNA(Lys) gene (i.e., the attR site of the resident element), leading to a CIME-ICE structure. Transfer of the whole composite element CIME-ICE was obtained, showing that the CIME is mobilizable in cis by the ICE. Therefore, genomic islands carrying putative virulence genes but lacking the mobility gene can be mobilized by a related ICE after site-specific accretion.

  16. Integration of Bioinformatics and Synthetic Promoters Leads to the Discovery of Novel Elicitor-Responsive cis-Regulatory Sequences in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Koschmann, Jeannette; Machens, Fabian; Becker, Marlies; Niemeyer, Julia; Schulze, Jutta; Bülow, Lorenz; Stahl, Dietmar J.; Hehl, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    A combination of bioinformatic tools, high-throughput gene expression profiles, and the use of synthetic promoters is a powerful approach to discover and evaluate novel cis-sequences in response to specific stimuli. With Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray data annotated to the PathoPlant database, 732 different queries with a focus on fungal and oomycete pathogens were performed, leading to 510 up-regulated gene groups. Using the binding site estimation suite of tools, BEST, 407 conserved sequence motifs were identified in promoter regions of these coregulated gene sets. Motif similarities were determined with STAMP, classifying the 407 sequence motifs into 37 families. A comparative analysis of these 37 families with the AthaMap, PLACE, and AGRIS databases revealed similarities to known cis-elements but also led to the discovery of cis-sequences not yet implicated in pathogen response. Using a parsley (Petroselinum crispum) protoplast system and a modified reporter gene vector with an internal transformation control, 25 elicitor-responsive cis-sequences from 10 different motif families were identified. Many of the elicitor-responsive cis-sequences also drive reporter gene expression in an Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection assay in Nicotiana benthamiana. This work significantly increases the number of known elicitor-responsive cis-sequences and demonstrates the successful integration of a diverse set of bioinformatic resources combined with synthetic promoter analysis for data mining and functional screening in plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:22744985

  17. Digital Systems Validation Handbook. Volume 2. Chapter 18. Avionic Data Bus Integration Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    U.S. Department of Transportation PFe 1rs Aviation Administration DOT/FAA/CT-88/10 HANDBOOK- VOLUME H DIGITAL SYSTEMS VALIDATION - CHAPTER 18 tw...18-29 improve identification, control, and auditing of software. SCM and SQA methods in RTCA/DO-178A are drawn directly from proven methods of hardware...procedures, and practices; reviews and audits ; configuration management; medium control; testing; supplier control; and appropriate records. A brief

  18. PV Manufacturing R&D -- Integrated CIS Thin-Film Manufacturing Infrastructure: Phase I Technical Report, 2 August 2002--31 October 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrant, D. E.; Gay, R. R.

    2004-06-01

    This subcontract report describes Shell Solar Industries (SSI), formerly Siemens Solar Industries, pursuing research and development of CuInSe2-based thin-film PV technology since 1980. In the 1980s, SSI demonstrated a 14.1%-efficient 3.4-cm2 active-area cell; unencapsulated integrated modules with aperture efficiencies of 11.2% on 940 cm2 and 9.1% on 3900 cm2; and an encapsulated module with 8.7% efficiency on 3883 cm2 (verified by NREL). Since these early achievements, SSI has made outstanding progress in the initial commercialization of high-performance thin-film CIS technology. Line yield has been increased from about 60% in 2000 to about 85% in 2002. This major accomplishment supports attractive cost projections for CIS. Recently, NREL confirmed a champion 12.8% aperture-area conversion efficiency for a large-area (3626 cm2) CIS module. Other than definition of the aperture area, this module is simply one module from the upper end of the production distribution for standard modules. Prerequisites for commitment to large-scale commercialization have been demonstrated at successive levels of CIS production. Remaining R&D challenges are to scale the processes to even larger areas, to reach higher production capacity, to demonstrate in-service durability over longer times, and to advance the fundamental understanding of CIS-based materials and devices with the goal of improvements for future products. SSI's thin-film CIS technology is poised to make very significant contributions to DOE/NREL/NCPV long-term goals of higher volume, lower-cost commercial products. The objective of this subcontract is to continue advancement of SSI's copper indium diselenide (CIS) technology through development and implementation of: high-throughput CIS absorber formation reactors; an XRF measurement system; a bar-code scribing system; a high-capacity ZnO monitoring system; a high-capacity continuous-light-source simulator; and integrated manufacturing infrastructure including

  19. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 006 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF cis - 1,2 - DICHLOROETHYLENE and trans - 1,2 - DICHLOROETHYLENE ( CAS Nos . cis : 156 - 59 - 2 ; trans : 156 - 60 - 5 ; mixture : 540 - 59 - 0 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS )

  20. Separate elements of the TERMINAL FLOWER 1 cis-regulatory region integrate pathways to control flowering time and shoot meristem identity.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Fernández-Nohales, Pedro; Doménech, María J; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Bradley, Desmond; Madueño, Francisco

    2016-09-15

    TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is a key regulator of Arabidopsis plant architecture that responds to developmental and environmental signals to control flowering time and the fate of shoot meristems. TFL1 expression is dynamic, being found in all shoot meristems, but not in floral meristems, with the level and distribution changing throughout development. Using a variety of experimental approaches we have analysed the TFL1 promoter to elucidate its functional structure. TFL1 expression is based on distinct cis-regulatory regions, the most important being located 3' of the coding sequence. Our results indicate that TFL1 expression in the shoot apical versus lateral inflorescence meristems is controlled through distinct cis-regulatory elements, suggesting that different signals control expression in these meristem types. Moreover, we identified a cis-regulatory region necessary for TFL1 expression in the vegetative shoot and required for a wild-type flowering time, supporting that TFL1 expression in the vegetative meristem controls flowering time. Our study provides a model for the functional organisation of TFL1 cis-regulatory regions, contributing to our understanding of how developmental pathways are integrated at the genomic level of a key regulator to control plant architecture. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Interactions of water quality and integrated groundwater management: Examples from the United States and Europe: Chapter 14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, Kelly L.; Barataud, Fabienne; Hunt, Randall J.; Benoit, Marc; Anglade, Juliette; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater is available in many parts of the world, but the quality of the water may limit its use. Contaminants can limit the use of groundwater through concerns associated with human health, aquatic health, economic costs, or even societal perception. Given this broad range of concerns, this chapter focuses on examples of how water quality issues influence integrated groundwater management. One example evaluates the importance of a naturally occurring contaminant Arsenic (As) for drinking water supply, one explores issues resulting from agricultural activities on the land surface and factors that influence related groundwater management, and the last examines unique issues that result from human-introduced viral pathogens for groundwater-derived drinking water vulnerability. The examples underscore how integrated groundwater management lies at the intersections of environmental characterization, engineering constraints, societal needs, and human perception of acceptable water quality. As such, water quality factors can be a key driver for societal decision making.

  2. Designing Adaptive Low-Dissipative High Order Schemes for Long-Time Integrations. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sjoegreen, B.; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A general framework for the design of adaptive low-dissipative high order schemes is presented. It encompasses a rather complete treatment of the numerical approach based on four integrated design criteria: (1) For stability considerations, condition the governing equations before the application of the appropriate numerical scheme whenever it is possible; (2) For consistency, compatible schemes that possess stability properties, including physical and numerical boundary condition treatments, similar to those of the discrete analogue of the continuum are preferred; (3) For the minimization of numerical dissipation contamination, efficient and adaptive numerical dissipation control to further improve nonlinear stability and accuracy should be used; and (4) For practical considerations, the numerical approach should be efficient and applicable to general geometries, and an efficient and reliable dynamic grid adaptation should be used if necessary. These design criteria are, in general, very useful to a wide spectrum of flow simulations. However, the demand on the overall numerical approach for nonlinear stability and accuracy is much more stringent for long-time integration of complex multiscale viscous shock/shear/turbulence/acoustics interactions and numerical combustion. Robust classical numerical methods for less complex flow physics are not suitable or practical for such applications. The present approach is designed expressly to address such flow problems, especially unsteady flows. The minimization of employing very fine grids to overcome the production of spurious numerical solutions and/or instability due to under-resolved grids is also sought. The incremental studies to illustrate the performance of the approach are summarized. Extensive testing and full implementation of the approach is forthcoming. The results shown so far are very encouraging.

  3. Rotational spectrum of cis-cis HOONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Fry, Juliane L.; Miller, Charles E.

    2004-03-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of cis-cis peroxynitrous acid, HOONO, has been observed. Over 220 transitions, sampling states up to J'=67 and Ka'=31, have been fitted with an rms uncertainty of 48.4 kHz. The experimentally determined rotational constants agree well with ab initio values for the cis-cis conformer, a five-membered ring formed by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The small, positive inertial defect Δ=0.075667(60) amu Å2 and lack of any observable torsional splittings in the spectrum indicate that cis-cis HOONO exists in a well-defined planar structure at room temperature.

  4. Integration of coral reef ecosystem process studies and remote sensing: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brook, John; Yates, Kimberly; Halley, Robert

    2006-01-01

    anthropogenic causes (Brown, 1988). Models of coral reef ecosystems, parameterized by process measurements and scaled in time-space using remote sensing, have the potential to address pressing research questions that are central to devising valid management strategies (Grigg el al., 1984; Hatcher, 1997b). To attain this goal, ecosystem-level models that integrate studies of physical and chemical forcing with observed biological and geological responses are required. This interdisciplinary approach to understanding reef biogeochemical dynamics can allow investigations that integrate the scales of time and space (Hatcher, 1997a), thereby enabling prediction of coral reef change (Andréfouët and Payri, 2001). In turn, prediction of holistic ecosystem function within various environmental focusing scenarios has substantial promise in mitigating future disturbance. Indeed, management of coral reefs at the ecosystem level has been suggested as the only meaningful approach to preserving coral reefs (Bohnsack and Ault, 1996; Christensen et al., 1996).

  5. Chapter 8 Tool for monitoring hydrophilic contaminants in water: polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Jones-Lepp, Tammy L.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank; Getting, Dominic T.; Goddard, Jon P.; Gravell, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The development of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides environmental scientists and policy makers a tool for assessing the presence and potential impacts of the hydrophilic component of these organic contaminants. The POCIS provides a means for determining the time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of targeted chemicals that can be used in risk assessments to determine the biological impact of hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) on the health of the impacted ecosystem. Field studies have shown that the POCIS has advantages over traditional sampling methods in sequestering and concentrating ultra-trace to trace levels of chemicals over time resulting in increased method sensitivity, ability to detect chemicals with a relatively short residence time or variable concentrations in the water, and simplicity in use. POCIS extracts can be tested using bioassays and can be used in organism dosing experiments for determining toxicological significance of the complex mixture of chemicals sampled. The POCIS has been successfully used worldwide under various field conditions ranging from stagnant ponds to shallow creeks to major river systems in both fresh and brackish water.

  6. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Mark A.

    2016-10-25

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  7. An integrated system CisGenome for analyzing ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongkai; Jiang, Hui; Ma, Wenxiu; Johnson, David S.; Myers, Richard M.; Wong, Wing H.

    2008-01-01

    CisGenome is a software system for analyzing genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data. It is designed to meet all basic needs of ChIP data analyses, including visualization, data normalization, peak detection, false discovery rate (FDR) computation, gene-peak association, and sequence and motif analysis. In addition to implementing previously published ChIP-chip analysis methods, the software contains new statistical methods designed specifically for ChIP-seq data. CisGenome has a modular design so that it supports interactive analyses through a graphic user interface as well as customized batch-mode computation for advanced data mining. A built-in browser allows visualization of array images, signals, gene structure, conservation, and DNA sequence and motif information. We illustrate the use of these tools by a comparative analysis of ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq data for the transcription factor NRSF/REST, a study of ChIP-seq analysis without negative control sample, and an analysis of a novel motif in Nanog- and Sox2-binding regions. PMID:18978777

  8. Representative Agricultural Pathways and Scenarios for Regional Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability, and Adaptation. 5; Chapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdivia, Roberto O.; Antle, John M.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Ruane, Alexander C.; Vervoort, Joost; Ashfaq, Muhammad; Hathie, Ibrahima; Tui, Sabine Homann-Kee; Mulwa, Richard; Nhemachena, Charles; hide

    2015-01-01

    The global change research community has recognized that new pathway and scenario concepts are needed to implement impact and vulnerability assessment where precise prediction is not possible, and also that these scenarios need to be logically consistent across local, regional, and global scales. For global climate models, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) have been developed that provide a range of time-series of atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations into the future. For impact and vulnerability assessment, new socio-economic pathway and scenario concepts have also been developed, with leadership from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC).This chapter presents concepts and methods for development of regional representative agricultural pathways (RAOs) and scenarios that can be used for agricultural model intercomparison, improvement, and impact assessment in a manner consistent with the new global pathways and scenarios. The development of agriculture-specific pathways and scenarios is motivated by the need for a protocol-based approach to climate impact, vulnerability, and adaptation assessment. Until now, the various global and regional models used for agricultural-impact assessment have been implemented with individualized scenarios using various data and model structures, often without transparent documentation, public availability, and consistency across disciplines. These practices have reduced the credibility of assessments, and also hampered the advancement of the science through model intercomparison, improvement, and synthesis of model results across studies. The recognition of the need for better coordination among the agricultural modeling community, including the development of standard reference scenarios with adequate agriculture-specific detail led to the creation of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) in 2010. The development of RAPs is one of the cross-cutting themes in AgMIP's work

  9. Integrative Modeling of eQTLs and Cis-Regulatory Elements Suggests Mechanisms Underlying Cell Type Specificity of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher D.; Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE) data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human complex phenotypic

  10. Assessing ecological integrity using multiscale information from Bureau of Land Management Assessment and Monitoring Programs [Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Sarah K. Carter; Natasha B. Carr; Curtis H. Flather; Erica Fleishman; Matthias Leu; Barry R. Noon; David J. A. Wood

    2016-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management manages 246 million surface acres (100 million hectares) across the United States for multiple uses and sustained yield. Ensuring protection of ecological systems in the context of multiple, and often conflicting, resource uses and values is a challenge. Ecological integrity and land health are terms used by the Bureau of Land Management...

  11. Chapter 4: Overview of the vegetation management treatment economic analysis module in the integrated landscape assessment project

    Treesearch

    Xiaoping Zhou; Miles A. Hemstrom

    2014-01-01

    Forest land provides various ecosystem services, including timber, biomass, and carbon sequestration. Estimating trends in these ecosystem services is essential for assessing potential outcomes of landscape management scenarios. However, the state-and transition models used in the Integrated Landscape Assessment Project for simulating landscape changes over time do not...

  12. Adaptation illustrations: Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Matt St. Pierre; Linda. Parker

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how the Adaptation Workbook (Chapter 3) can be used with the Adaptation Strategies and Approaches (Chapter 2) to develop adaptation tactics for two real-world management issues. The two illustrations in this chapter are intended to provide helpful tips to managers completing the Adaptation Workbook, as well as to show how the anticipated...

  13. PV Manufacturing R&D -- Integrated CIS Thin-Film Manufacturing Infrastructure: Final Technical Report, 2 August 2002--30 April 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrant, D. E.; Gay, R. R.

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this subcontract was to continue the advancement of CIS production at Shell Solar Industries through the development of high-throughput CIS absorber formation reactors, implementation of associated safety infrastructure, an XRF measurement system, a bar code scribing system, and Intelligent Processing functions for the CIS production line. The intent was to open up production bottlenecks thereby allowing SSI to exercise the overall process at higher production rates and lay the groundwork for evaluation of near-term and long-term manufacturing scale-up. The goal of the absorber formation reactor subcontract work was to investigate conceptual designs for high-throughput, large area (2x5 ft.) CIS reactors and provide design specifications for the first generation of these reactors. The importance of reactor design to the CIS formation process was demonstrated when first scaling from a baseline process in reactors for substrates to a large area reactor. SSI demonstrated that lower performance for large substrates was due to differences in absorber layer properties that were due to differences in the materials of construction and the physical design of the large reactor. As a result of these studies, a new large area reactor was designed and built that demonstrated circuit plate performance comparable to the performance using small area reactors. For this subcontract work, three tasks were identified to accomplish the absorber formation reactor work: Modeling, Mockup and Vendor Search. The goal of the mockup task was to demonstrate that large area substrates, nominally 2 by 5 ft., could be heated without warping and to begin exploring the achievable thermal uniformity for various reactor and substrate configurations and varied ramp rates. The mockup consisted of a metal simulation of the reactor that was placed in a large industrial furnace. Substrate temperature variations ranged from minimal to significant with increasing substrate load. Warping

  14. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  15. Materials for Spacecraft. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.

    2016-01-01

    The general knowledge in this chapter is intended for a broad variety of spacecraft: manned or unmanned, low Earth to geosynchronous orbit, cis-lunar, lunar, planetary, or deep space exploration. Materials for launch vehicles are covered in chapter 7. Materials used in the fabrication of spacecraft hardware should be selected by considering the operational requirements for the particular application and the design engineering properties of the candidate materials. The information provided in this chapter is not intended to replace an in-depth materials study but rather to make the spacecraft designer aware of the challenges for various types of materials and some lessons learned from more than 50 years of spaceflight. This chapter discusses the damaging effects of the space environment on various materials and what has been successfully used in the past or what may be used for a more robust design. The material categories covered are structural, thermal control for on-orbit and re-entry, shielding against radiation and meteoroid/space debris impact, optics, solar arrays, lubricants, seals, and adhesives. Spacecraft components not directly exposed to space must still meet certain requirements, particularly for manned spacecraft where toxicity and flammability are concerns. Requirements such as fracture control and contamination control are examined, with additional suggestions for manufacturability. It is important to remember that the actual hardware must be tested to understand the real, "as-built" performance, as it could vary from the design intent. Early material trades can overestimate benefits and underestimate costs. An example of this was using graphite/epoxy composite in the International Space Station science racks to save weight. By the time the requirements for vibration isolation, Space Shuttle frequencies, and experiment operations were included, the weight savings had evaporated.

  16. Tourette Association Chapters

    MedlinePlus

    ... com Arizona Email: info@tsa-az.org Website: http://tsa-az.org/ Arkansas Support Group of Northwest ... California/Hawaii Chapter Email: cbrackett2004@yahoo.com Website: http://www.tsanorcal-hawaii.org Southern California Chapter Phone: ...

  17. Chapter 6: Temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  18. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  19. Guidance for Establishing a Regional SER Chapter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Regional Society for Ecological Restoration International (SER) chapters are integral to grass root restoration efforts because they serve as a resource on ecological restoration for individuals and institutions within their chapter boundaries. SER recognized the Midwest-Great Lakes (MWGL) SER chapt...

  20. Status of flexible CIS research at ISET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basol, B. M.; Kapur, V. K.; Minnick, A.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin film solar cells fabricated on light-weight, flexible substrates are very attractive for space applications. In this work CulnSe2 (CIS) based thin film devices were processed on metallic foil substrates using the selenization technique. CIS deposition method involved reaction of electron-bean evaporated Cu-In precursor layers with a selenizing atmosphere at around 400 C. Several metallic foils such as Mo, Ti, Al, Ni, and Cu were evaluated as possible substrates for these devices. Solar cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of 9.0-9.34 percent and good mechanical integrity were demonstrated on Mo and Ti foils. Monolithic integration of these devices was also demonstrated up to 4 in x 4 in size.

  1. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  2. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  3. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  4. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  5. Synthesis [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    D. Schimel; A. C. Janetos; P. Backlund; J. Hatfield; D. P. Lettenmaier; M. G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The preceding chapters have focused on the observed and potential impacts of climate variability and change on U.S. agriculture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity. This section synthesizes information from those sectoral chapters to address a series of questions that were posed by the CCSP agencies in the prospectus for this report and formulate a set...

  6. Radiation stability of cis-isomers of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashkin, V. M.; Wester, D. W.; Campbell, J. A.; Grant, K. E.

    1996-10-01

    The γ-ray initiated decomposition of the pure cis-syn-cis and cis-anti-cis stereoisomers of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH-6) and its strontium nitrate complex was studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometry and gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry with integrated doses up to 1.5 MGy and dose rate varying from 3 to 8 Gy/s. The proposed shceme of radilysis of DCH-6 that is derived from the experimental data is consistent with symmetric initial cleavage of the CO bonds between the terminal C of the bridging diethylether groups and the O of the cyclohexane-1,2-diol groups. The cis-syn-cis isomer of DCH-6 is more stable to γ-radiation than the cis-anti-cis isomer.

  7. A Versatile Theranostic Delivery Platform Integrating Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Computed Tomography, pH/cis-Diol Controlled Release, and Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Jui; Chou, Shang-Wei; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-06-28

    The functions of biomedical imaging, cancer targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic agents were integrated into a drug delivery platform to proof its diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. This versatile nanocomposite is based on the strategic design of wormlike mesoporous silica nanocarriers that are decorated with extremely small iron oxide nanoparticles, having a prominent T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. The controlled release function was then achieved through the grafting of polyalcohol saccharide derivative ligands onto the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanoparticles to conjugate with boronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles, which acted as the gate and the source of computed tomography (CT) signals. This versatile platform thus exhibited a MRI/CT dual imaging property drawing on the strong points to offset the weaknesses of each, rendering more accurate diagnosis. The capping of gold nanoparticles controlled with the hydrolysis of boronate ester bonds provides the reversible opening/closing process, avoiding further release of drug once the nanocomposite leaves the cell or tissue. To endow this platform with targeting ability, protocatechuic acid was utilized as a linker to connect folic acid with the boronic acid of the gold nanoparticles. The anchor of targeting moiety, folic acid, enriched this platform and enhanced the specific cellular uptake toward cells with folate receptor. This integrated drug delivery platform was then loaded with the antitumor agent doxorubicin, demonstrating its power for targeted delivery, bioimaging, and controlled release chemotherapy to reduce the undesired side effects of chemotherapy.

  8. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  9. Chapter 9: Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, Carlos; Espinet-Gonzalez, Pilar; Vazquez, Manuel; Bosco, Nick; Miller, David; Kurtz, Sarah; Rubio, Francisca; McConnell,Robert

    2016-04-15

    This chapter describes the accumulated knowledge on CPV reliability with its fundamentals and qualification. It explains the reliability of solar cells, modules (including optics) and plants. The chapter discusses the statistical distributions, namely exponential, normal and Weibull. The reliability of solar cells includes: namely the issues in accelerated aging tests in CPV solar cells, types of failure and failures in real time operation. The chapter explores the accelerated life tests, namely qualitative life tests (mainly HALT) and quantitative accelerated life tests (QALT). It examines other well proven and experienced PV cells and/or semiconductor devices, which share similar semiconductor materials, manufacturing techniques or operating conditions, namely, III-V space solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). It addresses each of the identified reliability issues and presents the current state of the art knowledge for their testing and evaluation. Finally, the chapter summarizes the CPV qualification and reliability standards.

  10. Streamflow data: Chapter 13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiche, Gregg J.; Holmes, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Streamflow data are vital for a variety of water-resources issues, from flood warning to water supply planning. The collection of streamflow data is usually an involved and complicated process. This chapter serves as an overview of the streamflow data collection process. Readers with the need for the detailed information on the streamflow data collection process are referred to the many references noted in this chapter.

  11. Chapter on Distributed Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    MASSACHUSETTS LABORATORY FOR INSTITUTE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ("D / o O MIT/LCS/TM-384 CHAPTER ON DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING Leslie Lamport Nancy...22217 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Miude Secuwity Ciaifiation) Chapter on Distributed Computing 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lamport... distributed computing , distributed systems models, dis- tributed algorithms, message-passing, shared variables, 19. UBSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  12. Caesium cis-tetrachloridodioxidorhenate(VII).

    PubMed

    Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Lis, Tadeusz

    2008-02-01

    The title crystal structure, Cs[ReCl(4)O(2)], consists of cis-tetrachloridodioxidorhenate(VII) anions and caesium cations. The distorted octahedral anion has nearly C(2v) symmetry, with a cis arrangement of the oxide ligands. The Re-Cl bond lengths for the Cl atoms trans to the oxide ligands are affected by the trans influence of the Re-O bonds and are longer than for the Cl atoms cis to the oxide ligands [average of 2.472 (2) A versus average of 2.322 (2) A, respectively]. There are ten Cl atoms from six cis-tetrachloridodioxidorhenate(VII) anions in the neighbourhood of the caesium cation.

  13. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle.

  14. Chapter 8. Data Analysis

    Treesearch

    Lyman L. McDonald; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest barrier between monitoring and management is data analysis. Data languish in drawers and spreadsheets because those who collect or maintain monitoring data lack training in how to effectively summarize and analyze their findings. This chapter serves as a first step to surmounting that barrier by empowering any monitoring team with the basic...

  15. Chapter Three: Investigating Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with the statement that all talk happens somewhere, somehow, at some time and is produced by somebody for some purpose, and the approach that practice theorists have taken is that talk and its context are inseparable. The challenges that face an analyst of practice are then to describe the context, describe the talk, and…

  16. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  17. Water resources (Chapter 12)

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; Romano Foti; Jorge Ramirez

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on the vulnerability of U.S. freshwater supplies considering all lands, not just forest and rangelands. We do not assess the condition of those lands or report on how much of our water supply originates on lands of different land covers or ownerships, because earlier Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment work addressed these topics....

  18. Nursery management [Chapter 16

    Treesearch

    Kim M. Wilkinson

    2009-01-01

    This handbook provides an overview of the factors that go into starting and operating a native plant nursery. Management includes all aspects of working with plants in all their phases of growth as described in Chapter 3, Crop Planning and Developing Propagation Protocols. Management also includes working with the community; organizing materials and infrastructure;...

  19. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  20. User's guide [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Nicholas L. Crookston; Donald C. E. Robinson; Sarah J. Beukema

    2003-01-01

    The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter presents the model's options, provides annotated examples, describes the outputs, and describes how to use and apply the model.

  1. Adaptation workbook: Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Climate change imposes many challenges on the long-term management of ecosystems and is becoming an increasingly important consideration in land management planning and decisionmaking at a variety of spatial scales. The process outlined in this chapter helps managers incorporate climate change considerations into management planning and activities, while complementing...

  2. Aquatics [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    F. A. Vertucci; M. A. Conrad

    1994-01-01

    Within the GLEES boundary there are three alpine lakes and several streams and ponds. The selection of GLEES as a research site for investigating of the effects of chemical and physical climate change was in part based on the accessibility of these low alkalinity "sensitive" aquatic ecosystems. This chapter provides a brief description of the physical,...

  3. Floristics [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    J. D. Haines; R. C. Musselman; C. M. Regan

    1994-01-01

    The initial habitat classification as described in Chapter 2 was conducted in 1986 and 1987 based upon field identification of plant species. A field collection of vascular plant species was made during the 1988, 1989, and 1990 summer seasons. The plant species collected were identified and verified in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Herbarium at the University of...

  4. Forestry [Chapter 11

    Treesearch

    H. Gyde Lund; William A. Befort; James E. Brickell; William M. Ciesla; Elizabeth C. Collins; Raymond L. Czaplewski; Attilio Antonio Disperati; Robert W. Douglass; Charles W. Dull; Jerry D. Greer; Rachel Riemann Hershey; Vernon J. LaBau; Henry Lachowski; Peter A. Murtha; David J. Nowak; Marc A. Roberts; Pierre Schram; Mahadev D. Shedha; Ashbindu Singh; Kenneth C. Winterberger

    1997-01-01

    Foresters and other resource managers have used aerial photographs to help manage resources since the late 1920s. As discussed in chapter 1, however, it was not until the mid-1940s that their use became common. Obtaining photographic coverage was always a problem. For many areas of the world, reasonably complete coverage did not exist until after World War II. In...

  5. Tundra, Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    K. Nadelhoffer; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The North American Arctic, comprising the Tundra and Arctic Cordillera ecoregions (CEC 1997, Chapter 2), covers more than 3 million km2 (300 million ha), and accounts for nearly 14 percent of the North American land mass. The North American Arctic also constitutes about 20 percent of the much larger circumpolar Arctic shared by Canada, the United...

  6. Hurrah for Chapter Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glenowyn L.

    This annotated bibliography contains a list of 42 recent Chapter Books. The bibliography is divided into the following topics: Adventure-Survival (3 titles); Autobiography-Biography (3 titles); Death (1 title); Easy Readers (8 titles); Good Reading (12 titles); Historical Fiction (10 titles); Mystery (3 titles); Newbery Award Winner, 2000; and…

  7. Research recommendations [Chapter 10

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; Alvin L. Medina; John N. Rinne

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains a number of research recommendations that have developed from the 15 years of research on the UVR conducted by the Southwest Watershed Science Team, as well as from insights from key cooperators and contacts. It is meant to be our best insight as to where efforts should go now. Achieving these recommendations will depend on a number of factors,...

  8. CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Design Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R.; Kennedy, K.; Howard, R.; Whitmore, M.; Martin, C.; Garate, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In preparation for human exploration to Mars, there is a need to define the development and test program that will validate deep space operations and systems. In that context, a Proving Grounds CisLunar habitat spacecraft is being defined as the next step towards this goal. This spacecraft will operate differently from the ISS or other spacecraft in human history. The performance envelope of this spacecraft (mass, volume, power, specifications, etc.) is being defined by the Future Capabilities Study Team. This team has recognized the need for a human-centered approach for the internal architecture of this spacecraft and has commissioned a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture Study Team to develop a NASA reference configuration, providing the Agency with a "smart buyer" approach for future acquisition. THE CISLUNAR HABITAT INTERNAL ARCHITECTURE STUDY: Overall, the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture study will address the most significant questions and risks in the current CisLunar architecture, habitation, and operations concept development. This effort is achieved through definition of design criteria, evaluation criteria and process, design of the CisLunar Habitat Phase-1 internal architecture, and the development and fabrication of internal architecture concepts combined with rigorous and methodical Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) evaluations and testing of the conceptual innovations in a controlled test environment. The vision of the CisLunar Habitat Internal Architecture Study is to design, build, and test a CisLunar Phase-1 Habitat Internal Architecture that will be used for habitation (e.g. habitability and human factors) evaluations. The evaluations will mature CisLunar habitat evaluation tools, guidelines, and standards, and will interface with other projects such as the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program integrated Power, Avionics, Software (iPAS), and Logistics for integrated human-in-the-loop testing. The mission of the Cis

  9. DBMS UTILIZATION: A Corporate Information System (CIS) development approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozett, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Corporate Information System (CIS), an integrated information system intended to tie the corporation together as a functioning entity, is described. In addition to being a major upgraded automated data processing system, the CIS is a management philosophy which recognizes data as a valuable corporate resource and which distinguishes between data and selected data, or information. It further recognizes that different users need different kinds of information. Plans for CIS development are discussed. It will offer its users not just after-the-fact data, but timely information in a format that is meaningful and useful to the particular user, so that the information can be applied in planning, controlling, and decision making by all levels of management. In effect, CIS will help the corporation itself to function as a total, integrated system by typing together administrative activities through information exchange. The CIS supports the operational, tactical control, and strategic planning functions of the corporation. Operational functions are the day-to-day processing necessary to support the corporation's work, such as purchasing and payroll.

  10. DBMS UTILIZATION: A Corporate Information System (CIS) development approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozett, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Corporate Information System (CIS), an integrated information system intended to tie the corporation together as a functioning entity, is described. In addition to being a major upgraded automated data processing system, the CIS is a management philosophy which recognizes data as a valuable corporate resource and which distinguishes between data and selected data, or information. It further recognizes that different users need different kinds of information. Plans for CIS development are discussed. It will offer its users not just after-the-fact data, but timely information in a format that is meaningful and useful to the particular user, so that the information can be applied in planning, controlling, and decision making by all levels of management. In effect, CIS will help the corporation itself to function as a total, integrated system by typing together administrative activities through information exchange. The CIS supports the operational, tactical control, and strategic planning functions of the corporation. Operational functions are the day-to-day processing necessary to support the corporation's work, such as purchasing and payroll.

  11. Polymorphism of linoleic acid (cis-9, cis-12-octadecadienoic acid) and alpha-linolenic acid (cis-9, cis-12, cis-15-octadecatrienoic acid).

    PubMed

    Ueno, S; Miyazaki, A; Yano, J; Furukawa, Y; Suzuki, M; Sato, K

    2000-10-01

    Crystallization and polymorphic properties of linoleic acid (cis-9, cis-12-Octadecadienoic acid) (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (cis-9, cis-12, cis-15-Octadecatrienoic acid) (alpha-LNA) have been studied by optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The DSC analyses presented three polymorphs in LA, and two polymorphs in alpha-LNA. The XRD patterns of the higher- and lower-temperature forms in LA and alpha-LNA showed orthorhombic O'(//)+O-like and O'(//) subcell, which were similar to those of alpha- and gamma-forms of mono-unsaturated fatty acids, respectively. From the solvent crystallization of LA and alpha-LNA in acetonitrile, single crystals of the higher temperature polymorphs have been obtained. The crystal habits of truncated rhombic shape were also similar to those of alpha-forms of the mono-unsaturated fatty acids. The enthalpy and entropy values of fusion and dissolution of the alpha-forms of LA, alpha-LNA and oleic acid showed that the two values decreased with increasing number of the cis-double bond.

  12. Summary and conclusions [Chapter 11

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; John N. Rinne; Alvin L.. Medina

    2012-01-01

    Summaries and conclusions of each chapter are compiled here to provide a “Quick Reference” guide of major results and recommendations for the UVR. More detail can be obtained from individual chapters.

  13. Cis-Lunar Base Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Goodliff, Kandyce E.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Reeves, John D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, when mounting expeditions into uncharted territories, explorers have established strategically positioned base camps to pre-position required equipment and consumables. These base camps are secure, safe positions from which expeditions can depart when conditions are favorable, at which technology and operations can be tested and validated, and facilitate timely access to more robust facilities in the event of an emergency. For human exploration missions into deep space, cis-lunar space is well suited to serve as such a base camp. The outer regions of cis-lunar space, such as the Earth-Moon Lagrange points, lie near the edge of Earth s gravity well, allowing equipment and consumables to be aggregated with easy access to deep space and to the lunar surface, as well as more distant destinations, such as near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and Mars and its moons. Several approaches to utilizing a cis-lunar base camp for sustainable human exploration, as well as some possible future applications are identified. The primary objective of the analysis presented in this paper is to identify options, show the macro trends, and provide information that can be used as a basis for more detailed mission development. Compared within are the high-level performance and cost of 15 preliminary cis-lunar exploration campaigns that establish the capability to conduct crewed missions of up to one year in duration, and then aggregate mass in cis-lunar space to facilitate an expedition from Cis-Lunar Base Camp. Launch vehicles, chemical propulsion stages, and electric propulsion stages are discussed and parametric sizing values are used to create architectures of in-space transportation elements that extend the existing in-space supply chain to cis-lunar space. The transportation options to cis-lunar space assessed vary in efficiency by almost 50%; from 0.16 to 0.68 kg of cargo in cis-lunar space for every kilogram of mass in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). For the 15 cases, 5-year campaign

  14. Chapter 13: Tools for analysis

    Treesearch

    William Elliot; Kevin Hyde; Lee MacDonald; James. McKean

    2007-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of current computer modeling tools that are, or could be, adopted for use in evaluating the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. The chapter focuses on runoff, soil erosion and slope stability predictive tools. Readers should refer to chapters on soil erosion and stability for more detailed information on the physical...

