Science.gov

Sample records for intelligence test performance

  1. Impulsivity and Speed-Accuracy Strategies in Intelligence Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise H.; Rabbitt, Patrick M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Whether relations between intelligence test performance and information processing measures depend on individual differences in speed-accuracy preferences rather than capacity limitations and whether the impact of strategic variables changes with increasing age or extraversion was studied with 83 adults ages 50 to 79 years. Results are discussed…

  2. Effects of Nonverbally Communicated Personal Warmth on the Intelligence Test Performance of Indian and Eskimo Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinfeld, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Nonverbal cues which enthnographic analysis suggested were central to communicating personal warmth to Indian and Eskimo adolescents did produce significant changes on intelligence test performance. (Author/KM)

  3. Construct Validity of the Computerized Continuous Performance Test with Measures of Intelligence, Achievement, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Janice Whitten; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Administered Continuous Performance Test (CPT), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Wide Range Achievement Test-Revised, Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test, and reading comprehension subtest of Peabody Individual Achievement Test to 54 school-aged children and adolescents referred for evaluation of learning disabilities. Parents…

  4. CVSD intelligibility testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, J. M.

    Tests of the voice intelligibility of a 16-kilobit per second Continuously Variabale Slope Delta (CVSD) modulation for JTIDS applications are described. A Diagnostic Rhyme Test (DRT), a standard subjective intelligibility measure, was used to provide a reliable quantitative basis for judgement/comparisons of the CVSD performance under variouus test conditions (single-speaker mode, double speaker-mode, and masking channel mode). The DRT intelligibility score at each test condition characterizes the ability of the channel to provide the various psychoacoustic cues needed to distinguish words in a message. The physical hardware used in DRT evaluations is described in detail. The procedures used to collect and reduce the data to a meaningful form are outlined, and some mathematical models for characterizing DRT intelligibility are developed.

  5. Processing Speed, Intelligence, Creativity, and School Performance: Testing of Causal Hypotheses Using Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindermann, H.; Neubauer, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    According to mental speed theory of intelligence, the speed of information processing constitutes an important basis for cognitive abilities. However, the question, how mental speed relates to real world criteria, like school, academic, or job performance, is still unanswered. The aim of the study is to test an indirect speed-factor model in…

  6. Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 by Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, C. Holley; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of 292 4- to 17-year-olds with Williams syndrome (WS) on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 (KBIT-2; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004). Mean IQ Composite, Verbal standard score (SS), and Nonverbal SS were in the borderline range relative to the general population, with variability similar to the general population.…

  7. Concurrent Validity of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, V. Scott; Bell, Sherry Mee

    2006-01-01

    One hundred elementary- and middle-school students were administered the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT; B.A. Bracken & R.S. McCallum, 1998) and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R; G.H. Roid & L.J. Miller, 1997). Correlations between UNIT and Leiter-R scores were statistically significant ( p less…

  8. The Effects of Verbal and Nonverbal Contingent Reinforcement Upon the Intelligence Test Performance of Black Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheckart, George R.; Bass, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    It appears that contingent reinforcement may have an effect upon the intelligence test performance of black adults as evidenced by the consistent trend of the IQ scores in the direction of the proposed hypothesis. However, the primary analysis of the data revealed no statistically significant differences among treatment groups. (Author)

  9. Demand characteristics of music affect performance on the Wonderlic Personnel Test Of Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Verpaelst, Celissa C; Standing, Lionel G

    2007-02-01

    This study examined whether demand characteristics concerning music can change subjects' performance on the Wonderlic Personnel Test of intelligence. Participants (N= 60) were randomly assigned and informed either that Mozart's music typically enhances cognitive performance or diminishes it. They then completed the Wonderlic Personnel Test while listening to a Mozart piano sonata. The subjects with a positive set answered significantly more items correctly on the test (14%) than those with a negative set (p = .03). This result may hold implications for the study of the 'Mozart effect'.

  10. Implicit theories of intelligence and IQ test performance in adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Da Fonseca, D; Cury, F; Fakra, E; Rufo, M; Poinso, F; Bounoua, L; Huguet, P

    2008-04-01

    During the past decade, several studies have reported positive effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of children and adolescents with mental disorders. One of the most important CBT interventions is to teach children and adolescents to challenge negative thoughts that lead to maladjusted behaviors. Based on the implicit theories of intelligence framework, the main purpose of this study was to test whether an incremental theory manipulation could be used to affect IQ test performance in adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Results showed that patients demonstrated enhanced IQ performance and experienced less state anxiety when they were exposed to an incremental theory of intelligence manipulation. Our findings suggest that incremental theory manipulation provides a useful cognitive strategy for addressing school-related anxiety in adolescents with mental disorders such as GAD.

  11. A drop in performance on a fluid intelligence test due to instructed-rule mindset.

    PubMed

    ErEl, Hadas; Meiran, Nachshon

    2016-08-17

    A 'mindset' is a configuration of processing resources that are made available for the task at hand as well as their suitable tuning for carrying it out. Of special interest, remote-relation abstract mindsets are introduced by activities sharing only general control processes with the task. To test the effect of a remote-relation mindset on performance on a Fluid Intelligence test (Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, RAPM), we induced a mindset associated with little usage of executive processing by requiring participants to execute a well-defined classification rule 12 times, a manipulation known from previous work to drastically impair rule-generation performance and associated cognitive processes. In Experiment 1, this manipulation led to a drop in RAPM performance equivalent to 10.1 IQ points. No drop was observed in a General Knowledge task. In Experiment 2, a similar drop in RAPM performance was observed (equivalent to 7.9 and 9.2 IQ points) regardless if participants were pre-informed about the upcoming RAPM test. These results indicate strong (most likely, transient) adverse effects of a remote-relation mindset on test performance. They imply that although the trait of Fluid Intelligence has probably not changed, mindsets can severely distort estimates of this trait.

  12. Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracken, Bruce A.; McCallum, R. Steve

    This kit presents all components of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT), a newly developed instrument designed to measure the general intelligence and cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5 through 17) who may be disadvantaged by traditional verbal and language-loaded measures such as children with speech, language,…

  13. Intelligent test integration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sztipanovits, J.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J.; Kawamura, K.; Purves, B.; Williams, R.; Biglari, H.

    1988-01-01

    A new test technology is described which was developed for space system integration. The ultimate purpose of the system is to support the automatic generation of test systems in real time, distributed computing environments. The Intelligent Test Integration System (ITIS) is a knowledge based layer above the traditional test system components which can generate complex test configurations from the specification of test scenarios.

  14. Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 by Children with Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, C. Holley; Mervis, Carolyn B.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of 292 4 – 17-year-olds with Williams syndrome (WS) on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-2 (KBIT-2). Mean IQ Composite, Verbal standard score (SS), and Nonverbal SS were in the borderline range relative to the general population, with variability similar to the general population. Correlations between SSs and CA were close to 0, with no significant sex differences. There was a significant effect of maternal education on Verbal SS. The KBIT-2 appropriately captures the full range of performance of 8 – 17-year-olds with WS for the abilities measured and of all but the very lowest-functioning 5 – 7-year-olds. However, the KBIT-2 does not contain easy enough items to assess adequately the abilities of the lowest quartile of 4-year-olds. PMID:26701073

  15. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of Frontal Cortex Decreases Performance on the WAIS-IV Intelligence Test

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Mellin, Juliann M.; Lustenberger, Caroline M.; Boyle, Michael R.; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V.; Frohlich, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA at each anode for 20 minutes) or active sham tDCS (2mA for 40 seconds), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2mA for 20 minutes). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement. PMID:25934490

  16. An Examination of the Effect of Tangible and Social Reinforcers on Intelligence Test Performance of Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Janice; Eller, Ben F.

    1985-01-01

    Determined if intelligence quotient mean test scores of middle school students could be increased through the use of money and praise. Results indicated lower class performance increased with monetary reward, whites' performance increased with verbal praise, and white females' and middle class males' performance increased with monetary reward…

  17. Effects of Removing the Time Limit on First and Second Language Intelligence Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullane, Jennifer; McKelvie, Stuart J.

    2001-01-01

    Canadian postsecondary students (n=133) with moderate second-language competence took the Wonderlic Personnel Test with or without the standard time limit in English or French. Findings suggest that time accommodation can be applied to clients who are taking an intelligence test in their second language. (SLD)

  18. Intelligence Testing and Minority Students: Foundations, Performance Factors, and Assessment Issues. Racial and Ethnic Minority Psychology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Richard R.; Suzuki, Lisa A.

    This book examines intelligence assessment among ethnic minority children. Part 1, "Foundations," includes: (1) "Historical Issues" (e.g., emergence of intelligence testing in Europe and ideology of the intelligence testing movement); and (2) "Multicultural Perspective of Intelligence: Theory and Measurement Issues"…

  19. Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Student Examiners' Learning with Deliberate Test Practice and Examinees' Intelligence Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Rottman, Amy

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the implications of deliberate practice when teaching test administration skills, novice, but trained, graduate student examiners administered intelligence tests to a convenience sample of volunteer school-age examinees assigned to a first test session. A second, different convenience sample of volunteer school-age examinees were…

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of frontal cortex decreases performance on the WAIS-IV intelligence test.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Mellin, Juliann M; Lustenberger, Caroline M; Boyle, Michael R; Lee, Won Hee; Peterchev, Angel V; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability of motor cortex. However, there is conflicting evidence about the efficacy of this non-invasive brain stimulation modality to modulate performance on cognitive tasks. Previous work has tested the effect of tDCS on specific facets of cognition and executive processing. However, no randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study has looked at the effects of tDCS on a comprehensive battery of cognitive processes. The objective of this study was to test if tDCS had an effect on performance on a comprehensive assay of cognitive processes, a standardized intelligence quotient (IQ) test. The study consisted of two substudies and followed a double-blind, between-subjects, sham-controlled design. In total, 41 healthy adult participants were included in the final analysis. These participants completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) as a baseline measure. At least one week later, participants in substudy 1 received either bilateral tDCS (anodes over both F4 and F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA at each anode for 20 min) or active sham tDCS (2 mA for 40 s), and participants in substudy 2 received either right or left tDCS (anode over either F4 or F3, cathode over Cz, 2 mA for 20 min). In both studies, the WAIS-IV was immediately administered following stimulation to assess for performance differences induced by bilateral and unilateral tDCS. Compared to sham stimulation, right, left, and bilateral tDCS reduced improvement between sessions on Full Scale IQ and the Perceptual Reasoning Index. This demonstration that frontal tDCS selectively degraded improvement on specific metrics of the WAIS-IV raises important questions about the often proposed role of tDCS in cognitive enhancement.

  1. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj; Messina, Elena; Tunstel, Edward

    2009-09-01

    To design and develop capable, dependable, and affordable intelligent systems, their performance must be measurable. Scientific methodologies for standardization and benchmarking are crucial for quantitatively evaluating the performance of emerging robotic and intelligent systems technologies. There is currently no accepted standard for quantitatively measuring the performance of these systems against user-defined requirements; and furthermore, there is no consensus on what objective evaluation procedures need to be followed to understand the performance of these systems. The lack of reproducible and repeatable test methods has precluded researchers working towards a common goal from exchanging and communicating results, inter-comparing system performance, and leveraging previous work that could otherwise avoid duplication and expedite technology transfer. Currently, this lack of cohesion in the community hinders progress in many domains, such as manufacturing, service, healthcare, and security. By providing the research community with access to standardized tools, reference data sets, and open source libraries of solutions, researchers and consumers will be able to evaluate the cost and benefits associated with intelligent systems and associated technologies. In this vein, the edited book volume addresses performance evaluation and metrics for intelligent systems, in general, while emphasizing the need and solutions for standardized methods. To the knowledge of the editors, there is not a single book on the market that is solely dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems. Even books that address this topic do so only marginally or are out of date. The research work presented in this volume fills this void by drawing from the experiences and insights of experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. The book presents

  2. Comparison of Performance on Two Nonverbal Intelligence Tests by Adolescents with and without Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol A.; Gilbert, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Definitions of specific language impairment (SLI), for both research and clinical purposes, often state that nonverbal IQ scores must be within normal limits. This use of nonverbal IQ has been criticized on several grounds, including lack of equivalence between tests. In the current study, a sample of 204 adolescents with and without language…

  3. Brave New World of Intelligence Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Berkeley

    1979-01-01

    New approaches to assessing intelligence are discussed, as well as new intelligence tests. Among the developments are investigating neurometrics, adapting testing to the effects of technology on children, countering cultural bias, assessing social intelligence, focusing on aspects of cognitive styles, measuring learning potential, and using…

  4. Performance Intelligence, Sexual Offending and Psychopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijman, Henk; Merckelbach, Harald; Cima, Maaike

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that offenders have lowered verbal intelligence compared to their performance intelligence. This phenomenon has been linked traditionally to childhood risk factors (e.g. deficient education, abuse and neglect). Substantial discrepancies between performance intelligence quotients (PIQ) and verbal intelligence…

  5. The Validity of Tests of Social Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoepfner, Ralph

    The rationale underlying tests of social intelligence and some of the problems inherent in those tests are discussed. To measure social intelligence, paper and pencil tests were developed which were "situation free." These tests employed "stereotypic behavior of individual others." The stimuli used in the behavioral tests were…

  6. Emotional intelligence and nursing performance among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Brady, Noreen; O'Shea, Eileen R; Griffin, Mary T Quinn

    2011-05-01

    Some scholars have proposed that the educational preparation of nurses can be improved by incorporating emotional intelligence lessons into the nursing curricula. However, the relationship between emotional intelligence and nursing performance in nursing students is unknown. The purpose of the study was to examine this relationship among nursing students. A descriptive correlational design with non-probability sampling methods of 87 nursing students in a university setting was conducted. The variables of focus were emotional intelligence and nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was measured with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Nursing performance was measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance (6-D Scale). The sample was predominately Caucasian (91%), female (93%), mean age 24 years. The mean score for emotional intelligence was 0.53, SD ± 0.06 indicating moderate emotional intelligence. The mean score for nursing performance was 3.14, SD ± 0.40 indicating moderate nursing performance. Emotional intelligence was related to nursing performance. Four of the six nursing performance subscale scores were significantly correlated with the total emotional intelligence scores. Implications for nursing education and clinical practice are discussed.