  15. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  16. The Community Intercomparison Suite (CIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Schutgens, Nick; Cook, Nick; Kipling, Zak; Kershaw, Phil; Gryspeerdt, Ed; Lawrence, Bryan; Stier, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Earth observations (both remote and in-situ) create vast amounts of data providing invaluable constraints for the climate science community. Efficient exploitation of these complex and highly heterogeneous datasets has been limited however by the lack of suitable software tools, particularly for comparison of gridded and ungridded data, thus reducing scientific productivity. CIS (http://cistools.net) is an open-source, command line tool and Python library which allows the straight-forward quantitative analysis, intercomparison and visualisation of remote sensing, in-situ and model data. The CIS can read gridded and ungridded remote sensing, in-situ and model data - and many other data sources 'out-of-the-box', such as ESA Aerosol and Cloud CCI product, MODIS, Cloud CCI, Cloudsat, AERONET. Perhaps most importantly however CIS also employs a modular plugin architecture to allow for the reading of limitless different data types. Users are able to write their own plugins for reading the data sources which they are familiar with, and share them within the community, allowing all to benefit from their expertise. To enable the intercomparison of this data the CIS provides a number of operations including: the aggregation of ungridded and gridded datasets to coarser representations using a number of different built in averaging kernels; the subsetting of data to reduce its extent or dimensionality; the co-location of two distinct datasets onto a single set of co-ordinates; the visualisation of the input or output data through a number of different plots and graphs; the evaluation of arbitrary mathematical expressions against any number of datasets; and a number of other supporting functions such as a statistical comparison of two co-located datasets. These operations can be performed efficiently on local machines or large computing clusters - and is already available on the JASMIN computing facility. A case-study using the GASSP collection of in-situ aerosol observations

  17. Chapter 7: Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca; Coleman, Andre; Wigmosta, Mark; Schoenung, Susan; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Langholtz, Matthew; Davis, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    This chapter of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report provides an estimate of biomass potential at given minimum selling prices. This is not a projection of actual measured biomass or a simulation of commercial projects. Biomass potential is estimated based on 30 years of hourly local climate and strain-specific biophysical characteristics using the Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT), assuming sufficient available nutrients (including CO2). As is the case for terrestrial feedstocks, important resource analysis questions for algae include not only how much of the crop may be available but also what price might be needed to procure that supply. Identifying resource co-location opportunities for algal biofuel facilities has the potential to reduce costs, utilize waste resources, and focus attention on appropriate technologies and locations for commercialization.

  18. Recycling Of Cis Photovoltaic Waste

    DOEpatents

    Drinkard, Jr., William F.; Long, Mark O.; Goozner; Robert E.

    1998-07-14

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CIS photovoltaic cells and associated photovoltaic manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with dilute nitric acid, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating glass substrate from the leachate, electrolyzing the leachate to plate a copper and selenium metal mixture onto a first cathode, replacing the cathode with a second cathode, re-electrolyzing the leachate to plate cadmium onto the second cathode, separating the copper from selenium, and evaporating the depleted leachate to yield a zinc and indium containing solid.

  19. Low cost CIS device processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başol, B. M.; Kapur, V. K.; Leidholm, C. R.; Roe, R.; Halani, A.; Norsworthy, G.

    1997-02-01

    CIS films were grown on soda-lime glass/Mo substrates using a low cost, non-vacuum technique. Morphology of the resulting layers was improved and solar cells with 12.4% total area efficiency were demonstrated on these films. A submodule of about 25 cm2 area was also fabricated with a conversion efficiency of 8.17%. Work is now in progress to grow films containing Ga and/or S and to take this technology to larger scale production.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  2. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  3. Xenobiotics: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, Christine M.; Semlitsch, Raymond D.; Lannoo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    While a number of compounds have been reported as toxic to amphibians, until recently, there have been conspicuously few ecotoxicological studies concerning amphibians. Studies are now focusing on the effects of xenobiotics on amphibians, an interest likely stimulated by widespread reports of amphibian declines. It has been speculated that chemical contamination may be partially to blame for some documented amphibian declines, by disrupting growth, reproduction, and behavior. However, evidence that xenobiotics are directly to blame for population declines is sparse because environmental concentrations are typically not great enough to generate direct mortality. Although the effects of environmental contaminants on the amphibian immune system are currently unknown, it is possible that exposure to stressors such as organic pollutants (which enter ecosystems in the form of pesticides) may depress immune system function, thus allowing greater susceptibility to fungal infections. This chapter discusses toxicity testing for xenobiotics and presents the results of a study that has focused on the subtle effects of sublethal concentrations of the chemical carbaryl on tadpoles.

  4. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  5. Synthesis: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Geiser, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Driscoll, C.T.; Goodale, C.L.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J. S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a substantial increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and deposition (Galloway et al. 2003). Because of past, and, in some regions, continuing increases in emissions (Lehmann et al. 2005, Nilles and Conley 2001), this N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations and damage in many ecosystems across the United States. In some ecoregions, the impact of N deposition has been severe and has changed the biotic community structure and composition of ecosystems. In the Mediterranean California ecoregion, for example (see Chapter 13), replacement of native by exotic invasive vegetation is accelerated because exotic species are often more productive under elevated N deposition than native species in some California grasslands, coastal sage scrub, and desert scrub (Fenn et al. 2010, Rao and Allen 2010, Rao et al. 2010, Weiss 1999, Yoshida and Allen 2004). Such shifts in plant community composition and species richness can have consequences beyond changes in ecosystem structure: shifts may lead to overall losses in biodiversity and further impair particular threatened or endangered species (Stevens et al. 2004). Th e extirpation of the endangered checkerspot butterfl y (Euphydryas editha bayensis), because the host plant for the larval stage disappears in N-enriched ecosystems (Fenn et al. 2010, Weiss 1999), is just one example of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition.

  6. Chapter 11: Integrated Technology for Biobased Composites

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai; Alan W. Rudie; Theodore H. Wegner

    2013-01-01

    Forests play a major role in the ecosystem sustainability and general health of our planet. The biomass contained in our forests and other green vegetations affects the carbon cycle, climate change, habitat protection, clean water supplies, and sustainable economy. Exciting new opportunities are emerging for sustainably meeting global energy needs and simultaneously...

  7. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  9. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  10. Advanced research on cis-Neonicotinoids.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xusheng; Ye, Zhejun; Bao, Haibo; Liu, Zewen; Xu, Xiaoyong; Li, Zhong; Qian, Xuhong

    2011-01-01

    cis-Neonicotinoids are a type of neonicotinoid, in which the nitro or the cyano group are in cis-configuration relative to heteroaromatic moiety, which show excellent activities against a range of insect species. This review covers cis-neonicotinoids with commercialization perspectives, structural optimization (phenylazoneonicotinoids and chlorothiazolyl analogues of Paichongding), modes of action studies, radiao-synthesis of Paichongding and Cycloxaprid, and photostability of neonicotinoids.

  11. Decoding cis-regulatory systems in ascidians.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Takehiro

    2005-02-01

    Ascidians, or sea squirts, are lower chordates, and share basic gene repertoires and many characteristics, both developmental and physiological, with vertebrates. Therefore, decoding cis-regulatory systems in ascidians will contribute toward elucidating the genetic regulatory systems underlying the developmental and physiological processes of vertebrates. cis-Regulatory DNAs can also be used for tissue-specific genetic manipulation, a powerful tool for studying ascidian development and physiology. Because the ascidian genome is compact compared with vertebrate genomes, both intergenic regions and introns are relatively small in ascidians. Short upstream intergenic regions contain a complete set of cis-regulatory elements for spatially regulated expression of a majority of ascidian genes. These features of the ascidian genome are a great advantage in identifying cis-regulatory sequences and in analyzing their functions. Function of cis-regulatory DNAs has been analyzed for a number of tissue-specific and developmentally regulated genes of ascidians by introducing promoter-reporter fusion constructs into ascidian embryos. The availability of the whole genome sequences of the two Ciona species, Ciona intestinalis and Ciona savignyi, facilitates comparative genomics approaches to identify cis-regulatory DNAs. Recent studies demonstrate that computational methods can help identify cis-regulatory elements in the ascidian genome. This review presents a comprehensive list of ascidian genes whose cis-regulatory regions have been subjected to functional analysis, and highlights the recent advances in bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches to cis-regulatory systems in ascidians.

  12. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  13. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  14. Chapter 1 - Introduction

    Treesearch

    Kevin M. Potter

    2014-01-01

    Forests cover a vast area of the United States: 304 million ha, or approximately one-third of the Nation’s land area (Smith and others 2009). These forests possess substantial ecological and socioeconomic importance. Both their ecological integrity and their continued capacity to provide goods and services are of concern in the face of a long list of threats, including...

  15. Chapter II. Taxonomy and Phylogeny

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The book chapter presents a review of the taxonomic distribution of ornamental geophytic plants (bulbs, tubers, corms, rhizomes) and the modern classification of the families within which they belong....

  16. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  17. Chapter one: exposure measurements.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Engelbrecht, Johann P; Freeman, Natalie C G; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Jantunen, Matti; Michaud, Jon-Pierre; Saenz de Tejada, Sandra; Watson, John G; Wei, Fusheng; Wilson, William E; Yasuno, Mayayuki; Zhu, Tan

    2002-12-01

    Determining human exposure to suspended particulate concentrations requires measurements that quantify different particle properties in microenvironments where people live, work, and play. Particle mass, size, and chemical composition are important exposure variables, and these are typically measured with time-integrated samples on filters that are later submitted to laboratory analyses. This requires substantial sample handling, quality assurance, and data reduction. Newer technologies are being developed that allow in-situ, time-resolved measurements for mass, carbon, sulfate, nitrate, particle size, and other variables. These are large measurement systems that are more suitable for fixed monitoring sites than for personal applications. Human exposure studies need to be designed to accomplish specific objectives rather than to serve too many purposes. Resources need to be divided among study design, field sampling, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, data management, and data analysis phases. Many exposure projects allocated too little to the non-measurement activities.

  18. Characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lü, Chenchen; Liu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The affinity of boronic acids toward cis-diol-containing biomolecules has found wide applications in many fields, such as sensing, separation, drug delivery, and functional materials. A sound understanding of the binding interactions will greatly facilitate exquisite applications of this chemistry. Traditional techniques are associated with some apparent drawbacks, so they are only applicable to a limited range of boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. This chapter describes an affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method for the characterization of the binding strengths between boronic acids and cis-diol-containing biomolecules. As compared with existing approaches, such as (11)B NMR, the ACE method exhibits several significant advantages: (1) possibility of simultaneous study of multiple interactions, (2) low requirement on the purity of the binding species, (3) widely applicable to almost all types of cis-diol-containing compounds and boronic acids, and (4) high accuracy and precision.

  19. Germinating the 2050 Cis-Lunar Econosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Tinker, Michael L.; Nall, Mark E.; Wright, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director and MSFC's Office of Strategic Analysis and Communications (OSAC) chartered a diverse team for a six-week "sprint" to speculate (in a disciplined manner) and paint (with broad brush strokes) a picture of how earth, space, and public/private entities might be operating and relating to each other...in the year 2100. Two 12-person groups of civil servants, one with members having 15 years or less of NASA experience and the other with more senior members, worked independently and then compared and integrated their conclusions. In 2014, the "Space 2100" team, with some new team members and different group boundaries, ran a longer sprint to a) develop more detailed estimates of the operations and economics of space activities in the vicinity of the Earth and Moon in the 2050 time frame, b) identify evolutionary steps and viable paths needed to make that a reality, and c) recommend actions to enable and invigorate those steps. This paper explores Space 2100's first two sprints and their projections of NASA's role in what will likely be a highly networked international space industry and cis-lunar infrastructure.

  20. Germinating the 2050 Cis-Lunar Econosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Curreri, Peter A.; Ferguson, Cynthia K.; Nall, Mark E.; Tinker, Michael L.; Wright, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, Marshall Space Flight Center's upper management chartered a diverse team for a six-week 'sprint' to speculate (in a disciplined manner) and paint (with broad brush strokes) a picture of how earth, space, and public/private entities might be operating and relating to each other... in the year 2100. Two 12-person groups of civil servants, one with members having 15 years or less of NASA experience and the other with more senior members, worked independently and then compared and integrated their conclusions. In 2014, the 'Space 2100' team, with some new team members and different group boundaries, ran a longer sprint to a) develop more detailed estimates of the operations and economics of space activities in the vicinity of the Earth and Moon in the 2050 time frame, b) identify evolutionary paths, barriers, and opportunities, and c) suggest actions and philosophies to enable and invigorate progress towards the vision. This paper explores Space 2100's first two sprints and their projections of NASA's role in what will likely be a highly networked, international space industry and cis-lunar infrastructure.

  1. cis-Apa: a practical linker for the microwave-assisted preparation of cyclic pseudopeptides via RCM cyclative cleavage.

    PubMed

    Baron, Alice; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Lamaty, Frédéric

    2011-02-04

    A new linker cis-5-aminopent-3-enoic acid (cis-Apa) was prepared for the synthesis of cyclic pseudopeptides by cyclization-cleavage by using ring-closing methatesis (RCM). We developed a new synthetic pathway for the preparation of the cis-Apa linker that was tested in the cyclization-cleavage process of different RGD peptide sequences. Different macrocyclic peptidomimetics were prepared by using this integrated microwave-assisted method, showing that the readily available cis-Apa amino acid is well adapted as a linker in the cyclization-cleavage process.

  2. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  3. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 2 (Chapters 21- 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Part 3. Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. Chapter 25. Capacitance. Chapter 26. Current and Resistance. Chapter 27. Circuits. Chapter 28. Magnetic Fields. Chapter 29. Magnetic Fields Due to Currents. Chapter 30. Induction and Inductance. Chapter 31. Electromagnetic Oscillations and Alternating Current. Chapter 32. Maxwell's Equations; Magnetism of Matter. Part 4. Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Chapter 34. Images. Chapter 35. Interference. Chapter 36. Diffraction. Chapter 37. Relativity. Part 5. Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendices. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  4. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields.

  5. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  6. Chapter A6. Field Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A6 presents procedures and guidelines for the collection of data on air and water temperature, and on dissolved-oxygen concentrations, specific electrical conductance, pH, reduction-oxidation potential, alkalinity, and turbidity in water. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A (accessed August 6, 2005).

  7. Substrate influences on CIS device performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson-Elli, D.F.; Moore, C.B.; Gay, R.R.; Jensen, C.L.

    1994-12-31

    It has been reported that the substrate plays an active role in copper indium diselenide (CIS) devices. The physical properties of the substrate, i.e., thermal expansion coefficient, chemical composition, strain point, surface quality and cleanliness may all play a role in device efficiency and process reproducibility. For example, sodium is known to influence the conductivity of CIS, and that soda lime glass (SLG) introduces sodium into the CIS. In the experiments reported here, the sodium level in the CIS was varied by (a) changing the substrate composition and (b) the use of SiO{sub x}N{sub y} and SiN{sub x} barrier layers. Cells were fabricated on the candidate substrate and barrier layer combinations. V{sub oc} was observed to drop with the addition of barrier layers to sodium containing glasses. The films were also analyzed for sodium by SIMS. The cell performance and SIMS analysis are presented and their significance is discussed.

  8. Favorable genomic environments for cis-regulatory evolution: A novel theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Maeso, Ignacio; Tena, Juan J

    2016-09-01

    Cis-regulatory changes are arguably the primary evolutionary source of animal morphological diversity. With the recent explosion of genome-wide comparisons of the cis-regulatory content in different animal species is now possible to infer general principles underlying enhancer evolution. However, these studies have also revealed numerous discrepancies and paradoxes, suggesting that the mechanistic causes and modes of cis-regulatory evolution are still not well understood and are probably much more complex than generally appreciated. Here, we argue that the mutational mechanisms and genomic regions generating new regulatory activities must comply with the constraints imposed by the molecular properties of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) and the organizational features of long-range chromatin interactions. Accordingly, we propose a new integrative evolutionary framework for cis-regulatory evolution based on two major premises for the origin of novel enhancer activity: (i) an accessible chromatin environment and (ii) compatibility with the 3D structure and interactions of pre-existing CREs. Mechanisms and DNA sequences not fulfilling these premises, will be less likely to have a measurable impact on gene expression and as such, will have a minor contribution to the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, we discuss current comparative cis-regulatory data under the light of this new evolutionary model, and propose that the two most prominent mechanisms for the evolution of cis-regulatory changes are the overprinting of ancestral CREs and the exaptation of transposable elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Secondary School Mathematics. Preliminary Version. Sample Chapters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Max S.; And Others

    This volume contains preliminary versions of five of the chapters prepared by the SMSG curriculum project for use in grades 7 and 8. The first four chapters and the tenth chapter in the sequence are presented. The sample chapters in this volume illustrate a number of aspects of the curriculum project: (1) association of ideas of number and space…

  10. Chapter 6: Breeding season ecology

    Treesearch

    Mark K. Sogge

    2000-01-01

    The willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds across much of the conterminous United States and in portions of extreme southern Canada. As might be expected in such a wide-ranging species, willow flycatchers in different portions of the range exhibit differences in appearance, song, and ecological characteristics. The intent of this chapter is to...

  11. Chapter Seven: Prospects for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter suggests further ways that Practice Theory can be applied to understanding language teaching and learning. In particular, the author contends that more work is needed to describe the configuration of discursive resources in practices in foreign language communities in order to design effective pedagogies and assessments. In addition,…

  12. Chapter 2: Official Programmatic Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is a diverse field of practice, with each initiative claiming it has a unique approach. This chapter describes three initiatives, Youth-in-Government, Youth Science Center, and Public Achievement from the point-of-view of program staff. Their view is often privileged; it is the one used for official communication and public…

  13. Purpose and applications [Chapter 1

    Treesearch

    Nicholas L. Crookston

    2003-01-01

    The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter provides an introduction to the model by illustrating its purpose and chronicling some of the applications it has supported.

  14. Study site characterization. Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Chris Potter; Richard. Birdsey

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the main site characterization requirements at landscape-scale sampling locations. The overview is organized according to multiple "Site Attribute" headings that require descriptions throughout a given study site area, leading ultimately to a sufficient overall site characterization. Guidance is provided to describe the major...

  15. Chapter 1. Material and methods

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, A. R.; Uemura, K.

    1976-01-01

    This chapter outlines the way in which the problems of obtaining and assessing population-related material and analysing the data were tackled. Some of the limits of the approach used, namely, the examination of nearly all deaths from several demographically defined communities, are discussed. PMID:1087187

  16. What's New in Chapter Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glenowyn

    Listing 81 chapter books for children published between 1996-1999, this annotated bibliography gives interest level ratings, reading level ratings, a brief summary, and theme assignments. The 13 theme categories listed in alphabetical order include Adventure-Survival, Autobiography-Biography, Death, Divorce, Good Reading, Handicaps, Historical…

  17. Global reorganisation of cis-regulatory units upon lineage commitment of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Várnai, Csilla; Wingett, Steven W; Cairns, Jonathan; Collier, Amanda J; García-Vílchez, Raquel; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Osborne, Cameron S; Fraser, Peter; Rugg-Gunn, Peter J; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2017-03-23

    Long-range cis-regulatory elements such as enhancers coordinate cell-specific transcriptional programmes by engaging in DNA looping interactions with target promoters. Deciphering the interplay between the promoter connectivity and activity of cis-regulatory elements during lineage commitment is crucial for understanding developmental transcriptional control. Here, we use Promoter Capture Hi-C to generate a high-resolution atlas of chromosomal interactions involving ~22,000 gene promoters in human pluripotent and lineage-committed cells, identifying putative target genes for known and predicted enhancer elements. We reveal extensive dynamics of cis-regulatory contacts upon lineage commitment, including the acquisition and loss of promoter interactions. This spatial rewiring occurs preferentially with predicted changes in the activity of cis-regulatory elements and is associated with changes in target gene expression. Our results provide a global and integrated view of promoter interactome dynamics during lineage commitment of human pluripotent cells.

  18. CisSERS: Customizable in silico sequence evaluation for restriction sites

    DOE PAGES

    Sharpe, Richard M.; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; ...

    2016-04-12

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Here, data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated tomore » enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERSenable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3’UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERSand results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.« less

  19. CisSERS: Customizable in silico sequence evaluation for restriction sites

    DOE PAGES

    Sharpe, Richard M.; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; ...

    2016-04-12

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Here, data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated tomore » enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERSenable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3’UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERSand results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.« less

  20. CisSERS: Customizable In Silico Sequence Evaluation for Restriction Sites.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Richard M; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; Grimes, John; Galli, Marco; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Evans, Katherine; Kramer, David; Dhingra, Amit

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated to enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERS enable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3'UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERS and results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.

  1. Coronavirus cis-Acting RNA Elements.

    PubMed

    Madhugiri, R; Fricke, M; Marz, M; Ziebuhr, J

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses have exceptionally large RNA genomes of approximately 30 kilobases. Genome replication and transcription is mediated by a multisubunit protein complex comprised of more than a dozen virus-encoded proteins. The protein complex is thought to bind specific cis-acting RNA elements primarily located in the 5'- and 3'-terminal genome regions and upstream of the open reading frames located in the 3'-proximal one-third of the genome. Here, we review our current understanding of coronavirus cis-acting RNA elements, focusing on elements required for genome replication and packaging. Recent bioinformatic, biochemical, and genetic studies suggest a previously unknown level of conservation of cis-acting RNA structures among different coronavirus genera and, in some cases, even beyond genus boundaries. Also, there is increasing evidence to suggest that individual cis-acting elements may be part of higher-order RNA structures involving long-range and dynamic RNA-RNA interactions between RNA structural elements separated by thousands of nucleotides in the viral genome. We discuss the structural and functional features of these cis-acting RNA elements and their specific functions in coronavirus RNA synthesis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Venus 3 Book: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F.; Svedhem, H.; Head, J.

    2014-04-01

    This will be the first chapter in the planned 'Venus 3' book, which will present the latest knowledge about all aspects of the planet Venus. Chapter 1 will include: 1. Brief history of Venus observations, from telescopic studies up to and including early space missions (Venera, Mariner) 2. Overview of key results from more recent groundbased observations and space missions, including Pioneer Venus, the later Veneras, Vega, Magellan, Akatsuki and Venus Express 3. Summary of current knowledge, in three main sections: a. Surface and interior b. Atmosphere and climate c. Thermosphere, exosphere and magnetosphere 4. Outstanding scientific questions remaining, and future mission concepts providing background, introduction and an overview to the rest of the book.

  3. News from the Suncoast Chapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU's serenely-named Suncoast Chapter, one of the union's several regional groups, met twice during the 1989-1990 academic year. The fall meeting featured four panelists discussing “An Oil Spill in Tampa Bay—A Disaster Waiting to Happen.” The spring meeting hosted Arthur D. Weissman, chief of the Guidance and Oversight Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency, speaking

  4. Vegetation and acidification, Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    David R. DeWalle; James N. Kochenderfer; Mary Beth Adams; Gary W. Miller

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the impact of watershed acidification treatments on WS3 at the Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF) and at WS9 on vegetation is presented and summarized in a comprehensive way for the first time. WS7 is used as a vegetative reference basin for WS3, while untreated plots within WS9 are used as a vegetative reference for WS9. Bioindicators of acidification...

  5. Chapter 07: Species description pages

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    These pages are written to be the final step in the identification process; you will be directed to them by the key in Chapter 6. Each species or group of similar species in the same genus has its own set of pages. The information in the first page describes the characteristics of the wood covered in the manual. The page shows images of similar or confusable woods,...

  6. Forest management and water in the United States [Chapter 13

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary

    2017-01-01

    This chapter outlines a brief history of the United States native forests and forest plantations. It describes the past and current natural and plantation forest distribution (map, area, main species), as well as main products produced (timber, pulp, furniture, etc.). Integrated into this discussion is a characterization of the water resources of the United States and...

  7. The role of place-based social learning [Chapter 7

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Williams

    2017-01-01

    Hummel's observations on the limits of science to inform practice provides a useful starting point for a book chapter devoted to examining post-normal environmental policy where the "facts are uncertain, values in dispute, stakes high, and decisions urgent" (Funtowicz and Ravetz 1993, 739, 744). Central to the argument here is that the integration of...

  8. Advances in the CIS research at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.; Bhattacharya, R.N.; Granata, J.; Webb, J.; Niles, D.; Contreras, M.A.; Wiesner, H.; Hasoon, F.S.; Noufi, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes the research of the CIS Team at NREL in three major areas: absorber deposition; understanding the role of chemical bath deposited (CBD) CdS in CIS junctions; and in the development of devices without CdS. Low cost, scaleable processes chosen for absorber fabrication include sputtering, electrodeposition (ED), and close spaced sublimation (CSS). The interaction between the CBD and the CIS has been investigated and the results show that Cd might be instrumental in shaping the interface. The authors have also developed a process to fabricate a 13.5% efficiency ZnO/CuInGaSe{sub 2} device without CdS or other buffer layers.

  9. Cis and Trans Isomers of Cycloalkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Susan E.; Eberlein, Thomas H.

    2005-09-01

    As a rule, a trans disubstituted alkene is more stable than the corresponding cis isomer. For cycloalkenes of fewer than eleven members, cis isomers are more stable than their trans counterparts. Although this exception to the normal rule is occasionally noted in beginning organic chemistry textbooks, it is often done without a careful analysis of the reasons behind it. The purpose of this article is to provide that analysis. In order for a cycloalkene to accommodate a trans double bond one or more of the following nonideal geometries must occur: a twisted π bond; pyramidal sp 2 -carbon atoms; nonideal sp 3 bond angles; or longer than normal C C single and double bonds. This article provides a list of experimentally determined relative energies of the cis and trans isomers within the series cycloheptene cycloundecene, along with computationally derived energies at several levels of theory. It also examines the geometric distortions through which cycloalkenes relieve the strain introduced by a trans double bond.

  10. Map projections and the Internet: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kessler, Fritz; Battersby, Sarah E.; Finn, Michael P.; Clarke, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The field of map projections can be described as mathematical, static, and challenging. However, this description is evolving in concert with the development of the Internet. The Internet has enabled new outlets for software applications, learning, and interaction with and about map projections . This chapter examines specific ways in which the Internet has moved map projections from a relatively obscure paper-based setting to a more engaging and accessible online environment. After a brief overview of map projections, this chapter discusses four perspectives on how map projections have been integrated into the Internet. First, map projections and their role in web maps and mapping services is examined. Second, an overview of online atlases and the map projections chosen for their maps is presented. Third, new programming languages and code libraries that enable map projections to be included in mapping applications are reviewed. Fourth, the Internet has facilitated map projection education and research especially with the map reader’s comprehension and understanding of complex topics like map projection distortion is discussed.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Information Improves cis-Peptide-Based Function Annotation of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreetama; Bhadra, Pratiti; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Pal, Debnath

    2017-08-04

    cis-Peptide bonds, whose occurrence in proteins is rare but evolutionarily conserved, are implicated to play an important role in protein function. This has led to their previous use in a homology-independent, fragment-match-based protein function annotation method. However, proteins are not static molecules; dynamics is integral to their activity. This is nicely epitomized by the geometric isomerization of cis-peptide to trans form for molecular activity. Hence we have incorporated both static (cis-peptide) and dynamics information to improve the prediction of protein molecular function. Our results show that cis-peptide information alone cannot detect functional matches in cases where cis-trans isomerization exists but 3D coordinates have been obtained for only the trans isomer or when the cis-peptide bond is incorrectly assigned as trans. On the contrary, use of dynamics information alone includes false-positive matches for cases where fragments with similar secondary structure show similar dynamics, but the proteins do not share a common function. Combining the two methods reduces errors while detecting the true matches, thereby enhancing the utility of our method in function annotation. A combined approach, therefore, opens up new avenues of improving existing automated function annotation methodologies.

  12. Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, William Hunt; Jia, Dongyu; Deng, Wu-Min

    2014-01-01

    The Notch pathway is integrated into numerous developmental processes and therefore is fine-tuned on many levels, including receptor production, endocytosis, and degradation. Notch is further characterized by a twofold relationship with its Delta-Serrate (DSL) ligands, as ligands from opposing cells (trans-ligands) activate Notch, whereas ligands expressed in the same cell (cis-ligands) inhibit signaling. We show that cells without both cis- and trans-ligands can mediate Notch-dependent developmental events during Drosophila oogenesis, indicating ligand-independent Notch activity occurs when the receptor is free of cis- and trans-ligands. Furthermore, cis-ligands can reduce Notch activity in endogenous and genetically induced situations of elevated trans-ligand-independent Notch signaling. We conclude that cis-expressed ligands exert their repressive effect on Notch signaling in cases of trans-ligand-independent activation, and propose a new function of cis-inhibition which buffers cells against accidental Notch activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04415.001 PMID:25486593

  13. Chapter A4. Collection of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data that are used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses preparations and appropriate methods for the collection of surface-water, groundwater, and associated quality-control samples. Among the topics covered are considerations and procedures to prevent sample contamination; establishing site files; instructions for collecting depth-integrated isokinetic and nonisokinetic samples at flowing- and still-water sites; and guidelines for collecting formation water from wells having various types of construction and hydraulic and aquifer characteristics.

  14. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  15. Chapter 1 Information Management Program. User's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Denver, CO.

    The first of seven chapters in this guide for users of the Chapter 1 Information Management Program (CHIMP) provides an introduction to the program, which was designed to help school districts maintain data and produce reports used in the evaluation of Chapter 1 programs. It is noted that these reports are useful for meeting state and federal…

  16. Objectives and Overview. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    The RTO Task Group AVT-113 "Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft" was established in April 2003. Two facets of the group, "Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI)" and "Vortex Flow Experiment-2 (VFE-2)", worked closely together. However, because of the different requirements of each part, the CAWAPI facet concluded its work earlier (December 2006) than the VFE-2 facet (December 2007). In this first chapter of the Final Report of the Task Group an overview on its work is given, and the objectives for the Task Group are described.

  17. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  18. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  19. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  20. Stereoselective synthesis of cis-p-menth-8-ene-1,7-diol, cis-p-menthane-1,7-diol, and cis-p-menthane-1,7,8-triol.

    PubMed

    Kobler, Christoph; Effenberger, Franz

    2005-04-22

    The natural products cis-p-menthane-1,7-diol (cis-IV), cis-p-menth-8-ene-1,7-diol (cis-I) and cis-p-menthane-1,7,8-triol (cis-II) are obtained starting from the corresponding cis-cyanohydrins, cis-2 and cis-7, respectively, by chemical transformation of the cyano into the hydroxymethyl group. The key step of the synthesis is the very high cis-selectivity (> or = 96 %) of the MeHNL-catalyzed HCN addition to 4-alkylcyclohexanones. From 4-isopropylcyclohexanone (1) the cyanohydrin cis-2 and from 4-(1-methylvinyl)cyclohexanone (6) the cyanohydrin cis-7 result almost quantitatively. Regioselective hydroxylation of cis-I affords the triol cis-II. X-ray crystal structure determinations of the final products confirm their cis-configuration.

  1. Data on distribution and abundance: Monitoring for research and management [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2010-01-01

    In the first chapter of this book we identified the interdependence of method, data and theory as an important influence on the progress of science. The first several chapters focused mostly on progress in theory, in the areas of integrating spatial and temporal complexity into ecological analysis, the emergence of landscape ecology and its transformation into a multi-...

  2. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  4. Advances in CIS devices fabricated by a non-vacuum technique

    SciTech Connect

    Leidholm, C.R.; Norsworthy, G.A.; Roe, R.; Halani, A.; Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A novel, non-vacuum technique based on nano-particle deposition has been developed for the formation of CIS-type solar cell absorbers. Solar cells with {gt}12{percent} efficiency were previously demonstrated using this technique. Improvements in module integration processes have recently yielded 8{percent} minimodules of 75 cm{sup 2} area. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  6. Preparation and characterization of fluorophenylboronic acid-functionalized affinity monolithic columns for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianjin; Liu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Boronate affinity monolithic columns have been developed into an important means for the selective recognition and capture of cis-diol-containing biomolecules, such as glycoproteins, nucleosides and saccharides. The ligands of boronic acids are playing an important role in boronate affinity monolithic columns. Although several boronate affinity monoliths with high affinity toward cis-diol-containing biomolecules have been reported, only few publications are focused on their detailed procedures for preparation and characterization. This chapter describes in detail the preparation and characterization of a boronate affinity monolithic column applying 2,4-difluoro-3-formyl-phenylboronic acid (DFFPBA) as a ligand. The DFFPBA-functionalized monolithic column not only exhibited an ultrahigh boronate affinity toward cis-diol-containing biomolecules, but also showed great potential for the selective enrichment of cis-diol-containing biomolecules in real samples.

  7. Study of cis-cinnamic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wai Shing; Guo, Di; Wang, Xiao Li; Yin, Zhi Qi; Xia, Bing; Li, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Trans-cinnamic acid (CA) can be isomerized to cis-CA in Arabidopsis thaliana extract under sunlight. Piperonylic acid treatment of Arabidopsis under ultraviolet (UV) light increased the level of cis-CA in these treated tissues. Similarly, cis-CA was also detected from Oryza sativa seedlings grown under sunlight. These results suggest that cis-CA may occur in planta. Application of cis-CA to seedlings of both wild type Arabidopsis and auxin-insensitive mutants, aux1 and axr2, resulted in nearly identical dose response curves in root growth, indicating that the mode of action by which cis-CA affects plant growth is different from that of auxins. According to root growth inhibition assay, cis-CA is nearly 10 times more active than trans-CA. These results suggest that cis-CA is a unique plant growth regulator but its in vivo function remains to be elucidated.

  8. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  9. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  10. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  11. cis-Regulatory control circuits in development.

    PubMed

    Howard, Meredith L; Davidson, Eric H

    2004-07-01

    During development, an organism undergoes many rounds of pattern formation, generating ever-greater complexity with each ensuing round of cell division and specification. The instructions for executing this process are encoded in the cis-regulatory modules that direct the expression of developmental transcription factors and signaling molecules. Each transcription factor binding site within a cis-regulatory module contributes information about when, where, or how much a gene is turned on, and by dissecting the modules driving a given gene, all the inputs governing expression of the gene can be accurately identified. Furthermore, by mapping the output of each gene to the inputs of other genes, it is possible to reverse engineer developmental circuits and even whole networks. At this higher level of organization, common bilaterian strategies for specifying progenitor fields, locking down regulatory states, and driving development forward emerge.