  7. Gender difference in speech intelligibility using speech intelligibility tests and acoustic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare men with women in terms of speech intelligibility, to investigate the validity of objective acoustic parameters related with speech intelligibility, and to try to set up the standard data for the future study in various field in prosthodontics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty men and women were served as subjects in the present study. After recording of sample sounds, speech intelligibility tests by three speech pathologists and acoustic analyses were performed. Comparison of the speech intelligibility test scores and acoustic parameters such as fundamental frequency, fundamental frequency range, formant frequency, formant ranges, vowel working space area, and vowel dispersion were done between men and women. In addition, the correlations between the speech intelligibility values and acoustic variables were analyzed. RESULTS Women showed significantly higher speech intelligibility scores than men and there were significant difference between men and women in most of acoustic parameters used in the present study. However, the correlations between the speech intelligibility scores and acoustic parameters were low. CONCLUSION Speech intelligibility test and acoustic parameters used in the present study were effective in differentiating male voice from female voice and their values might be used in the future studies related patients involved with maxillofacial prosthodontics. However, further studies are needed on the correlation between speech intelligibility tests and objective acoustic parameters. PMID:21165272

  8. Performance tests.

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of psychological performance tests to assess the effects of environmental stressors. The large number and the variety of performance tests are illustrated, and the differences between performance tests and other psychological tests are described in terms of their design, construction, use, and purpose. The stressor emphasis is on the effects of drugs since that is where most performance tests have found their main application, although other stressors, e.g., fatigue, toxic chemicals, are mentioned where appropriate. Diazepam is used as an example. There is no particular performance emphasis since the tests are intended to have wide applicability. However, vehicle-driving performance is discussed because it has been the subject of a great deal of research and is probably one of the most important areas of application. Performance tests are discussed in terms of the four main underlying models--factor analysis, general information processing, multiple resource and strategy models, and processing-stage models--and in terms of their psychometric properties--sensitivity, reliability, and content, criterion, construct, and face validity. Some test taxonomies are presented. Standardization is also discussed with reference to the reaction time, mathematical processing, memory search, spatial processing, unstable tracking, verbal processing, and dual task tests used in the AGARD STRES battery. Some comments on measurement strengths and appropriate study designs and methods are included. PMID:9182033

  9. Piagetian Tasks, Traditional Intelligence and Achievement Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, J.; Koops, W.

    1983-01-01

    A study conducted with kindergarten and elementary school children showed that Piagetian tasks which measured seriation, conservation, and multiple classification were equal or superior to traditional intelligence tests in predicting number language, number line comprehension, and verbal arithmetic. (GC)

  10. TIE: an ability test of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions.

  11. TIE: An Ability Test of Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S.

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions. PMID:25072656

  12. Intelligent Testing: Integrating Psychological Theory and Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James C., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The field of intelligence testing has been revolutionized by Alan S. Kaufman. He developed the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) with David Wechsler, and his best-selling book, Intelligent Testing with the WISC-R, introduced the phrase "intelligent testing." Kaufman, with his wife, Nadeen, then created his own…

  13. Effects of Instruction and Stage-Fright on Intelligence Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Joost; Oostdam, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In the present research, it was tried to unravel the influence of various types of instruction on test anxiety levels and, in turn, its influence on intelligence test performance. Three types of instruction were compared: a stressful, achievement-orientated instruction; a reassuring, task-orientated instruction; and an ambiguous instruction.…

  14. Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Systems Technology, Inc., Hawthorne, CA, developed an electronic Critical Tracking Task (CTT) system that analyzes and rates a subject's visual/motor responses for Ames Research Center. Originally applied to measuring the effects of long term confinement in the mid 1960's, the CTT system is now marketed as FACTOR 1000 by Performance Factors, Inc. Alameda, CA, under a licensing agreement with Systems Technology. The system is a non-invasive, self-administered test that takes less than a minute and detects impairment from a broad range of causes, including stress, fatigue, illness, drugs, or alcohol. It is used daily by Old Town Trolley Tours, San Diego, CA, to assess each driver's physical coordination skills prior to the start of each shift. FACTOR 1000 reduces liabilities and costs related to accidents, and costs less than one dollar per day per employee. Performance Factors is now BioFactors, Inc.

  15. Longitudinal Assessment of Intellectual Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: Multilevel Modeling of Performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test--Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Kistler, Doris J.; John, Angela E.; Morris, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to address the longitudinal stability of standard scores (SSs) measuring intellectual ability for children with Williams syndrome (WS). Participants were 40 children with genetically confirmed WS who completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test--Second Edition (KBIT-2; A. S. Kaufman & N. L. Kaufman, 2004) 4-7…

  16. Intelligence, Working Memory, and Multitasking Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colom, Roberto; Martinez-Molina, Agustin; Shih, Pei Chun; Santacreu, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Multitasking performance is relevant in everyday life and job analyses highlight the influence of multitasking over several diverse occupations. Intelligence is the best single predictor of overall job performance and it is also related to individual differences in multitasking. However, it has been shown that working memory capacity (WMC) is…

  17. Performance evaluation of artificial intelligence classifiers for the medical domain.

    PubMed

    Smith, A E; Nugent, C D; McClean, S I

    2002-01-01

    The application of artificial intelligence systems is still not widespread in the medical field, however there is an increasing necessity for these to handle the surfeit of information available. One drawback to their implementation is the lack of criteria or guidelines for the evaluation of these systems. This is the primary issue in their acceptability to clinicians, who require them for decision support and therefore need evidence that these systems meet the special safety-critical requirements of the domain. This paper shows evidence that the most prevalent form of intelligent system, neural networks, is generally not being evaluated rigorously regarding classification precision. A taxonomy of the types of evaluation tests that can be carried out, to gauge inherent performance of the outputs of intelligent systems has been assembled, and the results of this presented in a clear and concise form, which should be applicable to all intelligent classifiers for medicine.

  18. Intelligent Tutoring System: A Tool for Testing the Research Curiosities of Artificial Intelligence Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaratan, Huseyin

    2003-01-01

    An ITS (Intelligent Tutoring System) is a teaching-learning medium that uses artificial intelligence (AI) technology for instruction. Roberts and Park (1983) defines AI as the attempt to get computers to perform tasks that if performed by a human-being, intelligence would be required to perform the task. The design of an ITS comprises two distinct…

  19. Proceedings of the 2009 Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, Raj; Messina, Elena

    2009-09-01

    The Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems (PerMIS) workshop is dedicated to defining measures and methodologies of evaluating performance of intelligent systems. As the only workshop of its kind, PerMIS has proved to be an excellent forum for sharing lessons learned and discussions as well as fostering collaborations between researchers and practitioners from industry, academia and government agencies. The main theme of the ninth iteration of the workshop, PerMIS'09, seeks to address the question: 'Does performance measurement accelerate the pace of advancement for intelligent systems?' In addition to the main theme, as in previous years, the workshop will focus on applications of performance measures to practical problems in commercial, industrial, homeland security, and military applications. The PerMIS'09 program consists of six plenary addresses and six general and special sessions. The topics that are to be discussed by the speakers cover a wide array of themes centered on many intricate facets of intelligent system research. The presentations will emphasize and showcase the interdisciplinary nature of intelligent systems research and why it is not straightforward to evaluate such interconnected system of systems. The three days of twelve sessions will span themes from manufacturing, mobile robotics, human-system interaction, theory of mind, testing and evaluation of unmanned systems, to name a few.

  20. Nontraditional Intelligence Testing: Samples of Humorous Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    In keeping with a model of intelligence that identifies at least 12 intelligence "talents," formal and informal intelligence or talent assessments have been developed. This paper presents some of these informal instruments that can be used to assess convergent and divergent forms of intelligence. These nontraditional instruments have been designed…

  1. Test Review: Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Sarah M.; Floyd, Randy G.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II; Wechsler, 2011) is a brief intelligence test designed for individuals aged 6 through 90 years. It is a revision of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI; Wechsler, 1999). During revision, there were three goals: enhancing the link between the Wechsler…

  2. Measuring emotional intelligence with the Mayer-Salovery-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

    PubMed

    Brackett, Marc A; Salovey, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript examines the measurement instrument developed from the ability model of EI (Mayer and Salovey, 1997), the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; Mayer, Salovey and Caruso, 2002). The four subtests, scoring methods, psychometric properties, reliability, and factor structure of the MSCEIT are discussed, with a special focus on the discriminant, convergent, predictive, and incremental validity of the test. The authors review associations between MSCEIT scores and important outcomes such as academic performance, cognitive processes, psychological well-being, depression, anxiety, prosocial and maladaptive behavior, and leadership and organizational behavior. Findings regarding the low correlations between MSCEIT scores and self-report measures of EI also are presented. In the conclusion the authors' provide potential directions for future research on emotional intelligence.

  3. A Study of the Relationship between Iranian EFL Learners' Level of Spatial Intelligence and Their Performance on Analytical and Perceptual Cloze Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadian, Moussa; Jalilian, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences with its emphasis on learner variables has been appreciated in language learning. Spatial intelligence, as one domain of the multiple structures of intelligence, which is thought to play a great role in reading, writing, and literacy, particularly in L2 learning, has not…

  4. Longitudinal assessment of intellectual abilities of children with Williams syndrome: multilevel modeling of performance on the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-Second Edition.

    PubMed

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Kistler, Doris J; John, Angela E; Morris, Colleen A

    2012-03-01

    Multilevel modeling was used to address the longitudinal stability of standard scores (SSs) measuring intellectual ability for children with Williams syndrome (WS). Participants were 40 children with genetically confirmed WS who completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-Second Edition (KBIT-2; A. S. Kaufman & N. L. Kaufman, 2004 ) 4-7 times over a mean of 5.06 years. Mean age at first assessment was 7.44 years (range  =  4.00-13.97 years). On average, KBIT-2 Composite IQ, Verbal SS, and Nonverbal SS were stable from 4 to 17 years, although there were significant individual differences in intercept (Composite IQ, Verbal SS, Nonverbal SS) and slope (Composite IQ, Nonverbal SS). Maternal education was significantly related to Verbal SS intercept. No significant sex differences were found. Implications for studies of genotype/phenotype correlations in WS are discussed.

  5. Respirator Speech Intelligibility Testing with an Experienced Speaker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    RESPIRATOR SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY TESTING WITH AN EXPERIENCED...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct 2008 - Jun 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Respirator Speech Intelligibility Testing with an...14. ABSTRACT The Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) is used by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess speech

  6. On the Use of Ordering Theory with Intelligence Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuneman, Janice

    This study investigated the feasibility of using the ordering theoretic procedure with multiple choice items, and its usefulness as an interpretive aid for intelligence test data. Data from two components of a group-administered multiple choice intelligence test (Otis-Lennon Mental Ability Tests) were analyzed using ordering theory procedure for…

  7. Practised Intelligence Testing Based on a Modern Test Conceptualization and Its Reference to the Common Intelligence Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubinger, Klaus D.; Litzenberger, Margarete; Mrakotsky, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The question is to what extent intelligence test-batteries prove any kind of empirical reference to common intelligence theories. Of particular interest are conceptualized tests that are of a high psychometric standard--those that fit the Rasch model--and hence are not exposed to fundamental critique. As individualized testing, i.e., a…

  8. Emotional intelligence and job performance: The mediating role of work-family balance.

    PubMed

    Weinzimmer, Laurence G; Baumann, Heidi M; Gullifor, Daniel P; Koubova, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examine the dynamics between emotional intelligence, work-family balance, and job performance. A review of the literature to date has shown distinct relationships between emotional intelligence to job performance and work-family balance to job performance. We utilize a sample of 233 respondents to empirically test our set of hypotheses that contend work-family balance mediates the relationship between emotional intelligence and job performance. Our results support these hypotheses. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  9. Beyond "g": Putting Multiple Intelligences Theory to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Beth A.; Ashton, Michael C.; Vernon, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated Gardner's "Theory of Multiple Intelligences" in a sample of 200 adults. For each of the hypothesized eight "intelligence" domains--Linguistic, Logical/Mathematical, Spatial, Interpersonal, Intrapersonal, Musical, Bodily-Kinesthetic, Naturalistic--we selected two tests based on Gardner's description of its content. Factor analysis…

  10. Goal Orientations Predict Academic Performance beyond Intelligence and Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Bipp, Tanja; Spinath, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Goal orientations are thought to be an important predictor of scholastic achievement. The present paper investigated the joint influence of goal orientations, intelligence, and personality on school performance in a sample of N=520 11th and 12th graders (303 female; mean age M=16.94 years). Intelligence, the Big Five factors of personality…

  11. Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain-especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex-and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret.