  12. Cis-regulatory Elements and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Siepel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Modification of gene regulation has long been considered an important force in human evolution, particularly through changes to cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that function in transcriptional regulation. For decades, however, the study of cis-regulatory evolution was severely limited by the available data. New data sets describing the locations of CREs and genetic variation within and between species have now made it possible to study CRE evolution much more directly on a genome-wide scale. Here, we review recent research on the evolution of CREs in humans based on large-scale genomic data sets. We consider inferences based on primate divergence, human polymorphism, and combinations of divergence and polymorphism. We then consider “new frontiers” in this field stemming from recent research on transcriptional regulation. PMID:25218861

  13. PDSS/IMC CIS user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Spacelab Payload Development Support System PDSS Image Motion Compensator (IMC) computer interface simulation (CIS) user's manual is given. The software provides a real time interface simulation for the following IMC subsystems: the Dry Rotor Reference Unit, the Advanced Star/Target Reference Optical sensor, the Ultra Violet imaging telescope, the Wisconson Ultraviolet Photopolarimetry Experiment, the Cruciform Power distributor, and the Spacelab Experiment Computer Operating System.

  14. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Aaron T; Stormo, Gary D

    2016-01-15

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species. Copyright © 2016 Spivak and Stormo.

  15. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Aaron T.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species. PMID:26772747

  16. Teaching Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sue; Butts, Jennifer Lease

    2011-01-01

    Integrity is one of those essential yet highly ambiguous concepts. For the purpose of this chapter, integrity is defined as that combination of both attributes and actions that makes entities appear to be whole and ethical, as well as consistent. Like the concepts of leadership or wisdom or community or collaboration, integrity is a key element of…

  17. Fragrance material review on cis-jasmone.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, J; Jones, L; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-10-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of cis-jasmone when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. cis-Jasmone is a member of the fragrance structural group ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones. The common characteristic structural element of the group members is a cyclopentanone or cyclopentenone ring with a straight or branched chain alkane or alkene substituent. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for cis-jasmone were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, phototoxicity, photoallergy, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all ketones cyclopentanones and cyclopentenones in fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Soils and water [Chapter 18

    Treesearch

    Goran Berndes; Heather Youngs; Maria Victoria Ramos Ballester; Heitor Cantarella; Annette L. Cowie; Graham Jewitt; Luiz Antonio Martinelli; Dan Neary

    2015-01-01

    Bioenergy production can have positive or negative impacts on soil and water. To best understand these impacts, the effects of bioenergy systems on water and soil resources should be assessed as part of an integrated analysis considering environmental, social and economic dimensions. Bioenergy production systems that are strategically integrated in the landscape to...

  19. Chapter 3 - At the roadside: Forest resources

    Treesearch

    Bryce Stokes; Timothy G. Rials; Leonard R. Johnson; Karen L. Abt; Prakash Nepal; Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Lixia He; Burton C. English

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 3 assesses the availability of forest resources to the roadside. Not all woody feedstocks are discussed in this chapter. Logging residues and wholetree biomass are included. Other feedstock categories have been moved to chapter 5 or are redefined to be included in the whole-tree biomass category. New methodologies and data are used in the assessment to

  20. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  1. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  2. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  3. Chapter 08: Comments on, and additional information for, wood identification

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    This manual has described the theory of identification (Chapter 1), the botanical basis of wood structure (Chapter 2), the use of a hand lens (Chapter 3), how to use cutting tools to prepare wood for observation with a lens (Chapter 4), and the characters used in hand lens wood identification (Chapter 5) before leading you through an identification key (Chapter 6) and...

  4. Rotational spectroscopy and dipole moment of cis-cis HOONO and DOONO.

    PubMed

    Fry, Juliane L; Drouin, Brian J; Miller, Charles E

    2006-02-28

    The rotational spectrum of cis-cis HOONO has been studied over a broad range of frequencies, 13-840 GHz, using pulsed beam Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy and room-temperature flow cell submillimeter spectroscopy. The rotational spectrum of the deuterated isotopomer, cis-cis DOONO, has been studied over a subset of this range, 84-640 GHz. Improved spectroscopic constants have been determined for HOONO, and the DOONO spectrum is analyzed for the first time. Weak-field Stark effect measurements in the region of 84-110 GHz have been employed to determine the molecular dipole moments of cis-cis HOONO [mu(a) = 0.542(8) D, mu(b) = 0.918(15) D, mu = 1.07(2) D] and DOONO [mu(a) = 0.517(9) D, mu(b) = 0.930(15) D, mu = 1.06(2) D]. The quadrupole coupling tensor in the principal inertial axis system for the 14N nucleus has been determined to be chi(aa) = 1.4907(25) MHz, chi(bb) = -4.5990(59) MHz, chi(ab) = 3.17(147) MHz, and chi(cc) = 3.1082(59) MHz. Coordinates of the H atom in the center-of-mass frame have been determined with use of the Kraitchman equations, /aH/ = 0.516 A and /bH/ = 1.171 A. The inertial defects of HOONO and DOONO are consistent with a planar equilibrium structure with significant out-of-plane H atom torsional motion. Comparisons of the present results are made to ab initio calculations.

  5. Environmental testing of CIS based modules

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, D.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes environmental testing of Siemen`s CIS modules. Charts and diagrams are presented on data concerning: temporary power loss of laminated mini-modules; the 50 thermal cycle test; the 10 humidity freeze cycle test; results after 1000 hours of exposure to damp heat; and interconnect test structures in damp heat testing. It is concluded that moisture ingress causes permanent increases in the series resistance of modules, and that improved packaging is needed for better high humidity reliability. Also, dry dark heat caused temporary power losses which were recovered in sunlight.

  6. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  7. New Directions for Chapter 1. Congressional Testimony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Iris C.

    The RAND Institute on Education and Training conducted an analysis of Federal policy options to improve education in low-income areas. The analysis focuses on Chapter 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the nation's program for assisting educationally disadvantaged students. After a quarter century of Chapter 1 efforts, it is…

  8. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  9. Education Evaluation Report, Chapter 1. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Walter L.

    This report describes and evaluates the effectiveness of programs in Delaware funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Where possible, Delaware program findings are compared to those of the Sustaining Effects Study, a federally funded national study of the precursor of Chapter 1, Title I of the Elementary…

  10. Chapter 6. Landscape Analysis for Habitat Monitoring

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin McGarigal; Kevin S. McKelvey; Christina D. Vojta; Claudia M. Regan

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this chapter is to describe standardized methods for measur¬ing and monitoring attributes of landscape pattern in support of habitat monitoring. This chapter describes the process of monitoring categorical landscape maps in which either selected habitat attributes or different classes of habitat quality are represented as different patch types...

  11. Harvesting, storing, and shipping [Chapter 13

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are ready for harvest and delivery to clients after they have reached target specifications (see Chapter 2, The Target Plant Concept) and have been properly hardened (see Chapter 12, Hardening). Originally, nursery stock was grown in soil in fields; nursery managers would "lift" those seedlings out of the ground to harvest them. That traditional...

  12. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  13. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  14. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  15. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  16. Chapter 6: CPV Tracking and Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Magalhaes, Pedro; Muller, Matthew

    2016-04-15

    This chapter explains the functional requirements of a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) sun tracker. It derives the design specifications of a CPV tracker. The chapter presents taxonomy of trackers describing the most common tracking architectures, based on the number of axes, their relative position, and the foundation and placing of tracking drives. It deals with the structural issues related to tracker design, mainly related to structural flexure and its impact on the system's acceptance angle. The chapter analyzes the auto-calibrated sun tracking control, by describing the state of the art and its development background. It explores the sun tracking accuracy measurement with a practical example. The chapter discusses tracker manufacturing and tracker field works. It reviews survey of different types of tracker designs obtained from different manufacturers. Finally, the chapter deals with IEC62817, the technical standard developed for CPV sun trackers.

  17. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  18. Chapter I, Chapter II, And State Compensatory Education Program Evaluations, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Sherry; And Others

    This report contains administrative summaries for program evaluations of these 11 1983-84 Chapter I, Chapter II, and state compensatory education programs in the Fort Worth Independent School District, Texas. The programs evaluated are the Elementary Resource Teacher/Aide Program; the Chapter I Parochial Reading and Mathematics Program; the…

  19. CisSERS: Customizable in silico sequence evaluation for restriction sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Richard M.; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; Grimes, John; Galli, Marco; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Evans, Katherine; Kramer, David; Dhingra, Amit; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-04-12

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Here, data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated to enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERSenable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3’UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERSand results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.

  20. Regioselective trans-cis photoisomerization of m-styrylstilbenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Y.; Uozy, Y.; Dote, T.; Ueda, M.; Matsuura, T.

    1988-01-06

    Trans-cis photoisomerization of m-styrylstilbenes, i.e., 2,4,6-triisopropyl-3'-styrylstilbene (TISS), 2,4,6-trimethyl-3'-styrylstilbene (TMSS), and 3-styrylstilbene (SS), and of stilbenes, i.e., 2,4,6-triisopropylstilbene (TIS), 2,4,6-trimethylstilbene (TMS), and stilbene (S), are studied under direct of benzophenone-sensitized irradiation in hexane. Measurements of quantum yields of isomerization have revealed that although the styrylstilbene molecule bears two styryl groups, the reaction is highly regioselective, depending upon the excitation conditions and reactant structures. For example, isomerization of trans, trans-TISS and trans,cis-TISS occurred either at the 2,4,6-trisubstituted styryl side upon direct excitation or at the unstubstituted styryl side upon sensitized excitation. When the starting material carries an unsubstituted cis-styryl group, the major isomerization always occurred at this moiety by either direct or sensitized excitation, e.g., cis,trans-TISS ..-->.. trans,trans-TISS, cis,cis-TISS ..-->.. trans,cis-TISS, and cis,trans-SS ..-->.. trans,trans-SS. Furthermore, the photoisomerization of cis,cis-SS was found to be one-way. These results are interpreted in terms of the usual energy sink concept: the excited-state energies (E/sub S/ and E/sub T/) of the stilbene chromophores depend on molecular distortion in a subtle manner.

  1. Chapter 6: Ecology and Biodiversity

    Treesearch

    Patricia N. Manley; Dennis D. Murphy; Seth Bigelow; Sudeep. Chandra

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of animal and plant communities serves as a critical measure of the effectiveness of policies designed to protect and restore ecosystem processes in the Lake Tahoe basin. The conservation of plants and animals in the Tahoe basin is utterly dependent on the conservation of its terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; so, in many ways, the research agenda that...

  2. A cis-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five cis-regulatory elements

    DOE PAGES

    Henry, Kelli F.; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2015-03-22

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the G564 upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directedmore » mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globularstage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a cis-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved. Lastly, a homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the G564 ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.« less

  3. A cis-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelli F; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the G564 upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globular-stage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a cis-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved. A homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the G564 ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.

  4. Integrity in Transactional Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This chapter begins with a discussion of the impact of limited resources on the integrity of transactions between students and student affairs administrators. A framework and guiding principles for maintaining integrity are offered, and then some general principles for transactions with students are presented. Next, the chapter involves integrity…

  5. The Role of cis Regulatory Evolution in Maize Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Zachary H.; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues. PMID:25375861

  6. Examples of storm impacts on barrier islands: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Doran, Kara; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the morphologic variability of barrier islands and on the differences in storm response. It describes different types of barrier island response to individual storms, as well as the integrated response of barrier islands to many storms. The chapter considers case study on the Chandeleur Island chain, where a decadal time series of island elevation measurements have documented a wide range of barrier island responses to storms and long-term processes that are representative of barrier island behaviour at many other locations. These islands are low elevation, extremely vulnerable to storms and exhibit a diversity of storm responses. Additionally, this location experiences a moderately high rate of relative sea-level rise, increasing its vulnerability to the combined impacts of storms and long-term erosional processes. Understanding how natural processes, including storm impacts and intervening recovery periods interact with man-made restoration processes is also broadly relevant to understand the natural and human response to future storms.

  7. Misinterpretations of United States pharmacopeia chapter <797>.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2012-01-01

    By now, all compounding pharmacists should be aware that United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> has been revised. However, the revisions are tedious to read and may be misinterpreted. This article discusses some of the misinterpreted revisions of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and clarifies the revisions on the topics of Terminology, The Compounder, Facilities and Environment, Personnel Cleansing and Garbing, Assigning Beyond-use Dates, and Testing. Compounders need to take a firm stand with these misinterpretations of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and educate those who are not thoroughly familiar with the document. Compounders need to be diligent in following these standards to prevent harm to the patients.

  8. Evidence for a 13,14-cis cycle in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Tavan, P.; Schulten, K.

    1986-07-01

    The authors discuss to what extent the vibrational spectra of bacteriorhodopsin are in agreement with a photo-cycle of bacteriorhodopsin that involves the sequence BR, IO(all-trans) ..-->.. K(13,14-cis) ..-->.. L(13,14-cis) ..-->.. M(13-cis) ..-->.. N(13-cis) ..-->.. O(all-trans). The discussion is based on a quantumchemical modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO) calculation of the vibrational spectra of the relevant isomers of the protonated retinal Schiff base. In particular, they investigated in these calculations the effects of different charge environments on the frequencies of the relevant C-C single bond stretching vibrations of these isomers.

  9. Closeout of CRADA JSA 2012S004: Chapter 5, Integrated Control System, of the document of the ESS Conceptual Design Report, publicly available at https://europeanspallationsource.se/accelerator-documents

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, Todd

    2013-04-22

    The integrated control system (ICS) is responsible for the whole ESS machine and facility: accelerator, target, neutron scattering instruments and conventional facilities. This unified approach keeps the costs of development, maintenance and support relatively low. ESS has selected a standardised, field-proven controls framework, the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which was originally developed jointly by Argonne and Los Alamos National Laboratories. Complementing this selection are best practices and experience from similar facilities regarding platform standardisation, control system development and device integration and commissioning. The components of ICS include the control system core, the control boxes, the BLED database management system, and the human machine interface. The control system core is a set of systems and tools that make it possible for the control system to provide required data, information and services to engineers, operators, physicists and the facility itself. The core components are the timing system that makes possible clock synchronisation across the facility, the machine protection system (MPS) and the personnel protection system (PPS) that prevent damage to the machine and personnel, and a set of control system services. Control boxes are servers that control a collection of equipment (for example a radio frequency cavity). The integrated control system will include many control boxes that can be assigned to one supplier, such as an internal team, a collaborating institute or a commercial vendor. This approach facilitates a clear division of responsibilities and makes integration much easier. A control box is composed of a standardised hardware platform, components, development tools and services. On the top level, it interfaces with the core control system components (timing, MPS, PPS) and with the human-machine interface. At the bottom, it interfaces with the equipment and parts of the facility through

  10. Polarons and bipolarons in cis-polyacetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Wolfram; Förner, Wolfgang

    1998-05-01

    We present a parametrization for the Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian for the description of cis-polyacetylene (cPA). In contrast to trans-polyacetylene, we have to include symmetry breaking between neighboring sites into the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger-type one-electron part of the Hamiltonian. Our parametrization is based on correlated ab initio calculations on cis-hexatriene and on the results of independent calculations found in the literature. For open-shell systems (singly charged polarons) we use the annihilated unrestricted Hartree-Fock method to avoid the artificial spin contaminations inherent in UHF (unrestricted HF) calculations, which lead to the inclusion of fractions of the correlation energy in UHF total energies which cannot be controlled and are different for different systems and even for different geometries of the same system. Thus UHF is useless for the calculation of potential hypersurfaces and thus in turn for dynamical simulations. We find that in cPA singly-charged polarons are formed, while in doubly-charged chains stable bipolarons are found, although of a quite large width. This is in contrast to recent results reported by Shimoi and Abe [Y. Shimoi and S. Abe, Synth. Met. 69, 687 (1995) and Phys. Rev. B 50, 14 781 (1994)] who found that two singly-charged polarons are more stable for realistic parameter values than a doubly-charged bipolaron. We further find that the charged polarons are mobile in the chain and thus we conclude that polarons and bipolarons can serve as charge carriers (the latter ones spinless) in doped cPA.

  11. Structured decision making: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, Michael C.; Grand, James B.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Krausman, Paul R.; Cain, James W. III

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife management is a decision-focused discipline. It needs to integrate traditional wildlife science and social science to identify actions that are most likely to achieve the array of desires society has surrounding wildlife populations. Decision science, a vast field with roots in economics, operations research, and psychology, offers a rich set of tools to help wildlife managers frame, decompose, analyze, and synthesize their decisions. The nature of wildlife management as a decision science has been recognized since the inception of the field, but formal methods of decision analysis have been underused. There is tremendous potential for wildlife management to grow further through the use of formal decision analysis. First, the wildlife science and human dimensions of wildlife disciplines can be readily integrated. Second, decisions can become more efficient. Third, decisions makers can communicate more clearly with stakeholders and the public. Fourth, good, intuitive wildlife managers, by explicitly examining how they make decisions, can translate their art into a science that is readily used by the next generation.

  12. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  13. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  14. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  15. Fire effects on prehistoric ceramics [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Trisha Rude; Anne Trinkle Jones

    2012-01-01

    In North America, prehistoric pottery is primarily earthenware (a porous ceramic, fired at a relatively low temperature). It is not glass-like or dense like other kinds of pottery such as stoneware and porcelain (see chapter 6).

  16. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  17. The CEQ Annual Report: Controversial Chapters Withheld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Walter G., III

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the content of the third Annual Report and discusses the controversy concerning the withholding'' of chapters concerning the energy crisis, recycling, and the pollution of the Delaware River Valley. Possible political motivations are discussed. (AL)

  18. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed Central

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-01-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills. PMID:26328134

  19. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  20. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  1. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  2. Chapter IV - Safety During Payload Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; Dollberg, John; Trinchero, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical hazards that can be expected to be encountered when processing payloads on the ground. Also described are some of the more common controls for these hazards. Many of these controls are based on hard requirements but they are also based on specific lessons learned. This chapter uses the term Flight Hardware (F/H) for all payloads regardless of size.

  3. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Jian-Chiun; Diao, Chien-Chen; Lin, Jing-Jenn; Chen, Yen-Lin; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity ( ρ), hall mobility ( μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study.

  4. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jian-Chiun; Diao, Chien-Chen; Lin, Jing-Jenn; Chen, Yen-Lin; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity (ρ), hall mobility (μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study.

  5. Evaluating the economic viability of CdTe/CIS and CIGS/CIS tandem photovoltaic modules

    DOE PAGES

    Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; Horowitz, Kelsey; Kanevce, Ana; ...

    2017-01-20

    In this paper, we analyze the potential cost competitiveness of two frameless, glass–glass thin-film tandem photovoltaic module structures, cadmium telluride (CdTe)/CuInSe2 (CIS) and CuIn0.3Ga0.7Se2 (CIGS)/CIS, based on the demonstrated cost of manufacturing the respective component cell technologies in high volume. To consider multiple economic scenarios, we base the CdTe/CIS module efficiency on the current industrial production of CdTe modules, while for CIGS/CIS, we use an aspirational estimate for CIGS efficiency. We focus on four-terminal mechanically stacked structures, thus avoiding the need to achieve current matching between the two cells. The top cell in such a tandem must have a transparentmore » back contact, which has not been successfully implemented to date. However, for the purpose of understanding the economic viability of both tandems, we assume that this can be implemented at a cost similar to that of sputtered indium tin oxide. The cost of both tandem module structures was found to be nearly identical on an equal-area basis and approximately $30/m2 higher than the single-junction alternatives. Both tandem modules are about 4% (absolute) more efficient than a module by using the top-cell material alone. We find that these tandem modules might reduce total system cost by as much as 11% in applications having a high area-related balance-of-system cost, such as area-constrained residential systems; however, the relative advantage of tandems decreases in the cases where balance-of-system costs are lower, such as in commercial and utility scale systems.« less

  6. [Integrity].

    PubMed

    Gómez Rodríguez, Rafael Ángel

    2014-01-01

    To say that someone possesses integrity is to claim that that person is almost predictable about responses to specific situations, that he or she can prudentially judge and to act correctly. There is a closed interrelationship between integrity and autonomy, and the autonomy rests on the deeper moral claim of all humans to integrity of the person. Integrity has two senses of significance for medical ethic: one sense refers to the integrity of the person in the bodily, psychosocial and intellectual elements; and in the second sense, the integrity is the virtue. Another facet of integrity of the person is la integrity of values we cherish and espouse. The physician must be a person of integrity if the integrity of the patient is to be safeguarded. The autonomy has reduced the violations in the past, but the character and virtues of the physician are the ultimate safeguard of autonomy of patient. A field very important in medicine is the scientific research. It is the character of the investigator that determines the moral quality of research. The problem arises when legitimate self-interests are replaced by selfish, particularly when human subjects are involved. The final safeguard of moral quality of research is the character and conscience of the investigator. Teaching must be relevant in the scientific field, but the most effective way to teach virtue ethics is through the example of the a respected scientist.

  7. U.S./CIS eye joint nuclear rocket venture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Smetanikov, Vladimir; D'Yakov, Evgenij K.; Pavshuk, Vladimir A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the significance for U.S. spacecraft development of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) reactor concept that has been developed in the (formerly Soviet) Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS NTR reactor employs a hydrogen-cooled zirconium hydride moderator and ternary carbide fuels; the comparatively cool operating temperatures associated with this design promise overall robustness.

  8. U.S./CIS eye joint nuclear rocket venture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Smetanikov, Vladimir; D'Yakov, Evgenij K.; Pavshuk, Vladimir A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the significance for U.S. spacecraft development of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) reactor concept that has been developed in the (formerly Soviet) Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS NTR reactor employs a hydrogen-cooled zirconium hydride moderator and ternary carbide fuels; the comparatively cool operating temperatures associated with this design promise overall robustness.

  9. Short asymmetric synthesis of (-)- and (+)-cis-lauthisan.

    PubMed

    Carreño, M Carmen; Des Mazery, Renaud; Urbano, Antonio; Colobert, Françoise; Solladié, Guy

    2005-05-12

    The asymmetric synthesis of both enantiomers of cis-lauthisan (3) is achieved in only six steps from diethyl pimelate (4), the key steps being the diastereodivergent reduction of beta-ketosulfoxide 7 and the highly cis-stereoselective Et(3)SiH/TMSOTf-promoted reductive cyclization of enantiopure hydroxy sulfinyl ketones (S)-14 and (R)-14.

  10. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases: structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Pliyev, B K; Gurvits, B Y

    1999-07-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPI) catalyze cis-trans isomerization of imide bonds in peptides and proteins. This review summarizes the literature on the structure and functions of PPIs, their involvement in protein folding, and organization of PPI-containing receptors and membrane channels. A possible role of several PPIs in distant interactions between cells is discussed.

  11. Comparative genomics-based identification and analysis of cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Hajime; Ochi, Haruki; Uchiyama, Chihiro; Louie, Sarah; Grainger, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Identification of cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers and promoters, is very important not only for analysis of gene regulatory networks but also as a tool for targeted gene expression experiments. In this chapter, we introduce an easy but reliable approach to predict enhancers of a gene of interest by comparing mammalian and Xenopus genome sequences, and to examine their activity using a co-transgenesis technique in Xenopus embryos. Since the bioinformatics analysis utilizes publically available web-tools, bench biologists can easily perform it without any need for special computing capability. The co-transgenesis assay, which directly uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products, quickly screens for activity of the candidate elements in a cloning-free manner. PMID:22956093

  12. Probing the cis-arrangement of prototype tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-3.

    PubMed

    Milatz, Susanne; Piontek, Jörg; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Blasig, Ingolf E; Fromm, Michael; Günzel, Dorothee

    2015-06-15

    Claudins form a large family of TJ (tight junction) proteins featuring four transmembrane segments (TM1-TM4), two extracellular loops, one intracellular loop and intracellular N- and C-termini. They form continuous and branched TJ strands by homo- or heterophilic interaction within the same membrane (cis-interaction) and with claudins of the opposing lateral cell membrane (trans-interaction). In order to clarify the molecular organization of TJ strand formation, we investigated the cis-interaction of two abundant prototypic claudins. Human claudin-1 and claudin-3, fused to ECFP or EYFP at the N- or C-terminus, were expressed in the TJ-free cell line HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293. Using FRET analysis, the proximity of claudin N- and C-termini integrated in homopolymeric strands composed of claudin-3 or of heteropolymeric strands composed of claudin-1 and claudin-3 were determined. The main results are that (i) within homo- and heteropolymers, the average distance between the cytoplasmic ends of the TM1s of cis-interacting claudin molecules is shorter than the average distance between their TM4s, and (ii) TM1 segments of neighbouring claudins are oriented towards each other as the cytoplasmic end of TM1 is in close proximity to more other TM1 segments than TM4 is to other TM4 segments. The results indicate at least two different cis-interaction interfaces within claudin-3 homopolymers as well as within claudin-1/claudin-3 heteropolymers. The data provide novel insight into the molecular TJ architecture consistent with a model with an antiparallel double-row cis-arrangement of classic claudin protomers within strands.

  13. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  14. [Enzymatic formation of a cis,cis-muconic acid derivative using pyrazon-degrading bacteria (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blobel, F; Eberspächer, J; Haug, S; Lingens, F

    1976-01-01

    The cis,cis-muconic acid derivative of pyrazon, which was formerly isolated from the medium of pyrazon-degrading bacteria, was formed enzymatically by incubation of the catechol derivative of pyrazon with partially purified ortho pyrocatechase from pyrazon-degrading bacteria.

  15. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  16. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh annual review of the econamic and scientific work of the U.S. Geological Survey. As in previous years the purpose of the volume is to make available promptly to the public the highlights of Survey investigations. This year the volume consists of 4 chapters (A through D) of Professional Paper 550. Chapter A contains a summary of significant results, and the remaining chapters are made up of collections of short technical papers. Many of the results summarized in chapter A are discussed in greater detail in the short papers or in reports listed in 'Publications in Fiscal Year 1966,' beginning on page A265. The tables of contents for chapters B through D are listed on pages A259-A264. Numerous Federal, State, county, and municipal agencies listed on pages A211-A215 cooperated financially with the Geological Survey during fiscal 1966 and have contributed significantly to the results reported here. They are identified where appropriate in the short technical papers that have appeared in Geological Survey Research and in papers published cooperatively, but generally are not identified in the brief statements in chapter A. Many individuals on the staff of the Geological Survey have contributed to 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' Reference is made to only a few. Frank W. Trainer, Water Resources Division, was responsible for organizing and assembling chapter A and for critical review of papers in chapters B-D, assisted by Louis Pavlides, Geologic Division. Marston S. Chase, Publications Division, was in charge of production aspects of the series, assisted by Jesse R. Upperco in technical editing, and William H. Elliott and James R. Hamilton in planning and preparing illustrations. The volume for next year, 'Geological Survey Research 1967,' will be published as chapters af Professional Paper 5715. Previous volumes are listed below, with their series designations. Gealagical Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Gealagical

  17. CisMiner: genome-wide in-silico cis-regulatory module prediction by fuzzy itemset mining.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Carmen; Lopez, Francisco J; Cano, Carlos; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Blanco, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene control regions are known to be spread throughout non-coding DNA sequences which may appear distant from the gene promoter. Transcription factors are proteins that coordinately bind to these regions at transcription factor binding sites to regulate gene expression. Several tools allow to detect significant co-occurrences of closely located binding sites (cis-regulatory modules, CRMs). However, these tools present at least one of the following limitations: 1) scope limited to promoter or conserved regions of the genome; 2) do not allow to identify combinations involving more than two motifs; 3) require prior information about target motifs. In this work we present CisMiner, a novel methodology to detect putative CRMs by means of a fuzzy itemset mining approach able to operate at genome-wide scale. CisMiner allows to perform a blind search of CRMs without any prior information about target CRMs nor limitation in the number of motifs. CisMiner tackles the combinatorial complexity of genome-wide cis-regulatory module extraction using a natural representation of motif combinations as itemsets and applying the Top-Down Fuzzy Frequent- Pattern Tree algorithm to identify significant itemsets. Fuzzy technology allows CisMiner to better handle the imprecision and noise inherent to regulatory processes. Results obtained for a set of well-known binding sites in the S. cerevisiae genome show that our method yields highly reliable predictions. Furthermore, CisMiner was also applied to putative in-silico predicted transcription factor binding sites to identify significant combinations in S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, proving that our approach can be further applied genome-wide to more complex genomes. CisMiner is freely accesible at: http://genome2.ugr.es/cisminer. CisMiner can be queried for the results presented in this work and can also perform a customized cis-regulatory module prediction on a query set of transcription factor binding sites provided by

  18. Chapter 10: CPV Multijunction Solar Cell Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Siefer, Gerald

    2016-04-15

    Characterization of solar cells can be divided into two types: the first is measurement of electrooptical semiconductor device parameters, and the second is determination of electrical conversion efficiency. This chapter reviews the multijunction concepts that are necessary for understanding Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cell characterization techniques, and describes how CPV efficiency is defined and used. For any I-V measurement of a multijunction cell, the sun simulator spectrum has to be adjusted in a way that all junctions generate the same photocurrent ratios with respect to each other as under reference conditions. The chapter discusses several procedures for spectral irradiance adjustments of solar simulators, essential for multijunction measurements. It overviews the light sources and optics commonly used in simulators for CPV cells under concentration. Finally, the chapter talks about the cell area, quantum efficiency (QE), and current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements that are needed to characterize cells as a function of irradiance.

  19. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  20. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  1. Chapter A8. Bottom-Material Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data(National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This release of Chapter A8 provides guidelines for the equipment and procedures needed to collect and process samples of bottom material for the evaluation of surface-water quality. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed April 2005).

  2. Chapter A1. Preparations for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses field-trip preparations, including selection of sample-collection sites for studies of surface-water quality, site reconnaissance and well selection for studies of groundwater quality, and the establishment of electronic files and field files and folders for a sampling site. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed Jan. 31, 2005).

  3. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 13, Perpendiculars and Parallels (I), Chapter 14, Similarity. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter of the seventh unit in this SMSG series discusses perpendiculars and parallels; topics covered include the relationship between parallelism and perpendicularity, rectangles, transversals, parallelograms, general triangles, and measurement of the circumference of the earth. The second chapter, on similarity, discusses scale…

  4. [Biennial Survey of Education, 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1930, No. 16. Chapter I - Chapter XX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    This document contains the first twenty chapters of the Biennial Survey of Education document, covering the years 1926-1928. The following chapters are included in this document: (1) Higher education (Arthur J. Klein); (2) Medical education (N. P. Colwell); (3) Legal education (Alfred Z. Reed); (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W.…

  5. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 23, Quadratic Functions, Chapter 24, Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter in the twelfth unit of this SMSG series deals with the following topics involving quadratic functions: parabolas, translations of the parabola, completing the square, solving quadratic equations, "falling body" functions, and the use of quadratics in solving other equations. The chapter on statistics discusses…

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 27, Logic, Chapter 28, Applications of Probability and Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    One chapter in the fourteenth unit of this SMSG series deals with logic; simple and compound statements, truth tables, logical equivalence, rules of a logical argument, proof, quantifiers, and negations are the topics covered. The second chapter of the unit discusses applications of probability and statistics, including random sampling,…

  7. Ultrafast Lasers Improve the Efficiency of CIS Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, Gerhard; Heiss, Andreas; Vogt, Helmut; Huber, Heinz P.

    CIS (Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2) thin film solar cells show a high potential to achieve the efficiencies of Si wafer-based solar cells. The commonly applied patterning processes for the integrated interconnects are based on nanosecond laser ablation and mechanical scribing. Both methods introduce damages on the thin films by thermal effects and mechanical forces. By picosecond laser processing we realized all three patterning steps to the monolithic thin films CIS modules, namely the separation of the molybdenum back electrode, the absorber and the ZnO font electrode (P1, P2 and P3 respectively). We achieved an efficiency of 14.7% for 300 x 300 mm2 modules.

  8. Response of previously irradiated skin to combinations of x radiation, hyperthermia, and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Sager, H.; Constable, W.; Goodchild, N.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse legs were irradiated to a dose of 30 Gy. After 50 days, when the acute reaction had regressed to a steady state, they were retreated with either various doses of x rays (15 to 30 Gy), hyperthermia, 45 min at 42.7 degrees C, cis-DDP, or a combination of these agents. The maximum skin reactions and the skin reactions integrated over 50 days were determined. Statistical analysis of these data indicated the thermal enhancement ratio for the previously irradiated skin was approximately 1.20. The combination of x irradiation, hyperthermia, and cis-DDP treatments to the previously irradiated skin did not enhance the radiation damage beyond that produced by x irradiation and hyperthermia.

  9. Chapter 4. Work Through the Valley: Plan

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Loretta; Meade, Barbara; Koegel, Paul; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Young-Brinn, Angela; Terry, Chrystene; Norris, Keith

    2016-01-01

    This first of three chapters on the Valley stage, or main work of a Community-Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) initiative, concerns the planning phase of the work cycle. The main goal of this phase is to develop an action plan, which clarifies the goals, methods, responsible individuals, and timeline for doing the work. Further, this chapter reviews approaches, such as creativity and use of humor, that help level the playing field and assure community co-leadership with academic partners in developing effective action plans. PMID:20088079

  10. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, A.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1995-12-19

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe{sub 2} where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor. 15 figs.

  11. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, Angus A.; Yang, Li-Chung

    1995-01-01

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe.sub.2 where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor.

  12. Effects of Cd{sup 2+} on cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Hiroshi

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • The effects of Cd on the dimer of cadherin in living cells was analyzed. • Cd induced cadherin dimer formation was not detected in living cell with low Ca. • Ca mediated structural cooperativity and allostery in the native cadherin. • Ca concentration-dependent competitive displacement of Cd from cadherin is proposed. - Abstract: E-cadherin, a calcium (Ca{sup 2+})-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecule, plays a key role in the maintenance of tissue integrity. We have previously demonstrated that E-cadherin functions in vivo as a cis-dimer through chemical cross-linking reagents. Ca{sup 2+} plays an important role in the cis-dimer formation of cadherin. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Ca{sup 2+} interacts with the binding sites that regulate cis-dimer structures have not been completely elucidated. As expected for a Ca{sup 2+} antagonist, cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) disrupts cadherin function by displacing Ca{sup 2+} from its binding sites on the cadherin molecules. We used Cd{sup 2+} as a probe for investigating the role of Ca{sup 2+} in the dynamics of the E-cadherin extracellular region that involve cis-dimer formation and adhesion. While cell–cell adhesion assembly was completely disrupted in the presence of Cd{sup 2+}, the amount of cis-dimers of E-cadherin that formed at the cell surface was not affected. In our “Cd{sup 2+}-switch” experiments, we did not find that Cd{sup 2+}-induced E-cadherin cis-dimer formation in EL cells when they were incubated in low-Ca{sup 2+} medium. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time the effects of Cd{sup 2+} on the cis-dimer structure of E-cadherin in living cells using a chemical cross-link analysis.

  13. Histone replacement marks the boundaries of cis-regulatory domains.

    PubMed

    Mito, Yoshiko; Henikoff, Jorja G; Henikoff, Steven

    2007-03-09

    Cellular memory is maintained at homeotic genes by cis-regulatory elements whose mechanism of action is unknown. We have examined chromatin at Drosophila homeotic gene clusters by measuring, at high resolution, levels of histone replacement and nucleosome occupancy. Homeotic gene clusters display conspicuous peaks of histone replacement at boundaries of cis-regulatory domains superimposed over broad regions of low replacement. Peaks of histone replacement closely correspond to nuclease-hypersensitive sites, binding sites for Polycomb and trithorax group proteins, and sites of nucleosome depletion. Our results suggest the existence of a continuous process that disrupts nucleosomes and maintains accessibility of cis-regulatory elements.

  14. The Golgi apparatus: roles for distinct 'cis' and 'trans' compartments.

    PubMed

    Rothman, J E

    1982-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus seems to consist of distinct cis and trans compartments that are proposed to act sequentially to refine the protein export of the endoplasmic reticulum by removing escaped endoplasmic reticulum proteins. Refinement may be a multi-stage process that employs a principle akin to fractional distillation; the stack of cisternae comprising the cis Golgi may be the plates in this distillation tower. The trans Golgi, consisting of the last one or two cisternae, may be the receiver that collects from the cis Golgi only its most refined fraction for later distribution to specific locations throughout the cell.

  15. Chapter XX: POLYMODAL SENSORY INTEGRATION IN RETINAL GANGLION CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color “dimensions” of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of “pressure phosphenes” and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place. PMID:26427477

  16. i-cisTarget 2015 update: generalized cis-regulatory enrichment analysis in human, mouse and fly.

    PubMed

    Imrichová, Hana; Hulselmans, Gert; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Potier, Delphine; Aerts, Stein

    2015-07-01

    i-cisTarget is a web tool to predict regulators of a set of genomic regions, such as ChIP-seq peaks or co-regulated/similar enhancers. i-cisTarget can also be used to identify upstream regulators and their target enhancers starting from a set of co-expressed genes. Whereas the original version of i-cisTarget was focused on Drosophila data, the 2015 update also provides support for human and mouse data. i-cisTarget detects transcription factor motifs (position weight matrices) and experimental data tracks (e.g. from ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics) that are enriched in the input set of regions. As experimental data tracks we include transcription factor ChIP-seq data, histone modification ChIP-seq data and open chromatin data. The underlying processing method is based on a ranking-and-recovery procedure, allowing accurate determination of enrichment across heterogeneous datasets, while also discriminating direct from indirect target regions through a 'leading edge' analysis. We illustrate i-cisTarget on various Ewing sarcoma datasets to identify EWS-FLI1 targets starting from ChIP-seq, differential ATAC-seq, differential H3K27ac and differential gene expression data. Use of i-cisTarget is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. Address: http://gbiomed.kuleuven.be/apps/lcb/i-cisTarget. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 5 (Chapters 38-44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendix A: The International System of Units (SI). Appendix B: Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. Appendix C: Some Astronomical Data. Appendix D: Conversion Factors. Appendix E: Mathematical Formulas. Appendix F: Properties of the Elements. Appendix G: Periodic Tables of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions, Exercises, and Problems. Index.

  18. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  19. Chapter 10:Hardwoods for timber bridges

    Treesearch

    James P. Wacker; Ed T. Cesa

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes the joint efforts of the Forest Service and the FHWA to administer national programs including research, demonstration bridges, and technology transfer components. Summary information on a number of Forest Service-WIT demonstration bridges constructed with hardwoods is also provided.

  20. Chapter 2:Basic properties of undervalued hardwoods

    Treesearch

    John I. Zerbe

    2005-01-01

    Among the most abundant of our undervalued hardwoods are the soft maples. However, other species that are also underutilized include some species of birch and some lower grades of the hard maples. This chapter covers physical, mechanical, and other important properties of different soft maples, hard maples, and yellow birch and compares them with the properties of...

  1. Chapter 9. Benefits of International Collaboration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, we share what we have learned from working with our Brazilian colleagues on a multi university, multiyear, and multi basin ecological assessment and how those experiences were transmitted more broadly. These lessons (each of which is described in subsequent parag...

  2. Decision Support for Ecosystem Management (Chapter 28)

    Treesearch

    Keith Reynolds; Jennifer Bjork; Rachel Riemann Hershey; Dan Schmoldt; John Payne; Susan King; Lee DeCola; Mark J. Twery; Pat Cunningham

    1999-01-01

    This chapter presents a management perspective on decision support for ecosystem management.The Introduction provides a brief historical overview of decision support technology as it has been used in natural resource management, discusses the role of decision support in ecosystem management as we see it, and summarizes the current state of the technology.

  3. Other pospiviroids infecting Solanaceous plants (Book Chapter)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aside from potato spindle tuber viroid, the genus Pospiviroid contains several agents reported to naturally infect solanaceous crops (e.g. tomato, potato, pepper) or ornamental plants (e.g. Petunia hybrida, Solanum spp., Brugmansia spp.). The present chapter focuses on the following so-called solana...

  4. Chapter 9. Benefits of International Collaboration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, we share what we have learned from working with our Brazilian colleagues on a multi university, multiyear, and multi basin ecological assessment and how those experiences were transmitted more broadly. These lessons (each of which is described in subsequent parag...

  5. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  6. Life cycle analysis of biochar [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Richard D. Bergman; Hongmei Gu; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Nathaniel M. Anderson

    2017-01-01

    All products, including bioproducts, have an impact on the environment by consuming resources and releasing emissions during their production. Biochar, a bioproduct, has received considerable attention because of its potential to sequester carbon in soil while enhancing productivity, thus aiding sustainable supply chain development. In this chapter, the environmental...

  7. Parent Involvement in Local Chapter 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, E. Deborah; Shields, Patrick M.

    This report focuses on the involvement of parents in local projects funded under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. It researches the kind and extent of involvement, the impact of state and local factors on it, and the effect of the change from Title I to Chapter…

  8. Chapter 7: Materials for Launch Vehicle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Grant; Jone, Clyde S. III

    2017-01-01

    This chapter concerns materials for expendable and reusable launch vehicle (LV) structures. An emphasis is placed on applications and design requirements, and how these requirements are met by the optimum choice of materials. Structural analysis and qualification strategies, which cannot be separated from the materials selection process, are described.

  9. Chapter 1 Schoolwide Project Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, E. Allen; Beckstrom, Sharon

    Chapter 1 schoolwide projects are intended to serve educationally disadvantaged students by improving the instructional program provided to all students in high-poverty schools. This report provides a comprehensive look at schoolwide projects in the 1991-92 school year, using data from surveys of all schoolwide project schools. The response rate…

  10. Chapter 10. Dynamics of subalpine forests

    Treesearch

    Dennis H. Knight

    1994-01-01

    The boreal owl's fairly specific habitat requirements restrict its range in the conterminous U.S. to subalpine forests (see Chapter 9). These forests provide tree cavities, uncrusted snow that facilitates preying on small mammals, and cool microclimates essential for summer roosting. Such forests also provide habitat for the owl's prey which consists...

  11. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  12. Chapter 2. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This second chapter focuses on an analysis of the aspects that characterize the typical content of students' attitudes toward the world of computers. In this connection, it attempts to determine what is of the greatest interest to students as they deal with the world of computers, which types of programs they use, and which magazines they read…

  13. Effective Chapter 1 Programs in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrum, Phyllis

    This report describes 11 effective compensatory education programs in Oregon schools funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. One high school, four middle school, and six elementary school programs are profiled. Each profile includes the following information: (1) demographics; (2) staffing; (3) parent…

  14. Meadow management and treatment options [chapter 8

    Treesearch

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Jerry R. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Restoration and management objectives and approaches are most effective when based on an understanding of ecosystem processes and the long- and short-term causes of disturbance (Wohl and others 2005). As detailed in previous chapters, several factors are critical in developing effective management strategies for streams and their associated meadow ecosystems in the...

  15. The Chapter I Challenge: Colorado's Contribution 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Janice Rose

    Chapter I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the largest federally-funded program designed to provide services to elementary and secondary students to meet the special needs of educationally deprived students who reside in areas with high concentrations of low-income families. The 1994-95 school year is the last year of…

  16. Chapter 3: Status and trends of vegetation

    Treesearch

    James M. Guldin; Frank R. Thompson; Lynda L. Richards; Kyra C. Harper

    1999-01-01

    This chapter provides information about the vegetation cover of the Assessment area. The types and areal extent of vegetation in the Highlands are of interest for many reasons. Vegetation cover largely determines the availability of habitat for terrestrial animals, plants, and other organisms. Vegetation cover strongly influences what uses {e.g., timber, forage,...

  17. Chapter 3. Current management situation: Flammulated owls

    Treesearch

    Jon Verner

    1994-01-01

    The flammulated owl (Otus flammeolus) is a western mountain species associated mainly with ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jefferyi) forests in the United States and Canada (see Chapter 4). As a neotropical migrant, this small forest owl occurs on national forests in the United States during...

  18. Chapter 8. Current management situation: Boreal owls

    Treesearch

    Jon Verner

    1994-01-01

    The range of boreal owls (Aegolius funereus) in the United States includes Alaska, the mountains of the western United States, and the northern tier states from the Atlantic to Pacific (see Chapter 9). Based on the species' documented distribution (see National Geographic Society 1987, Hayward et al. 1987, Johnsgard 1988, and others) the owl may...

  19. Landscape genomics: A brief perspective [Chapter 9

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Schwartz; Gordon Luikart; Kevin S. McKelvey; Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    Landscape genetics is the amalgamation of population genetics and landscape ecology (see Manel et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2007). In Chapter 17, we discuss landscape genetics and provide two examples of applications in the area of modeling population connectivity and inferring fragmentation. These examples, like virtually all extant landscape genetic analyses, were...

  20. Science, practice, and place [Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Place-oriented inquiry and practice are proposed as keys to overcoming the persistent gap between science and practice. This chapter begins by describing some of the reasons science fails to simplify conservation practice, highlighting the challenges associated with the social and ecological sciences of multi-scaled complexity. Place concepts help scientists and...

  1. Chapter 4. Arceuthobium in North America

    Treesearch

    F. G. Hawksworth; D. Wiens; B. W. Geils

    2002-01-01

    The biology, pathology, and systematics of dwarf mistletoes are recently and well reviewed in Hawksworth and Wiens (1996). That monograph forms the basis for the text in this and chapter 5 and should be consulted for more information (for example, references, photographs, and distribution maps). In addition to extracting the information that would be most relevant to...

  2. Chapter 1 Migrant Education Program: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Thomas B.; And Others

    This report documents the implementation of the migrant education program funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation Improvement Act in the Houston (Texas) Independent School District and evaluates the program's impact on student achievement, grades, conduct, and attendance. The program offered assistance to eligible migrant children…

  3. Chapter 12: spatial or area repellents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatial repellents a three-dimensional zone of protection around a host from attacks by biting arthropods. This chapter reviews current knowledge and outlines future directions for utilization of spatial repellents. Current knowledge includes the kinds of products, both active and passive devices,...

  4. Invasive species in southern Nevada [Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Mathew L. Brooks; Steven M. Ostoja; Jeanne C. Chambers

    2013-01-01

    Southern Nevada contains a wide range of topographies, elevations, and climatic zones emblematic of its position at the ecotone between the Mojave Desert, Great Basin, and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. These varied environmental conditions support a high degree of biological diversity (Chapter 1), but they also provide opportunities for a wide range of invasive species...

  5. Adaptation strategies and approaches: Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Maria Janowiak; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of information is available on climate change adaptation, but much of it is very broad and of limited use at the finer spatial scales most relevant to land managers. This chapter contains a "menu" of adaptation actions and provides land managers in northern Wisconsin with a range of options to help forest ecosystems adapt to climate change impacts....

  6. Chapter 13, Policy options: North America

    Treesearch

    Jane Barr; James Dobrowolski; John Campbell; Philippe Le Prestre; Lori Lynch; Marc Sydnor; Robert Adler; Jose Etcheverry; Alexander Kenny; Catherine Hallmich; Jim Lazar; Russell M. Meyer; Robin Newmark; Janet Peace; Julie A. Suhr Pierce; Stephen. Yamasaki

    2012-01-01

    As previously indicated, GEO-5 shifts the GEO focus from identifying environmental problems to identifying solutions that governments can then prioritize. This chapter provides examples of a number of policy options and market mechanisms that have shown some success in improving environmental conditions in North America. They are organized by priority environmental...

  7. Chapter 3. Fresh Meat Texture and Tenderness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge of meat tenderness and the antemortem and postmortem strategies that can be used to influence meat tenderness. Tenderness is critical to the consumer acceptance of meat products. Numerous antemortem and postmortem factors can impact tende...

  8. Chapter 2. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This second chapter focuses on an analysis of the aspects that characterize the typical content of students' attitudes toward the world of computers. In this connection, it attempts to determine what is of the greatest interest to students as they deal with the world of computers, which types of programs they use, and which magazines they read…

  9. Addressing uncertainty in vulnerability assessments [Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    Linda Joyce; Molly Cross; Evan Girvatz

    2011-01-01

    This chapter addresses issues and approaches for dealing with uncertainty specifically within the context of conducting climate change vulnerability assessments (i.e., uncertainties related to identifying and modeling the sensitivities, levels of exposure, and adaptive capacity of the assessment targets).

  10. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  11. Chapter 6. available lepidopteran insect cell lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter lists the known cell lines from Lepidoptera, largely based on previous compilations of insect cell lines published by W. Fred Hink. More than 320 lines from 65 species are listed. The official designation is given for each cell line as well as the species, tissue source, and, when kno...

  12. Forest management practices and silviculture. Chapter 12.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala; Elon S. Verry

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of forest management and silviculture practices, and lessons learned, on the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The forests there are a mosaic of natural regeneration and conifer plantations. Verry (1969) described forest-plant communities in detail for the study watersheds (Sl through S6) on the MEF. The remaining area is described in...

  13. Trans-cis molecular photoswitching in interstellar Space.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, S; Goicoechea, J R; Roncero, O; Aguado, A; Tercero, B; Cernicharo, J

    2016-12-01

    As many organic molecules, formic acid (HCOOH) has two conformers (trans and cis). The energy barrier to internal conversion from trans to cis is much higher than the thermal energy available in molecular clouds. Thus, only the most stable conformer (trans) is expected to exist in detectable amounts. We report the first interstellar detection of cis-HCOOH. Its presence in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated gas exclusively (the Orion Bar photodissociation region), with a low trans-to-cis abundance ratio of 2.8 ± 1.0, supports a photoswitching mechanism: a given conformer absorbs a stellar photon that radiatively excites the molecule to electronic states above the interconversion barrier. Subsequent fluorescent decay leaves the molecule in a different conformer form. This mechanism, which we specifically study with ab initio quantum calculations, was not considered in Space before but likely induces structural changes of a variety of interstellar molecules submitted to UV radiation.

  14. Trans-cis molecular photoswitching in interstellar Space*

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Roncero, O.; Aguado, A.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2016-01-01

    As many organic molecules, formic acid (HCOOH) has two conformers (trans and cis). The energy barrier to internal conversion from trans to cis is much higher than the thermal energy available in molecular clouds. Thus, only the most stable conformer (trans) is expected to exist in detectable amounts. We report the first interstellar detection of cis-HCOOH. Its presence in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated gas exclusively (the Orion Bar photodissociation region), with a low trans-to-cis abundance ratio of 2.8 ± 1.0, supports a photoswitching mechanism: a given conformer absorbs a stellar photon that radiatively excites the molecule to electronic states above the interconversion barrier. Subsequent fluorescent decay leaves the molecule in a different conformer form. This mechanism, which we specifically study with ab initio quantum calculations, was not considered in Space before but likely induces structural changes of a variety of interstellar molecules submitted to UV radiation. PMID:28003686

  15. New cis-clerodane diterpenoids from Croton schiedeanus.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Pilar; Correa, Sofía Ximena; Guerrero, Mario; Carron, Rosalía; San Feliciano, Arturo

    2005-03-01

    The acid fraction of extracts from the aerial part of Croton schiedeanus afforded six cis-clerodane type diterpenoids. Two of them (1 and 4) are new natural compounds. Structural elucidation was achieved on the basis of their spectral data.

  16. The metabolism of cis- and trans-decalin

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, T. H.; Robertson, J. S.; Williams, R. T.

    1966-01-01

    1. The metabolism of cis- and trans-decalin in the rabbit has been investigated. 2. Both hydrocarbons were oxidized to racemic secondary alcohols and excreted as ether glucuronides in amounts equal to about 60% of the dose administered. The principal glucuronides were isolated as triacetyl methyl esters and as sodium salts. 3. cis-Decalin gave rise mainly to (±)-cis–cis-2-decalol, together with a little cis–trans-2-decalol, and trans-decalin mainly to (±)-trans–cis-2-decalol and a small amount of trans–trans-2-decalol. 4. These results suggest that biological oxidation of the decalins does not occur via a free-radical mechanism. An attempt is made to explain why racemic alcohols are obtained, rather than the more typical optically active products of enzymic reaction, and a mechanism is proposed. It is suggested that enzymes similar to steroid hydroxylases are involved. PMID:5968538

  17. The tomato cis-prenyltransferase gene family.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Tariq A; Matsuba, Yuki; Schauvinhold, Ines; Yu, Geng; Lees, Hazel A; Klein, Samuel E; Pichersky, Eran

    2013-02-01

    cis-prenyltransferases (CPTs) are predicted to be involved in the synthesis of long-chain polyisoprenoids, all with five or more isoprene (C5) units. Recently, we identified a short-chain CPT, neryl diphosphate synthase (NDPS1), in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Here, we searched the tomato genome and identified and characterized its entire CPT gene family, which comprises seven members (SlCPT1-7, with NDPS1 designated as SlCPT1). Six of the SlCPT genes encode proteins with N-terminal targeting sequences, which, when fused to GFP, mediated GFP transport to the plastids of Arabidopsis protoplasts. The SlCPT3-GFP fusion protein was localized to the cytosol. Enzymatic characterization of recombinant SlCPT proteins demonstrated that SlCPT6 produces Z,Z-FPP, and SlCPT2 catalyzes the formation of nerylneryl diphosphate while SlCPT4, SlCPT5 and SlCPT7 synthesize longer-chain products (C25-C55). Although no in vitro activity was demonstrated for SlCPT3, its expression in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dolichol biosynthesis mutant (rer2) complemented the temperature-sensitive growth defect. Transcripts of SlCPT2, SlCPT4, SlCPT5 and SlCPT7 are present at low levels in multiple tissues, SlCPT6 is exclusively expressed in red fruit and roots, and SlCPT1, SlCPT3 and SlCPT7 are highly expressed in trichomes. RNAi-mediated suppression of NDPS1 led to a large decrease in β-phellandrene (which is produced from neryl diphosphate), with greater reductions achieved with the general 35S promoter compared to the trichome-specific MKS1 promoter. Phylogenetic analysis revealed CPT gene families in both eudicots and monocots, and showed that all the short-chain CPT genes from tomato (SlCPT1, SlCPT2 and SlCPT6) are closely linked to terpene synthase gene clusters.

  18. Workstation Designs for a Cis-Lunar Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Using the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) system, a suite of workstations required for deep space missions have been proposed to fill out habitation functions in an International Space Station (ISS) derived Cis-lunar Deep Space Habitat. This paper introduces the functional layout of the Cis-lunar habitat design, and describes conceptual designs for modular deployable work surfaces, General Maintenance Workstation (GMWS), In-Space Manufacturing Workstation (ISMW), Intra-Vehicular Activity Telerobotics Work Station (IVA-TRWS), and Galley / Wardroom.

  19. Workstation Designs for a Cis-Lunar Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Using the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) system, a suite of workstations required for deep space missions have been proposed to fill out habitation functions in an International Space Station (ISS) derived Cis-lunar Deep Space Habitat. This paper introduces the functional layout of the Cis-lunar habitat design, and describes conceptual designs for modular deployable work surfaces, General Maintenance Workstation (GMWS), In-Space Manufacturing Workstation (ISMW), Intra-Vehicular Activity Telerobotics Work Station (IVA-TRWS), and Galley / Wardroom.

  20. Prolyl cis-trans isomerization as a molecular timer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun Ping; Finn, Greg; Lee, Tae Ho; Nicholson, Linda K

    2007-10-01

    Proline is unique in the realm of amino acids in its ability to adopt completely distinct cis and trans conformations, which allows it to act as a backbone switch that is controlled by prolyl cis-trans isomerization. This intrinsically slow interconversion can be catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved group of peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase enzymes. These enzymes include cyclophilins and FK506-binding proteins, which are well known for their isomerization-independent role as cellular targets for immunosuppressive drugs. The significance of enzyme-catalyzed prolyl cis-trans isomerization as an important regulatory mechanism in human physiology and pathology was not recognized until the discovery of the phosphorylation-specific prolyl isomerase Pin1. Recent studies indicate that both phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent prolyl cis-trans isomerization can act as a novel molecular timer to help control the amplitude and duration of a cellular process, and prolyl cis-trans isomerization might be a new target for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Nozomi Cis-Lunar Phase Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryne, Mark; Criddle, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched Nozomi, its first mission to the planet Mars using the newly developed M-V launch vehicle on July 3, 1998. Scientific objectives of the mission are to study the structure and dynamics of the Martian upper atmosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. Nozomi is a cooperative mission between ISAS and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA contribution includes navigation and tracking services provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spacecraft also serves as an engineering demonstration of basic technology for planetary exploration. One of the new technologies was a unique trajectory, developed by ISAS, which used solar gravitational perturbations at the weak stability boundary as an aid to achieve an Earth-Mars transfer orbit. This trajectory saves approximately 120 m/s of Delta V compared to direct hyperbolic insertion and is considered an enabling technology for the mission. Nozomi was the first spacecraft to employ this trajectory and provided on-orbit validation of the technique. The trajectory was achieved by initially placing the spacecraft in a highly elliptical cis-lunar phasing orbit. Six maneuvers were performed during this period to correct injection errors and target an outbound lunar swingby in September 1998. The gravity assist from the lunar swingby raised apogee to the vicinity of the weak stability boundary. After three more targeting maneuvers, Nozomi performed an inbound lunar swingby followed immediately by a powered Earth swingby in late December 1998. A 420 m/s Trans Mars Insertion (TMI) burn at the final Earth periapsis was intended to place the spacecraft on a heliocentric trajectory leading to Mars orbit insertion in October 1999. Orbit determination for Nozomi is performed in parallel by both ISAS and the Multi-Mission Navigation (MMNAV) group at JPL. This was an advantage for the mission because each group would generate

  2. Nozomi Cis-Lunar Phase Orbit Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryne, Mark; Criddle, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched Nozomi, its first mission to the planet Mars using the newly developed M-V launch vehicle on July 3, 1998. Scientific objectives of the mission are to study the structure and dynamics of the Martian upper atmosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. Nozomi is a cooperative mission between ISAS and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA contribution includes navigation and tracking services provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spacecraft also serves as an engineering demonstration of basic technology for planetary exploration. One of the new technologies was a unique trajectory, developed by ISAS, which used solar gravitational perturbations at the weak stability boundary as an aid to achieve an Earth-Mars transfer orbit. This trajectory saves approximately 120 m/s of Delta V compared to direct hyperbolic insertion and is considered an enabling technology for the mission. Nozomi was the first spacecraft to employ this trajectory and provided on-orbit validation of the technique. The trajectory was achieved by initially placing the spacecraft in a highly elliptical cis-lunar phasing orbit. Six maneuvers were performed during this period to correct injection errors and target an outbound lunar swingby in September 1998. The gravity assist from the lunar swingby raised apogee to the vicinity of the weak stability boundary. After three more targeting maneuvers, Nozomi performed an inbound lunar swingby followed immediately by a powered Earth swingby in late December 1998. A 420 m/s Trans Mars Insertion (TMI) burn at the final Earth periapsis was intended to place the spacecraft on a heliocentric trajectory leading to Mars orbit insertion in October 1999. Orbit determination for Nozomi is performed in parallel by both ISAS and the Multi-Mission Navigation (MMNAV) group at JPL. This was an advantage for the mission because each group would generate

  3. Genetic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for enhanced production of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been extensively studied for decades because of its health benefits including cancer prevention, anti-atherogenic and anti-obesity effects, and modulation of the immune system. We previously described the production of trans-10, cis-12 CLA in Yarrowia lipolytica by expressing the gene coding for linoleic acid isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes (pai). However the stable strain produced CLA at about 0.08% of dry cell weight (DCW), a level of production which was not high enough for practical applications. The goal of the present study was to enhance production of CLA by genetic engineering of Y. lipolytica strains. Results We have now co-expressed the delta 12-desaturase gene (FADS12, d12) from Mortierella alpina together with the codon-optimized linoleic acid isomerase (opai) gene in Y. lipolytica, expressed under the control of promoter hp16d modified by fusing 12 copies of UAS1B to the original promoter hp4d. A multi-copy integration plasmid was used to further enhance the expression of both genes. Using glucose as the sole carbon source, the genetically-modified Y. lipolytica produced trans-10, cis-12-CLA at a level of up to 10% of total fatty acids and 0.4% of DCW. Furthermore, when the recombinant yeast was grown with soybean oil, trans-10, cis-12-CLA now accumulated at a level of up to 44% of total fatty acids, which represented 30% of DCW after 38.5 h of cultivation. In addition, trans-10, cis-12-CLA was also detected in the growth medium up to 0.9 g/l. Conclusions We have successfully produced trans-10, cis-12-CLA with a titre of 4 g/l of culture (3.1 g/l in cells and 0.9 g/l in culture medium). Our results demonstrate the potential use of Y. lipolytica as a promising microbial cell factory for trans-10, cis-12-CLA production. PMID:23866108

  4. Integrative approaches: promoting socioecological resilience

    Treesearch

    J.W. Long; Carl Skinner; M. North; C.T. Hunsaker; L. Quinn-Davidson

    2014-01-01

    This chapter begins by discussing current challenges for ecosystem management that emerged from multiple chapters of the full synthesis. It then considers integrative approaches to promote resilience, including general strategies that recognize the integrated nature of socioecological systems, the importance of promoting disturbance regimes upon which these systems...

  5. Metrology of Large Parts. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    As discussed in the first chapter of this book, there are many different methods to measure a part using optical technology. Chapter 2 discussed the use of machine vision to measure macroscopic features such as length and position, which was extended to the use of interferometry as a linear measurement tool in chapter 3, and laser or other trackers to find the relation of key points on large parts in chapter 4. This chapter looks at measuring large parts to optical tolerances in the sub-micron range using interferometry, ranging, and optical tools discussed in the previous chapters. The purpose of this chapter is not to discuss specific metrology tools (such as interferometers or gauges), but to describe a systems engineering approach to testing large parts. Issues such as material warpage and temperature drifts that may be insignificant when measuring a part to micron levels under a microscope, as will be discussed in later chapters, can prove to be very important when making the same measurement over a larger part. In this chapter, we will define a set of guiding principles for successfully overcoming these challenges and illustrate the application of these principles with real world examples. While these examples are drawn from specific large optical testing applications, they inform the problems associated with testing any large part to optical tolerances. Manufacturing today relies on micrometer level part performance. Fields such as energy and transportation are demanding higher tolerances to provide increased efficiencies and fuel savings. By looking at how the optics industry approaches sub-micrometer metrology, one can gain a better understanding of the metrology challenges for any larger part specified to micrometer tolerances. Testing large parts, whether optical components or precision structures, to optical tolerances is just like testing small parts, only harder. Identical with what one does for small parts, a metrologist tests large parts and optics

  6. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-to-trans isomerization of the 15–15′ C=C bond in 9,15,9′-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the following biosynthetic pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand-switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large, hydrophobic compound in a membrane is unprecedented. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially utilizes a novel chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  7. Predominant contribution of cis-regulatory divergence in the evolution of mouse alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingsong; Sun, Wei; Ballegeer, Marlies; Libert, Claude; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Divergence of alternative splicing represents one of the major driving forces to shape phenotypic diversity during evolution. However, the extent to which these divergences could be explained by the evolving cis-regulatory versus trans-acting factors remains unresolved. To globally investigate the relative contributions of the two factors for the first time in mammals, we measured splicing difference between C57BL/6J and SPRET/EiJ mouse strains and allele-specific splicing pattern in their F1 hybrid. Out of 11,818 alternative splicing events expressed in the cultured fibroblast cells, we identified 796 with significant difference between the parental strains. After integrating allele-specific data from F1 hybrid, we demonstrated that these events could be predominately attributed to cis-regulatory variants, including those residing at and beyond canonical splicing sites. Contrary to previous observations in Drosophila, such predominant contribution was consistently observed across different types of alternative splicing. Further analysis of liver tissues from the same mouse strains and reanalysis of published datasets on other strains showed similar trends, implying in general the predominant contribution of cis-regulatory changes in the evolution of mouse alternative splicing. PMID:26134616

  8. Functional cis-regulatory modules encoded by mouse-specific endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vasavi; Choudhary, Mayank N. K.; Pehrsson, Erica; Xing, Xiaoyun; Fiore, Christopher; Pandey, Manishi; Maricque, Brett; Udawatta, Methma; Ngo, Duc; Chen, Yujie; Paguntalan, Asia; Ray, Tammy; Hughes, Ava; Cohen, Barak A.; Wang, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules contain multiple transcription factor (TF)-binding sites and integrate the effects of each TF to control gene expression in specific cellular contexts. Transposable elements (TEs) are uniquely equipped to deposit their regulatory sequences across a genome, which could also contain cis-regulatory modules that coordinate the control of multiple genes with the same regulatory logic. We provide the first evidence of mouse-specific TEs that encode a module of TF-binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The majority (77%) of the individual TEs tested exhibited enhancer activity in mouse ESCs. By mutating individual TF-binding sites within the TE, we identified a module of TF-binding motifs that cooperatively enhanced gene expression. Interestingly, we also observed the same motif module in the in silico constructed ancestral TE that also acted cooperatively to enhance gene expression. Our results suggest that ancestral TE insertions might have brought in cis-regulatory modules into the mouse genome. PMID:28348391

  9. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 1 (Chapters 1-11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-12-01

    Chapter 1.Measurement. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2.Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3.Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the deser t plains? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4.Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5.Force and Motion-I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to fly the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6.Force and Motion-II. Can a Grand Prix race car be driven

  10. Vaccination against bacterial kidney disease: Chapter 22

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Wiens, Gregory D.; Hammell, K. Larry; Rhodes, Linda D.; Edited by Gudding, Roar; Lillehaug, Atle; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) of salmonid fishes, caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been recognized as a serious disease in salmonid fishes since the 1930s. This chapter discusses the occurrence and significance, etiology, and pathogenesis of BKD. It then describes the different vaccination procedures and the effects and side-effects of vaccination. Despite years of research, however, only a single vaccine has been licensed for prevention of BKD, and has demonstrated variable efficacy. Therefore, in addition to a presentation of the current status of BKD vaccination, a discussion of potential future directions for BKD vaccine development is included in the chapter. This discussion is focused on the unique characteristics of R. salmoninarum and its biology, as well as aspects of the salmonid immune system that might be explored specifically to develop more effective vaccines for BKD prevention.

  11. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter B

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    This collection of 43 short papers is the first published chapter of 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' The papers report on scientific and economic results of current work by members of the Conservation, Geologic, Topographic, and Water Resources Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Chapter A, to be published later in the year, will present a summary of significant results of work done during fiscal year 1966, together with lists of investigations in progress, reports published, cooperating agencies, and Geological Survey offices. 'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh volume of the annual series Geological Survey Research. The six volumes already published are listed below, with their series designations. Geological Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Geological Survey Research 1961-Prof. Paper 424 Geological Survey Research 1962-Prof. Paper 450 Geological Survey Research 1963-Prof. Paper 475 Geological Survey Research 1964-Prof. Paper 501 Geological Survey Research 1965-Prof. Paper 525

  12. Chapter D in Geological Survey research 1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1964-01-01

    This collection of 43 short papers is the last of the chapters of Geological Survey Research 1964. The papers report on scientific and economic results of current work by members of the Geologic, Conservation, Water Resources, and Topographic Divisions of the U.S. Geological Survey. Some of the papers present results of completed parts of continuing investigations; others announce new discoveries or preliminary results of investigations that will be discussed in greater detail in reports to be published in the future. Still others are. scientific notes of limited scope, and short papers on techniques and instrumentation. Chapter A of this series presents a summary of results of work done during the present fiscal year.

  13. IRIG 106 Chapter 10 Programmers Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-16

    to help the computer programmer write software for operating IRIG 106 Chapter 10 standard digital recorders, and to analyze data from these...it can be associated with the correct recorder channel. When writing TMATS, the appropriate comments must follow the appropriate attribute records...endian in the CDB and require writing to the CDB a byte at a time from a little-endian processor to write the multi-byte values in proper order

  14. 31 CFR Appendixes to Chapter V - Note

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Ch. V, Nt. Appendixes to Chapter V—Note Notes: The alphabetical lists... “formerly known as”; “n.k.a.” means “now known as”; “DOB” means “date of birth”; “DWT” means “deadweight”; “GRT” means “Gross Registered Tonnage”; “POB” means “place of birth”. 5. U.S. financial...

  15. Dust and human health: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morman, Suzette A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that exposure to fine particulate matter may increase risk for human morbidity and mortality. Until recently, population health related studies examining the effects of particulate matter on human health generally examined anthropogenic (industry and combustion by-products) sources with few studies considering contributions from natural sources. This chapter provides an overview of naturally occurring inorganic mineral dust research and associated human health ailments and some of the challenges in elucidating the etiological mechanisms responsible.

  16. Haramekhala - tantra (the first chapter on medicine).

    PubMed

    Sharma, P V

    1986-01-01

    This translation of Haramekhala - tantra of the author is based on Banaras Hindu University manuscript which seems to be a novel one. The manuscript runs into 133 stanzas in all in the form of dialogue between lord Siva and goddess Parvati. This is only the first chapter (of the great work) dealing with medicine. From stanza 109 onwards some magic spells are described and as such those have not been included in this translation.

  17. Chapter 1: Physics with Trapped Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Martina; Madsen, Niels; Thompson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Ion traps, which were first introduced in the late 1950s and early 1960s, have established themselves as indispensable tools in many areas of physics, chemistry and technology. This chapter gives a brief survey of the operating principles and development of ion traps, together with a short description of how ions are loaded and detected. This is followed by a brief account of some of the current applications of ion traps.

  18. Capturing spatiotemporal variation in wildfires for improving postwildfire debris‐flow hazard assessments [Chapter 20

    Treesearch

    Jessica Haas; Matthew Thompson; Anne Tillery; Joe H. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires can increase the frequency and magnitude of catastrophic debris flows. Integrated, proactive naturalhazard assessment would therefore characterize landscapes based on the potential for the occurrence and interactions of wildfires and postwildfire debris flows. This chapter presents a new modeling effort that can quantify the variability surrounding a key...

  19. Water, water quality and health (Chapter 3 in Book entitled: Environmental Tracking for Public Health Surveillance).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter identifies the role environmental tracking plays in identifying public health water hazard and water quality issues. It outlines public health issues to be examined and provides an integrated overview of water and diseases by combining knowledge of the hydrological ...

  20. Methodology (Chapter A in the Teacher's Manual of the Adult Migrant Education Program, Australia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, D. E.