  12. Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligence is the ability to learn from experience and to adapt to, shape, and select environments. Intelligence as measured by (raw scores on) conventional standardized tests varies across the lifespan, and also across generations. Intelligence can be understood in part in terms of the biology of the brain—especially with regard to the functioning in the prefrontal cortex—and also correlates with brain size, at least within humans. Studies of the effects of genes and environment suggest that the heritability coefficient (ratio of genetic to phenotypic variation) is between .4 and .8, although heritability varies as a function of socioeconomic status and other factors. Racial differences in measured intelligence have been observed, but race is a socially constructed rather than biological variable, so such differences are difficult to interpret. PMID:22577301

  13. TPMS Data Analysis for Enhancing Intelligent Vehicle Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, M. A.; Hussain, A.; Mohamed, A.; Samad, S. A.

    The main objective of the study is to analyze Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) data that contributes significantly towards the enhancement of the intelligent vehicle performance evaluation. TPMS pressure and temperature data were collected from the prototype model of the MEMS Tire Pressure Module (TPM) that was fitted on to an intelligent tire rim through its receiver. In this study, we are focusing only analytical data analysis of TPMS. In the analytical study, a novel method for data classification, goodness of fit and hypothesis testing was proposed. A classification scheme was employed to classify the temperature and pressure data based on ID at the quadrant basis operating zone of the Front Right (FR), Front Left (FL), Rear Left (RL) and Rear Right (RR) tires. Principle Component Analysis (PCA) with polynomial fitting for exploring goodness of fit of tire data was also applied. Finally, hypothesis testing using Satterthwaite statistic was carried out. Results obtained are in agreement with the null hypothesis and as such validate the usefulness of the TPMS system in maintaining and enhancing vehicle performance.

  14. Development of an intelligent hypertext system for wind tunnel testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Steinle, Frank W.; Wu, Y. C. L. Susan; Hoyt, W. Andes

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a system utilizing artificial intelligence technology to improve the productivity of project engineers who conduct wind tunnel tests. The objective was to create an intelligent hypertext system which integrates a hypertext manual and expert system that stores experts' knowledge and experience. The preliminary (Phase I) effort implemented a prototype IHS module encompassing a portion of the manuals and knowledge used for wind tunnel testing. The effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the intelligent hypertext system concept. A module for the internal strain gage balance, implemented on both IBM-PC and Macintosh computers, is presented. A description of the Phase II effort is included.

  15. A description of the comprehensive test of nonverbal intelligence.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, J L; Rees, F J

    1998-05-01

    The Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, or CTONI, has become an essential compliment to the traditional tests of intelligence, such as the WISC-III, DTLA-3, and the Binet. The CTONI provides examiners with a measure of nonverbal reasoning that requires no spoken language or complex motor skills. The CTONI has been proven to be unbiased with regard to gender, minority, or disabling condition. Finally, it is possible to estimate the intelligence of people without the contamination of social, ethnic, or disability bias.

  16. Emotional intelligence and clinical performance/retention of nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Marvos, Chelsea; Hale, Frankie B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This exploratory, quantitative, descriptive study was undertaken to explore the relationship between clinical performance and anticipated retention in nursing students. Methods: After approval by the university's Human Subjects Committee, a sample of 104 nursing students were recruited for this study, which involved testing with a valid and reliable emotional intelligence (EI) instrument and a self-report survey of clinical competencies. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that although the group average for total EI score and the 6 score subsets were in the average range, approximately 30% of the individual total EI scores and 30% of two branch scores, identifying emotions correctly and understanding emotions, fell in the less than average range. This data, as well as the analysis of correlation with clinical self-report scores, suggest recommendations applicable to educators of clinical nursing students. Conclusions: Registered nurses make-up the largest segment of the ever-growing healthcare workforce. Yet, retention of new graduates has historically been a challenge for the profession. Given the projected employment growth in nursing, it is important to identify factors which correlate with high levels of performance and job retention among nurses. There is preliminary evidence that EI a nontraditional intelligence measure relates positively not only with retention of clinical staff nurses, but with overall clinical performance as well. PMID:27981096

  17. Emotional intelligence score and performance of dental undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yuh; Ninomiya, Kazunori; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and undergraduate dental students' ability to deal with different situations of communication in a clinical dentistry practical training course of communication skills. Fourth-year students in 2012 and in 2013 at the Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Niigata participated in the survey. The total number of participating students was 129 (88 males and 41 females). The students were asked to complete the Japanese version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test in communication skills. Female students tended to have significantly higher EI score than males. The EI score in the group with high-grade academic performers was higher than in the low-grade group. The influence of EI on academic performance appeared to be mainly due to the students' ability to accurately perceiving emotions and to their ability to understand emotional issues. The importance of EI may also lie in its ability to parse out personality factors from more changeable aspects of a person's behavior. Although further studies are required, we believe that dental educators need to assume the responsibility to help students develop their emotional competencies that they will need to prosper in their chosen careers. In our conclusion, dental educators should support low achievers to increase their levels of self-confidence instead of concentrating mainly on improving their technical skill and academic performance. This may lead to upgrading their skills for managing emotions and to changing their learning approach.

  18. Emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and occupational therapy students' fieldwork performance.

    PubMed

    Andonian, Lynne

    2013-07-01

    This study explored the relationship of emotional intelligence level and self-efficacy to fieldwork performance for occupational therapy students. Occupational therapy students (n = 199) from 36 occupational therapy programs in the United States completed the two surveys, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and the Student Confidence Questionnaire, during their professional Level 2 fieldwork placements. The surveys were compared to the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student completed by the fieldwork educators. Results showed that degree of emotional intelligence, having a choice in the fieldwork setting, and having professional experience in a related setting were positively correlated to Fieldwork Performance scores. Students' self-efficacy was not related to Fieldwork Performance scores. This suggests fostering students' emotional intelligence and capacity for accurate skill appraisal supports fieldwork success.

  19. Emotional Intelligence Moderates Perfectionism and Test Anxiety among Iranian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Abu Talib, Mansor

    2015-01-01

    Test anxiety is one of the common forms of anxiety for students. Thus, it is necessary to improve our knowledge regarding the etiology of test anxiety. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between perfectionism, emotional intelligence, and test anxiety among Iranian students. This study also was conducted to test emotional…

  20. Intelligent Monitoring of Rocket Test Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, Esteban; Rocha, Stephanie; Figueroa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Stephanie Rocha is an undergraduate student pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Esteban Duran is pursuing a degree in Computer Science. Our mentor is Fernando Figueroa. Our project involved developing Intelligent Health Monitoring at the High Pressure Gas Facility (HPGF) utilizing the software GensymG2.

  1. Finding Creative Potential on Intelligence Tests via Divergent Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, James C.; Kaufman, Scott Barry; Lichtenberger, Elizabeth O.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing creative potential using a comprehensive battery of standardized tests requires a focus on "how" and "why" an individual responds in addition to "how well" they respond. Using the "intelligent testing" philosophy of focusing on the person being tested rather than the measure itself helps…

  2. Sensory discrimination and intelligence: testing Spearman's other hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Deary, Ian J; Bell, P Joseph; Bell, Andrew J; Campbell, Mary L; Fazal, Nicola D

    2004-01-01

    At the centenary of Spearman's seminal 1904 article, his general intelligence hypothesis remains one of the most influential in psychology. Less well known is the article's other hypothesis that there is "a correspondence between what may provisionally be called 'General Discrimination' and 'General Intelligence' which works out with great approximation to one or absoluteness" (Spearman, 1904, p. 284). Studies that do not find high correlations between psychometric intelligence and single sensory discrimination tests do not falsify this hypothesis. This study is the first directly to address Spearman's general intelligence-general sensory discrimination hypothesis. It attempts to replicate his findings with a similar sample of schoolchildren. In a well-fitting structural equation model of the data, general intelligence and general discrimination correlated .92. In a reanalysis of data published byActon and Schroeder (2001), general intelligence and general sensory ability correlated .68 in men and women. One hundred years after its conception, Spearman's other hypothesis achieves some confirmation. The association between general intelligence and general sensory ability remains to be replicated and explained.

  3. Experimental Test-Bed for Intelligent Passive Array Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Torres, Miguel; David, Sunil; Isom, Adam; Cotto, Jose; Sharaiha, Samer

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the test-bed designed for the investigation of passive direction finding, recognition, and classification of speech and sound sources using sensor arrays. The test-bed forms the experimental basis of the Intelligent Small-Scale Spatial Direction Finder (ISS-SDF) project, aimed at furthering digital signal processing and intelligent sensor capabilities of sensor array technology in applications such as rocket engine diagnostics, sensor health prognostics, and structural anomaly detection. This form of intelligent sensor technology has potential for significant impact on NASA exploration, earth science and propulsion test capabilities. The test-bed consists of microphone arrays, power and signal distribution modules, web-based data acquisition, wireless Ethernet, modeling, simulation and visualization software tools. The Acoustic Sensor Array Modeler I (ASAM I) is used for studying steering capabilities of acoustic arrays and testing DSP techniques. Spatial sound distribution visualization is modeled using the Acoustic Sphere Analysis and Visualization (ASAV-I) tool.

  4. Reserve capacity of the elderly in aging-sensitive tests of fluid intelligence: replication and extension.

    PubMed

    Baltes, P B; Dittmann-Kohli, F; Kliegl, R

    1986-06-01

    Fluid intelligence belongs to that cluster of intellectual abilities evincing aging loss. To examine further the range of intellectual reserve available to aging individuals and the question of replicability in a new cultural and laboratory setting, 204 healthy older adults (mean age = 72 years; range = 60-86) participated in a short-term longitudinal training study. For experimental subjects, 10 sessions consisted of cognitive training involving two subability tests (Figural Relations, Induction) of fluid intelligence. The pattern of outcomes replicates and expands on earlier studies. Older adults have the reserve to evince substantial increases in levels of performance in fluid intelligence tests. Transfer of training, however, is narrow in scope. Training also increases accuracy of performance and the ability to solve more difficult test items. Difficulty level was estimated in a separate study, with a comparable sample of N = 112 elderly adults. Future research is suggested to examine whether intellectual reserve extends to near-maximum levels of performance.

  5. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Next Intelligent Systems

    SciTech Connect

    del Pobil, Angel; Madhavan, Raj; Bonsignorio, Fabio

    2009-10-01

    Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems presents research dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems by drawing from the experiences and insights of leading experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. This contributed volume offers a detailed and coherent picture of state-of-the-art, recent developments, and further research areas in intelligent systems. The chapters cover a broad range of applications, such as assistive robotics, planetary surveying, urban search and rescue, and line tracking for automotive assembly. Subsystems or components described in this book include human-robot interaction, multi-robot coordination, communications, perception, and mapping. Chapters are also devoted to simulation support and open source software for cognitive platforms, providing examples of the type of enabling underlying technologies that can help intelligent systems to propagate and increase in capabilities. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems serves as a professional reference for researchers and practitioners in the field. This book is also applicable to advanced courses for graduate level students and robotics professionals in a wide range of engineering and related disciplines including computer science, automotive, healthcare, manufacturing, and service robotics.

  6. On the Relevance of Intelligence: Applications for Classrooms? Intelligence Testing: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Nancy

    The relevance of intelligence testing for schools within one district, the Sacramento (California) school district and the state of California is explored, and applications of intelligence theory in district schools and classrooms are discussed. Intelligence, for purposes of this discussion, is the aggregate capacity of each student's…

  7. Phonetic Intelligibility Testing in Adults with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bunton, Kate; Leddy, Mark; Miller, Jon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document speech intelligibility deficits for a group of five adult males with Down syndrome, and use listener based error profiles to identify phonetic dimensions underlying reduced intelligibility. Phonetic error profiles were constructed for each speaker using the Kent, Weismer, Kent, and Rosenbek (1989) word intelligibility test. The test was designed to allow for identification of reasons for the intelligibility deficit, quantitative analyses at varied levels, and sensitivity to potential speech deficits across populations. Listener generated profiles were calculated based on a multiple-choice task and a transcription task. The most disrupted phonetic features, across listening task, involved simplification of clusters in both the word initial and word final position, and contrasts involving tongue-posture, control, and timing (e.g., high-low vowel, front-back vowel, and place of articulation for stops and fricatives). Differences between speakers in the ranking of these phonetic features was found, however, the mean error proportion for the six most severely affected features correlated highly with the overall intelligibility score (0.88 based on multiple-choice task, .94 for the transcription task). The phonetic feature analyses are an index that may help clarify the suspected motor speech basis for the speech intelligibility deficits seen in adults with Down syndrome and may lead to improved speech management in these individuals. PMID:17692179

  8. Mastery-Level Measurement: An Alternative Approach to Norm-Referenced Intelligence Testing Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Pierre, Sharon D.

    The measurement of intelligence (I.Q. testing method) has been based on test item construction methods that set norms for mental levels. Individual performance levels are determined by the distribution of scores based on the total group or mean score. The problem with this method of assessment for research purposes is that idiosyncratic…

  9. Measurement of ability emotional intelligence: results for two new tests.

    PubMed

    Austin, Elizabeth J

    2010-08-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has attracted considerable interest amongst both individual differences researchers and those in other areas of psychology who are interested in how EI relates to criteria such as well-being and career success. Both trait (self-report) and ability EI measures have been developed; the focus of this paper is on ability EI. The associations of two new ability EI tests with psychometric intelligence, emotion perception, and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso EI test (MSCEIT) were examined. The new EI tests were the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM) and the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU). Only the STEU and the MSCEIT Understanding Emotions branch were significantly correlated with psychometric intelligence, suggesting that only understanding emotions can be regarded as a candidate new intelligence component. These understanding emotions tests were also positively correlated with emotion perception tests, and STEM and STEU scores were positively correlated with MSCEIT total score and most branch scores. Neither the STEM nor the STEU were significantly correlated with trait EI tests, confirming the distinctness of trait and ability EI. Taking the present results as a starting-point, approaches to the development of new ability EI tests and models of EI are suggested.

  10. Does IQ = IQ? Comparability of Intelligence Test Scores in Typically Developing Children.

    PubMed

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Lemola, Sakari; Grob, Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Numerous intelligence tests are available to psychological diagnosticians to assess children's intelligence, but whether they yield comparable test results has been little studied. We examined test scores of 206 typically developing children aged 6 to 11 years on five German intelligence tests (Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales; Snijders Oomen Nonverbal Intelligence Test; Intelligence and Development Scales; Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, 4th edition; Culture Fair Intelligence Test Scale 2), which were individually administered. On a sample level, the test scores showed strong correlation and little or no mean difference. These results indicate that the tests measure a similar underlying construct, which is interpreted as general intelligence. On an individual level, however, test scores significantly differed across tests for 12% to 38% of the children. Differences did not depend on which test was used but rather on unexplained error. Implications for the application of intelligence assessment in psychological practice are discussed.

  11. Personality Traits and General Intelligence as Predictors of Academic Performance: A Structural Equation Modelling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosander, Pia; Backstrom, Martin; Stenberg, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which personality traits, after controlling for general intelligence, predict academic performance in different school subjects. Upper secondary school students in Sweden (N=315) completed the Wonderlic IQ test (Wonderlic, 1992) and the IPIP-NEO-PI test (Goldberg, 1999). A series of…

  12. Psychological variables and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV performance.

    PubMed

    Gass, Carlton S; Gutierrez, Laura

    2016-06-07

    The MMPI-2 and WAIS-IV are commonly used together in neuropsychological evaluations yet little is known about their interrelationships. This study explored the potential influence of psychological factors on WAIS-IV performance in a sample of 180 predominantly male veteran referrals that underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological examination in a VA Medical Center. Exclusionary criteria included failed performance validity testing and self-report distortion on the MMPI-2. A Principal Components Analysis was performed on the 15 MMPI-2 content scales, yielding three broader higher-order psychological dimensions: Internalized Emotional Dysfunction (IED), Externalized Emotional Dysfunction (EED), and Fear. Level of IED was not related to performance on the WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ or its four indexes: (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Working Memory, and Processing Speed). EED was not related to WAIS-IV performance. Level of Fear, which encompasses health preoccupations (HEA) and distorted perceptions (BIZ), was significantly related to WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ and Verbal Comprehension. These results challenge the common use of high scores on the MMPI-2 IED measures (chiefly depression and anxiety) to explain deficient WAIS-IV performance. In addition, they provide impetus for further investigation of the relation between verbal intelligence and Fear.

  13. Validity of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (CTONI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossen, Eric A.; Shearer, Deirdre K.; Penfield, Randall D.; Kranzler, John H.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the construct validity of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (CTONI) in two separate investigations. The first study examined criterion-related evidence of validity across racial/ethnic groups on the CTONI and the Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Tests of Achievement (3rd edition). The second study examined the…

  14. Concurrent Validity Study of the Slosson Intelligence Test-Revised in Mental Retardation Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunen, Seth; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Concurrent validity testing of the Slosson Intelligence Test-Revised with the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (Fourth Edition), involving 191 individuals (ages 5-69 and IQs of 36 to 110), found a high correlation between the two scales. However, the Slosson unsatisfactorily matched the Stanford-Binet's assignment of individuals to IQ categories.…

  15. Test Review: Review of Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition: Kaufman, A. S., & Kaufman, N. L. (2004). "Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition". Bloomington, MN: Pearson, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Sherry K.; Jaspers, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, Second Edition (KBIT-2; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004b), which is designed to provide a brief, individualized format for measuring verbal and nonverbal intelligence in children and adults from the ages of 4 years, 0 months through 90 years, 11 months. The test consists of only…

  16. An Investigation of the Relationship between Iranian EFL Learners' Cultural Intelligence and Their Performance on the IELTS Listening Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, Arezoo; Khosravi, Robab; Nasiri, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between Iranian EFL Learners' Cultural intelligence (CQ) and their performance on the IELTS Listening Module. Sixty advanced EFL students majoring in English translation at University of Zanjan were matched for the study through the Oxford Quick Placement Test. Cultural Intelligence Scale developed…

  17. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Student Teacher Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Todd L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study (N = 40) was to determine whether Student Teacher Performance (STP), as measured by a behavior-based performance evaluation process, is associated with Emotional Intelligence (EI), as measured by a personality assessment instrument. The study is an important contribution to the literature in that it appears…

  18. Examples Performance Testing Templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Siple, Bud H.

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this Performance Testing Program Plan is to identify the process and phased approach that will be implemented at Site XYZ . The purpose of the testing program at Site XYZ is specifically designed to evaluate the effectiveness of systems that are employed at this site. This plan defines tasks to be accomplished to ensure that performance testing is conducted as effectively and efficiently as possible.

  19. Language Testing and International Intelligibility: A Hong Kong Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A central issue in language testing is the choice of norms, and the need to reconcile notions of "standard" English with local language norms and features. Data from studies of international intelligibility indicate that some features of "standard" language descriptions, based on native-speaker language use, are not essential…

  20. Use of Brief Intelligence Tests in the Identification of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Eric E.; Kilmer, Lydia M.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; McIntosh, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Schools often administer brief intelligence tests as the first step in the identification of students who are cognitively gifted. However, brief measures are often used without consideration of underlying constructs or the psychometric properties of the measures and without regard to the links between screening decisions and educational…

  1. An Interpretive Profile for the Slosson Intelligence Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Mark

    1975-01-01

    The S.I.T. is an age scale of intelligence with demonstrated reliability and high validity coefficients correlated to the Stanford-Binet. The items of the SIT were classified according to a scheme resembling Valett's classification of Stanford-Binet test items. A comparison of the classifications is made. (Author)

  2. Using business intelligence to improve performance.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Tom; Graves, Brian; Glass, Steve; Harrison, A Marc; Donovan, Chris; Proctor, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Cleveland Clinic's enterprise performance management program offers proof that comparisons of actual performance against strategic objectives can enable healthcare organization to achieve rapid organizational change. Here are four lessons Cleveland Clinic learned from this initiative: Align performance metrics with strategic initiatives. Structure dashboards for the CEO. Link performance to annual reviews. Customize dashboard views to the specific user.

  3. Measuring the Performance and Intelligence of Systems: Proceedings of the 2002 PerMIS Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messina, E. R.; Meystel, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: Performance Metrics; Performance of Multiple Agents; Performance of Mobility Systems; Performance of Planning Systems; General Discussion Panel 1; Uncertainty of Representation I; Performance of Robots in Hazardous Domains; Modeling Intelligence; Modeling of Mind; Measuring Intelligence; Grouping: A Core Procedure of Intelligence; Uncertainty in Representation II; Towards Universal Planning/Control Systems.

  4. Intelligence Test Scores and Birth Order among Young Norwegian Men (Conscripts) Analyzed within and between Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerkedal, Tor; Kristensen, Petter; Skjeret, Geir A.; Brevik, John I.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of a within and between family analysis of the relation between birth order and intelligence. The material comprises more than a quarter of a million test scores for intellectual performance of Norwegian male conscripts recorded during 1984-2004. Conscripts, mostly 18-19 years of age, were born to women for…

  5. Using Intelligent Simulation to Enhance Human Performance in Aircraft Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William B.; Norton, Jeffrey E.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors research and development investigates the capabilities and limitations of the human within a system. Of the many variables affecting human performance in the aviation maintenance system, training is among the most important. The advent of advanced technology hardware and software has created intelligent training simulations. This paper describes one advanced technology training system under development for the Federal Aviation Administration.

  6. Creativity, Emotional Intelligence, and School Performance in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansenne, Michel; Legrand, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that both creativity and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to children school performance. In this study, we investigated the incremental validity of EI over creativity in an elementary school setting. Seventy-three children aged from 9 to 12 years old were recruited to participate in the study. Verbal and…

  7. Some Factors Underlying Mathematical Performance: The Role of Visuospatial Working Memory and Non-Verbal Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyttala, Minna; Lehto, Juhani E.

    2008-01-01

    Passive and active visuospatial working memory (VSWM) were investigated in relation to maths performance. The mental rotation task was employed as a measure of active VSWM whereas passive VSWM was investigated using a modified Corsi Blocks task and a matrix pattern task. The Raven Progressive Matrices Test measured fluid intelligence. A total of…

  8. Interindividual Differences in Learning Performance: The Effects of Age, Intelligence, and Strategic Task Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliegel, Matthias; Altgassen, Mareike

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated fluid and crystallized intelligence as well as strategic task approaches as potential sources of age-related differences in adult learning performance. Therefore, 45 young and 45 old adults were asked to learn pictured objects. Overall, young participants outperformed old participants in this learning test. However,…

  9. Test and Performance Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Test and performance anxiety is not recognized easily in schools, in large part because adolescents rarely refer themselves for emotional concerns. Not wanting to risk teasing or public attention, anxious adolescents suffer in silence and under perform on school-related tasks. In school, anxiety is experienced often by students when being…

  10. Test anxiety and intelligence testing: a closer examination of the stage-fright hypothesis and the influence of stressful instruction.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Joost; Oostdam, Ron

    2007-03-01

    The influence of test anxiety and the content of instruction (stressful versus reassuring) on measurements of intelligence were investigated. It was expected that components of test anxiety would show differential effects on test performance. A Latin Square design was used to unravel the effects of test type and test order. Furthermore, effects of type of instruction, stressful versus reassuring, were studied by means of a within-subjects design. Test anxiety was measured with the Revised Worry-Emotionality Questionnaire. Measurements for verbal ability, reasoning, and memory were administered. Performance on memory tests showed less vulnerability to test anxiety compared with the other tests, with a picture recall test being insensitive. The negative effect of test anxiety was mostly confined to the beginning of a test session, independent of the type of test. Partial support for the so-called stage-fright hypothesis was found. The effect of instructional content was equivocal.

  11. Intelligent neural network classifier for automatic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Baoxing; Yu, Heping

    1996-10-01

    This paper is concerned with an application of a multilayer feedforward neural network for the vision detection of industrial pictures, and introduces a high characteristics image processing and recognizing system which can be used for real-time testing blemishes, streaks and cracks, etc. on the inner walls of high-accuracy pipes. To take full advantage of the functions of the artificial neural network, such as the information distributed memory, large scale self-adapting parallel processing, high fault-tolerance ability, this system uses a multilayer perceptron as a regular detector to extract features of the images to be inspected and classify them.