    This methodology for teaching English as a second language begins with a discussion of the basis for methodology, which is seen as revolving around the nature of language and the nature of the learner and society. The actual methodological approach is embodied in the following chapters: "Developing an Integrated Programme,""Focus on Use,""Focus on…

  1. Animal movement data: GPS telemetry, autocorrelation and the need for path-level analysis [chapter 7

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    In the previous chapter we presented the idea of a multi-layer, multi-scale, spatially referenced data-cube as the foundation for monitoring and for implementing flexible modeling of ecological pattern-process relationships in particulate, in context and to integrate these across large spatial extents at the grain of the strongest linkage between response and driving...

  2. Water, water quality and health (Chapter 3 in Book entitled: Environmental Tracking for Public Health Surveillance).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter identifies the role environmental tracking plays in identifying public health water hazard and water quality issues. It outlines public health issues to be examined and provides an integrated overview of water and diseases by combining knowledge of the hydrological ...

  3. Glucose intolerance following cis-platinum treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R S; Mayor, G H; Rosenbaum, R W; Hook, J B; Santiago, J V; Bond, J T

    1982-01-01

    cis-Dichlorodiammineplatinum (cis-Pt) is a heavy metal complex used in cancer chemotherapy. Since this drug has been shown to induce hyperglycemia in rats, these studies were initiated to elucidate the effects of cis-Pt on carbohydrate tolerance and insulin and glucagon secretion. Two days following i.v. cis-Pt (2.5 or 7.5 mg/kg, 5 ml/kg) or vehicle administration to male F-344 rats, plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and glucagon (IRG) concentrations were determined in the basal state and serially following a glucose load (2 g/kg, i.p.). Since cis-Pt induces a dose-related anorexia, a pair-fed control group was also studied. Administration of 7.5 mg/kg cis-Pt was associated with plasma glucose concentrations 2.5-5 times greater than ad-libitum and pair-fed controls at every time point during the 2-h glucose tolerance test. Although basal plasma IRI concentrations of the 7.5-mg/kg group were comparable to ad-libitum fed controls, they were significantly greater than those of pair-fed partners. Furthermore, the appropriate IRI response to a glucose stimulus observed in both controls and the 2.5-mg/kg group was absent in the 7.5-mg/kg group. Basal plasma IRG concentrations of the 7.5-mg/kg group were approximately 3-4 times greater than ad-libitum and pair-fed controls and were not suppressed following a glucose load. These results suggest that cis-Pt induces marked glucose intolerance in association with an impaired IRI response and abnormal glucagon response to a glucose stimulus.

  4. A Survey of Geologic Resources. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonson, Jennifer; Rickman, Doug

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the resources available from the Moon itself: regolith, geologically concentrated materials, and lunar physical features that will enable habitation and generation of power on the surface. This chapter briefly covers the formation of the Moon and thus the formation of the crust of the Moon, as well as the evolution of the regolith. The characteristics of the regolith are provided in some detail, including its mineralogy and lithology. The location of high concentrations of specific minerals or rocks is noted. Other ideal locations for in situ resource utilization technology and lunar habitation are presented. This chapter is intended to be a brief review of current knowledge, and to serve as a foundational source for further study. Each concept presented here has a wealth of literature associated with it; the reader is therefore directed to that literature with each discussion. With great interest in possible manned lunar landings and continued study of the Moon by multiple satellites, the available information changes regularly.

  5. Chapter A9. Safety in Field Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, Susan L.; Ray, Ronald G.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses topics related to personal safety to be used in the collection of water-quality data, including: policies and general regulations on field safety; transportation of people and equipment; implementation of surface-water and ground-water activities; procedures for handling chemicals; and information on potentially hazardous environmental conditions, animals, and plants. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.usgs.gov/publications/ index.html.

  6. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on the friction and wear properties of selected solid lubricating films to aid users in choosing the best lubricant, deposition conditions, and operational variables. For simplicity, discussion of the tribological properties of concern is separated into two parts. The first part of the chapter discusses the different solid lubricating films selected for study including commercially developed solid film lubricants: (1) bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), (2) magnetron-sputtered MoS2, (3) ion-plated silver, (4) ion-plated lead, (5) magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC), and (6) plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DEC) films. Marked differences in the friction and wear properties of the different films resulted from the different environmental conditions (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, and dry nitrogen) and the solid film lubricant materials. The second part of the chapter discusses the physical and chemical characteristics, friction behavior, and endurance life of the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The role of interface species and the effects of applied load, film thickness, oxygen pressure, environment, and temperature on the friction and wear properties are considered.

  7. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 1, (Chapters 1 - 21)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Jearl

    2004-01-01

    Chapter 1. Measurement 1. How does the appearance of a new type of cloud signal changes in Earth's atmosphere? 1-1 What Is Physics? 1-2 Measuring Things. 1-3 The International System of Units. 1-4 Changing Units. 1-5 Length. 1-6 Time. 1-7 Mass. Review & Summary. Problems. Chapter 2. Motion Along a Straight Line. What causes whiplash injury in rear-end collisions of cars? 2-1 What Is Physics? 2-2 Motion. 2-3 Position and Displacement. 2-4 Average Velocity and Average Speed. 2-5 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed. 2-6 Acceleration. 2-7 Constant Acceleration: A Special Case. 2-8 Another Look at Constant Acceleration. 2-9 Free-Fall Acceleration. 2-10 Graphical Integration in Motion Analysis. 2 Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 3. Vectors. How does an ant know the way home with no guiding clues on the desert plains? 3-1 What Is Physics? 3-2 Vectors and Scalars. 3-3 Adding Vectors Geometrically. 3-4 Components of Vectors. 3-5 Unit Vectors. 3-6 Adding Vectors by Components. 3-7 Vectors and the Laws of Physics. 3-8 Multiplying Vectors. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 4. Motion in Two and Three Dimensions. In a motorcycle jump for record distance, where does the jumper put the second ramp? 4-1 What Is Physics? 4-2 Position and Displacement. 4-3 Average Velocity and Instantaneous Velocity. 4-4 Average Acceleration and Instantaneous Acceleration. 4-5 Projectile Motion. 4-6 Projectile Motion Analyzed. 4-7 Uniform Circular Motion. 4-8 Relative Motion in One Dimension. 4-9 Relative Motion in Two Dimensions. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 5. Force and Motion--I. When a pilot takes off from an aircraft carrier, what causes the compulsion to .y the plane into the ocean? 5-1 What Is Physics? 5-2 Newtonian Mechanics. 5-3 Newton's First Law. 5-4 Force. 5-5 Mass. 5-6 Newton's Second Law. 5-7 Some Particular Forces. 5-8 Newton's Third Law. 5-9 Applying Newton's Laws. Review & Summary. Questions. Problems. Chapter 6. Force and Motion--II. Can a

  8. Evaluating cis-2,6-Dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) as a Base Component in Lithium-Mediated Zincation Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David R; Garden, Jennifer A; Kennedy, Alan R; Leenhouts, Sarah M; Mulvey, Robert E; O'Keefe, Philip; O'Hara, Charles T; Steven, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in metallation chemistry have centred on the bulky secondary amide 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide (TMP) within mixed metal, often ate, compositions. However, the precursor amine TMP(H) is rather expensive so a cheaper substitute would be welcome. Thus this study was aimed towards developing cheaper non-TMP based mixed-metal bases and, as cis-2,6-dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) was chosen as the alternative amide, developing cis-DMP zincate chemistry which has received meagre attention compared to that of its methyl-rich counterpart TMP. A new lithium diethylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] (TMEDA=N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethylenediamine) has been synthesised by co-complexation of Li(cis-DMP), Et2Zn and TMEDA, and characterised by NMR (including DOSY) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, which revealed a dinuclear contact ion pair arrangement. By using N,N-diisopropylbenzamide as a test aromatic substrate, the deprotonative reactivity of [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] has been probed and contrasted with that of the known but previously uninvestigated di-tert-butylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)tBu2]. The former was found to be the superior base (for example, producing the ortho-deuteriated product in respective yields of 78 % and 48 % following D2O quenching of zincated benzamide intermediates). An 88 % yield of 2-iodo-N,N-diisopropylbenzamide was obtained on reaction of two equivalents of the diethylzincate with the benzamide followed by iodination. Comparisons are also drawn using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazide (HMDS), diisopropylamide and TMP as the amide component in the lithium amide, Et2Zn and TMEDA system. Under certain conditions, the cis-DMP base system was found to give improved results in comparison to HMDS and diisopropylamide (DA), and comparable results to a TMP system. Two novel complexes isolated from reactions of the di-tert-butylzincate and crystallographically characterised, namely the pre-metallation complex [{(iPr)2N(Ph)C=O}LiZn(cis

  9. Evaluating cis-2,6-dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) as a base component in lithium-mediated zincation chemistry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Garden, Jennifer A; Kennedy, Alan R; Leenhouts, Sarah M; Mulvey, Robert E; O'Keefe, Philip; O'Hara, Charles T; Steven, Alan

    2013-09-27

    Most recent advances in metallation chemistry have centred on the bulky secondary amide 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide (TMP) within mixed metal, often ate, compositions. However, the precursor amine TMP(H) is rather expensive so a cheaper substitute would be welcome. Thus this study was aimed towards developing cheaper non-TMP based mixed-metal bases and, as cis-2,6-dimethylpiperidide (cis-DMP) was chosen as the alternative amide, developing cis-DMP zincate chemistry which has received meagre attention compared to that of its methyl-rich counterpart TMP. A new lithium diethylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] (TMEDA=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine) has been synthesised by co-complexation of Li(cis-DMP), Et2Zn and TMEDA, and characterised by NMR (including DOSY) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, which revealed a dinuclear contact ion pair arrangement. By using N,N-diisopropylbenzamide as a test aromatic substrate, the deprotonative reactivity of [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)Et2] has been probed and contrasted with that of the known but previously uninvestigated di-tert-butylzincate, [(TMEDA)LiZn(cis-DMP)tBu2]. The former was found to be the superior base (for example, producing the ortho-deuteriated product in respective yields of 78% and 48% following D2O quenching of zincated benzamide intermediates). An 88% yield of 2-iodo-N,N-diisopropylbenzamide was obtained on reaction of two equivalents of the diethylzincate with the benzamide followed by iodination. Comparisons are also drawn using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazide (HMDS), diisopropylamide and TMP as the amide component in the lithium amide, Et2Zn and TMEDA system. Under certain conditions, the cis-DMP base system was found to give improved results in comparison to HMDS and diisopropylamide (DA), and comparable results to a TMP system. Two novel complexes isolated from reactions of the di-tert-butylzincate and crystallographically characterised, namely the pre-metallation complex [{(iPr)2N(Ph)C=O}LiZn(cis

  10. Overview of NATO Background on Scramjet Technology. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. Philip; Bouchez, Marc; McClinton, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present overview is to summarize the current knowledge of the NATO contributors. All the topics will be addressed in this chapter, with references and some examples. This background enhances the level of knowledge of the NATO scramjet community, which will be used for writing the specific chapters of the Report. Some previous overviews have been published on scramjet technology worldwide. NASA, DOD, the U.S. industry and global community have studied scramjet-powered hypersonic vehicles for over 40 years. Within the U.S. alone, NASA, DOD (DARPA, U.S. Navy and USAF), and industry have participated in hypersonic technology development. Over this time NASA Langley Research Center continuously studied hypersonic system design, aerothermodynamics, scramjet propulsion, propulsion-airframe integration, high temperature materials and structural architectures, and associated facilities, instrumentation and test methods. These modestly funded programs were substantially augmented during the National Aero-Space Plane (X-30) Program, which spent more than $3B between 1984 and 1995, and brought the DOD and other NASA Centers, universities and industry back into hypersonics. In addition, significant progress was achieved in all technologies required for hypersonic flight, and much of that technology was transferred into other programs, such as X-33, DC-X, X-37, X-43, etc. In addition, technology transfer impacted numerous other industries, including automotive, medical, sports and aerospace.

  11. Cis-regulatory mechanisms governing stem and progenitor cell transitions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kong, Guangyao; Gao, Xin; Chang, Yuan-I; Hewitt, Kyle J.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Prathibha, Rajalekshmi; Ranheim, Erik A.; Dewey, Colin N.; Zhang, Jing; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-element encyclopedias provide information on phenotypic diversity and disease mechanisms. Although cis-element polymorphisms and mutations are instructive, deciphering function remains challenging. Mutation of an intronic GATA motif (+9.5) in GATA2, encoding a master regulator of hematopoiesis, underlies an immunodeficiency associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whereas an inversion relocalizes another GATA2 cis-element (−77) to the proto-oncogene EVI1, inducing EVI1 expression and AML, whether this reflects ectopic or physiological activity is unknown. We describe a mouse strain that decouples −77 function from proto-oncogene deregulation. The −77−/− mice exhibited a novel phenotypic constellation including late embryonic lethality and anemia. The −77 established a vital sector of the myeloid progenitor transcriptome, conferring multipotentiality. Unlike the +9.5−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell genesis was unaffected in −77−/− embryos. These results illustrate a paradigm in which cis-elements in a locus differentially control stem and progenitor cell transitions, and therefore the individual cis-element alterations cause unique and overlapping disease phenotypes. PMID:26601269

  12. Innovative front end processing for next generation CIS module production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Volker; Jasenek, Axel; Sandfort, Christian; Letsch, Andreas; Koetschau, Immo; Hahn, Thomas; Feichtinger, Jochen; Eschrich, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    The successful implementation of two new process steps into an existing Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIS) production line was achieved. One, a newly developed back contact, aims for a better process control, as far as the transition of the metallic back contact to a selenide/metal bi-layer during CIS-formation is concerned. This was done by the introduction of a corrosion resistant barrier layer, which reliably stops chalcogenide diffusion from the top. By doing so, a back contact layer is obtained, with well defined properties in which the functionalities of the back electrode now is divided between two separated layers. The other development presented in this paper, tackles the complexity of CIS-module production and the interferences between the different processes required. By shifting the P1-scribing process after i-ZnO deposition, the process sequence for CIS is simplified and it will be shown that this new P1i exhibits superior properties as far as CIS morphology and groove quality is concerned.

  13. Multiple Functional Variants in cis Modulate PDYN Expression.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Courtney C; Silverman, Jesse S; Haygood, Ralph; Reininga, Jennifer M; Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A

    2010-02-01

    Understanding genetic variation and its functional consequences within cis-regulatory regions remains an important challenge in human genetics and evolution. Here, we present a fine-scale functional analysis of segregating variation within the cis-regulatory region of prodynorphin, a gene that encodes an endogenous opioid precursor with roles in cognition and disease. In order to characterize the functional consequences of segregating variation in cis in a region under balancing selection in different human populations, we examined associations between specific polymorphisms and gene expression in vivo and in vitro. We identified five polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region that affect transcript abundance: a 68-bp repeat recognized in prior studies, as well as two microsatellites and two single nucleotide polymorphisms not previously implicated as functional variants. The impact of these variants on transcription differs by brain region, sex, and cell type, implying interactions between cis genotype and the differentiated state of cells. The effects of individual variants on expression level are not additive in some combinations, implying epistatic interactions between nearby variants. These data reveal an unexpectedly complex relationship between segregating genetic variation and its expression-trait consequences and highlights the importance of close functional scrutiny of natural genetic variation within even relatively well-studied cis-regulatory regions.

  14. Conditional gene vectors regulated in cis.

    PubMed

    Pich, Dagmar; Humme, Sibille; Spindler, Mark-Peter; Schepers, Aloys; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang

    2008-08-01

    Non-integrating gene vectors, which are stably and extrachromosomally maintained in transduced cells would be perfect tools to support long-term expression of therapeutic genes but preserve the genomic integrity of the cellular host. Small extrachromosomal plasmids share some of these ideal characteristics but are primarily based on virus blueprints. These plasmids are dependent on viral trans-acting factors but they can replicate their DNA molecules in synchrony with the chromosome of the cellular host and segregate to daughter cells in an autonomous fashion. On the basis of the concept of the latent origin of DNA replication of Epstein-Barr virus, oriP, we devised novel derivatives, which exclusively rely on an artificial replication factor for both nuclear retention and replication of plasmid DNA. In addition, an allosteric switch regulates the fate of the plasmid molecules, which are rapidly lost upon addition of doxycycline. Conditional maintenance of these novel plasmid vectors allows the reversible transfer of genetic information into target cells for the first time.

  15. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  16. Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Chapter 1: Introduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chapter 1 of “Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy” provides an introduction to the document. /meta name=DC.title content=Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Chapter 1: Introduction

  17. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 ...

  18. 48 CFR Appendix G to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false G Appendix G to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendix G to Chapter 2 ...

  19. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7 ...

  20. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7 ...

  1. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7 ...

  2. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7 ...

  3. 48 CFR Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false G Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes G-H to Chapter 7 ...

  4. 48 CFR Appendix E to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false E Appendix E to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendix E to Chapter 7...

  5. 48 CFR Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Appendixes A-C to Chapter 7...

  6. Anatomy and physiology of plant conductive systems. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, C.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models considered in the book are representations of the physical features and chemical reactions that define interactions between plants and their environment. By centering attention on equations, it is easy to lose sight of the intricate and complex nature of the problem. The particular chapter describes the anatomy of important plant features and briefly discuss some physiological principles that will help to visualize and perceive the conditions which are represented in the models. Because of the many competing interactions, the fate of chemicals in the soil/plant/air environment is not obvious. Models were thus developed to intelligently integrate available knowledge, to increase understanding of the complex interactions, to aid in presentation of plant functions, and to help make predictions about chemical fate.

  7. Redescription of Cis taurus (Reitter, 1878) (Coleoptera: Ciidae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ester H; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2013-01-09

    Cis taurus (Reitter) is the type-species of Macrocis Reitter, a genus subsequently synonymized with Cis Latreille. It names a diversified but barely studied species-group of Cis, the taurus group. The objective of the present work is to redescribe C. taurus, designate a lectotype and provide the first description of male abdominal terminalia of the species. We also provide new data on its geographic distribution, restricted to three major Mexico mountain ranges: the Sierra Madre Oriental, the Sierra Madre de Chiapas and the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (Sierra Nevada). This is a first and important step in the ongoing revision of the taurus species-group.

  8. cisExpress: motif detection in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Triska, Martin; Grocutt, David; Southern, James; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2013-09-01

    One of the major challenges for contemporary bioinformatics is the analysis and accurate annotation of genomic datasets to enable extraction of useful information about the functional role of DNA sequences. This article describes a novel genome-wide statistical approach to the detection of specific DNA sequence motifs based on similarities between the promoters of similarly expressed genes. This new tool, cisExpress, is especially designed for use with large datasets, such as those generated by publicly accessible whole genome and transcriptome projects. cisExpress uses a task farming algorithm to exploit all available computational cores within a shared memory node. We demonstrate the robust nature and validity of the proposed method. It is applicable for use with a wide range of genomic databases for any species of interest. cisExpress is available at www.cisexpress.org.

  9. Sequence polymorphisms cause many false cis eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Li, Yang; Breitling, Rainer; Nap, Jan-Peter; Jansen, Ritsert C

    2007-07-18

    Many investigations have reported the successful mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression phenotypes (eQTLs). Local eQTLs, where expression phenotypes map to the genes themselves, are of especially great interest, because they are direct candidates for previously mapped physiological QTLs. Here we show that many mapped local eQTLs in genetical genomics experiments do not reflect actual expression differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in cis-acting factors changing mRNA levels. Instead they indicate hybridization differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in the mRNA region that is targeted by the microarray probes. Many such polymorphisms can be detected by a sensitive and novel statistical approach that takes the individual probe signals into account. Applying this approach to recent mouse and human eQTL data, we demonstrate that indeed many local eQTLs are falsely reported as "cis-acting" or "cis" and can be successfully detected and eliminated with this approach.

  10. cisExpress: motif detection in DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Triska, Martin; Grocutt, David; Southern, James; Murphy, Denis J.; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: One of the major challenges for contemporary bioinformatics is the analysis and accurate annotation of genomic datasets to enable extraction of useful information about the functional role of DNA sequences. This article describes a novel genome-wide statistical approach to the detection of specific DNA sequence motifs based on similarities between the promoters of similarly expressed genes. This new tool, cisExpress, is especially designed for use with large datasets, such as those generated by publicly accessible whole genome and transcriptome projects. cisExpress uses a task farming algorithm to exploit all available computational cores within a shared memory node. We demonstrate the robust nature and validity of the proposed method. It is applicable for use with a wide range of genomic databases for any species of interest. Availability: cisExpress is available at www.cisexpress.org. Contact: tatiana.tatarinova@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23793750

  11. The role of cis-carotenoids in abscisic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Parry, A D; Babiano, M J; Horgan, R

    1990-08-01

    Evidence has been obtained which is consistent with 9'-cis-neoxanthin being a major precursor of abscisic acid (ABA) in higher plants. A mild, rapid procedure was developed for the extraction and analysis of carotenoids from a range of tissues. Once purified the carotenoids were identified from their light-absorbance properties, reactions with dilute acid, high-performance liquid chromatography Rts, mass spectra and the quasiequilibria resulting from iodine-catalysed or chlorophyllsensitised photoisomerisation. Two possible ABA precursors, 9'-cis-neoxanthin and 9-cis-violaxanthin, were identified in extracts of light-grown and etiolated leaves (of Lycopersicon esculentum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Cicer arietinum, Zea mays, Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, Plantago lanceolata and Digitalis purpurea), and roots of light-grown and etiolated plants (Lycopersicon, Phaseolus and Zea). The 9,9'-di-cisisomer of violaxanthin was synthesised but its presence was not detected in any extracts. Levels of 9'-cis-neoxanthin and all-trans-violaxanthin were between 20- to 100-fold greater than those of ABA in light-grown leaves. The levels of 9-cis-violaxanthin were similar to those of ABA but unaffected by water stress. Etiolated Phaseolus leaves contained reduced amounts of carotenoids (15-20% compared with light-grown leaves) but retained the ability to synthesise large amounts of ABA. The amounts of ABA synthesised, measured as increases in ABA and its metabolites phaseic acid and dihydrophaseic acid, were closely matched by decreases in the levels of 9'-cis-neoxanthin and all-trans-violaxanthin. In etiolated seedlings grown on 50% D2O, deuterium incorporation into ABA was similar to that into the xanthophylls. Relative levels of carotenoids in roots and light-grown and etiolated leaves of the ABA-deficient mutants, notabilis, flacca and sitiens were the same as those found in wild-type tomato tissues.

  12. Using Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle in Chapter Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Eley, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    Student-led chapter presentations provide an excellent opportunity for instructors to evaluate a student's comprehension of the assigned chapter, as well as the student's ability to present and convey information in a public forum. Although several instructors realize the benefits of requiring students to complete chapter presentations either as…

  13. Student Chapters: Meeting Expectations and Providing High Quality Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Casey E.; Juengling, Lisa B.; Laurent, Rebekah D.; Pye, Nicole; Williamson, James

    2014-01-01

    Why do students join student chapters? What do they hope to gain from joining them? The Louisiana State University (LSU) chapter of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) conducted a research project that addresses these questions. The SAA-LSU chapter surveyed LIS students and recent graduates from the 61 ALA accredited LIS programs in the…

  14. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All…

  15. Evaluation of the Chapter 1 Guidance Program, 1992-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavros, Denny

    This report presents 1991-93 findings from 410 Chapter 1 elementary school students and a sample of 150 Chapter 1 high school students concerning the effectiveness of the Chapter 1 Guidance Program. Participating students were generally lacking in respectable academic performance, tended to misbehave, and had a history of poor attendance.…

  16. Chapter Innovators Guide, 2000: Models of Innovation Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National FFA Organization, Indianapolis, IN.

    This guide presents the Future Farmers of America (FFA) 2000 Model of Innovation award winners' projects. Chapters demonstrated abilities to identify goals and objectives, create a workable plan of action, attain and evaluate results, and identify items learned and ways to improve. Chapter 1 discusses the FFA National Chapter Award program that…

  17. Columbia: The Economic Foundation of Peace. Chapters 21-28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giugale, Marcelo M., Ed.; Lafourcade, Olivier, Ed.; Luff, Connie, Ed.

    This document contains 8 chapters of a 35-chapter book that presents a comprehensive diagnosis of current economic, social, and educational conditions in Colombia and their importance to development prospects and the quest for peace. The eight chapters covered here are part of a section titled "Sharing the Fruits of Growth with All…

  18. Isolation of cis-Zeatin from Corynebacterium fascians Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Scarbrough, Emanuel; Armstrong, Donald J.; Skoog, Folke; Frihart, Charles R.; Leonard, Nelson J.

    1973-01-01

    Three cytokinin-active constituents have been isolated from the culture medium of Corynebacterium fascians, a plant pathogen causing fasciation. One constituent is now identified as cis-zeatin [6-(4-hydroxy-3-methyl-cis-2-butenylamino)purine]. It represents the first unequivocal demonstration of the production of a zeatin isomer by a bacterial species. Another constituent was identified earlier as 6-(3-methyl-2-butenyl-amino)purine. The third constituent, distinct, on Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, from the above two and their ribosides, has not yet been identified. Images PMID:16592126

  19. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  20. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  1. Chapter 24: Psychosocial aspects of vaccine acceptability.

    PubMed

    Zimet, Gregory D; Liddon, Nicole; Rosenthal, Susan L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Allen, Betania

    2006-08-31

    In this chapter we identify psychosocial issues that have been raised with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and review the research literature on HPV vaccine acceptability. Many women and physicians have relatively poor knowledge about HPV, but despite this, most healthcare providers are willing to recommend HPV vaccination and parents are interested in having their children vaccinated. Concerns about post-vaccination sexual behavior change do not appear to be justified, but can certainly be addressed through anticipatory guidance. Most research studies have come out of the United States and other English-speaking industrialized countries. More psychosocial research regarding HPV vaccination is therefore needed from developing countries.

  2. Promoting the APS Chapter Program by sharing its history, best practices, and how-to guide for establishing new chapters.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Mari K

    2017-03-01

    Early establishment of physiological societies in Oklahoma and Ohio demonstrated the benefits of networking physiologists and paved the way for establishing the APS Chapter Program. Designed to promote the general objectives of the APS, the Chapter Program was officially launched in 1995, with Ohio being the first recognized chapter. There are 13 active chapters regularly engaged in numerous activities designed to advance physiology education and research. In the hopes that others will recognize the important offerings of state chapters and consider organizing one, the aims for this paper are to 1) share a brief history, 2) provide rationale for chapter initiation, and 3) describe the process involved in establishing a chapter. In light of current changes in American Medical Association and Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines, the present time may be critical in promoting chapters, as they play a vital role in sustaining recognition and support for the discipline. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Identification and characterization of promoters and cis-regulatory elements of genes involved in secondary metabolites production in hop (Humulus lupulus. L).

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Kocabek, Tomas; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    Molecular and biochemical studies have shown that gene contains single or combination of different cis-acting regulatory elements are actively controlling the transcriptional regulation of associated genes, downstream effects of these result in the modulation of various biological pathways such as biotic/abiotic stress responses, hormonal responses to growth and development processes and secondary metabolite production. Therefore, the identification of promoters and their cis-regulatory elements is one of intriguing area to study the dynamic complex regulatory network of genes activities by integrating computational, comparative, structural and functional genomics. Several bioinformatics servers or database have been established to predict the cis-acting elements present in the promoter region of target gene and their association with the expression profiles in the TFs. The aim of this study is to predict possible cis-acting regulatory elements that have putative role in the transcriptional regulation of a dynamic network of metabolite gene activities controlling prenylflavonoid and bitter acids biosynthesis in hop (Humulus lupulus). Recent release of hop draft genome enabled us to predict the possible cis-acting regulatory elements by extracting 2kbp of 5' regulatory regions of genes important for lupulin metabolome biosynthesis, using Plant CARE, PLACE and Genomatix Matinspector professional databases. The result reveals the plausible role of cis-acting regulatory elements in the regulation of gene expression primarily involved in lupulin metabolome biosynthesis including under various stress conditions.

  4. Methods of assessing responses of trees, stands, and ecosystems to air pollution (Chapter 7). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, K.W.; Duriscoe, D.M.; Cook, E.R.; Cline, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The chapter focuses on three main types of assessments of pollution effects used in the case studies chronicled in Chapter 8 through 12 (Regional Studies of conifer forests in the west). These are measures of crown condition of individual trees; impacts on populations and communities; and temporal patterns in radial growth. The concepts behind the development of each approach are introduced with references to previous work, leading to a discussion of the state of science. The importance of quality assurance techniques to the success of any assessment of air pollution effects is also discussed.

  5. A fast photoswitch for minimally perturbed peptides: investigation of the trans-->cis photoisomerization of N-methylthioacetamide.

    PubMed

    Helbing, Jan; Bregy, Harald; Bredenbeck, Jens; Pfister, Rolf; Hamm, Peter; Huber, Robert; Wachtveitl, Josef; De Vico, Luca; Olivucci, Massimo

    2004-07-21

    Thio amino acids can be integrated into the backbone of peptides without significantly perturbing their structure. In this contribution we use ultrafast infrared and visible spectroscopy as well as state-of-the-art ab initio computations to investigate the photoisomerization of the trans form of N-methylthioacetamide (NMTAA) as a model conformational photoswitch. Following the S2 excitation of trans-NMTAA in water, the return of the molecule into the trans ground state and the formation of the cis isomer is observed on a dual time scale, with a fast component of 8-9 ps and a slow time constant of approximately 250 ps. On both time scales the probability of isomerization to the cis form is found to be 30-40%, independently of excitation wavelength. Ab initio CASPT2//CASSCF photochemical reaction path calculations indicate that, in vacuo, the trans-->cis isomerization event takes place on the S1 and/or T1 triplet potential energy surfaces and is controlled by very small energy barriers, in agreement with the experimentally observed picosecond time scale. Furthermore, the calculations identify one S2/S1 and four nearly isoenergetic S1/S0 conical intersection decay channels. In line with the observed isomerization probability, only one of the S1/S0 conical intersections yields the cis conformation upon S1-->S0 decay. A substantially equivalent excited-state relaxation results from four T1/S0 intersystem crossing points.

  6. Promoting the APS Chapter Program by Sharing Its History, Best Practices, and How-to Guide for Establishing New Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Mari K.

    2017-01-01

    Early establishment of physiological societies in Oklahoma and Ohio demonstrated the benefits of networking physiologists and paved the way for establishing the APS Chapter Program. Designed to promote the general objectives of the APS, the Chapter Program was officially launched in 1995, with Ohio being the first recognized chapter. There are 13…

  7. Promoting the APS Chapter Program by Sharing Its History, Best Practices, and How-to Guide for Establishing New Chapters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Mari K.

    2017-01-01

    Early establishment of physiological societies in Oklahoma and Ohio demonstrated the benefits of networking physiologists and paved the way for establishing the APS Chapter Program. Designed to promote the general objectives of the APS, the Chapter Program was officially launched in 1995, with Ohio being the first recognized chapter. There are 13…

  8. Chapter 44: history of neurology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter starts from the Renaissance (although the origins of Italian neurology can be traced back to the Middle Ages), when treatises of nervous system physiopathology still followed Hippocratic and Galenic "humoral" theories. In Italy, as elsewhere in Europe, the concepts of humoral pathology were abandoned in the 18th century, when neurology was influenced by novel trends. Neurology acquired the status of clinical discipline (as "clinic of mental diseases") after national reunification (declared in 1861 but completed much later). At the end of the 19th and first decades of the 20th century, eminent Italian "neuropsychiatrists" (including, among many others, Ugo Cerletti, who introduced electroconvulsive shock therapy in 1938) stimulated novel knowledge and approaches, "centers of excellence" flourished, and "Neurological Institutes" were founded. In the first half of the 20th century, the history of Italian neurology was dominated by World Wars I and II (which stimulated studies on the wounded) and the fascist regime in-between the Wars (when the flow of information was instead very limited). Italy became a republic in 1946, and modern neurology and its distinction from psychiatry were finally promoted. The chapter also provides detailed accounts of scientific societies and journals dedicated to the neurological sciences in Italy.

  9. Universal Sensor and Actuator Requirements. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Taylor; Webster, John; Garg, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    The previous chapters have focused on the requirements for sensors and actuators for "More Intelligent Gas Turbine Engines" from the perspective of performance and operating environment. Even if a technology is available, which meets these performance requirements, there are still various hurdles to be overcome for the technology to transition into a real engine. Such requirements relate to TRL (Technology Readiness Level), durability, reliability, volume, weight, cost, etc. This chapter provides an overview of such universal requirements which any sensor or actuator technology will have to meet before it can be implemented on a product. The objective here is to help educate the researchers or technology developers on the extensive process that the technology has to go through beyond just meeting performance requirements. The hope is that such knowledge will help the technology developers as well as decision makers to prevent wasteful investment in developing solutions to performance requirements, which have no potential to meet the "universal" requirements. These "universal" requirements can be divided into 2 broad areas: 1) Technology value proposition; and 2) Technology maturation. These requirements are briefly discussed in the following.

  10. Chapter 9. Benefits of International Collaboration | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this chapter, we share what we have learned from working with our Brazilian colleagues on a multi university, multiyear, and multi basin ecological assessment and how those experiences were transmitted more broadly. These lessons (each of which is described in subsequent paragraphs) included 1) learning about markedly different ecosystems; 2) values to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) of testing monitoring protocols in those ecosystems; 3) applying lessons from the CEMIG (Companhia Energética de Minas Gerais) project to research on other continents and elsewhere in Brazil; 4) advantages of academic team research; 5) benefits of corporate-sponsored research and federal student scholarships; 6) communicating with the general public; 7) the research web that has developed out of our work in Brazil; and 8) experiencing Brazilian culture. The USEPA’s NARS survey designs and field methods are being applied in large basin stream surveys in countries outside of the U.S. These applications not only provide valuable tests of the NARS approaches, but enhance International cooperation and generate new understandings of natural and anthropogenic controls on biota and physical habitat in streams. These understandings not only aid interpretation of the condition of streams in the regions surveyed, but also refine approaches for interpreting aquatic resource surveys elsewhere. In this book chapter, Robert Hughes and Philip Kaufmann describe th

  11. Volatile hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates: Chapter 12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates are among the most commonly occurring and widely distributed contaminants in the environment. This chapter presents a summary of the sources, transport, fate, and remediation of volatile fuel hydrocarbons and fuel additives in the environment. Much research has focused on the transport and transformation processes of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel oxygenates, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and methyl tert‐butyl ether, in groundwater following release from underground storage tanks. Natural attenuation from biodegradation limits the movement of these contaminants and has received considerable attention as an environmental restoration option. This chapter summarizes approaches to environmental restoration, including those that rely on natural attenuation, and also engineered or enhanced remediation. Researchers are increasingly combining several microbial and molecular-based methods to give a complete picture of biodegradation potential and occurrence at contaminated field sites. New insights into the fate of petroleum hydrocarbons and fuel additives have been gained by recent advances in analytical tools and approaches, including stable isotope fractionation, analysis of metabolic intermediates, and direct microbial evidence. However, development of long-term detailed monitoring programs is required to further develop conceptual models of natural attenuation and increase our understanding of the behavior of contaminant mixtures in the subsurface.

  12. Redundancy and the evolution of cis-regulatory element multiplicity.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Tiago; Azevedo, Ricardo B R

    2010-07-08

    The promoter regions of many genes contain multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor (TF). One possibility is that this multiplicity evolved through transitional forms showing redundant cis-regulation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we must disentangle the relative contributions of different evolutionary mechanisms to the evolution of binding site multiplicity. Here, we attempt to do this using a model of binding site evolution. Our model considers binding sequences and their interactions with TFs explicitly, and allows us to cast the evolution of gene networks into a neutral network framework. We then test some of the model's predictions using data from yeast. Analysis of the model suggested three candidate nonadaptive processes favoring the evolution of cis-regulatory element redundancy and multiplicity: neutral evolution in long promoters, recombination and TF promiscuity. We find that recombination rate is positively associated with binding site multiplicity in yeast. Our model also indicated that weak direct selection for multiplicity (partial redundancy) can play a major role in organisms with large populations. Our data suggest that selection for changes in gene expression level may have contributed to the evolution of multiple binding sites in yeast. We conclude that the evolution of cis-regulatory element redundancy and multiplicity is impacted by many aspects of the biology of an organism: both adaptive and nonadaptive processes, both changes in cis to binding sites and in trans to the TFs that interact with them, both the functional setting of the promoter and the population genetic context of the individuals carrying them.

  13. A cis-Regulatory Signature for Chordate Anterior Neuroectodermal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Christiaen, Lionel; Joly, Jean-Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking findings of comparative developmental genetics was that expression patterns of core transcription factors are extraordinarily conserved in bilaterians. However, it remains unclear whether cis-regulatory elements of their target genes also exhibit common signatures associated with conserved embryonic fields. To address this question, we focused on genes that are active in the anterior neuroectoderm and non-neural ectoderm of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Following the dissection of a prototypic anterior placodal enhancer, we searched all genomic conserved non-coding elements for duplicated motifs around genes showing anterior neuroectodermal expression. Strikingly, we identified an over-represented pentamer motif corresponding to the binding site of the homeodomain protein OTX, which plays a pivotal role in the anterior development of all bilaterian species. Using an in vivo reporter gene assay, we observed that 10 of 23 candidate cis-regulatory elements containing duplicated OTX motifs are active in the anterior neuroectoderm, thus showing that this cis-regulatory signature is predictive of neuroectodermal enhancers. These results show that a common cis-regulatory signature corresponding to K50-Paired homeodomain transcription factors is found in non-coding sequences flanking anterior neuroectodermal genes in chordate embryos. Thus, field-specific selector genes impose architectural constraints in the form of combinations of short tags on their target enhancers. This could account for the strong evolutionary conservation of the regulatory elements controlling field-specific selector genes responsible for body plan formation. PMID:20419150

  14. Team-based thin-film CIS research activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullal, Harin S.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the team-based thin-film copper indium diselenide (CIS) research activities. The CIS team was formed in December 1994 in Kona, Hawaii. Originally, the team had two working groups: the "Junction" and the "Absorber" groups. Currently, there are four working groups the Present Junction, New Junction, Substrate/Mo Impact, and the Transient Effect groups. We have completed extensive data compilation of CIS-based films and solar cells using various techniques such as Auger, photoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, secondary-ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, capacitance-voltage, light and dark current-voltage, and quantum efficiency. Studies are under way to understand the fundamental mechanisms that demonstrate a total-area, high efficiency of 17.7% in CuInGaSe2 devices using chemical-bath deposition (CBD) CdS. Alternate buffer layers are also being investigated to replace the CBD CdS. The impact of various Mo substrates from the various industrial partners has been investigated, and the results are reported. A study is under way to investigate the transient effects in encapsulated/laminated thin-film CIS-based devices.

  15. cis- and trans-Stilbenes: Chromatographic Separation and Photochemical Isomerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Samuel G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment that is to be performed midway in the first semester of an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory coinciding with the students' introduction to cis-trans isomerism in the study of alkenes. Discusses the apparatus, materials, experimental procedure, historical significance, and results. (CW)

  16. Creating a Collaborative Learning Community in the CIS Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of transforming a traditional university computer lab to create a collaborative learning community known as the CIS Sandbox, by remodeling a physical space and supporting it with a virtual presence through the use of social media tools. The discussion applies Selander's "designs for…

  17. cis- and trans-Stilbenes: Chromatographic Separation and Photochemical Isomerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Samuel G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment that is to be performed midway in the first semester of an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory coinciding with the students' introduction to cis-trans isomerism in the study of alkenes. Discusses the apparatus, materials, experimental procedure, historical significance, and results. (CW)

  18. Efficient direct ZnO/CIS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.C.; William Addis, F.; Lei, W.; Li, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes investigations of CIS solar cells with ZnO window layers deposited by MOCVD. These studies have been conducted with graded absorber CIS substrates obtained from Siemens Solar. Cell fabrication involves surface preparation of the Siemens substrate, growth of 200 to 400 A of undoped ZnO by MOCVD, deposition of a highly conducting ZnO top contact layer and deposition of a Ni/Ag collector grid. MOCVD growth of ZnO is accomplished in a SPIRE 500XT reactor by reacting a zinc adduct and tetrahydrofuran. Processing development has been conducted by forming test cells on ZnO/CIS structures by depositing thin, transparent Al contacts 2.8 mm in diameter on top of the ZnO window layer to serve as contacts. Several cells have been completed with a total area efficiency {ge}11.0{percent}, with the best result being 11.3{percent}. The best active area efficiency is approximately 12{percent}. Other topics discussed include current-voltage characteristics of direct ZnO/CIS cells. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Creating a Collaborative Learning Community in the CIS Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of transforming a traditional university computer lab to create a collaborative learning community known as the CIS Sandbox, by remodeling a physical space and supporting it with a virtual presence through the use of social media tools. The discussion applies Selander's "designs for…

  20. cis-parthenolid-9-one from Anvillea garcinii.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, E; McPhail, A T

    2000-11-01

    The cis-isomer (2) of the previously isolated parthenolid-9-one (1) was isolated from Anvillea garcinii and the structures and relative stereochemistries of both were determined from NMR data in combination with single-crystal X-ray analysis. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity for both compounds are reported.

  1. Peer Tutoring in the CIS Sandbox: Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a student-created and facilitated peer-tutoring activity to assist first-year students in preparing for their final exam in an introductory information technology course. Tutors at the CIS Sandbox, a collaborative learning lab at an American university, offered a series of "Crunch Sessions" to their peers. This…

  2. Trans-cis molecular photoswitching in interstellar space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Roncero, O.; Aguado, A.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2016-11-01

    As many organic molecules, formic acid (HCOOH) has two conformers (trans and cis). The energy barrier to internal conversion from trans to cis is much higher than the thermal energy available in molecular clouds. Thus, only the most stable conformer (trans) is expected to exist in detectable amounts. We report the first interstellar detection of cis-HCOOH. Its presence in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated gas exclusively (the Orion Bar photodissociation region), with a low trans-to-cis abundance ratio of 2.8 ± 1.0, supports a photoswitching mechanism: a given conformer absorbs a stellar photon that radiatively excites the molecule to electronic states above the interconversion barrier. Subsequent fluorescent decay leaves the molecule in a different conformer form. This mechanism, which we specifically study with ab initio quantum calculations, was not considered in Space before but likely induces structural changes of a variety of interstellar molecules submitted to UV radiation. This paper makes use of observations obtained with the IRAM-30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  3. Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)

    SciTech Connect

    John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

    2008-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not

  4. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (<13,000), in part because of an overrepresentation among the former in multiallelic tandem repeat variation, especially (AC)(n) dinucleotide microsatellites. The role of microsatellites in gene expression variation may provide a larger store of heritable phenotypic variation, and a more rapid mutational input of such variation, than has been realized. Finally, we outline the distinctive consequences of cis-regulatory variation for the genotype-phenotype relationship, including ubiquitous epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions, as well as underappreciated modes of pleiotropy and overdominance. Ordinary small-scale mutations contribute to pervasive variation in transcription rates and consequently to patterns of human phenotypic variation.

  5. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A

    2002-11-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (<13,000), in part because of an overrepresentation among the former in multiallelic tandem repeat variation, especially (AC)(n) dinucleotide microsatellites. The role of microsatellites in gene expression variation may provide a larger store of heritable phenotypic variation, and a more rapid mutational input of such variation, than has been realized. Finally, we outline the distinctive consequences of cis-regulatory variation for the genotype-phenotype relationship, including ubiquitous epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions, as well as underappreciated modes of pleiotropy and overdominance. Ordinary small-scale mutations contribute to pervasive variation in transcription rates and consequently to patterns of human phenotypic variation.

  6. Structural Brain Network Characteristics Can Differentiate CIS from Early RRMS

    PubMed Central

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Kolber, Pierre; Luessi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Groppa, Sergiu

    2016-01-01

    Focal demyelinated lesions, diffuse white matter (WM) damage, and gray matter (GM) atrophy influence directly the disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify specific characteristics of GM and WM structural networks in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in comparison to patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Twenty patients with CIS, 33 with RRMS, and 40 healthy subjects were investigated using 3 T-MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied, together with probabilistic tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps for WM and cortical thickness correlation analysis for GM, to determine the structural connectivity patterns. A network topology analysis with the aid of graph theoretical approaches was used to characterize the network at different community levels (modularity, clustering coefficient, global, and local efficiencies). Finally, we applied support vector machines (SVM) to automatically discriminate the two groups. In comparison to CIS subjects, patients with RRMS were found to have increased modular connectivity and higher local clustering, highlighting increased local processing in both GM and WM. Both groups presented increased modularity and clustering coefficients in comparison to healthy controls. SVM algorithms achieved 97% accuracy using the clustering coefficient as classifier derived from GM and 65% using WM from probabilistic tractography and 67% from modularity of FA maps to differentiate between CIS and RRMS patients. We demonstrate a clear increase of modular and local connectivity in patients with early RRMS in comparison to CIS and healthy subjects. Based only on a single anatomic scan and without a priori information, we developed an automated and investigator-independent paradigm that can accurately discriminate between patients with these clinically similar disease entities, and could thus complement the current dissemination-in-time criteria for

  7. The 11-cis Retinal Origins of Lipofuscin in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Adler, Leopold; Boyer, Nicholas P; Chen, Chunhe; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Crouch, Rosalie K; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2015-01-01

    Lipofuscin is a fluorescent mixture of partially digested proteins and lipids that accumulates with age in the lysosomal compartment of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye. Because it has been found to have significant cytotoxic potential, lipofuscin is thought to play a role in retinal degeneration diseases including age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease, a form of juvenile macular degeneration. The only known components of lipofuscin are bis-retinoids, the condensation products of two molecules of retinal. The bulk of lipofuscin is thought to originate in the rod photoreceptor outer segments as a by-product of reactions involving the retinal chromophore of rhodopsin. 11-cis retinal flows from the RPE into the rod outer segments, where it combines with opsin to form rhodopsin; all-trans retinal is released into the rod outer segments by photoactivated rhodopsin following its excitation by light. Both 11-cis and all-trans retinal can generate lipofuscin-like fluorophores and bis-retinoids when added to rod outer segment membranes. The levels of lipofuscin precursor fluorophores present in the outer segments of dark-adapted rods are similar in cyclic-light- and dark-reared mice, as are the levels of accumulated lipofuscin in the RPE. Because the retinol dehydrogenase enzyme present in rod outer segments can reduce all-trans but not 11-cis retinal, lipofuscin precursors are more likely to form from 11-cis than all-trans retinal, even under cyclic light conditions. Thus, 11-cis retinal may be the primary source of lipofuscin in the retina. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (<13,000), in part because of an overrepresentation among the former in multiallelic tandem repeat variation, especially (AC)(n) dinucleotide microsatellites. The role of microsatellites in gene expression variation may provide a larger store of heritable phenotypic variation, and a more rapid mutational input of such variation, than has been realized. Finally, we outline the distinctive consequences of cis-regulatory variation for the genotype-phenotype relationship, including ubiquitous epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions, as well as underappreciated modes of pleiotropy and overdominance. Ordinary small-scale mutations contribute to pervasive variation in transcription rates and consequently to patterns of human phenotypic variation.

  9. Materials for Liquid Propulsion Systems. Chapter 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halchak, John A.; Cannon, James L.; Brown, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Earth to orbit launch vehicles are propelled by rocket engines and motors, both liquid and solid. This chapter will discuss liquid engines. The heart of a launch vehicle is its engine. The remainder of the vehicle (with the notable exceptions of the payload and guidance system) is an aero structure to support the propellant tanks which provide the fuel and oxidizer to feed the engine or engines. The basic principle behind a rocket engine is straightforward. The engine is a means to convert potential thermochemical energy of one or more propellants into exhaust jet kinetic energy. Fuel and oxidizer are burned in a combustion chamber where they create hot gases under high pressure. These hot gases are allowed to expand through a nozzle. The molecules of hot gas are first constricted by the throat of the nozzle (de-Laval nozzle) which forces them to accelerate; then as the nozzle flares outwards, they expand and further accelerate. It is the mass of the combustion gases times their velocity, reacting against the walls of the combustion chamber and nozzle, which produce thrust according to Newton's third law: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. Solid rocket motors are cheaper to manufacture and offer good values for their cost. Liquid propellant engines offer higher performance, that is, they deliver greater thrust per unit weight of propellant burned. They also have a considerably higher thrust to weigh ratio. Since liquid rocket engines can be tested several times before flight, they have the capability to be more reliable, and their ability to shut down once started provides an extra margin of safety. Liquid propellant engines also can be designed with restart capability to provide orbital maneuvering capability. In some instances, liquid engines also can be designed to be reusable. On the solid side, hybrid solid motors also have been developed with the capability to stop and restart. Solid motors are covered in detail in chapter 11. Liquid

  10. Chapter 2: Stand-alone Applications - TOPCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables or TOPCAT is a graphical viewer for table data. It offers a variety of ways to work with data tables, including a browser for the cell data, viewers for information about table and column metadata, dataset visualization, and even analysis. We discuss a small subset of TOPCAT's functionalities in this chapter. TOPCAT was originally developed as part of the Starlink program in the United Kingdom. It is now maintained by AstroGrid. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public License. It is available for download and a version is included in the software distribution accompanying this book. TOPCAT is a GUI interface on top of the STIL library. A command line interface to this library, STILTS, described in Chapter 21 provides scriptable access to many of the capabilities described here. The purpose of this tutorial is to provide an overview of TOPCAT to the novice user. The best place to look for and learn about TOPCAT is the web page maintained by Mark B. Taylor. There, TOPCAT documentation is provided in HTML, PDF, via screen shots, etc. In this chapter we take the user through a few examples that give the general idea of how TOPCAT works. The majority of the functionality of TOPCAT is not included in this short tutorial. Our goal in this tutorial is to lead the reader through an exercise that would result in a publication quality figure (e.g. for a journal article). Specifically, we will use TOPCAT to show how the color-magnitude relation of a galaxy cluster compares to that of all galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (York et al. 2000). This diagnostic is used not only in cluster finding, but its linear fit can provide insight into the age and/or metallicity of the oldest galaxies in galaxy clusters (which are some of the oldest galaxies in the Universe). The data we need for this exercise are: 1) the entire spectroscopic galaxy catalog from the SDSS, with galaxy positions, galaxy

  11. Tamarix, hydrology and fluvial geomorphology: Chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auerbach, Daniel A.; Merritt, David M.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Sher, Anna A; Quigley, Martin F.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the impact of hydrology and fluvial geomorphology on the distribution and abundance of Tamarix as well as the reciprocal effects of Tamarix on hydrologic and geomorphic conditions. It examines whether flow-regime alteration favors Tamarix establishment over native species, and how Tamarix stands modify processes involved in the narrowing of river channels and the formation of floodplains. It begins with an overview of the basic geomorphic and hydrologic character of rivers in the western United States before analyzing how this setting has contributed to the regional success of Tamarix. It then considers the influence of Tamarix on the hydrogeomorphic form and function of rivers and concludes by discussing how a changing climate, vegetation management, and continued water-resource development affect the future role of Tamarix in these ecosystems.

  12. History of Artificial Gravity. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Gilles; Bukley, Angie; Paloski, William

    2006-01-01

    This chapter reviews the past and current projects on artificial gravity during space missions. The idea of a rotating wheel-like space station providing artificial gravity goes back in the writings of Tsiolkovsky, Noordung, and Wernher von Braun. Its most famous fictional representation is in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which also depicts spin-generated artificial gravity aboard a space station and a spaceship bound for Jupiter. The O Neill-type space colony provides another classic illustration of this technique. A more realistic approach to rotating the space station is to provide astronauts with a smaller centrifuge contained within a spacecraft. The astronauts would go into it for a workout, and get their gravity therapeutic dose for a certain period of time, daily or a few times a week. This simpler concept is current being tested during ground-based studies in several laboratories around the world.

  13. Mercury and halogens in coal: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolker, Allan; Quick, Jeffrey C.; Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.; Senior, Constance L.

    2014-01-01

    Apart from mercury itself, coal rank and halogen content are among the most important factors inherent in coal that determine the proportion of mercury captured by conventional controls during coal combustion. This chapter reviews how mercury in coal occurs, gives available concentration data for mercury in U.S. and international commercial coals, and provides an overview of the natural variation in halogens that influence mercury capture. Three databases, the U.S. Geological Survey coal quality (USGS COALQUAL) database for in-ground coals, and the 1999 and 2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Information Collection Request (ICR) databases for coals delivered to power stations, provide extensive results for mercury and other parameters that are compared in this chapter. In addition to the United States, detailed characterization of mercury is available on a nationwide basis for China, whose mean values in recent compilations are very similar to the United States in-ground mean of 0.17 ppm mercury. Available data for the next five largest producers (India, Australia, South Africa, the Russian Federation, and Indonesia) are more limited and with the possible exceptions of Australia and the Russian Federation, do not allow nationwide means for mercury in coal to be calculated. Chlorine in coal varies as a function of rank and correspondingly, depth of burial. As discussed elsewhere in this volume, on a proportional basis, bromine is more effective than chlorine in promoting mercury oxidation in flue gas and capture by conventional controls. The ratio of bromine to chlorine in coal is indicative of the proportion of halogens present in formation waters within a coal basin. This ratio is relatively constant except in coals that have interacted with deep-basin brines that have reached halite saturation, enriching residual fluids in bromine. Results presented here help optimize mercury capture by conventional controls and provide a starting point for

  14. Cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of acetylene: identification of cis-well vibrational levels.

    PubMed

    Merer, Anthony J; Steeves, Adam H; Baraban, Joshua H; Bechtel, Hans A; Field, Robert W

    2011-06-28

    A systematic analysis of the S(1)-trans (Ã(1)A(u)) state of acetylene, using IR-UV double resonance along with one-photon fluorescence excitation spectra, has allowed assignment of at least part of every single vibrational state or polyad up to a vibrational energy of 4200 cm(-1). Four observed vibrational levels remain unassigned, for which no place can be found in the level structure of the trans-well. The most prominent of these lies at 46 175 cm(-1). Its (13)C isotope shift, exceptionally long radiative lifetime, unexpected rotational selection rules, and lack of significant Zeeman effect, combined with the fact that no other singlet electronic states are expected at this energy, indicate that it is a vibrational level of the S(1)-cis isomer (Ã(1)A(2)). Guided by ab initio calculations [J. H. Baraban, A. R. Beck, A. H. Steeves, J. F. Stanton, and R. W. Field, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 244311 (2011)] of the cis-well vibrational frequencies, the vibrational assignments of these four levels can be established from their vibrational symmetries together with the (13)C isotope shift of the 46 175 cm(-1) level (assigned here as cis-3(1)6(1)). The S(1)-cis zero-point level is deduced to lie near 44 900 cm(-1), and the ν(6) vibrational frequency of the S(1)-cis well is found to be roughly 565 cm(-1); these values are in remarkably good agreement with the results of recent ab initio calculations. The 46 175 cm(-1) vibrational level is found to have a 3.9 cm(-1) staggering of its K-rotational structure as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the isomerization barrier. Such tunneling does not give rise to ammonia-type inversion doubling, because the cis and trans isomers are not equivalent; instead the odd-K rotational levels of a given vibrational level are systematically shifted relative to the even-K rotational levels, leading to a staggering of the K-structure. These various observations represent the first definite assignment of an isomer of

  15. Use of a Drosophila Genome-Wide Conserved Sequence Database to Identify Functionally Related cis-Regulatory Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Thomas; Yavatkar, Amarendra S; Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Tyson, Leonard J; Ross, Jermaine; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lee, Chi-Hon; Awasaki, Takeshi; Lee, Tzumin; Odenwald, Ward F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phylogenetic footprinting has revealed that cis-regulatory enhancers consist of conserved DNA sequence clusters (CSCs). Currently, there is no systematic approach for enhancer discovery and analysis that takes full-advantage of the sequence information within enhancer CSCs. Results: We have generated a Drosophila genome-wide database of conserved DNA consisting of >100,000 CSCs derived from EvoPrints spanning over 90% of the genome. cis-Decoder database search and alignment algorithms enable the discovery of functionally related enhancers. The program first identifies conserved repeat elements within an input enhancer and then searches the database for CSCs that score highly against the input CSC. Scoring is based on shared repeats as well as uniquely shared matches, and includes measures of the balance of shared elements, a diagnostic that has proven to be useful in predicting cis-regulatory function. To demonstrate the utility of these tools, a temporally-restricted CNS neuroblast enhancer was used to identify other functionally related enhancers and analyze their structural organization. Conclusions: cis-Decoder reveals that co-regulating enhancers consist of combinations of overlapping shared sequence elements, providing insights into the mode of integration of multiple regulating transcription factors. The database and accompanying algorithms should prove useful in the discovery and analysis of enhancers involved in any developmental process. Developmental Dynamics 241:169–189, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key findings A genome-wide catalog of Drosophila conserved DNA sequence clusters. cis-Decoder discovers functionally related enhancers. Functionally related enhancers share balanced sequence element copy numbers. Many enhancers function during multiple phases of development. PMID:22174086

  16. Expression-Guided In Silico Evaluation of Candidate Cis Regulatory Codes for Drosophila Muscle Founder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; He, Fangxue Sherry; Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M; Bulyk, Martha L

    2006-01-01

    While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed “CodeFinder”) that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors) is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested) new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells. PMID:16733548

  17. Secondary loss of a cis-spliced intron during the divergence of Giardia intestinalis assemblages.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2014-06-30

    Giardia intestinalis is a parasitic unicellular eukaryote with a highly reduced genome, in which only six cis-spliced and four trans-spliced introns have been discovered. However, we anticipate that more cis- and trans-spliced introns likely remain unidentified in genes encoding hypothetical proteins that occupy ca. 2/3 of all of the open reading frames (ORFs) in the Giardia genome. Consequently, comprehensive surveys of introns in ORFs for hypothetical proteins are critical for better understanding of the intron evolution in this organism. In this study, we identified two novel cis-spliced introns in the draft genome data of G. intestinalis strain WB, by surveying the conserved sequence motifs shared amongst the previously known introns. G. intestinalis strains can be divided into phylogenetically distinct assemblages A-H, and all the introns identified in past studies are shared among the published genome data from strains WB, DH, GS, and P15 representing assemblages A1, A2, B, and E, respectively. Nevertheless one of the two novel introns identified in this study was found to be absent in strain P15. By considering the organismal relationship among G. intestinalis assemblages A1, A2, B, and E, one of the two introns identified in this study has highly likely been lost after the divergence of the assemblages. On the basis of a sequence comparison between the intron-bearing loci in WB, DH, and GS genomes and the homologous but intron-free locus in P15 genome, we propose that the loss of this particular intron was mediated by integration of the DNA fragment reverse-transcribed from mature mRNAs.

  18. High-throughput discovery of post-transcriptional cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Wissink, Erin M; Fogarty, Elizabeth A; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-03-03

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation controls the amount of protein produced from an individual mRNA by altering rates of decay and translation. Many sequence elements that direct post-transcriptional regulation have been found; in mammals, most such elements are located within the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Comparative genomic studies demonstrate that mammalian 3'UTRs contain extensive conserved sequence tracts, yet only a small fraction corresponds to recognized elements, implying that many additional novel elements exist. Despite a variety of computational, molecular, and biochemical approaches, identifying functional 3'UTRs elements remains difficult. We created a high-throughput cell-based screen that enables identification of functional post-transcriptional 3'UTR regulatory elements. Our system exploits integrated single-copy reporters, which are expressed and processed as endogenous genes. We screened many thousands of short random sequences for their regulatory potential. Control sequences with known effects were captured effectively using our approach, establishing that our methodology was robust. We found hundreds of functional sequences, which we validated in traditional reporter assays, including verifying their regulatory impact in native sequence contexts. Although 3'UTRs are typically considered repressive, most of the functional elements were activating, including ones that were preferentially conserved. Additionally, we adapted our screening approach to examine the effect of elements on RNA abundance, revealing that most elements act by altering mRNA stability. We developed and used a high-throughput approach to discover hundreds of post-transcriptional cis-regulatory elements. These results imply that most human 3'UTRs contain many previously unrecognized cis-regulatory elements, many of which are activating, and that the post-transcriptional fate of an mRNA is largely due to the actions of many individual cis-regulatory elements within its

  19. Integrity in Student Affairs Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    "Integrity" is a term that is intuitively appealing, but hard to define and implement. This chapter discusses those conceptual complexities as well as an ideal portrait of organizations with integrity, a description of the challenges to the integrity of organizations, a discussion of the enhancement of integrity through compliance programs and…

  20. A cis-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five cis-regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Kelli F.; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2015-03-22

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the G564 upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globularstage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a cis-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved. Lastly, a homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the G564 ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.

  1. Different reaction mechanisms for cis- and trans-prenyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yenpin; Liu Hunge; Liang, P-H.

    2009-02-06

    Octaprenyl diphosphate synthase (OPPs) and undecaprenyl diphosphate synthases (UPPs) catalyze consecutive condensation reactions of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with 5 and 8 isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to generate C{sub 40} and C{sub 55} products with trans- and cis-double bonds, respectively. In this study, we used IPP analogue, 3-bromo-3-butenyl diphosphate (Br-IPP), in conjunction with radiolabeled FPP, to probe the reaction mechanisms of the two prenyltransferases. Using this alternative substrate with electron-withdrawing bromo group at the C3 position to slow down the condensation step, trapping of farnesol in the OPPs reaction from radiolabeled FPP under basic condition was observed, consistent with a sequential mechanism. In contrast, UPPs reaction yielded no farnesyl carbocation intermediate under the same condition with radiolabeled FPP and Br-IPP, indicating a concerted mechanism. Our data demonstrate the different reaction mechanisms for cis- and tran-prenyltransferases although they share the same substrates.

  2. DNA interaction with cis- and trans- isomers of photosensitive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between DNA and photosensitive cationic surfactant in a solution is studied. Studies were conducted to examine the impact of the surfactant in its cis- conformation on the size of DNA molecule and also to investigate the phase behavior of the system depending on DNA and surfactant concentration. We conclude that trans- isomer of surfactant requires its smaller concentration to reach the DNA compaction compared with cis- isomer received by UV radiation of solutions. Studies of DNA-surfactant systems were performed by means of spectrophotometry and viscometry. Variation of surfactant concentration enables us to determine the precipitation zone on phase diagram. From the viscosity study it can be indicated that precipitation zone is narrower for UV-radiated surfactant and it shifts to higher surfactant concentration. Also we examine the reversibility of DNA compaction in systems with the surfactant in its trans- form.

  3. Functional Evolution of a cis-Regulatory Module

    PubMed Central

    Palsson, Arnar; Alekseeva, Elena; Bergman, Casey M; Nathan, Janaki; Kreitman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Lack of knowledge about how regulatory regions evolve in relation to their structure–function may limit the utility of comparative sequence analysis in deciphering cis-regulatory sequences. To address this we applied reverse genetics to carry out a functional genetic complementation analysis of a eukaryotic cis-regulatory module—the even-skipped stripe 2 enhancer—from four Drosophila species. The evolution of this enhancer is non-clock-like, with important functional differences between closely related species and functional convergence between distantly related species. Functional divergence is attributable to differences in activation levels rather than spatiotemporal control of gene expression. Our findings have implications for understanding enhancer structure–function, mechanisms of speciation and computational identification of regulatory modules. PMID:15757364

  4. Quantitative functional interrelations within the cis-regulatory system of the S. purpuratus Endo16 gene.

    PubMed

    Yuh, C H; Moore, J G; Davidson, E H

    1996-12-01

    similar approach to analyze the repressive activity of the three Endo16 cis-regulatory modules that act negatively in controlling spatial expression. The evidence obtained confirms that the repressive modules act only by affecting the output of module A (C.-H. Yuh and E. Davidson (1996) Development 122, 1069-1082). A new hierarchical model of the cis-regulatory system was formulated in which module A plays a central integrating role, and which also implies specific functions for certain DNA-binding sites within the basal promoter fragment of the gene. Additional kinetic experiments were then carried out, and key aspects of the model were confirmed.

  5. Cis and Trans Cooperativity of E-Cadherin Mediates Adhesion in Biomimetic Lipid Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Jorjadze, Ivane; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of cell-cell adhesion is important in cell motility, tissue growth, and for the mechanical integrity of tissues. Although the role of active cytoskeleton dynamics in regulating cadherin interactions is crucial in vivo, here we present a biomimetic emulsion system to characterize the passive E-cadherin-mediated adhesion between droplets. The visualization of a three-dimensional assembly of lipid droplets, functionalized with extracellular E-cadherin domains, reveals a hierarchy of homophilic interactions. First, the high interfacial tension of droplets facilitates trans cadherin-cadherin adhesion, which is strong enough to stabilize looser than random close packing configurations. Second, fluorescence enhancement shows that adding clustering agents, such as calcium or chelating ligands, favor the lateral cis adhesion of the already bound cadherin pairs over the clustering of monomer cadherin on the surface. Finally, above a threshold cadherin and calcium concentration, the cis and trans protein interactions become strong enough to trigger and promote droplet fusion. While E-cadherin is not known to participate in cellular fusion, this mechanism is general because replacing calcium with cholesterol to cluster the cadherin-carrying lipids also promotes fusion. These results suggest that passive clustering, via calcium-induced dimerization or membrane ordering, may contribute to the reinforcement of cell-cell contacts. Alternatively, a molecular switch for fusion offers a route to mixing droplet contents and controlling their size in situ. PMID:26789762

  6. Near-UV absorption cross sections and trans/cis equilibrium of nitrous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Bongartz, A.; Kames, J.; Welter, F.; Schurath, U. )

    1991-02-07

    The A {sup 1}A{double prime} {l arrow} X {sup 1}A{prime} absorption spectrum of gaseous nitrous acid has been measured in the 300-400-nm range. Absolute cross sections were determined by a combination of gas-phase and wet chemical analysis. The cross sections of prominent bands are 25% larger than the recommended values of Stockwell and Calvert. The influence of spectral resolution on absolute and differential absorption cross sections was also investigated. The integrated band area of the n{pi}* transition yields an oscillator strength f = (8.90 {plus minus} 0.36) {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, less than the reported liquid phase value of 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. The equilibrium constant K = p{sub trans}/p{sub cis}, based on the assumption that the oscillator strength of the n{pi}* transition is the same for both rotamers, was found to be 3.25 {plus minus} 0.30 at 277 K. This yields an energy difference {Delta}E between trans- and cis-HONO of -2,700 J mol{sup {minus}1} in the electronic ground state, and -6,000 J mol{sup {minus}1} in the excited state.

  7. Numerical Prediction of Dust. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Benincasa, F.; Boucher, O.; Brooks, M.; Chen, J. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Gong, S.; Huneeus, N.; Jones, L; Lu, S.; Menut, L.; Mulcahy, J.; Nickovic, S.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Perez, C.; Reid, J. S.; Sekiyama, T. T.; Tanaka, T.; Terradellas, E.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Zhou, C.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Covers the whole breadth of mineral dust research, from a scientific perspective Presents interdisciplinary work including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies Explores the role of dust as a player and recorder of environmental change This volume presents state-of-the-art research about mineral dust, including results from field campaigns, satellite observations, laboratory studies, computer modelling and theoretical studies. Dust research is a new, dynamic and fast-growing area of science and due to its multiple roles in the Earth system, dust has become a fascinating topic for many scientific disciplines. Aspects of dust research covered in this book reach from timescales of minutes (as with dust devils, cloud processes, and radiation) to millennia (as with loess formation and oceanic sediments), making dust both a player and recorder of environmental change. The book is structured in four main parts that explore characteristics of dust, the global dust cycle, impacts of dust on the Earth system, and dust as a climate indicator. The chapters in these parts provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of this highly interdisciplinary subject. The contributions presented here cover dust from source to sink and describe all the processes dust particles undergo while travelling through the atmosphere. Chapters explore how dust is lifted and transported, how it affects radiation, clouds, regional circulations, precipitation and chemical processes in the atmosphere, and how it deteriorates air quality. The book explores how dust is removed from the atmosphere by gravitational settling, turbulence or precipitation, how iron contained in dust fertilizes terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and about the role that dust plays in human health. We learn how dust is observed, simulated using computer models and forecast. The book also details the role of dust deposits for climate reconstructions

  8. Chapter 24: Programmatic Interfaces - IDL VOlib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.

    In this chapter, we describe a library for working with the VO using IDL (the Interactive Data Language). IDL is a software environment for data analysis, visualization, and cross-platform application development. It has wide-usage in astronomy, including NASA (e.g. http://seadas.gsfc.nasa.gov/), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (http://www.sdss.org), and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph Instrument (http://ssc.spitzer.caltech.edu/archanaly/contributed/smart/). David Stern, the founder of Research Systems, Inc. (RSI), began the development of IDL while working with NASA's Mars Mariner 7 and 9 data at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado. In 1981, IDL was rewritten in assembly language and FORTRAN for VAX/VMS. IDL's usage has expanded over the last decade into the fields of medical imaging and engineering, among many others. IDL's programming style carries over much of this FORTRAN-legacy, and has a familiar feel to many astronomers who learned their trade using FORTRAN. The spread of IDL-usage amongst astronomers can in part be attributed to the wealth of publicly astronomical libraries. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) maintains a list of astronomy-related IDL libraries, including the well known Astronomy User's Library (hereafter ASTROLIB2). We will use some of these GSFC IDL libraries. We note that while IDL is a licensed-software product, the source code of user-written procedures are typically freely available to the community. To make the most out of this section as a reader, it is important that many of the data discovery, access, and analysis protocols are understood before reading this chapter. In the next section, we provide an overview of some of the NVO terminology with which the reader should be familiar. The IDL library discussed here is specifically for use with the Virtual Observatory and is named VOlib. IDL's VOlib is available at http://nvo.noao.edu and is included with the software distrubution for this

  9. History and Status of the CIS Customs Union

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, T.M.; Erickson, S.A.