  12. The Prediction of Students' Academic Performance With Fluid Intelligence in Giving Special Consideration to the Contribution of Learning.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuezhu; Schweizer, Karl; Wang, Tengfei; Xu, Fen

    2015-01-01

    The present study provides a new account of how fluid intelligence influences academic performance. In this account a complex learning component of fluid intelligence tests is proposed to play a major role in predicting academic performance. A sample of 2, 277 secondary school students completed two reasoning tests that were assumed to represent fluid intelligence and standardized math and verbal tests assessing academic performance. The fluid intelligence data were decomposed into a learning component that was associated with the position effect of intelligence items and a constant component that was independent of the position effect. Results showed that the learning component contributed significantly more to the prediction of math and verbal performance than the constant component. The link from the learning component to math performance was especially strong. These results indicated that fluid intelligence, which has so far been considered as homogeneous, could be decomposed in such a way that the resulting components showed different properties and contributed differently to the prediction of academic performance. Furthermore, the results were in line with the expectation that learning was a predictor of performance in school.

  13. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  14. Artificial intelligence and expert systems in-flight software testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasie, M. P.; Muratore, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss the introduction of advanced information systems technologies such as artificial intelligence, expert systems, and advanced human-computer interfaces directly into Space Shuttle software engineering. The reconfiguration automation project (RAP) was initiated to coordinate this move towards 1990s software technology. The idea behind RAP is to automate several phases of the flight software testing procedure and to introduce AI and ES into space shuttle flight software testing. In the first phase of RAP, conventional tools to automate regression testing have already been developed or acquired. There are currently three tools in use.

  15. Intelligent self-tuning of PID control for the robotic testing system for human musculoskeletal joints test.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lianfang

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, an intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control method is introduced to the robotic testing system for the biomechanical study of human musculoskeletal joints. For the testing system, the robot is a highly nonlinear and heavily coupled complicated system, and the human spinal specimen also demonstrates nonlinear property when undergoing testing. Although the conventional PID control approach is extensively used in most industrial control systems, it will break down for nonlinear systems, particularly for complicated systems that have no precise mathematical models. To overcome those difficulties, an intelligent fuzzy PID controller is proposed replacing the widely used conventional PID controllers. The fuzzy PID algorithm is outlined using the fuzzy set theory. The design techniques are developed based on the linguistic phase plane approach. The heuristic rules of syntheses are summarized into a rule-based expert system. Experiments are carried out and the results demonstrate the good performance of the robotic testing system using the proposed control method.

  16. 'A Mental Test for Every Child': The Use of Intelligence Tests in Progressive School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Paul Davis

    This essay shows that the adoption of intelligence tests by the schools was a complex development. Tests were adopted during the 1920s as part of the reform program fashioned by the network of applied psychologists and school people. While the network itself often viewed testing as a means to improve the schools and society, immigrants and blacks…

  17. Validating an artificial intelligence human proximity operations system with test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Justin; Straub, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    An artificial intelligence-controlled robot (AICR) operating in close proximity to humans poses risk to these humans. Validating the performance of an AICR is an ill posed problem, due to the complexity introduced by the erratic (noncomputer) actors. In order to prove the AICR's usefulness, test cases must be generated to simulate the actions of these actors. This paper discusses AICR's performance validation in the context of a common human activity, moving through a crowded corridor, using test cases created by an AI use case producer. This test is a two-dimensional simplification relevant to autonomous UAV navigation in the national airspace.

  18. The Effect of Test Content and Context on the Anxiety-Intelligence Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Roberta M.; Milgram, Norman A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of test content and context on the anxiety-intelligence relationship was investigated in a group-administration of an intelligence measure presumably free of anxiety-provoking cues, comprehension of cartoons and several conventional intelligence and achievement measures. Subjects were 177 boys and girls in grades 4 to 6. (MS)

  19. Emotional Intelligence Tests: Potential Impacts on the Hiring Process for Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, Shane; Wegener, Matt; Bay, Darlene; Cook, Gail Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Emotional intelligence is increasingly recognized as being important for professional career success. Skills related to emotional intelligence (e.g. organizational commitment, public speaking, teamwork, and leadership) are considered essential. Human resource professionals have begun including tests of emotional intelligence (EI) in job applicant…

  20. Intraindividual neuropsychological test variability in healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment.

    PubMed

    Heyanka, Daniel J; Holster, Jessica L; Golden, Charles J

    2013-08-01

    Knowledge of patterns of neuropsychological performance among normal, healthy individuals is integral to the practice of clinical neuropsychology, because clinicians may not always account for intraindividual variability (IIV) before coming to diagnostic conclusions. The IIV was assessed among a sample of 46 healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment, utilizing a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition (WMS-IV). The data indicated substantial variability in neurocognitive abilities. All participants were found to demonstrate scores considered impaired by at least 2 standard deviations (SDs). Despite adjusting for outliers, no participant produced a "normal" testing profile with an intraindividual maximum discrepancy (MD) of less than 1 SD in either direction. When WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) was considered, participants generally demonstrated cognitive test scores ranging from 2 SDs less than to 1.5 SDs greater than their FSIQ. Furthermore, after demographic corrections, the majority (59%) of participants demonstrated at least 1 impaired cognitive test score, as defined by being 1 to 1.5 SDs below the mean. Overall, results substantiate the need for clinicians to consider FSIQ and educational attainment in interpretation of neuropsychological testing results, given the relevant commonality of "abnormal" test scores within this population. This may ultimately reduce the likelihood of making false-positive conclusions of impairment when educational attainment and intelligence are high, thus improving diagnostic accuracy.

  1. Relation of Employee and Manager Emotional Intelligence to Job Satisfaction and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sy, Thomas; Tram, Susanna; O'Hara, Linda A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among employees' emotional intelligence, their manager's emotional intelligence, employees' job satisfaction, and performance for 187 food service employees from nine different locations of the same restaurant franchise. We predicted and found that employees' emotional intelligence was positively associated…

  2. The assessment of emotional intelligence: a comparison of performance-based and self-report methodologies.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Irina; Matheson, Kimberly; Mantler, Janet

    2006-02-01

    We assessed the patterns of convergent validity for the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002), a performance-based measure of emotional intelligence (EI) that entails presenting problems thought to have correct responses, and a self-report measure of EI (Schutte et al., 1998). The relations between EI and demographic characteristics of a diverse community sample (N = 223) concurred with previous research. However, the performance-based and self-report scales were not related to one another. Only self-reported EI scores showed a consistent pattern of relations with self-reported coping styles and depressive affect, whereas the performance-based measure demonstrated stronger relations with age, education, and receiving psychotherapy. We discuss implications for the validity of these measures and their utility.

  3. The effect of test content and context on the anxiety-intelligence relationship.

    PubMed

    Milgram, R M; Milgram, N A

    1977-03-01

    The effect of test content and context on the anxiety-intelligence relationship was investigated by group-administering an intelligence measure presumably free of anxiety provoking cues, comprehension of cartoons, and several conventional intelligence and achievement measures to 177 boys and girls in Grades 4-6 in greater Tel-Aviv. Since the humor comprehension intelligence measure was as negatively correlated with test anxiety as were the conventional measures, it was concluded that trait anxiety is not a sufficient explanation of the anxiety-intelligence relationship.

  4. A human performance modelling approach to intelligent decision support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, Michael S.; Boys, Randy M.

    1987-01-01

    Manned space operations require that the many automated subsystems of a space platform be controllable by a limited number of personnel. To minimize the interaction required of these operators, artificial intelligence techniques may be applied to embed a human performance model within the automated, or semi-automated, systems, thereby allowing the derivation of operator intent. A similar application has previously been proposed in the domain of fighter piloting, where the demand for pilot intent derivation is primarily a function of limited time and high workload rather than limited operators. The derivation and propagation of pilot intent is presented as it might be applied to some programs.

  5. The Development of the Wechsler Scales and Their Influence on Contemporary Intelligence Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benisz, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The history of intelligence testing merits study as standardized intelligence tests have been administered for only a little over a century. The most popular tests in use today are the Wechsler scales, despite the availability of other test batteries that are better grounded in contemporary theory. To understand why contemporary revisions of…

  6. Temporal Relations and Intelligence: Correlating Relational Performance with Performance on the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hora, Denis; Pelaez, Martha; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Rae, Gordon; Robinson, Karen; Chaudhary, Tahir

    2008-01-01

    Relational frame theory (RFT) explicitly suggests that derived relational responding underlies complex verbally-based cognitive performances. The current study investigated whether the ability to respond in accordance with temporal relations between stimuli was predictive of performance on the four indices of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale,…

  7. The role of cognitive versus emotional intelligence in Iowa Gambling Task performance: What's emotion got to do with it?

    PubMed

    Webb, Christian A; DelDonno, Sophie; Killgore, William D S

    2014-01-01

    Debate persists regarding the relative role of cognitive versus emotional processes in driving successful performance on the widely used Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). From the time of its initial development, patterns of IGT performance were commonly interpreted as primarily reflecting implicit, emotion-based processes. Surprisingly, little research has tried to directly compare the extent to which measures tapping relevant cognitive versus emotional competencies predict IGT performance in the same study. The current investigation attempts to address this question by comparing patterns of associations between IGT performance, cognitive intelligence (Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence; WASI) and three commonly employed measures of emotional intelligence (EI; Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, MSCEIT; Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory, EQ-i; Self-Rated Emotional Intelligence Scale, SREIS). Results indicated that IGT performance was more strongly associated with cognitive, than emotional, intelligence. To the extent that the IGT indeed mimics "real-world" decision-making, our findings, coupled with the results of existing research, may highlight the role of deliberate, cognitive capacities over implicit, emotional processes in contributing to at least some domains of decision-making relevant to everyday life.

  8. Role of working memory, inhibition, and fluid intelligence in the performance of the Tower of London task.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Giovanni; La Torre, Francesca Romana; Marin, Dario; Antonucci, Gabriella; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2016-09-20

    We investigated the relationship between verbal and visuo-spatial measures of working memory, inhibition, fluid intelligence and the performance on the Tower of London (ToL) task in a large sample of 830 healthy participants aged between 18 and 71 years. We found that fluid intelligence and visuo-spatial working memory accounted for a significant variance in the ToL task, while performances on verbal working memory and on the Stroop Test were not predictive for performance on the ToL. The present results confirm that fluid intelligence has a fundamental role on planning tests, but also show that visuo-spatial working memory plays a crucial role in ToL performance.

  9. What is the relationship between emotional intelligence and dental student clinical performance?

    PubMed

    Victoroff, Kristin Zakariasen; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Emotional intelligence has emerged as a key factor in differentiating average from outstanding performers in managerial and leadership positions across multiple business settings, but relatively few studies have examined the role of emotional intelligence in the health care professions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and dental student clinical performance. All third- and fourth-year students at a single U.S. dental school were invited to participate. Participation rate was 74 percent (100/136). Dental students' EI was assessed using the Emotional Competence Inventory-University version (ECI-U), a seventy-two-item, 360-degree questionnaire completed by both self and other raters. The ECI-U measured twenty-two EI competencies grouped into four clusters (Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, and Relationship Management). Clinical performance was assessed using the mean grade assigned by clinical preceptors. This grade represents an overall assessment of a student's clinical performance including diagnostic and treatment planning skills, time utilization, preparation and organization, fundamental knowledge, technical skills, self-evaluation, professionalism, and patient management. Additional variables were didactic grade point average (GPA) in Years 1 and 2, preclinical GPA in Years 1 and 2, Dental Admission Test academic average and Perceptual Ability Test scores, year of study, age, and gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. The Self-Management cluster of competencies (b=0.448, p<0.05) and preclinical GPA (b=0.317, p<0.01) were significantly correlated with mean clinical grade. The Self-Management competencies were emotional self-control, achievement orientation, initiative, trustworthiness, conscientiousness, adaptability, and optimism. In this sample, dental students' EI competencies related to Self-Management were significant predictors of mean clinical grade

  10. Performance Evaluation and Metrics for Perception in Intelligent Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Shi, Jane; Hanning, Tobias; Muralikrishnan, Bala; Young, S. Susan; Chang, Tommy

    An unsolved but important problem in intelligent manufacturing is dynamic pose estimation under complex environmental conditions—tracking an object's pose and position as it moves in an environment with uncontrolled lighting and background. This is a central task in robotic perception, and a robust, highly accurate solution would be of use in a number of manufacturing applications. To be commercially feasible, a solution must also be benchmarked against performance standards so manufacturers fully understand its nature and capabilities. The PerMIS 2008 Special Session on “Performance Metrics for Perception in Intelligent Manufacturing,” held August 20, 2008, brought together academic, industrial and governmental researchers interested in calibrating and benchmarking vision and metrology systems. The special session had a series of speakers who each addressed a component of the general problem of benchmarking complex perception tasks, including dynamic pose estimation. The components included assembly line motion analysis, camera calibration, laser tracker calibration, super-resolution range data enhancement and evaluation, and evaluation of 6DOF pose estimation for visual servoing. This Chapter combines and summarizes the results of the special session, giving a framework for benchmarking perception systems and relating the individual components to the general framework.

  11. Enhance hospital performance from intellectual capital to business intelligence.

    PubMed

    Karami, Mahtab; Fatehi, Mansoor; Torabi, Mashallah; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Rahimi, Azin; Safdari, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) refers to technologies, tools, and practices for collecting, integrating, analyzing, and presenting large volumes of information to enable better decision making. The aim of this study is to provide a general overview of BI and its impacts on improving hospital performance. In this paper, literature is reviewed on the concept, classification, and structure of intellectual capital and BI. Research on the building of BI and its impact on the performance of hospitals are briefly summarized. Some areas in healthcare which can utilize BI benefits, including radiology, are also discussed. Used properly, BI is an effective communication tool that can enable hospitals to reach strategic goals and objectives and can also help eliminate information asymmetry.

  12. Issues in the Educational, Psychological Assessment of Visually Impaired Children: Test-Retest Reliability of the Williams Intelligence Test for Children with Defective Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Michael J.; Hill, Eileen W.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses some problems confronting teachers and psychologists when making decisions as to how to use the currently available test procedures. It reports data gathered on three separate occasions on the performance of a group of blind and partially sighted children on the Williams Intelligence Test which is the only specialist IQ test…

  13. Infiniband Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, M

    2005-10-13

    A look at the performance of the infiniband interconnect using the Voltaire host stack. This will attempt to compare not only infiniband to other high-performance interconnects, but will also take a look at comparing some of the different hardware choices available at the time of writing (e.g. Opteron, EM64T, pci-express and pci-x).

  14. Visual acuity and test performance.

    PubMed

    Heron, E; Zytkoskee, A

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of scholastic achievement (American College Testing Service) test scores confirms previous reports that persons with poor visual acuity perform better on these tests than individuals with normal or superior acuity.

  15. A National Study of the Social and Treatment "Invalidity" of Intelligence Testing for Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagnato, Stephen J.; Neisworth, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Conducted national consumer survey of preschool psychologists (n=185) regarding treatment and social validity of early intelligence tests for preschoolers with developmental deficits (n=7,223). Results demonstrated that early intelligence tests failed to be acceptable tools 43% of time and failed to document eligibility of over 3,000 young…

  16. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test Version 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, B.R.; Gignac, G.; Manocha, R.; Stough, C.

    2005-01-01

    and discussed.There has been some debate recently over the scoring, reliability and factor structure of ability measures of emotional intelligence (EI). This study examined these three psychometric properties with the most recent ability test of EI, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso,…

  17. Is "g" an Entity? A Japanese Twin Study Using Syllogisms and Intelligence Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shikishima, Chizuru; Hiraishi, Kai; Yamagata, Shinji; Sugimoto, Yutaro; Takemura, Ryo; Ozaki, Koken; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Toda, Tatsushi; Ando, Juko

    2009-01-01

    Using a behavioral genetic approach, we examined the validity of the hypothesis concerning the singularity of human general intelligence, the "g" theory, by analyzing data from two tests: the first consisted of 100 syllogism problems and the second a full-scale intelligence test. The participants were 448 Japanese young adult twins (167…

  18. Intelligent transient transitions detection of LRE test bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fengyu; Shen, Zhengguang; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Health Monitoring Systems is an implementation of monitoring strategies for complex systems whereby avoiding catastrophic failure, extending life and leading to improved asset management. A Health Monitoring Systems generally encompasses intelligence at many levels and sub-systems including sensors, actuators, devices, etc. In this paper, a smart sensor is studied, which is use to detect transient transitions of liquid-propellant rocket engines test bed. In consideration of dramatic changes of variable condition, wavelet decomposition is used to work real time in areas. Contrast to traditional Fourier transform method, the major advantage of adding wavelet analysis is the ability to detect transient transitions as well as obtaining the frequency content using a much smaller data set. Historically, transient transitions were only detected by offline analysis of the data. The methods proposed in this paper provide an opportunity to detect transient transitions automatically as well as many additional data anomalies, and provide improved data-correction and sensor health diagnostic abilities. The developed algorithms have been tested on actual rocket test data.

  19. A Framework for Intelligent Rocket Test Facilities with Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Solano, Wanda; Morris, Jon; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Polikar, Robi

    2003-01-01

    A long-term center goal at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the formulation and implementation of a framework for an Intelligent Rocket Test Facility (IRTF), which incorporates distributed smart sensor elements. The IRTF is to provide reliable, high-confident measurements. Specific objectives include: 1. Definition of a framework and architecture that supports implementation of highly autonomous methodologies founded on basic physical principles and embedded knowledge. 2. Modeling of autonomous sensors and processes as self-sufficient, evolutionary elements. 3. Development of appropriate communications protocols to enable the complex interactions that must take place to allow timely and high-quality flow of of information among all the autonomous elements of the system. 4. Development of lab-scale prototypes of key system elements. Though our application is next-generation rocket test facilities, applications for the approach are much wider and include monitoring of shuttle launch operations, air and spacecraft operations and health monitoring, and other large-scale industrial system operations such as found in processing and manufacturing plans. Elements of prototype IRTF have been implemented in preparation for advanced development and validation using rocket test stand facilities as SSC. This work has identified issues that are important to further development of complex network and should be of interest to other working with sensor networks.

  20. EEG Alpha Power and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doppelmayr, M.; Klimesch, W.; Stadler, W.; Pollhuber, D.; Heine, C.

    2002-01-01

    Tested whether alpha power in different sub-bands is selectively related to intelligence. For 74 Austrian subjects, the EEG was recorded during a resting session and 2 different intelligence tests were performed. Findings show a strong positive correlation between intelligence and alpha power. (SLD)

  1. The relationship between the social management of emotional intelligence and academic performance among medical students.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Md Zain, Azhar; Hassan, Faezah

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interaction with peers was said to facilitate cognitive and intellectual development leading to good academic performance. There was paucity of published data on the effect of social management (SM) emotional intelligence (EI) on academic performance. We conducted this study to examine their relationship in the undergraduate medical students in a public medical school in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to measure the SM. The first and final year medical students were invited to participate. Students answered a paper-based demography questionnaire and completed the online MSCEIT in privacy. Independent predictors were identified using multivariate analyses. A total of 163 (84 first year and 79 final year) medical students completed the study (at a response rate of 66.0%). SM score (B = -.10 95% CI -.175 to -.015, p = .021) was significantly related to the continuous assessment (CA) marks (adjusted R(2) = .45, F13,137 = 10.26, p < .0001), and was a predictor of poor result in the overall CA (adjusted OR 1.06 95% CI 1.011-1.105). Negative relationships might exist between emotional social intelligence and academic success in undergraduate medical students. A different collection of social skills and SM EI could be constructive towards academic achievement in medical schools.

  2. Intelligent Launch and Range Operations Virtual Test Bed (ILRO-VTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge; Rajkumar, T.

    2003-01-01

    Intelligent Launch and Range Operations Virtual Test Bed (ILRO-VTB) is a real-time web-based command and control, communication, and intelligent simulation environment of ground-vehicle, launch and range operation activities. ILRO-VTB consists of a variety of simulation models combined with commercial and indigenous software developments (NASA Ames). It creates a hybrid software/hardware environment suitable for testing various integrated control system components of launch and range. The dynamic interactions of the integrated simulated control systems are not well understood. Insight into such systems can only be achieved through simulation/emulation. For that reason, NASA has established a VTB where we can learn the actual control and dynamics of designs for future space programs, including testing and performance evaluation. The current implementation of the VTB simulates the operations of a sub-orbital vehicle of mission, control, ground-vehicle engineering, launch and range operations. The present development of the test bed simulates the operations of Space Shuttle Vehicle (SSV) at NASA Kennedy Space Center. The test bed supports a wide variety of shuttle missions with ancillary modeling capabilities like weather forecasting, lightning tracker, toxic gas dispersion model, debris dispersion model, telemetry, trajectory modeling, ground operations, payload models and etc. To achieve the simulations, all models are linked using Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The test bed provides opportunities for government, universities, researchers and industries to do a real time of shuttle launch in cyber space.

  3. Emotional Intelligence of Malaysian Academia towards Work Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngah, Rohana; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman; Rahman, Zanariah Abdul

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the research conducted in relating to emotional intelligence of university staff to work attitude. The Emotional Intelligence (EI) Scale devised by Schutte et al. (1998) is used in this study, which is more suitable compared to BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory. Beside their experiences, knowledge and skills, emotion play an…

  4. Emotional intelligence and emotions associated with optimal and dysfunctional athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Devonport, Tracey J; Soos, Istvan; Karsai, Istvan; Leibinger, Eva; Hamar, Pal

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between self-report measures of emotional intelligence and memories of pre-competitive emotions before optimal and dysfunctional athletic performance. Participant-athletes (n = 284) completed a self-report measure of emotional intelligence and two measures of pre-competitive emotions; a) emotions experienced before an optimal performance, and b) emotions experienced before a dysfunctional performance. Consistent with theoretical predictions, repeated MANOVA results demonstrated pleasant emotions associated with optimal performance and unpleasant emotions associated with dysfunctional performance. Emotional intelligence correlated with pleasant emotions in both performances with individuals reporting low scores on the self-report emotional intelligence scale appearing to experience intense unpleasant emotions before dysfunctional performance. We suggest that future research should investigate relationships between emotional intelligence and emotion-regulation strategies used by athletes. Key pointsAthletes reporting high scores of self-report emotional intelligence tend to experience pleasant emotions.Optimal performance is associated with pleasant emotions and dysfunctional performance is associated with unpleasant emotions.Emotional intelligence might help athletes recognize which emotional states help performance.

  5. Resident Advisor General Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence, Personality Dimensions, and Internal Belief Characteristics as Predictors of Rated Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Max B.; Stemler, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Resident Advisors (RAs) have a significant hand in helping students adjust and thrive in college life. Given the importance of selecting high-performing RAs, this study sought to examine how well various measures of intelligence (e.g., general, emotional) in addition to personality and additional "internal belief" characteristics predict…

  6. Race Differences in Tested Intelligence: Important Socially, Obscure Causally. A Review ... of "Bias in Mental Testing", by Arthur R. Jensen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Lloyd G.

    1981-01-01

    This document is a book review of "Bias in Mental Testing" by Arthur R. Jensen. Jensen discusses intelligence as a phenotypic construct. The problem of ethnic differences in phenotypic intelligence is emotionally charged, which makes rational consideration of the issues difficult. The reviewer disagrees with the author's predisposition…

  7. Cross-Cultural Bias Analysis of Cattell Culture-Fair Intelligence Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nenty, H. Johnson

    The Cattell Culture Fair Intelligence Test (CCFIT) was administered to a large sample of American, Nigerian, and Indian adolescents, and item data were examined for cultural bias. The CCFIT was designed to measure fluid intelligence, which is not influenced by cultural differences. Four different item analysis techniques were used to determine…

  8. Intelligence and the Epistemics of Interpersonal Acumen: Testing Some Implications of Gardner's Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosnow, Ralph L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Five studies testing the theory of interpersonal intelligence of H. Gardner with 133 college students found that, when adults mastered 1 combination in a hierarchy of action-intention combinations, they also tended to master combinations involving more complex skills. Findings are consistent with Gardner's view of interpersonal intelligence. (SLD)

  9. Further Studies of the Wonderlic Personnel Test as a Brief Measure of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodrill, Carl B.; Warner, Molly H.

    1988-01-01

    Used psychiatric, neurological, psychiatric/neurological, and normal subjects to evaluate the relations between the Wonderlic and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale in each sample. Found close relations in all cases, suggesting the value of additional attention to the Wonderlic Personnel Test as a brief measure of intelligence. (ASuthor/KS)

  10. Methodology Investigation of AI(Artificial Intelligence) Test Officer Support Tool. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    American Association for Artificial inteligence A! ............. Artificial inteliigence AMC ............ Unt:ed States Army Maeriel Comand ASL...block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Artificial Intelligence, Expert Systems Automated Aids to Testing 9. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and...identify by block number) This report covers the application of Artificial Intelligence-Techniques to the problem of creating automated tools to

  11. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-V: Test Review.

    PubMed

    Na, Sabrina D; Burns, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Changes from the fourth edition of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) to the fifth edition are discussed, with particular emphasis on how the electronic administration facilitated assessment. The hierarchical organization and conceptualization of primary indices have been adjusted, based on recent theory and research on the construct of intelligence. Changes also include updates to psychometric properties and consideration of cultural bias. The scoring program allows intelligence scores to be linked statistically to achievement measures to aid in diagnoses of learning disabilities. Electronic assessment was clunky at times but overall delivered on its promise of quicker and more accurate administration and scoring.

  12. Flight Test Implementation of a Second Generation Intelligent Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System project team has developed a series of flight control concepts designed to demonstrate the benefits of a neural network-based adaptive controller. The objective of the team was to develop and flight-test control systems that use neural network technology, to optimize the performance of the aircraft under nominal conditions, and to stabilize the aircraft under failure conditions. Failure conditions include locked or failed control surfaces as well as unforeseen damage that might occur to the aircraft in flight. The Intelligent Flight Control System team is currently in the process of implementing a second generation control scheme, collectively known as Generation 2 or Gen 2, for flight testing on the NASA F-15 aircraft. This report describes the Gen 2 system as implemented by the team for flight test evaluation. Simulation results are shown which describe the experiment to be performed in flight and highlight the ways in which the Gen 2 system meets the defined objectives.