    1999-08-31

    This report explores the history of the CIS Customs Union and the major obstacles the Union faces in its implementation. Investigation of the Customs Union is necessary as its implementation could effect the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Program. Russian Customs contends that radiation detectors should not be installed along the Customs Union members borders of as the borders will be dissolved when the Union is implemented.

  10. City of Troitsk and Sooty Snow, Chelyabinsk, CIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view shows the industrial pollution around the Siberian city of Troitsk (54.0N, 61.0E). Troitsk is the smallest of a group of three heavy industrial cities east of the Urals, the others being Magnitogorsk and Chelyabinsk. All have been cited as being some of the worst industrial polluted cities in the CIS. Despite being the smallest of the three, Troitsk has the largest area of soot blackened snow. Respiratory diseases among the citizens are chronic.

  11. Thermodynamic state ensemble models of cis-regulation.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Marc S; Cohen, Barak A

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in computational biology is to develop models that accurately predict a gene's expression from its surrounding regulatory DNA. Here we present one class of such models, thermodynamic state ensemble models. We describe the biochemical derivation of the thermodynamic framework in simple terms, and lay out the mathematical components that comprise each model. These components include (1) the possible states of a promoter, where a state is defined as a particular arrangement of transcription factors bound to a DNA promoter, (2) the binding constants that describe the affinity of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that occur in each state, and (3) whether each state is capable of transcribing. Using these components, we demonstrate how to compute a cis-regulatory function that encodes the probability of a promoter being active. Our intention is to provide enough detail so that readers with little background in thermodynamics can compose their own cis-regulatory functions. To facilitate this goal, we also describe a matrix form of the model that can be easily coded in any programming language. This formalism has great flexibility, which we show by illustrating how phenomena such as competition between transcription factors and cooperativity are readily incorporated into these models. Using this framework, we also demonstrate that Michaelis-like functions, another class of cis-regulatory models, are a subset of the thermodynamic framework with specific assumptions. By recasting Michaelis-like functions as thermodynamic functions, we emphasize the relationship between these models and delineate the specific circumstances representable by each approach. Application of thermodynamic state ensemble models is likely to be an important tool in unraveling the physical basis of combinatorial cis-regulation and in generating formalisms that accurately predict gene expression from DNA sequence.

  12. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  13. Proton irradiation of the CIS115 for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Holland, A. D.; Winstone, G. P.; Gow, J. P. D.; Stefanov, K.; Leese, M.

    2015-09-01

    The CIS115 is one of the latest CMOS Imaging Sensors designed by e2v technologies, with 1504x2000 pixels on a 7 μm pitch. Each pixel in the array is a pinned photodiode with a 4T architecture, achieving an average dark current of 22 electrons pixel-1 s-1 at 21°C measured in a front-faced device. The sensor aims for high optical sensitivity by utilising e2v's back-thinning and processing capabilities, providing a sensitive silicon thickness approximately 9 μm to 12 μm thick with a tuned anti-reflective coating. The sensor operates in a rolling shutter mode incorporating reset level subtraction resulting in a mean pixel readout noise of 4.25 electrons rms. The full well has been measured to be 34000 electrons in a previous study, resulting in a dynamic range of up to 8000. These performance characteristics have led to the CIS115 being chosen for JANUS, the high-resolution and wide-angle optical camera on the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE). The three year science phase of JUICE is in the harsh radiation environment of the Jovian magnetosphere, primarily studying Jupiter and its icy moons. Analysis of the expected radiation environment and shielding levels from the spacecraft and instrument design predict the End Of Life (EOL) displacement and ionising damage for the CIS115 to be equivalent to 1010 10 MeV protons cm-2 and 100 krad(Si) respectively. Dark current and image lag characterisation results following initial proton irradiations are presented, detailing the initial phase of space qualification of the CIS115. Results are compared to the pre-irradiation performance and the instrument specifications and further qualification plans are outlined.

  14. City of Troitsk and Sooty Snow, Chelyabinsk, CIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view shows the industrial pollution around the Siberian city of Troitsk (54.0N, 61.0E). Troitsk is the smallest of a group of three heavy industrial cities east of the Urals, the others being Magnitogorsk and Chelyabinsk. All have been cited as being some of the worst industrial polluted cities in the CIS. Despite being the smallest of the three, Troitsk has the largest area of soot blackened snow. Respiratory diseases among the citizens are chronic.

  15. Pesticide Registration Manual: Chapter 10 - Data Compensation Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter provides information about data compensation requirements, procedures, and obligations when submitting an application for registration, amended registration, reregistration or registration review.

  16. Dealing with Processing Chapter 10 Files from Multiple Vendors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudtson, Kevin Mark

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses the experiences of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's (DFRC) Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) in dealing with the problems encountered while performing post flight data processing using the WATR's data collection/processing system on Chapter 10 files from different Chapter 10 recorders. The transition to Chapter 10 recorders has brought Vvith it an assortment of issues that must be addressed: the ambiguities of language in the Chapter 10 standard, the unrealistic near-term expectations of the Chapter 10 standard, the incompatibility of data products generated from Chapter 10 recorders, and the unavailability of mature Chapter 10 applications. Some of these issues properly belong to the users of Chapter 10 recorders, some to the manufacturers, and some to the flight test community at large. The goal of this presentation is to share the WATR's lesson learned in processing data products from various Chapter 10 recorder vendors. The WATR could benefit greatly in the open forum Vvith lessons learned discussions with other members of the flight test community.

  17. Integrity in Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Banta, Trudy W.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for integrity in practice and theory has been part of the evolution of student personnel work all the way back to the turn of the 20th century. This chapter seeks to take stock of the question of integrity in relation to one of the core knowledge bases used by those engaged in student affairs work today--student development. The authors…

  18. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  19. CREME: Cis-Regulatory Module Explorer for the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Sharan, R; Ovcharenko, I; Ben-Hur, A

    2004-02-11

    The binding of transcription factors to specific regulatory sequence elements is a primary mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Eukaryotic genes are often regulated by several transcription factors, whose binding sites are tightly clustered and form cis-regulatory modules. In this paper we present a web-server, CREME, for identifying and visualizing cis-regulatory modules in the promoter regions of a given set of potentially co-regulated genes. CREME relies on a database of putative transcription factor binding sites that have been annotated across the human genome using a library of position weight matrices and evolutionary conservation with the mouse and rat genomes. A search algorithm is applied to this dataset to identify combinations of transcription factors whose binding sites tend to co-occur in close proximity in the promoter regions of the input gene set. The identified cis-regulatory modules are statistically scored and significant combinations are reported and graphically visualized. Our web-server is available at http://creme.dcode.org/.

  20. Cis-Active RNA Elements (CREs) and Picornavirus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Steil, Benjamin P.; Barton, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of picornavirus RNA replication has improved over the past 10 years, due in large part to the discovery of cis-active RNA elements (CREs) within picornavirus RNA genomes. CREs function as templates for the conversion of VPg, the Viral Protein of the genome, into VPgpUpUOH. These so called CREs are different from the previously recognized cis-active RNA sequences and structures within the 5′ and 3′ NTRs of picornavirus genomes. Two adenosine residues in the loop of the CRE RNA structures allow the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 3DPol to add two uridine residues to the tyrosine residue of VPg. Because VPg and/or VPgpUpUOH prime the initiation of viral RNA replication, the asymmetric replication of viral RNA could not be explained without an understanding of the viral RNA template involved in the conversion of VPg into VPgpUpUOH primers. We review the growing body of knowledge regarding picornavirus CREs and discuss how CRE RNAs work coordinately with viral replication proteins and other cis-active RNAs in the 5′ and 3′ NTRs during RNA replication. PMID:18773930

  1. Cis-Selective Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization with Ruthenium Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Keitz, Benjamin K.; Fedorov, Alexey; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Using a C-H activated, ruthenium-based metathesis catalyst, the cis selective ROMP of several monocyclic alkenes, as well as norbornene and oxanorbornene-type monomers is reported. The cis content of the isolated polymers depended heavily on monomer structure and temperature. By lowering the temperature, cis content as high as 96% could be obtained. PMID:22239675

  2. Synthetic trehalose esters of cis-alkene and diene α'-mycolic acids of Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Taher, Salam G; Muzael, Maged; Al Dulayymi, Juma'a R; Baird, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of an α'-mycolic acid of Mycobacterium smegmatis and other mycobacteria, containing a cis,cis-diene, and of the trehalose mono- and di-mycolates of this, and of a related α'-mycolic acid containing one cis-alkene, is reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Absorption of CIS Immigrants into Israeli Schools: A Semipermeable Enclave Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnik, Julia; Sabar, Naama; Shoham, Edna; Shapira, Rina

    2001-01-01

    Examined how immigrants from the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) assimilated into Israeli society and schools. Data from observations, interviews, and surveys indicated that educational policies and school arrangements, and CIS immigrants' high self-esteem, produced a semipermeable enclave. CIS students acquired the Hebrew language and…

  4. Absorption of CIS Immigrants into Israeli Schools: A Semipermeable Enclave Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnik, Julia; Sabar, Naama; Shoham, Edna; Shapira, Rina

    2001-01-01

    Examined how immigrants from the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) assimilated into Israeli society and schools. Data from observations, interviews, and surveys indicated that educational policies and school arrangements, and CIS immigrants' high self-esteem, produced a semipermeable enclave. CIS students acquired the Hebrew language and…

  5. cis-Verbenol: An aggregation pheromone for the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Miller; Jean P. Lafontaine

    1991-01-01

    cis-Verbenol increased catches of mail mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, to multiple-funnel traps baited with myrcene and exo-brevicomin. Cis-Verbenol had no effect on the response of males to traps baited with myrcene, exo-brevicomin and trans-verbenol. In contrast, cis-verbenol increased catches of female D. ...

  6. cis-platinum and ovarian carcinoma. In vitro chemosensitivity of cultured tumour cells from patients receiving high dose cis-platinum as first line treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. P.; Ford, C. H.; Newman, C. E.; Howell, A.

    1987-01-01

    A study on the in vitro sensitivity of tumour cells from patients with ovarian cancer has been carried out in parallel with a clinical study designed to evaluate the role of high-dose cis-platinum (CIS) as first-line chemotherapy. A total of 50 samples from 102 patients have been successfully cultured and screened for in vitro chemosensitivity to 7 drugs, including CIS. The malignant nature of cells growing in culture was confirmed using a combination of karyology, morphology and immunohistochemical staining with HMFG2. Tumours were graded as sensitive (less than 40% of control 3H-leucine incorporation), intermediate (41-60% of control) or resistant (greater than 61% of control) to CIS. Correlation of in vitro sensitivity to cis-platinum with clinical response to cis-platinum assessed using CT scan and second-look laparotomy, showed positive correlation in 9/11 (89%) patients (8 = S/S; 1 = R/R); positive correlation between in vitro sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard and clinical response was also found in 4/6 patients receiving cyclophosphamide (3 = S/S; 1 = R/R). All patients with sensitive tumours showed a clinical response to cis-platinum. Comparison of cis-platinum sensitivity with sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard and melphalan showed that some tumours were sensitive only to cis-platinum; resistance to cis-platinum and sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard/melphalan was an infrequent occurrence. Some tumours which were resistant to cis-platinum showed sensitivity to adriamycin and bleomycin, particularly those from untreated patients. Sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil and resistance to cis-platinum was found in approximately equal proportions of tumours in both the treated and untreated groups. PMID:3435704

  7. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  8. Microscopic functional anatomy: Integumentary system: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Ostrander, Gary K.

    2000-01-01

    Many of the features of the fish integument can only be observed microscopically. Because there are over 20,000 living fishes, mostly higher bony fishes (teleosts), a great diversity exists in the microscopic anatomy of the integument. This chapter presents several examples from varied taxonomic groups to illustrate the variation in morphological features. As in all vertebrate epidermis, the fundamental structural unit is the epithelial cell. This is the only constant feature, as a great diversity of cell types exists in the various fish taxa. Some of these include apocrine mucous cells and a variety of other secretory cells, ionocytes, sensory cells, and wandering cells such as leukocytes. The dermis consists essentially of two sets of collagen fibers arranged in opposing geodesic spirals around the body. The dermis of most fishes is divided into two major layers. The upper (outer) layer, the stratum spongiosum or stratum laxum, is a loose network of connective tissue, whereas the lower layer, the stratum compactum, is a dense layer consisting primarily of orthogonal collagen bands. There are also specialized dermal elements such as chromatophores scales, and fin rays.

  9. Chapter 3: Small Molecules and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    “Big” molecules such as proteins and genes still continue to capture the imagination of most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians. “Small” molecules, on the other hand, are the molecules that most biologists, biochemists and bioinformaticians prefer to ignore. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that small molecules such as amino acids, lipids and sugars play a far more important role in all aspects of disease etiology and disease treatment than we realized. This particular chapter focuses on an emerging field of bioinformatics called “chemical bioinformatics” – a discipline that has evolved to help address the blended chemical and molecular biological needs of toxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics, metabolomics and systems biology. In the following pages we will cover several topics related to chemical bioinformatics. First, a brief overview of some of the most important or useful chemical bioinformatic resources will be given. Second, a more detailed overview will be given on those particular resources that allow researchers to connect small molecules to diseases. This section will focus on describing a number of recently developed databases or knowledgebases that explicitly relate small molecules – either as the treatment, symptom or cause – to disease. Finally a short discussion will be provided on newly emerging software tools that exploit these databases as a means to discover new biomarkers or even new treatments for disease. PMID:23300405

  10. Carbon cycling in terrestrial environments: Chapter 17

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Yang; Huntington, Thomas G.; Osher, Laurie J.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Trumbore, Susan E.; Amundson, Ronald; Harden, Jennifer W.; McKnight, Diane M.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Aiken, George R.; Lyons, W. Berry; Aravena, Ramon O.; Baron, Jill S.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews a number of applications of isotopic techniques for the investigation of carbon cycling processes. Carbon dioxide (C02) is an important greenhouse gas. Its concentration in the atmosphere has increased from an estimated 270 ppm at the beginning of the industrial revolution to ∼ 360 ppm at present. Climatic conditions and atmospheric C02 concentration also influence isotopic discrimination during photosynthesis. Natural and anthropogenically induced variations in the carbon isotopic abundance can be exploited to investigate carbon transformations between pools on various time scales. It also discusses one of the isotopes of carbon, the 14C, that is produced in the atmosphere by interactions of cosmic-ray produced neutrons with stable isotopes of nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and carbon (C), and has a natural abundance in the atmosphere of ∼1 atom 14 C per 1012 atoms 12C. The most important factor affecting the measured 14C ages of soil organic matter is the rate of organic carbon cycling in soils. Differences in the dynamics of soil carbon among different soils or soil horizons will result in different soil organic 14C signatures. As a result, the deviation of the measured 14C age from the true age could differ significantly among different soils or soil horizons.

  11. Variations in pesticide tolerance: Chapter 16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, Christine M.; Semlitsch, Raymond D.; Lannoo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a number of amphibian populations have declined in recent years. The cause of these population declines has been difficult to establish because in some instances only a single species is declining while sympatric species are thriving. This chapter discusses the results of research that has been conducted to determine the degree of variation present in amphibians with respect to their response to insecticide exposure. The study assessed the degree of variation in response to an anthropogenic stressor among and within species of frogs in the family Ranidae, focusing on the variation in tolerance of tadpoles to the insecticide carbaryl. Carbaryl acts by inhibiting nervous system acetylcholinesterase, which is a common mode of action among insecticides; thus, carbaryl can serve as a model chemical with which to examine amphibian responses. The study also analyzed variation in a hierarchical fashion to identify where variation was the greatest: among nine ranid species, among populations within a single species, and within populations of southern leopard frogs.

  12. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-02-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  13. Three-Dimensional Imaging. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelso, R. M.; Delo, C.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with three-dimensional imaging of fluid flows. Although relatively young, this field of research has already yielded an enormous range of techniques. These vary widely in cost and complexity, with the cheapest light sheet systems being within the budgets of most laboratories, and the most expensive Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems available to a select few. Taking the view that the most likely systems to be developed are those using light sheets, the authors will relate their knowledge and experience of such systems. Other systems will be described briefly and references provided. Flows are inherently three-dimensional in structure; even those generated around nominally 2-D surface geometry. It is becoming increasingly apparent to scientists and engineers that the three-dimensionalities, both large and small scale, are important in terms of overall flow structure and species, momentum, and energy transport. Furthermore, we are accustomed to seeing the world in three dimensions, so it is natural that we should wish to view, measure and interpret flows in three-dimensions. Unfortunately, 3-D images do not lend themselves to convenient presentation on the printed page, and this task is one of the challenges facing us.

  14. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium's randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences.

  15. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L.; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium’s randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. Methods The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Results Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. Conclusion The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Practice Implications Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences. PMID:26855885

  16. PreCisIon: PREdiction of CIS-regulatory elements improved by gene’s positION

    PubMed Central

    Elati, Mohamed; Nicolle, Rémy; Junier, Ivan; Fernández, David; Fekih, Rim; Font, Julio; Képès, François

    2013-01-01

    Conventional approaches to predict transcriptional regulatory interactions usually rely on the definition of a shared motif sequence on the target genes of a transcription factor (TF). These efforts have been frustrated by the limited availability and accuracy of TF binding site motifs, usually represented as position-specific scoring matrices, which may match large numbers of sites and produce an unreliable list of target genes. To improve the prediction of binding sites, we propose to additionally use the unrelated knowledge of the genome layout. Indeed, it has been shown that co-regulated genes tend to be either neighbors or periodically spaced along the whole chromosome. This study demonstrates that respective gene positioning carries significant information. This novel type of information is combined with traditional sequence information by a machine learning algorithm called PreCisIon. To optimize this combination, PreCisIon builds a strong gene target classifier by adaptively combining weak classifiers based on either local binding sequence or global gene position. This strategy generically paves the way to the optimized incorporation of any future advances in gene target prediction based on local sequence, genome layout or on novel criteria. With the current state of the art, PreCisIon consistently improves methods based on sequence information only. This is shown by implementing a cross-validation analysis of the 20 major TFs from two phylogenetically remote model organisms. For Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, respectively, PreCisIon achieves on average an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 70 and 60%, a sensitivity of 80 and 70% and a specificity of 60 and 56%. The newly predicted gene targets are demonstrated to be functionally consistent with previously known targets, as assessed by analysis of Gene Ontology enrichment or of the relevant literature and databases. PMID:23241390

  17. Visual clustering analysis of CIS logs to inform creation of a user-configurable Web CIS interface.

    PubMed

    Senathirajah, Y; Bakken, S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for the study of clinical information system (CIS) logfiles joined with information in the clinical data warehouse. This method uses heatmap representations and clustering techniques to examine clinicians' viewing patterns of laboratory test results. The context of our application of these techniques is to inform the creation of a widget-based interface to the CIS. We address the rationale, feasibility, and usefulness of our method through examination of three hypotheses: 1) The frequency distribution of laboratory test viewing will follow a 'long tail' pattern, indicating that patterns are highly variable and supporting the rationale for a widget-based configurable system. 2) Patterns of laboratory testing viewing (by clinician, specialty, clinician/patient/day, and ICD-9-CM codes) can be distinguished by our methods. 3) The identified clusters will include more than 80% of the laboratory test elements found in 30 randomly selected patient records for one day. The data were plotted as heatmaps and clustered using hierarchical clustering software. Various parameters were tested to give the optimal clusters. All the hypotheses were supported. For Hypothesis 3, 91.4% of information elements in the records were covered by the generated clusters. Study findings support the rationale, feasibility, and usefulness of our methods to examine patterns of information access among clinicians and to inform the creation of widget-based interfaces. The results also contribute to our general understanding of clinicians' CIS use.

  18. Chapter 2 Formula: Evaluation Report 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Kristen M.

    Chapter 2 Formula provides federal funds to the states through the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) as amended by P.L. 100-297 in 1988. Chapter 2 funds can support one or more programs that do the following: meet the educational needs of students with special needs (at-risk and high-cost students); acquire curricular…

  19. Valley segments, stream reaches, and channel units [Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Peter A. Bisson; David R. Montgomery; John M. Buffington

    2006-01-01

    Valley segments, stream reaches, and channel units are three hierarchically nested subdivisions of the drainage network (Frissell et al. 1986), falling in size between landscapes and watersheds (see Chapter 1) and individual point measurements made along the stream network (Table 2.1; also see Chapters 3 and 4). These three subdivisions compose the habitat for large,...

  20. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  1. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  2. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2...

  3. Results of a Process for Improving Chapter 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billig, Shelley H.; And Others

    Between 1985 and 1988, the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Center developed, refined, and disseminated a research-based process for improving local compensatory education programs. Known as the Chapter 1 Improvement Process (CHIP), the effort combined knowledge from five research areas into a year-long,…

  4. Equity in School District Finances and Chapter 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazen, Shelley

    The extent and effects of inequities in Chapter 1 compensatory funding and the relationships between demographic, financial, and educational variables and state and local Chapter 1 policies are investigated. Multiple regression analysis is used to determine the relationships among dependent variables, which include expenditures and number of…

  5. Chapter 1 Support for Instructional Development, 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaemper, Jack; Morse, Kathy

    Six of the 39 Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' Chapter 1 participating schools, as part of the school-based budgeting process, allocated a portion of their Chapter 1 resource allocation for on-site intensive staff development activities. Three schools--Alamosa, Chaparral, and Duranes--agreed to utilize the time of a Support for…

  6. Chapter 5. Using Habitat Models for Habitat Mapping and Monitoring

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Timothy J. Mersmann; Gretchen G. Moisen; Kevin S. McKelvey; Christina D. Vojta

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides guidance for applying existing habitat models to map and monitor wildlife habitat. Chapter 2 addresses the use of conceptual models to create a solid foundation for selecting habitat attributes to monitor and to translate these attributes into quantifiable and reportable monitoring measures. Most wildlife species, however, require a complex suite...

  7. Transitional Chapter Books: Representations of African American Girlhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNair, Jonda C.; Brooks, Wanda M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a content analysis of nine transitional chapter books featuring African American females. Transitional chapter books are geared toward transitional readers--children in grades 2 through 4 who have outgrown predictable books and other types of easy readers but are not ready for more complex novels. The purpose of this study is…

  8. IRIG 106-07 Chapter 10 Programming Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    in the Chapter 10 header. Format 0 video data can be readily decoded with commonly available MPEG libraries such as the open source ffmpeg library...106 Chapter 10 releases. MPEG decoder libraries such as ffmpeg commonly take as input a 188 byte array of TS data. Due to the use of 16-bit words

  9. Implications of fire management on cultural resources [Chapter 9

    Treesearch

    Rebecca S. Timmons; Leonard deBano; Kevin C. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Previous chapters in this synthesis have identified the important fuel, weather, and fire relationships associated with damage to cultural resources (CR). They have also identified the types of effects commonly encountered in various fire situations and provided some guidance on how to recognize damages and minimize their occurrence. This chapter describes planning...

  10. Chapter 2: Optical Properties of the Water Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, D. A.; Collins, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this chapter, and in chapter 29, the basic inter-relationship between the flux of radiant energy through the water column and the fixation of carbon by the phytoplankton in the ocean through processes of photosynthesis or primary production will be discussed.

  11. Grand-Slam Strategies: Winning Tips for Cutting Chapter Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Melinda

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for more cost-effective college alumni chapter administration include better marketing and communications, regionally tailored periodicals, planning ahead, coordinating spring volunteer training with admissions travel, encouraging faculty participation, using mentors for program development, letting chapters pay expenses, and better use…

  12. Chapter 1 Support for Instructional Development, 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaemper, Jack; Morse, Kathy

    Six of the 39 Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' Chapter 1 participating schools, as part of the school-based budgeting process, allocated a portion of their Chapter 1 resource allocation for on-site intensive staff development activities. Three schools--Alamosa, Chaparral, and Duranes--agreed to utilize the time of a Support for…

  13. 48 CFR Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false B Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Appendixes B-E to Chapter 2 ...

  14. Introduction to MODIS Cloud Products. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven

    2006-01-01

    derived from heritage instruments. This chapter provides an overview of the MODIS Level-2 and -3 operational cloud products.

  15. Ecological consequences of manipulative parasites: chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kuris, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    phrases such as “may ultimately infl uence community structure” (Kiesecker and Blaustein 1999), yet few demonstrate ecological effects. Here, we consider the conditions under which manipulative parasites might have a substantial ecological effect in nature and highlight those for which evidence exists (see also Chapter 10).

  16. Annotation of cis-regulatory elements by identification, subclassification, and functional assessment of multispecies conserved sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Jim R.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Ventress, Nicki; Prabhakar, Shyam; Clark, Kevin; Anguita, Eduardo; De Gobbi, Marco; de Jong, Pieter; Rubin, Eddy; Higgs, Douglas R.

    2005-01-01

    An important step toward improving the annotation of the human genome is to identify cis-acting regulatory elements from primary DNA sequence. One approach is to compare sequences from multiple, divergent species. This approach distinguishes multispecies conserved sequences (MCS) in noncoding regions from more rapidly evolving neutral DNA. Here, we have analyzed a region of ≈238kb containing the human α globin cluster that was sequenced and/or annotated across the syntenic region in 22 species spanning 500 million years of evolution. Using a variety of bioinformatic approaches and correlating the results with many aspects of chromosome structure and function in this region, we were able to identify and evaluate the importance of 24 individual MCSs. This approach sensitively and accurately identified previously characterized regulatory elements but also discovered unidentified promoters, exons, splicing, and transcriptional regulatory elements. Together, these studies demonstrate an integrated approach by which to identify, subclassify, and predict the potential importance of MCSs. PMID:15998734

  17. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  18. Metal-organic frameworks from copper dimers with cis- and trans-1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and cis,cis-1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Hitoshi; Akita-Tanaka, Motoko; Inoue, Katsuya; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Hayao; Vilminot, Serge; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2007-07-23

    Single crystals of three coordination networks containing the Cu(2)(COO)(4) core bridged by cyclohexane have been hydrothermally prepared by the reaction of 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic (1,4-H(2)chdc) or 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylic (1,3,5-H(3)chtc) acid and Cu(NO(3))(2) x 6H(2)O. We report their characterizations by single-crystal X-ray structure determinations, IR spectroscopy, thermal analyses, and their magnetic properties. [Cu(2)(trans-1,4-chdc)(2)] (1) consists of 4 x 4 grids with the dimeric nodes connected by the trans-1,4-chdc, and these grids are then connected to each other by Cu-O bonds, resulting in a porous network (void volume of 130 Angstrom(3) per cell or 25%) with no solvent in its cavities. [Cu(2)(cis-1,4-chdc)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (2) consists of two-legged ladders where the dimer nodes are bridged by pairs of cis-1,4-chdc and the water molecules cap the ends of the Cu dimers. [Cu(2)(1,3,5-Hchtc)(2)] (3) displays 4 x 4 grids, but each dimeric node is connected to its neighbors within the same grid by Cu-O bonds to form a layered network which further makes hydrogen-bond interactions with its neighbors. 2 and 3 have compact structures without any space for solvents. IR and DT-TGA confirm the absence of water in the empty channels of 1, while IR shows the presence of both protonated and deprotonated carboxyl groups for 3. The magnetic properties of all three compounds are dominated by the strong Cu-Cu antiferromagnetic interaction resulting in singlet-triplet gaps of 450-500 K.

  19. Biological effects: Marine mammals and sea turtles (chapter 14). Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Haebler, R.

    1994-01-01

    All spills are different, varying in type and amount of oil spilled, species exposed, and geographic and atmospheric conditions. It is important to understand as much as possible about both the natural history and characteristics of various species and the specific effects oil has on wildlife. Doing so improves the ability to extrapolate from one spill to another and improves prediction of types and severity of effects to wildlife. This chapter presents an overview of the biological effects of oil on marine mammals and sea turtles.

  20. Integrated sensor bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutka, M. J.

    1994-03-01

    In this thesis an integrated sensor bus interface is presented. The proposed bus offers a number of interface procedures to enhance the system flexibility. It enables a 13-bit data exchange per message frame, automatic addressing, device clearing and resetting, and handling of service-request and polling procedures. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the existing data transmission technologies. It presents the most popular digital buses along with their application fields. Also other research activities on sensor buses are described. Chapter 2 deals with the requirements which have to be imposed on the desired sensor bus. It shows both communication and compatibility requirements. Chapter 3 introduces the proposed sensor bus. It presents the interface structure together with implemented bus procedures. The detailed description of the proposed sensor bus protocol is given in Chapter 4. It is divided into two parts; a logical layer description (i.e., sensor bus protocol) and a physical layer description (i.e., transmission medium and electrical characteristics). Chapter 5 deals with the compatibility issue. It investigates differences between typical processes used for sensors and digital circuits. Chapter 6 shows the design of a sensor bus interface prototype. In Chapter 7 the performance of the fabricated interface is discussed.

  1. Chapter 6: Fire damage of wood structures

    Treesearch

    B. Kukay; R.H. White; F. Woeste

    2012-01-01

    Depending on the severity, fire damage can compromise the structural integrity of wood structures such as buildings or residences. Fire damage of wood structures can incorporate several models that address (1) the type, cause, and spread of the fire, (2) the thermal gradients and fire-resistance ratings, and (3) the residual load capacity (Figure 6.1). If there is a...

  2. Enantioselective disruption of the endocrine system by Cis-Bifenthrin in the male mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Wang, Jiangcong; Pan, Xiuhong; Miao, Wenyu; Lin, Xiaojian; Wang, Linggang; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-07-01

    Bifenthrin (BF), as a chiral pyrethroid, is widely used to control field and household pests in China. At present, the commercial BF is a mixed compound containing cis isomers (cis-BF) including two enantiomers of 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF. In the present study, the two individual cis-BF enantiomers were separated by a preparative supercritical fluid chromatography. Then, four week-old adolescent male ICR mice were orally administered 1R-cis-BF and 1S-cis-BF separately daily for 3 weeks at doses of 0, 7.5 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively. Results showed that the transcription status of some genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and transport as well as testosterone (T) synthesis in the testes were influenced by cis-BF enantiomers. Especially, we observed that the transcription status of key genes on the pathway of T synthesis including cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P45017α)) were selectively altered in the testis of mice when treated with 1S-cis-BF, suggesting that it is the possible reason to explain why the lower serum T concentration in 1S-cis-BF treated group. Taken together, it concluded that both of the cis-BF enantiomers have the endocrine disruption activities, while 1S-cis-BF was higher than 1R-cis-BF in mice when exposed during the puberty. The data was helpful to understand the toxicity of cis-BF in mammals under enantiomeric level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Teratogenicity and transplacental pharmacokinetics of 13-cis-retinoic acid in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, C; Chari, S; Kromka, M; Staudner, H; Juhasz, L; Rudiger, H; Agnish, N

    1994-03-01

    No embryotoxic or teratogenic effects, considered to be treatment related, were observed in rabbits after daily oral doses of 3 mg/kg of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13-cis-RA) from Day 8 to Day 11 of gestation. In contrast, treatment with 15 mg/kg/day significantly increased the rate of fetal resorptions (22%) and 13 out of 68 surviving fetuses (16%) were malformed. Pharmacokinetic studies with both dosing regimens of 13-cis-RA in pregnant rabbits showed that on Day 11 of gestation, high concentrations of parent compound, 13-cis-RA, and its major metabolite, 13-cis-4-oxoRA, existed in maternal plasma. Much lower concentrations were found for all-trans-4-oxoRA and all-trans-RA. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of all-trans-RA following the 15 mg/kg/day dosing regimen of 13-cis-RA was only 1.2% that of parent compound 13-cis-RA. At this dose, embryo levels of 13-cis-RA, 13-cis-4-oxoRA, and all-trans-4-oxoRA were 2.5-, 4.7-, and 3.6-fold higher by AUC comparison (24-hr period of Day 11) compared with the dose of 3 mg/kg. However, embryo levels of all-trans-RA were virtually identical at both doses and were, in fact, somewhat lower than endogenous concentrations measured in untreated rabbit embryos. In contrast to mice, where isomerization from 13-cis- to all-trans-RA was suggested to be crucial for the teratogenic action of 13-cis-RA, we found that the teratogenic action of 13-cis-RA (15 mg/kg/day) in rabbits is characterized by increased whole embryo concentrations of 13-cis-RA, 13-cis-4-oxoRA, and all-trans-4-oxoRA, but not of all-trans-RA.

  4. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  5. Getting the Most from Pi Sigma Alpha Chapters: Exploring the Chapter Activity Grant Program and Its Multiplier Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The political science honor society, Pi Sigma Alpha, has chapters in nearly 700 institutions across the United States. The organization sponsors many programs that can contribute a great deal to students of political science; however, many students are unaware of these opportunities. This article encourages chapter advisors to make use of these…

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 15, The Real Number System, Chapter 16, Area, Volume, and Computation. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    Topics covered in the first chapter of Unit 8 of this SMSG series include square roots, operations with radicals, operations with real numbers, and the structure of the real number system. The second chapter deals with measurement of area (for rectangular regions, other polygons, and circles), volume and surface area, computation involving…

  7. Reinventing Chapter 1: Annual National Conference of State Chapter 1 Coordinators. Conference Presentations (September 20-23, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Compensatory Education Programs.

    This document provides the individual and panel presentations for the Annual National Conference of State Chapter 1 Coordinators concerning Compensatory Education Programs. Presentations and their authors are as follows: (1) "Chapter 1 and School Reform: An Overview" (Richard W. Riley); (2) "Systemic Reform and Educational…

  8. Chapter 9: Pedagogical Content Knowing for Model-Based Instruction in Physical Education and Future Directions for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Jacalyn L.; Metzler, Michael W.; Gurvitch, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to advance the concept of pedagogical content knowledge in a manner that would better align it with the integrative type of knowledge needed by teachers at all three stages (preservice teachers, induction teachers, and cooperating teachers), allowing them to use model-based instruction (MBI) most effectively in…

  9. Children's Art Carnival Creative Reading Program, 1988-89. E.C.I.A. Chapter 1. Evaluation Section Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrero, Frank; And Others

    The Chapter One Children's Art Carnival (C.A.C.) Creative Reading Program was designed to improve students' literacy skills through participation in creative arts activities integrated with instruction in reading and writing. Operating at sites in Manhattan, Queens, and the Bronx, the 1988-89 program served 334 students in second through fifth…

  10. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...

  11. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...

  12. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...

  13. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...

  14. 21 CFR 573.637 - Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methyl esters of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12-octadecadienoic acids). 573.637 Section 573.637 Food and Drugs FOOD AND... RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing...

  15. Alchornea cordifolia seed oil: A rich source of a new C20 epoxide, (+)cis-14,15-epoxy-cis-11-eicosenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, R; Plattner, R D; Spencer, G F

    1977-07-01

    A C20 homolog of vernolic acid has been found at the 50% level inAlchornea cordifolia, Euphorbiaceae, seed oil. This new acid, (+)cis-14,15-epoxy-cis-11-eicosenoic (alchornoic) acid, was isolated by high-pressure liquid chromotography and characterized by mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy, optical rotary dispersion, and ozonolysis-gas-chromotography.