  13. The Differential Effects of General Mental Ability and Emotional Intelligence on Academic Performance and Social Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Lynda Jiwen; Huang, Guo-hua; Peng, Kelly Z.; Law, Kenneth S.; Wong, Chi-Sum; Chen, Zhijun

    2010-01-01

    This study considers the debate about whether emotional intelligence (EI) has incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence dimensions. We propose that EI and general mental abilities (GMA) differ in predicting academic performance and the quality of social interactions among college students. Using two college student samples, we…

  14. Emotions, Intelligence, and Performance. Symposium 45. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Doug

    This paper, titled "The Components of Emotional Intelligence and the Relationship to Sales Performance," presents two general approaches to studying emotional intelligence. The first is a broad model approach that considers abilities as well as a series of personality traits. The second is based on ability models. The possible correlation between…

  15. The Relationship between the Emotional Intelligence of Secondary Public School Principals and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashworth, Stephanie R.

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between secondary public school principals' emotional intelligence and school performance. The correlational study employed an explanatory sequential mixed methods model. The non-probability sample consisted of 105 secondary public school principals in Texas. The emotional intelligence characteristics of the…

  16. The Role of Verbal and Performance Intelligence in Children's Strategy Selection and Execution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luwel, Koen; Foustana, Ageliki; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which verbal intelligence (VIQ) and performance intelligence (PIQ) contribute to strategy selection and execution in the context of a numerosity judgement task. The choice/no-choice method was used to appropriately assess strategy selection (in terms of strategy repertoire, frequency and adaptivity) and…

  17. Uniform peanut performance test 2015

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, 2 controls and 13 entries were evaluated at 9 locations....

  18. Uniform peanut performance test 2013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, 2 controls and 13 entries were evaluated at 9 locations....

  19. Validity evidence for the situational judgment test paradigm in emotional intelligence measurement.

    PubMed

    Libbrecht, Nele; Lievens, Filip

    2012-01-01

    To date, various measurement approaches have been proposed to assess emotional intelligence (EI). Recently, two new EI tests have been developed based on the situational judgment test (SJT) paradigm: the Situational Test of Emotional Understanding (STEU) and the Situational Test of Emotion Management (STEM). Initial attempts have been made to examine the construct-related validity of these new tests; we extend these findings by placing the tests in a broad nomological network. To this end, 850 undergraduate students completed a personality inventory, a cognitive ability test, a self-report EI test, a performance-based EI measure, the STEU, and the STEM. The SJT-based EI tests were not strongly correlated with personality and fluid cognitive ability. Regarding their relation with existing EI measures, the tests did not capture the same construct as self-report EI measures, but corresponded rather to performance-based EI measures. Overall, these results lend support for the SJT paradigm for measuring EI as an ability.

  20. What Does Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology Tell Us about Multiple Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Studies that have used noninvasive brain imaging techniques to record neocortical activity while individuals were performing cognitive intelligence tests (traditional intelligence) and social intelligence tests were reviewed. In cognitive intelligence tests 16 neocortical areas were active, whereas in social intelligence 10 areas were active.…

  1. Swedish Test of Intelligibility for Children (STI-CH)--validity and reliability of a computer-mediated single word intelligibility test for children.

    PubMed

    Lagerberg, Tove B; Hartelius, Lena; Johnels, Jakob Åsberg; Ahlman, Anna-Karin; Börjesson, Andrea; Persson, Christina

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: first, to describe a new Swedish intelligibility test (Swedish Test of Intelligibility for Children, STI-CH) and second to evaluate its validity and reliability. STI-CH is based on the repetition of single words. Ten children with a speech-sound disorder (4:6-8:3 years of age, mean = 6.0 years) and 10 children with typical speech and language development (4:8-7:4 years of age, mean = 5.9 years) were included. Twenty speech-language pathology students served as listeners. Intra-judge reliability was high (r > 0.92), as was the intra-class correlation of inter-judge reliability (0.97). In terms of validity, there was a significant difference in STI-CH scores between the two groups, and the scores correlated statistically significantly with the Percentage of Consonants Correct (r = 0.94) and with intelligibility in spontaneous speech (r = 0.85). To sum up, the results indicate that STI-CH could be an option for the assessment of intelligibility in Swedish-speaking children, and that the principles used in the development of the test could be of use in the design of intelligibility tests in languages other than Swedish.

  2. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    MedlinePlus

    ... labs also vary in complexity, the volume of tests performed, the technology utilized, and the number and type of professionals who conduct the testing . There are important differences among the various testing settings. This information will be useful in ... Proudly sponsored by ... Learn ...

  3. Collaborative Test Reviews: Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Anuradha; Makela, Carole J.

    2010-01-01

    A group study method proved helpful in improving senior-level students' performance on unit tests through collaborative learning. Students of a History of Textiles course voluntarily attended study sessions to review course content and prepare for unit tests. The students who attended the group reviews scored better on tests than those who did…

  4. The Predictive Validity of Four Intelligence Tests for School Grades: A Small Sample Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Gygi, Jasmin T.; Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Schweizer, Florine; Grob, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Intelligence is considered the strongest single predictor of scholastic achievement. However, little is known regarding the predictive validity of well-established intelligence tests for school grades. We analyzed the predictive validity of four widely used intelligence tests in German-speaking countries: The Intelligence and Development Scales (IDS), the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS), the Snijders-Oomen Nonverbal Intelligence Test (SON-R 6-40), and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV), which were individually administered to 103 children (Mage = 9.17 years) enrolled in regular school. School grades were collected longitudinally after 3 years (averaged school grades, mathematics, and language) and were available for 54 children (Mage = 11.77 years). All four tests significantly predicted averaged school grades. Furthermore, the IDS and the RIAS predicted both mathematics and language, while the SON-R 6-40 predicted mathematics. The WISC-IV showed no significant association with longitudinal scholastic achievement when mathematics and language were analyzed separately. The results revealed the predictive validity of currently used intelligence tests for longitudinal scholastic achievement in German-speaking countries and support their use in psychological practice, in particular for predicting averaged school grades. However, this conclusion has to be considered as preliminary due to the small sample of children observed. PMID:28348543

  5. Test Review: Hammill, D. D., Pearson, N. A., & Weiderholt, J. L. (2009). "Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2)." Austin, TX: PRO-ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delen, Erhan; Kaya, Fatih; Ritter, Nicola L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2), a nonverbal intelligence test created to assess reasoning and problem solving of children and adults. The goal of the CTONI-2 is to minimize the influence of language ability on intelligence test scores. Oral or pantomime instructions can…

  6. Using Interactive Computing to Expand Intelligence Testing: A Critique and Prospectus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Earl; Pellegrino, James

    1985-01-01

    There are economic advantages in using microcomputers as automated testing stations for measuring aptitude and intelligence. Microcomputers also make it possible to expand and modify testing procedures for psychological functions included in conventional tests and to test psychological functions not generally assessed by conventional tests, such…

  7. Application of intelligent systems to wind tunnel test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Steinle, Frank W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An approach to the application of intelligent-systems technology to the wind tunnel facilities at NASA Ames Research Center is outlined. To help fulfill the long-range goals of improving data quality and increasing personnel efficiency and management effectiveness, three major areas of intelligent systems application are recommended. The available state-of-the-art technology for developing the proposed systems is reviewed including the application of commercial software packages. The initial tasks and effort to develop these systems are recommended. A prototype expert system for selection of internal strain-gage balances has been built and is presented herein as an example model for the future systems.

  8. Emotional Intelligence and Problem Solving Strategy: Comparative Study Basedon "Tower of Hanoi" Test

    PubMed Central

    Arefnasab, Zahra; Zare, Hosein; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare problem solving strategies between peoples with high and low emotional intelligence (EI). Methods: This study is a cross sectional descriptive study.The sample groups include senior BS& BA between 20-30 years old into two with high and low emotional intelligence, each group had 30 subjects.Data was analyzed with non-parametric chi square test for main dependent variable (problem solving strategies) and accessory dependent variables(manner of starting and fulfillmentof the test).The Independent two group T-test was used for analyzing other accessory dependent variables(Number of errors and total time used for fulfillment of the test). Results: There was a significant difference between two groups in “number of errors” (t=-3.67,p=0) and “total time used for fulfillment of the test”(-6.17,p=0) and there was significant relation between EI and “problem solving strategies” (χ2=25.71, p<0.01) and (Cramer's v = 0.65, p<0.01) .Also there was significant relation between EI and “fulfillment of test” (χ2=20.31, p<0.01) and (φ=0.58, p<0.01). But the relation between EI and "manner of starting the test" was not significant (χ2=1.11, p=0.29). Subjects with high EI used more “insightful” strategy and subjects with low EI used more “trial- error” strategy. The first group completed the test more rapidlyand with fewer errors, compared with the second group. In addition the first group was more successful in performing the test than the second one. Conclusion: People with high EI significantly solve problems better than people with lowEI. PMID:24644484

  9. Proctored and Unproctored Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brallier, Sara; Palm, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This study examined test performance as a function of test format (proctored versus unproctored) and course type (traditional versus distance). The participants were 246 undergraduate students who completed introductory sociology courses during four semesters at a southeastern university. During each semester, the same instructor taught a…

  10. DSN system performance test software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The system performance test software is currently being modified to include additional capabilities and enhancements. Additional software programs are currently being developed for the Command Store and Forward System and the Automatic Total Recall System. The test executive is the main program. It controls the input and output of the individual test programs by routing data blocks and operator directives to those programs. It also processes data block dump requests from the operator.

  11. Test of Spanish sentences to measure speech intelligibility in noise conditions.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Teresa; González-Alvarez, Julio

    2011-06-01

    This article describes the development of a test for measuring the intelligibility of speech in noise for the Spanish language, similar to the test developed by Kalikow, Stevens, and Elliot (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 5, 1337-1360, 1977) for the English language. The test consists of six forms, each comprising 25 high-predictability (HP) sentences and 25 low-predictability (LP) sentences. The sentences were used in a perceptual task to assess their intelligibility in babble noise across three different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions in a sample of 474 normal-hearing listeners. The results showed that the listeners obtained higher scores of intelligibility for HP sentences than for LP sentences, and the scores were lower for the higher SNRs, as was expected. The final six forms were equivalent in intelligibility and phonetic content.

  12. Test Review: Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syeda, Maisha M.; Climie, Emma A.

    2014-01-01

    The "Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition" (WPPSI-IV; Wechsler, 2012a, 2012b) is a comprehensive clinical tool, intended for assessing cognitive functioning among children aged 2 years 6 months through 7 years 7 months. Published by Pearson, the WPPSI-IV is an individually administered tool, to be used by…

  13. Measuring the engagement level of children for multiple intelligence test using Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Yun, Woo han; Park, Chan kyu; Yoon, H.; Kim, Jaehong; Park, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we present an affect recognition system for measuring the engagement level of children using the Kinect while performing a multiple intelligence test on a computer. First of all, we recorded 12 children while solving the test and manually created a ground truth data for the engagement levels of each child. For a feature extraction, Kinect for Windows SDK provides support for a user segmentation and skeleton tracking so that we can get 3D joint positions of an upper-body skeleton of a child. After analyzing movement of children, the engagement level of children's responses is classified into two classes: High or Low. We present the classification results using the proposed features and identify the significant features in measuring the engagement.

  14. Higher emotional intelligence is related to lower test anxiety among students

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadpanah, Mohammad; Keshavarz, Mohammadreza; Haghighi, Mohammad; Jahangard, Leila; Bajoghli, Hafez; Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Background For students attending university courses, experiencing test anxiety (TA) dramatically impairs cognitive performance and success at exams. Whereas TA is a specific case of social phobia, emotional intelligence (EI) is an umbrella term covering interpersonal and intrapersonal skills, along with positive stress management, adaptability, and mood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that higher EI and lower TA are associated. Further, sex differences were explored. Method During an exam week, a total of 200 university students completed questionnaires covering sociodemographic information, TA, and EI. Results Higher scores on EI traits were associated with lower TA scores. Relative to male participants, female participants reported higher TA scores, but not EI scores. Intrapersonal and interpersonal skills and mood predicted low TA, while sex, stress management, and adaptability were excluded from the equation. Conclusion The pattern of results suggests that efforts to improve intrapersonal and interpersonal skills, and mood might benefit students with high TA. Specifically, social commitment might counteract TA. PMID:26834474

  15. Online Intelligent Controllers for an Enzyme Recovery Plant: Design Methodology and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Leite, M. S.; Fujiki, T. L.; Silva, F. V.; Fileti, A. M. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of intelligent controllers for use in a process of enzyme recovery from pineapple rind. The proteolytic enzyme bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) is precipitated with alcohol at low temperature in a fed-batch jacketed tank. Temperature control is crucial to avoid irreversible protein denaturation. Fuzzy or neural controllers offer a way of implementing solutions that cover dynamic and nonlinear processes. The design methodology and a comparative study on the performance of fuzzy-PI, neurofuzzy, and neural network intelligent controllers are presented. To tune the fuzzy PI Mamdani controller, various universes of discourse, rule bases, and membership function support sets were tested. A neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS), based on Takagi-Sugeno rules, and a model predictive controller, based on neural modeling, were developed and tested as well. Using a Fieldbus network architecture, a coolant variable speed pump was driven by the controllers. The experimental results show the effectiveness of fuzzy controllers in comparison to the neural predictive control. The fuzzy PI controller exhibited a reduced error parameter (ITAE), lower power consumption, and better recovery of enzyme activity. PMID:21234106

  16. Does emotional intelligence change during medical school gross anatomy course? Correlations with students' performance and team cohesion.