  16. Nanoporous Materials in Atmosphere Revitalization. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Maldonado, J.; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Luna, Bernadette; Junaedi, Christian; Mulloth, Lila; Perry, Jay L.; Raptis, Raphael G.; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2012-01-01

    lowering cabin levels of CO2 and NH3 as well as reducing power requirements and increasing reliability. This chapter summarizes the challenges faced by ECLS system engineers in pursuing these goals, and the promising materials developments that may be part of the technical solution for challenges of crewed space exploration beyond LEO.

  17. Ca2+-Responsive cis-Elements in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Aliza; Kaplan, Boaz

    2007-01-01

    External physical and chemical stimuli are transduced via second messengers, following primary interaction with specific membrane or soluble receptors. Ca2+ is an important second messenger in plants as in other eukaryotes, mediating responses to numerous environmental stimuli and affecting a multitude of cellular processes including gene expression. However, there is yet very little information concerning the cis-elements that mediate Ca2+-responsive gene expression. In this article we discuss a recent investigation combining bioinformatics with experimental data, revealing DNA regulatory elements that convey specific cytosolic Ca2+ transients to the transcription machinery. PMID:19704800

  18. Deep conservation of cis-regulatory elements in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Maeso, Ignacio; Irimia, Manuel; Tena, Juan J.; Casares, Fernando; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Despite the vast morphological variation observed across phyla, animals share multiple basic developmental processes orchestrated by a common ancestral gene toolkit. These genes interact with each other building complex gene regulatory networks (GRNs), which are encoded in the genome by cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that serve as computational units of the network. Although GRN subcircuits involved in ancient developmental processes are expected to be at least partially conserved, identification of CREs that are conserved across phyla has remained elusive. Here, we review recent studies that revealed such deeply conserved CREs do exist, discuss the difficulties associated with their identification and describe new approaches that will facilitate this search. PMID:24218633

  19. cis-clerodane diterpenes from the liverwort Scapania ciliata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Zhu, Rong-Xiu; Wang, Song; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Lin, Zhao-Min; Li, Rui-Juan; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2013-09-01

    Chemical investigation of the Chinese liverwort Scapania ciliata led to the isolation of four new cis-clerodane lactones, named ciliatolides A-D (1-4, resp.), among which compound 1 was found to be a tetranorclerodanoid. Their structures were determined by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, and, in the case of compound 1, together with a single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The absolute configurations were established by analysis of the CD spectra and by quantum-chemical CD calculations. The cytotoxicities of compounds 1-4 were preliminarily tested against the PC3 and MCF-7 cell lines.

  20. Development of a novel prediction method of cis-elements to hypothesize collaborative functions of cis-element pairs in iron-deficient rice.

    PubMed

    Kakei, Yusuke; Ogo, Yuko; Itai, Reiko N; Kobayashi, Takanori; Yamakawa, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2013-09-22

    Cis-acting elements are essential genomic sequences that control gene expression. In higher eukaryotes, a series of cis-elements function cooperatively. However, further studies are required to examine the co-regulation of multiple cis-elements on a promoter. The aim of this study was to propose a model of cis-element networks that cooperatively regulate gene expression in rice under iron (Fe) deficiency. We developed a novel clustering-free method, microarray-associated motif analyzer (MAMA), to predict novel cis-acting elements based on weighted sequence similarities and gene expression profiles in microarray analyses. Simulation of gene expression was performed using a support vector machine and based on the presence of predicted motifs and motif pairs. The accuracy of simulated gene expression was used to evaluate the quality of prediction and to optimize the parameters used in this method. Based on sequences of Oryza sativa genes upregulated by Fe deficiency, MAMA returned experimentally identified cis-elements responsible for Fe deficiency in O. sativa. When this method was applied to O. sativa subjected to zinc deficiency and Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to salt stress, several novel candidate cis-acting elements that overlap with known cis-acting elements, such as ZDRE, ABRE, and DRE, were identified. After optimization, MAMA accurately simulated more than 87% of gene expression. Predicted motifs strongly co-localized in the upstream regions of regulated genes and sequences around transcription start sites. Furthermore, in many cases, the separation (in bp) between co-localized motifs was conserved, suggesting that predicted motifs and the separation between them were important in the co-regulation of gene expression. Our results are suggestive of a typical sequence model for Fe deficiency-responsive promoters and some strong candidate cis-elements that function cooperatively with known cis-elements.

  1. Annual Report of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program: Fiscal Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Terraqua, Inc.

    2009-07-20

    This document was created as an annual report detailing the accomplishments of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP) in the Upper Columbia Basin in fiscal year 2008. The report consists of sub-chapters that reflect the various components of the program. Chapter 1 presents a report on programmatic coordination and accomplishments, and Chapters 2 through 4 provide a review of how ISEMP has progressed during the 2008 fiscal year in each of the pilot project subbasins: the John Day (Chapter 2), Wenatchee/Entiat (Chapter 3) and Salmon River (Chapter 4). Chapter 5 presents a report on the data management accomplishments in 2008.

  2. Latex Clearing Protein—an Oxygenase Cleaving Poly(cis-1,4-Isoprene) Rubber at the cis Double Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Böse, Dietrich; Oetermann, Sylvia; Eggers, Jessica; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, a potent rubber-degrading actinomycete, harbors two latex clearing proteins (Lcps), which are known to be essential for the microbial degradation of rubber. However, biochemical information on the exact role of this protein in the degradation of polyisoprene was lacking. In this study, the gene encoding Lcp1VH2 was heterologously expressed in strains of Escherichia coli, the corresponding protein was purified, and its role in rubber degradation was examined by measurement of oxygen consumption as well as by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. It turned out that active Lcp1VH2 is a monomer and is responsible for the oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) in synthetic as well as in natural rubber by the addition of oxygen (O2) to the cis double bonds. The resulting oligomers possess repetitive isoprene units with aldehyde (CHO-CH2—) and ketone (—CH2-CO-CH3) functional groups at the termini. Two fractions with average isoprene contents of 18 and 10, respectively, were isolated, thus indicating an endocleavage mechanism. The activity of Lcp1VH2 was determined by applying a polarographic assay. Alkenes, acyclic terpenes, or other rubber-like polymers, such as poly(cis-1,4-butadiene) or poly(trans-1,4-isoprene), are not oxidatively cleaved by Lcp1VH2. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme are at pH 7 and 30°C, respectively. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that active Lcp1VH2 is a Cu(II)-containing oxygenase that exhibits a conserved domain of unknown function which cannot be detected in any other hitherto-characterized enzyme. The results presented here indicate that this domain might represent a new protein family of oxygenases. PMID:24928880

  3. Latex clearing protein-an oxygenase cleaving poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) rubber at the cis double bonds.

    PubMed

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Böse, Dietrich; Oetermann, Sylvia; Eggers, Jessica; Pietruszka, Jörg; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, a potent rubber-degrading actinomycete, harbors two latex clearing proteins (Lcps), which are known to be essential for the microbial degradation of rubber. However, biochemical information on the exact role of this protein in the degradation of polyisoprene was lacking. In this study, the gene encoding Lcp1VH2 was heterologously expressed in strains of Escherichia coli, the corresponding protein was purified, and its role in rubber degradation was examined by measurement of oxygen consumption as well as by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. It turned out that active Lcp1VH2 is a monomer and is responsible for the oxidative cleavage of poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) in synthetic as well as in natural rubber by the addition of oxygen (O2) to the cis double bonds. The resulting oligomers possess repetitive isoprene units with aldehyde (CHO-CH2-) and ketone (-CH2-CO-CH3) functional groups at the termini. Two fractions with average isoprene contents of 18 and 10, respectively, were isolated, thus indicating an endocleavage mechanism. The activity of Lcp1VH2 was determined by applying a polarographic assay. Alkenes, acyclic terpenes, or other rubber-like polymers, such as poly(cis-1,4-butadiene) or poly(trans-1,4-isoprene), are not oxidatively cleaved by Lcp1VH2. The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme are at pH 7 and 30°C, respectively. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that active Lcp1VH2 is a Cu(II)-containing oxygenase that exhibits a conserved domain of unknown function which cannot be detected in any other hitherto-characterized enzyme. The results presented here indicate that this domain might represent a new protein family of oxygenases.

  4. The retina visual cycle is driven by cis retinol oxidation in the outer segments of cones.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinya; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate rod and cone photoreceptors require continuous supply of chromophore for regenerating their visual pigments after photoactivation. Cones, which mediate our daytime vision, demand a particularly rapid supply of 11-cis retinal chromophore in order to maintain their function in bright light. An important contribution to this process is thought to be the chromophore precursor 11-cis retinol, which is supplied to cones from Müller cells in the retina and subsequently oxidized to 11-cis retinal as part of the retina visual cycle. However, the molecular identity of the cis retinol oxidase in cones remains unclear. Here, as a first step in characterizing this enzymatic reaction, we sought to determine the subcellular localization of this activity in salamander red cones. We found that the onset of dark adaptation of isolated salamander red cones was substantially faster when exposing directly their outer vs. their inner segment to 9-cis retinol, an analogue of 11-cis retinol. In contrast, this difference was not observed when treating the outer vs. inner segment with 9-cis retinal, a chromophore analogue which can directly support pigment regeneration. These results suggest, surprisingly, that the cis-retinol oxidation occurs in the outer segments of cone photoreceptors. Confirming this notion, pigment regeneration with exogenously added 9-cis retinol was directly observed in the truncated outer segments of cones, but not in rods. We conclude that the enzymatic machinery required for the oxidation of recycled cis retinol as part of the retina visual cycle is present in the outer segments of cones.

  5. Sequence Polymorphisms Cause Many False cis eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Li, Yang; Breitling, Rainer; Nap, Jan-Peter; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2007-01-01

    Many investigations have reported the successful mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression phenotypes (eQTLs). Local eQTLs, where expression phenotypes map to the genes themselves, are of especially great interest, because they are direct candidates for previously mapped physiological QTLs. Here we show that many mapped local eQTLs in genetical genomics experiments do not reflect actual expression differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in cis-acting factors changing mRNA levels. Instead they indicate hybridization differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in the mRNA region that is targeted by the microarray probes. Many such polymorphisms can be detected by a sensitive and novel statistical approach that takes the individual probe signals into account. Applying this approach to recent mouse and human eQTL data, we demonstrate that indeed many local eQTLs are falsely reported as “cis-acting” or “cis” and can be successfully detected and eliminated with this approach. PMID:17637838

  6. Theoretical study of trans-cis photoisomerism in polymethine cyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momicchioli, Fabio; Baraldi, Ivan; Berthier, Gaston

    1988-06-01

    The trans-cis photoisomerism of polymethine dyes has been interpreted so far using different and rather inconsistent models of the potential energy surfaces. In order to search for a unified electronic model, we tackled the problem again from an intramolecular point of view. Our study consisted in qualitative MO considerations followed by explicit (CS INDO) calculations of the S 0, T 1 and S 1 potential energy curves for a proper model system: pentamethine cyanine isomerizing around the 2-3 and 3-4 bonds. Torsional energy levels for the calculated potential curves were also obtained. The main conclusions are: (i) the photoreaction proceeds through a "non-spectroscopic" (perp) S 1 minimum which exists also in the isolated molecule, (ii) this twisted excited species has charge transfer character (TICT), as opposed to the biradicaloid character of the "non-spectroscopic" S 1 minimum involved in the trans→cis photoisomerization of olefines (e.g., stilbene). The possible consequences on the dynamics of the excited state relaxation in non-polar solvents are envisaged.

  7. Phase transitions in chlorobenzene-cis-decalin mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansingh, Abhai; Agarwal, C. B.; Singh, Ramadhar

    1980-01-01

    The dielectric constant ɛ' and loss tangent tan δ of chlorobenzene-cis-decalin mixtures have been measured in the temperature range 77 K to 330 K and frequency range 0.1 to 100 kHz. On cooling, ɛ' increases with decreasing temperature upto about 135 K, after which it drops rapidly with decreasing T followed by a slow decrease. This indicates that the liquid mixture goes to an amorphous phase which transforms to a glass phase of restricted dipole rotation below T g; however, the peak in ɛ' is due to relaxation in the amorphous phase (α relaxation) and does not give an exact T g. On heating, the behaviour of the cooling curve is retraced upto 160 K, after which ɛ' drops suddenly to a value lower than that at 77 K in the glass phase. This indicates the transition to a crystalline phase in which dipole rotational freedom is completely lost. The crystalline phase changes to a eutectic liquid phase of high ɛ' at a temperature (200 K) lower than the melting point of chlorobenzene and cis-decalin. Dielectric dispersion is observed only in the glass and amorphous phases. The dielectric relaxation time is independent of the concentration of chlorobenzene.

  8. Active Ageing in CIS Countries: Semantics, Challenges, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Alexandre; Zaidi, Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Although the CIS countries are connected together by the legacy of breaking away from the Soviet Union, they have had a distinctive transition course and are rather diverse in terms of the population ageing challenges and policy responses in place. The commonality is that a comprehensive national strategy on ageing is lacking, and many of necessary reforms were put aside owing to political uncertainties, lack of societal consensus, and financial instability. The notion of active ageing is associated with the term “accelerated ageing,” which is understood to be an individual living a life under harsh living conditions or a society experiencing rapid increases in the relative number of older persons, and therefore it carries a negative connotation. Yet, in the same spirit as the European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations 2012, the CIS countries have initiated sectoral programmes towards enhancing employment of older workers, social participation of older people in the society in a wider sense and also measures promoting health and independent living of older persons. PMID:23346109

  9. The cis-regulatory code of Hox function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Sebastian; Ha, Nati; Polychronidou, Maria; Friedrich, Jana; Bezdan, Daniela; Kaspar, Petra; Schaefer, Martin H; Ossowski, Stephan; Henz, Stefan R; Mundorf, Juliane; Rätzer, Jenny; Papagiannouli, Fani; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Precise gene expression is a fundamental aspect of organismal function and depends on the combinatorial interplay of transcription factors (TFs) with cis-regulatory DNA elements. While much is known about TF function in general, our understanding of their cell type-specific activities is still poor. To address how widely expressed transcriptional regulators modulate downstream gene activity with high cellular specificity, we have identified binding regions for the Hox TF Deformed (Dfd) in the Drosophila genome. Our analysis of architectural features within Hox cis-regulatory response elements (HREs) shows that HRE structure is essential for cell type-specific gene expression. We also find that Dfd and Ultrabithorax (Ubx), another Hox TF specifying different morphological traits, interact with non-overlapping regions in vivo, despite their similar DNA binding preferences. While Dfd and Ubx HREs exhibit comparable design principles, their motif compositions and motif-pair associations are distinct, explaining the highly selective interaction of these Hox proteins with the regulatory environment. Thus, our results uncover the regulatory code imprinted in Hox enhancers and elucidate the mechanisms underlying functional specificity of TFs in vivo. PMID:22781127

  10. The cis-regulatory code of Hox function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sorge, Sebastian; Ha, Nati; Polychronidou, Maria; Friedrich, Jana; Bezdan, Daniela; Kaspar, Petra; Schaefer, Martin H; Ossowski, Stephan; Henz, Stefan R; Mundorf, Juliane; Rätzer, Jenny; Papagiannouli, Fani; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2012-08-01

    Precise gene expression is a fundamental aspect of organismal function and depends on the combinatorial interplay of transcription factors (TFs) with cis-regulatory DNA elements. While much is known about TF function in general, our understanding of their cell type-specific activities is still poor. To address how widely expressed transcriptional regulators modulate downstream gene activity with high cellular specificity, we have identified binding regions for the Hox TF Deformed (Dfd) in the Drosophila genome. Our analysis of architectural features within Hox cis-regulatory response elements (HREs) shows that HRE structure is essential for cell type-specific gene expression. We also find that Dfd and Ultrabithorax (Ubx), another Hox TF specifying different morphological traits, interact with non-overlapping regions in vivo, despite their similar DNA binding preferences. While Dfd and Ubx HREs exhibit comparable design principles, their motif compositions and motif-pair associations are distinct, explaining the highly selective interaction of these Hox proteins with the regulatory environment. Thus, our results uncover the regulatory code imprinted in Hox enhancers and elucidate the mechanisms underlying functional specificity of TFs in vivo.

  11. Randomized Subspace Learning for Proline Cis-Trans Isomerization Prediction.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarrah, Omar Y; Yoo, Paul D; Taha, Kamal; Muhaidat, Sami; Shami, Abdallah; Zaki, Nazar

    2015-01-01

    Proline residues are common source of kinetic complications during folding. The X-Pro peptide bond is the only peptide bond for which the stability of the cis and trans conformations is comparable. The cis-trans isomerization (CTI) of X-Pro peptide bonds is a widely recognized rate-limiting factor, which can not only induces additional slow phases in protein folding but also modifies the millisecond and sub-millisecond dynamics of the protein. An accurate computational prediction of proline CTI is of great importance for the understanding of protein folding, splicing, cell signaling, and transmembrane active transport in both the human body and animals. In our earlier work, we successfully developed a biophysically motivated proline CTI predictor utilizing a novel tree-based consensus model with a powerful metalearning technique and achieved 86.58 percent Q2 accuracy and 0.74 Mcc, which is a better result than the results (70-73 percent Q2 accuracies) reported in the literature on the well-referenced benchmark dataset. In this paper, we describe experiments with novel randomized subspace learning and bootstrap seeding techniques as an extension to our earlier work, the consensus models as well as entropy-based learning methods, to obtain better accuracy through a precise and robust learning scheme for proline CTI prediction.

  12. [Synthesis and crystalline structure of cis-monochloro(dimenthylsulfoxide)].

    PubMed

    Bentefrit, F; Viossat, B; Tomas, A; Nguyen Huy, D; Morgant, G

    2002-03-01

    The synthesis of cis-monochloro(dimethylsulfoxide)(metforminuro) platine(II) was investigated. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P 2(1)/c with Z=4. The cell parameters are: a=9.173(2); b=11.286( 2); c=12.556( 3) (A); b=99.69(2) degrees. The structure of this compound was refined to R=0.031 and wR=0.038 using 1461 independent reflexions with I>3 s(I). The platinum coordination is square planar, built up from one Cl, one O from the dimethylsulfoxide, and one bidentate chelating ligand (metforminure anion) via the two imine nitrogen atoms in cis position. The negative charge of the metforminure ligand ensures the electric neutrality in the complex. The crystal packing is characterized by four hydrogen bonds, one of which is bifurcated (involving Cl atom (intramolecular bonding) and O(i) (intermolecular bonding; symmetry code i: x, 3/2-y; 1/2+z).

  13. Crystal structure of 1,6-di-thia-cyclo-deca-cis-3,cis-8-diene (DTCDD).

    PubMed

    Baughman, Russell G; Delanty, Molly C; Ortwerth, Michael F

    2014-11-01

    The title compound, C8H12S2 (trivial name DTCDD), was obtained as a side product of the reaction between cis-1,4-di-chloro-but-2-ene and sodium sulfide. The asymmetric unit consists of one-quarter of the mol-ecule (S site symmetry 2) and the complete mol-ecule has 2/m (C 2h ) point symmetry with the C=C bond in an E conformation. The geometry of the title compound is compared to those of a chloro derivative and a mercury complex.

  14. BMC{trademark}: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    Barrier Membrane Containment (BMC){trademark} is a high-density polyethylene membrane (HDPE) groundwater barrier and pass-through system, with applications ranging from plume control and containment to groundwater manipulation coupled with in-site treatment. BMC{trademark} system can function as a permeable or impermeable reaction wall, a cut-off wall, interceptor trenches, a barrier with collection and/or monitoring system, and a pass-through in a funnel and gate configuration. BMC{trademark} can be inspected with a down-hole video camera, producing a permanent VHS format tape, insuring the integrity of the wall and the interlocking joints.

  15. A primer on regression methods for decoding cis-regulatory logic

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Debopriya; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-03-03

    The rapidly emerging field of systems biology is helping us to understand the molecular determinants of phenotype on a genomic scale [1]. Cis-regulatory elements are major sequence-based determinants of biological processes in cells and tissues [2]. For instance, during transcriptional regulation, transcription factors (TFs) bind to very specific regions on the promoter DNA [2,3] and recruit the basal transcriptional machinery, which ultimately initiates mRNA transcription (Figure 1A). Learning cis-Regulatory Elements from Omics Data A vast amount of work over the past decade has shown that omics data can be used to learn cis-regulatory logic on a genome-wide scale [4-6]--in particular, by integrating sequence data with mRNA expression profiles. The most popular approach has been to identify over-represented motifs in promoters of genes that are coexpressed [4,7,8]. Though widely used, such an approach can be limiting for a variety of reasons. First, the combinatorial nature of gene regulation is difficult to explicitly model in this framework. Moreover, in many applications of this approach, expression data from multiple conditions are necessary to obtain reliable predictions. This can potentially limit the use of this method to only large data sets [9]. Although these methods can be adapted to analyze mRNA expression data from a pair of biological conditions, such comparisons are often confounded by the fact that primary and secondary response genes are clustered together--whereas only the primary response genes are expected to contain the functional motifs [10]. A set of approaches based on regression has been developed to overcome the above limitations [11-32]. These approaches have their foundations in certain biophysical aspects of gene regulation [26,33-35]. That is, the models are motivated by the expected transcriptional response of genes due to the binding of TFs to their promoters. While such methods have gathered popularity in the computational domain

  16. Row erupts over axed chapter from Newt Gingrich book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2012-02-01

    A chapter written by a respected climate scientist for a book co-edited by Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has been canned because its author asserts that humans are responsible for climate change.

  17. FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10, 2003: Listeria monocytogenes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual, Chapter 10 describes procedures for analysis of food samples and may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, aerosol, liquid and water samples containing Listeria monocytogenes.

  18. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  19. General RMP Guidance - Chapter 4: Offsite Consequence Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter provides basic compliance information, not modeling methodologies, for people who plan to do their own air dispersion modeling. OCA is a required part of the risk management program, and involves worst-case and alternative release scenarios.

  20. Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms of James H. Windrim and George Summers’s neoclassical competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. United States Parmacopeia Chapter <797> timeline: 1989 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Newton, David W

    2013-01-01

    This article features a tabular chronology of events deemed relevant to the creation and revision of United States Pharmacopeia General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding--Sterile Preparations, which premiered in 2004.

  2. Legislative engagement at the chapter level: tips for getting involved.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Tiffany M

    2012-01-01

    Legislative and advocacy efforts of locally organized groups of nurses can affect local, state and national health care issues. Ways to get involved include participating in AWHONN chapter and section meetings, local health fairs and letter-writing campaigns.

  3. Pesticide Registration Manual: Chapter 17 - State Regulatory Authority

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FIFRA authorizes states to issue Experimental Use Permits, Special Local Needs registrations, and to apply for Emergency Exemptions under specific conditions. This chapter provides detailed information relevant to state actions under FIFRA.

  4. The Cis-regulatory Logic of the Mammalian Photoreceptor Transcriptional Network

    PubMed Central

    Hsiau, Timothy H.-C.; Diaconu, Claudiu; Myers, Connie A.; Lee, Jongwoo; Cepko, Constance L.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs) mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation. PMID:17653270

  5. Implications of climate and land use change: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jefferson S.; Murgueitio, Enrique; Calle, Zoraida; Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara; Stallard, Robert F.; Balvanera, Patricia; Hall, Jefferson S.; Kirn, Vanessa; Yanguas-Fernandez, Estrella

    2015-01-01

    This chapter relates ecosystem services to climate change and land use. The bulk of the chapter focuses on ecosystem services and steepland land use in the humid Neotropics – what is lost with land-cover changed, and what is gained with various types of restoration that are sustainable given private ownership. Many case studies are presented later in the white paper. The USGS contribution relates to climate change and the role of extreme weather events in land-use planning.

  6. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  7. Chapter 2: Development of the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Suleyman; Odaci, Ersan; Unal, Bunyami; Sahin, Bunyamin; Fornaro, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Normal function of the peripheral nerve (PN) is based on morphological integrity and relationship between axons, Schwann cells, and connective sheaths, which depends on the correct development of all these components. Most of the relevant studies in this field were carried out using animal models, since reports on the development of the human PNs from the time of prenatal formation to postnatal development are limited as it is quite difficult to find many nerves in fetuses. In this review paper, we will address the main developmental stages of axons, Schwann cells, and connective tissue sheaths in PNs. Knowledge on the development of PNs and their main components is important for the study of nerve repair and regeneration. This knowledge can be helpful for designing innovative treatment strategies since, like with other organs, the development and regeneration processes share many biological features.

  8. Evaluation of 9-cis retinoic acid and mitotane as antitumoral agents in an adrenocortical xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltán; Baghy, Kornélia; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Micsik, Tamás; Nyírő, Gábor; Rácz, Gergely; Butz, Henriett; Perge, Pál; Kovalszky, Ilona; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila; Igaz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The available drug treatment options for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) are limited. In our previous studies, the in vitro activity of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA) on adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells was shown along with its antitumoral effects in a small pilot xenograft study. Our aim was to dissect the antitumoral effects of 9-cisRA on ACC in a large-scale xenograft study involving mitotane, 9-cisRA and their combination. 43 male SCID mice inoculated with NCI-H295R cells were treated in four groups (i. control, ii. 9-cisRA, iii. mitotane, iv. 9-cisRA + mitotane) for 28 days. Tumor size follow-up, histological and immunohistochemical (Ki-67) analysis, tissue gene expression microarray, quantitative real-time-PCR for the validation of microarray results and to detect circulating microRNAs were performed. Protein expression was studied by proteomics and Western-blot validation. Only mitotane alone and the combination of 9-cisRA and mitotane resulted in significant tumor size reduction. The Ki-67 index was significantly reduced in both 9-cisRA and 9-cisRA+mitotane groups. Only modest changes at the mRNA level were found: the 9-cisRA-induced overexpression of apolipoprotein A4 and down-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4A was validated. The expression of circulating hsa-miR-483-5p was significantly reduced in the combined treatment group. The SET protein was validated as being significantly down-regulated in the combined mitotane+9-cisRA group. 9-cisRA might be a helpful additive agent in the treatment of ACC in combination with mitotane. Circulating hsa-miR-483-5p could be utilized for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ACC patients, and the treatment-induced reduction in protein SET expression might raise its relevance in ACC biology.

  9. Evaluation of 9-cis retinoic acid and mitotane as antitumoral agents in an adrenocortical xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltán; Baghy, Kornélia; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Micsik, Tamás; Nyírő, Gábor; Rácz, Gergely; Butz, Henriett; Perge, Pál; Kovalszky, Ilona; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila; Igaz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The available drug treatment options for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) are limited. In our previous studies, the in vitro activity of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA) on adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells was shown along with its antitumoral effects in a small pilot xenograft study. Our aim was to dissect the antitumoral effects of 9-cisRA on ACC in a large-scale xenograft study involving mitotane, 9-cisRA and their combination. 43 male SCID mice inoculated with NCI-H295R cells were treated in four groups (i. control, ii. 9-cisRA, iii. mitotane, iv. 9-cisRA + mitotane) for 28 days. Tumor size follow-up, histological and immunohistochemical (Ki-67) analysis, tissue gene expression microarray, quantitative real-time-PCR for the validation of microarray results and to detect circulating microRNAs were performed. Protein expression was studied by proteomics and Western-blot validation. Only mitotane alone and the combination of 9-cisRA and mitotane resulted in significant tumor size reduction. The Ki-67 index was significantly reduced in both 9-cisRA and 9-cisRA+mitotane groups. Only modest changes at the mRNA level were found: the 9-cisRA-induced overexpression of apolipoprotein A4 and down-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4A was validated. The expression of circulating hsa-miR-483-5p was significantly reduced in the combined treatment group. The SET protein was validated as being significantly down-regulated in the combined mitotane+9-cisRA group. 9-cisRA might be a helpful additive agent in the treatment of ACC in combination with mitotane. Circulating hsa-miR-483-5p could be utilized for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ACC patients, and the treatment-induced reduction in protein SET expression might raise its relevance in ACC biology. PMID:26885453

  10. Genomic analysis reveals major determinants of cis-regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora.

    PubMed

    Steige, Kim A; Laenen, Benjamin; Reimegård, Johan; Scofield, Douglas G; Slotte, Tanja

    2017-01-31

    Understanding the causes of cis-regulatory variation is a long-standing aim in evolutionary biology. Although cis-regulatory variation has long been considered important for adaptation, we still have a limited understanding of the selective importance and genomic determinants of standing cis-regulatory variation. To address these questions, we studied the prevalence, genomic determinants, and selective forces shaping cis-regulatory variation in the outcrossing plant Capsella grandiflora We first identified a set of 1,010 genes with common cis-regulatory variation using analyses of allele-specific expression (ASE). Population genomic analyses of whole-genome sequences from 32 individuals showed that genes with common cis-regulatory variation (i) are under weaker purifying selection and (ii) undergo less frequent positive selection than other genes. We further identified genomic determinants of cis-regulatory variation. Gene body methylation (gbM) was a major factor constraining cis-regulatory variation, whereas presence of nearby transposable elements (TEs) and tissue specificity of expression increased the odds of ASE. Our results suggest that most common cis-regulatory variation in C. grandiflora is under weak purifying selection, and that gene-specific functional constraints are more important for the maintenance of cis-regulatory variation than genome-scale variation in the intensity of selection. Our results agree with previous findings that suggest TE silencing affects nearby gene expression, and provide evidence for a link between gbM and cis-regulatory constraint, possibly reflecting greater dosage sensitivity of body-methylated genes. Given the extensive conservation of gbM in flowering plants, this suggests that gbM could be an important predictor of cis-regulatory variation in a wide range of plant species.

  11. Genomic analysis reveals major determinants of cis-regulatory variation in Capsella grandiflora

    PubMed Central

    Steige, Kim A.; Laenen, Benjamin; Reimegård, Johan; Slotte, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the causes of cis-regulatory variation is a long-standing aim in evolutionary biology. Although cis-regulatory variation has long been considered important for adaptation, we still have a limited understanding of the selective importance and genomic determinants of standing cis-regulatory variation. To address these questions, we studied the prevalence, genomic determinants, and selective forces shaping cis-regulatory variation in the outcrossing plant Capsella grandiflora. We first identified a set of 1,010 genes with common cis-regulatory variation using analyses of allele-specific expression (ASE). Population genomic analyses of whole-genome sequences from 32 individuals showed that genes with common cis-regulatory variation (i) are under weaker purifying selection and (ii) undergo less frequent positive selection than other genes. We further identified genomic determinants of cis-regulatory variation. Gene body methylation (gbM) was a major factor constraining cis-regulatory variation, whereas presence of nearby transposable elements (TEs) and tissue specificity of expression increased the odds of ASE. Our results suggest that most common cis-regulatory variation in C. grandiflora is under weak purifying selection, and that gene-specific functional constraints are more important for the maintenance of cis-regulatory variation than genome-scale variation in the intensity of selection. Our results agree with previous findings that suggest TE silencing affects nearby gene expression, and provide evidence for a link between gbM and cis-regulatory constraint, possibly reflecting greater dosage sensitivity of body-methylated genes. Given the extensive conservation of gbM in flowering plants, this suggests that gbM could be an important predictor of cis-regulatory variation in a wide range of plant species. PMID:28096395

  12. Hearing on H.R. 6: Reform Proposals for Chapter 1. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This report presents testimony and prepared statements from witnesses who addressed the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the reform of Chapter 1. The primary question addressed at these hearings concerns how Chapter 1 can be reformed to better integrate and serve the needs of limited English-proficient students.…

  13. Organisational culture matters for system integration in health care.

    PubMed

    Munir, Samina K; Kay, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the 'Actual Usefulness' of the system and the 'Organisational Culture'. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated.

  14. Organisational Culture Matters for System Integration in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Samina K.; Kay, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the ‘Actual Usefulness’ of the system and the ‘Organisational Culture’. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated. PMID:14728220

  15. Enthalpy of ligand substitution in cis organopalladium complexes with monodentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Salas, Gorka; Casares, Juan A; Espinet, Pablo

    2009-10-21

    The enthalpy for the substitution reaction cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + 2 L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + 2THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) has been measured in THF by calorimetric methods for Rf = 3,5-dichloro-2,4,6-trifluorophenyl, L = PPh(3), AsPh(3), SbPh(3), PMePh(2), PCyPh(2), PMe(3), AsMePh(2), or L(2) = dppe (1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane), dppf (1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene). The values determined show that the substitution enthalpy has a strong dependence on the electronic and steric properties of the ligand. The study of the consecutive substitution reactions cis-[PdRf(2)(THF)(2)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + THF, and cis-[PdRf(2)L(THF)] + L -->cis-[PdRf(2)L(2)] + THF has been carried our for L = PPh(3) and L = PCyPh(2). The first substitution is clearly more favorable for the bulkier leaving ligand, but the second gives practically the same DeltaH value for both cases, indicating that the differences in steric hindrance happen to compensate the electronic differences for both ligands. The X-ray structures of cis-[PdRf(2)(PMePh(2))(2)], cis-[PdRf(2)(dppe)] and cis-[PdRf(2)(dppf)] are reported.

  16. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, E.; Inciong, E. J.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    1990-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  17. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, E.; Inciong, E. J.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    1990-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  18. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  19. Enantioselective synthesis of cis-decalins using organocatalysis and sulfonyl Nazarov reagents.

    PubMed

    Peña, Javier; Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Moro, Rosalina F; Garrido, Narciso M; Marcos, Isidro S; Sanz, Francisca; Díez, David

    2015-04-10

    The first organocatalytic synthesis of cis-decalins using sulfonyl Nazarov reagents is reported. The Jørgensen's catalyst directs this highly enantioselective synthesis using different cyclohexenal derivatives.

  20. Abiotic reductive dechlorination of cis-DCE by ferrous monosulfide mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sung Pil; Hayes, Kim F

    2015-11-01

    Cis-1,2,-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE) is a toxic, persistent contaminant occurring mainly as a daughter product of incomplete degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). This paper reports on abiotic reductive dechlorination of cis-DCE by mackinawite (FeS1-x), a ferrous monosulfide, under variable geochemical conditions. To assess in situ abiotic cis-DCE dechlorination by mackinawite in the field, mackinawite suspensions prepared in a field groundwater sample collected from a cis-DCE contaminated field site were used for dechlorination experiments. The effects of geochemical variables on the dechlorination rates were monitored. A set of dechlorination experiments were also carried out in the presence of aquifer sediment from the site over a range of pH conditions to better simulate the actual field situations. The results showed that the suspensions of freshly prepared mackinawite reductively transformed cis-DCE to acetylene, whereas the conventionally prepared powder form of mackinawite had practically no reactivity with cis-DCE under the same experimental conditions. Significant cis-DCE degradation by mackinawite has not been reported prior to this study, although mackinawite has been shown to reductively transform PCE and TCE. This study suggests feasibility of using mackinawite for in situ remediation of cis-DCE-contaminated sites with high S levels such as estuaries under naturally achieved or stimulated sulfate-reducing conditions.