    PubMed

    Holman, Michelle A; Porter, Samuel G; Pawlina, Wojciech; Juskewitch, Justin E; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course Schutte Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SSEIT). Individual EI scores were then compared with composite course performance grade and team cohesion survey results. Mean pre-course EI score was 140.3 out of a possible 160. During the course, mean individual EI scores did not change significantly (P = 0.17) and no correlation between EI scores and academic performance was noted (P = 0.31). In addition, EI did not correlate with team cohesion (P = 0.16). While business has found significant utility for EI in increasing performance and productivity, its role in medical education is still uncertain.

  17. Relations between performance on the advance matrices and the EPI in high-intelligence subjects.

    PubMed

    Gibson, H B

    1975-11-01

    This study continues the investigation of the relationship between performance on tests of intelligence, and the personality parameters of the Eysenckian theoretical framework. Candidates for admission to an honours degree course (n = 281) were given the Advanced Progressive Matrices as a screening device. Those admitted to the course were on later occasions given both forms of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI). In view of problems of test-retest on the EPI, scores were analysed in a novel fashion to give three groups: 'introverts', 'extraverts' and 'ambiverts'. The 'introverts' scored significantly highest on the Matrices, but the scores of the 'ambiverts' were lowest. Neuroticism showed little interaction with other variables. These results are discussed in terms of the theory of reactive inhibition. New data on the Advanced Progressive Matrices are given which are significantly higher than the published university norms.

  18. Research into the interaction between high performance and cognitive skills in an intelligent tutoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Pamela K.

    1991-01-01

    Two intelligent tutoring systems were developed. These tutoring systems are being used to study the effectiveness of intelligent tutoring systems in training high performance tasks and the interrelationship of high performance and cognitive tasks. The two tutoring systems, referred to as the Console Operations Tutors, were built using the same basic approach to the design of an intelligent tutoring system. This design approach allowed researchers to more rapidly implement the cognitively based tutor, the OMS Leak Detect Tutor, by using the foundation of code generated in the development of the high performance based tutor, the Manual Select Keyboard (MSK). It is believed that the approach can be further generalized to develop a generic intelligent tutoring system implementation tool.

  19. Aging and strategic retrieval in a cued-recall test: the role of executive functions and fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Taconnat, Laurence; Clarys, David; Vanneste, Sandrine; Bouazzaoui, Badiâa; Isingrini, Michel

    2007-06-01

    Cued-recall in episodic memory was investigated in relation to low and high cognitive support at retrieval, executive function level and fluid intelligence level in 81 healthy adults divided first into two age groups (young and elderly adults). The first analyses showed that age-related differences were greater when a low cognitive support was provided to recall the words. An individual index of loss of performance when the number of cues was decreased was then calculated. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that the executive functions measure (perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was a better candidate than the fluid intelligence measure (Cattell's culture fair test) to account for the age-related variance of the size of performance loss. These findings suggest that age differences in implementing strategic retrieval may be mainly due to a decline in executive functions.

  20. Can Scores Obtained from the Slosson Intelligence Test be Used with as much Confidence as Scores Obtained from the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Robert J.; And Others

    This study was concerned with determining the validity of the Slosson Intelligence Test (SIT) using the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (S-B), Form L-M as the validity criterion. The sample consisted of 724 students enrolled in 10 public school systems in northeastern Massachusetts. Using the Pearson-Product Moment formula a coefficient of…

  1. Intelligence and Neuropsychological Aptitude Testing of U.S. Air Force MQ-1 Predator Pilot Training Candidates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    pilot tasks completed by the United Kingdom Royal Air Force (UK RAF) (Bailey M, Predator Pilot and Sensor Operator Selection Test Batteries, Royal...standard deviation SME subject matter expert SUPT Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training UK United Kingdom USAF U.S. Air Force VIQ verbal intelligence quotient ... UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) USAF School of Aerospace Medicine Aerospace Medicine Dept/FECN 2510 Fifth St

  2. An Examination of the Flynn Effect in the National Intelligence Test in Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, William

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the Flynn Effect (FE; i.e., the rise in IQ scores over time) in Estonia from Scale B of the National Intelligence Test using both classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) methods. Secondary data from two cohorts (1934, n = 890 and 2006, n = 913) of students were analyzed, using both classical test theory (CTT)…

  3. Eugenics and Education: A Note on the Origins of the Intelligence Testing Movement in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Roy

    1980-01-01

    Examines influence of Francis Galton and the Eugenics Education Society in the intelligence testing movement in England (early 1900s). For eugenicists, the central issue confronting society was the problem of racial deterioration. They responded with modification of the Binet-Simon tests and developed tests to examine the whole ability range.…

  4. Intelligent data layout mechanism for high-performance image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kelvin T.; Tao, Wenchao; Yang, Limin; Kimme-Smith, Carolyn; Bassett, Lawrence W.; Valentino, Daniel J.

    1998-06-01

    Trends in medical imaging indicate that the storage requirements for digital medical datasets require a more efficient, scalable storage architecture for large-scale RIS/PACS to support high-speed retrieval for multiple concurrent clients. As storage and networking technologies mature, the cost of applying such technologies in medical imaging has become more economically viable. We propose to take advantage of such economies of scale in technology to provide an effective network workstation storage solution for achieving (1) faster display and navigation response time, (2) higher server throughput and (3) better data storage management. Full-field direct digital mammography presents a challenging problem in the design of digital workstation systems for screening and diagnosis. Due to the spatial and contrast resolution required for mammography, the digital images are large (exceeding 5K X 6K X 14 bits approximately equals 60MB per image) and therefore difficult to display using commercially available technology. We are developing clinically useful methods of storing, displaying and manipulating large digital images in a medical media server using commercial technology. In this paper we propose an Intelligent Grid-based Data Layout Mechanism to optimize the total response time of a reading by minimizing the speed of image access (data I/O time) and the number of data access requests to the server (queueing effects) during the image navigation. A Navigation Threads Model is developed to characterize the performance of many navigation threads involved in the course of performing a reading session. In our grid-based data layout approach, a large 2D direct-digital mammogram image is divided spatially into many small 2D grids and is stored into an array of magnetic disks to provide parallel grid-based readout services to clients. Such a grid- based approach not only provides fine-granularity control, but also provides a means of collecting statistical information about

  5. Evidence for a collective intelligence factor in the performance of human groups.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Anita Williams; Chabris, Christopher F; Pentland, Alex; Hashmi, Nada; Malone, Thomas W

    2010-10-29

    Psychologists have repeatedly shown that a single statistical factor--often called "general intelligence"--emerges from the correlations among people's performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. But no one has systematically examined whether a similar kind of "collective intelligence" exists for groups of people. In two studies with 699 people, working in groups of two to five, we find converging evidence of a general collective intelligence factor that explains a group's performance on a wide variety of tasks. This "c factor" is not strongly correlated with the average or maximum individual intelligence of group members but is correlated with the average social sensitivity of group members, the equality in distribution of conversational turn-taking, and the proportion of females in the group.

  6. Hybrid Modeling for Testing Intelligent Software for Lunar-Mars Closed Life Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Intelligent software is being developed for closed life support systems with biological components, for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The intelligent software functions include planning/scheduling, reactive discrete control and sequencing, management of continuous control, and fault detection, diagnosis, and management of failures and errors. Four types of modeling information have been essential to system modeling and simulation to develop and test the software and to provide operational model-based what-if analyses: discrete component operational and failure modes; continuous dynamic performance within component modes, modeled qualitatively or quantitatively; configuration of flows and power among components in the system; and operations activities and scenarios. CONFIG, a multi-purpose discrete event simulation tool that integrates all four types of models for use throughout the engineering and operations life cycle, has been used to model components and systems involved in the production and transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a plant-growth chamber and between that chamber and a habitation chamber with physicochemical systems for gas processing.

  7. Artificial Intelligence and Its Use in Cost Type analyses with an Example in Cost Performance Measurement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    7-Ai6i 817 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ITS USE IN COST TYE1/I ANALYSES WdITH ANt EXAMPLE IN COST PERFORMANCE I MERSUREMENT(U) DEFENSE SYSTEMS...INTELLIGENCE-THE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY/ NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSORS K ~ With the advent of ARTIFICAL INTELLEGENCE (AI), we are entering into a new era of...language processor which is commerically available is INTELLECT, by Artifical Intellegence Incorporated, Waltham, Mass. To illustrate what a natural

  8. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) were established in 1973 through an informal arrangement among cooperating scientists involving seven major peanut-producing states. In 1995, plant material transfer agreements were also accepted among all cooperators in the UPPT. The year 2012 completed...

  9. Test Review: L. Brown, R. J. Sherbenou, & S. K. Johnsen "Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-4" (Toni-4). Austin, TX--PRO-ED, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Nicola; Kilinc, Emin; Navruz, Bilgin; Bae, Yunhee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Fourth Edition (TONI-4), an individually administered instrument created to assess intelligence. The distinguishing characteristic of the TONI-4 is the nonverbal, motor-reduced format that assesses common elements of intelligence without the confounding effects of motor or linguistic skills. The…

  10. Using Emotional Intelligence and Social Support to Predict Job Performance of Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branscum, Paul; Haider, Taj; Brown, David; Sharma, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The theory of emotional intelligence (EI) has been developed to evaluate and highlight the importance of emotional health, especially on job performance. Purpose: No study has examined EI's role on the performance of public health educators; therefore, this study examined the role of EI and social support on the performance of health…

  11. Development of the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) test for hearing aid comparisons.

    PubMed

    Cox, R M; McDaniel, D M

    1989-06-01

    The Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) Test has been developed for use in clinical comparisons of hearing aid conditions. After listening to a short passage of connected speech, subjects generate a rating proportional to its intelligibility using an equal-appearing interval scale from 0 to 10. Before test passages are presented, the signal-to-babble ratio (SBR) is adjusted to a level that elicits intelligibility ratings of 7-8 for a "setup" passage. Then, with SBR held constant, three or more test passages are rated and the results averaged for each aided condition. This paper describes the generation of recorded test materials and their investigation using normally hearing listeners. Based on these data, a critical difference of about 2 scale intervals is recommended. A future paper will deal with results for hearing-impaired subjects.

  12. Investigating links between emotional intelligence and observer performance by radiologists in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Sarah J.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Cumming, Steven; MacKay, Stuart J.; McEntee, Mark F.; Keane, Kevin; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.

    2014-03-01

    A novel direction of radiology research is better understanding the links between cognitive and personality factors and radiologists' accuracy and performance. This study examines relationships between Emotional Intelligence (EI) scores and observer performance by radiologists in breast cancer detection. Three separate samples were collected with Australian and US breast imaging radiologists. The radiologists were asked to undertake a mammographic interpretation task to identify malignant breast lesions and localise them, in addition to use a confidence rating scale to report confidence in the decision. Following this activity, the radiologists were administered the EI Trait (TEIQue-SF) questionnaire. The Trait EI test gives a Global EI score and 4 sub-scores in Well-being, Self-Control, Emotionality and Sociability. Sample 1 (Sydney 2012) radiologists were divided into 2 experience bands; radiologists practicing <13 years as "less" experience and <13 years as "more". There was a significant correlation (r = 0.849, p =0.012) between Self-Control and Location Sensitivity in the "less" experience group; however there was little correlation between this EI trait in "more" experience, although more experienced radiologists had significantly higher EI scores for sociability than their less experienced counterparts (z = -1.981, P = 0.047). In the second sample (Darwin 2013) radiologists were divided into 2 groups: high and low experience, however there were no statistically significant correlation between EI and performance in any band. For sample 3 (Louisville 2013) radiologists were divided into 3 groups of experience, with the "medium "experience radiologists having correlations between EI factors "emotionality" and "sociability" to Location Sensitivity and JAFROC. Our preliminary results indicate EI is correlated to observer performance in lesser experienced radiologists. It is suggested that tasks perceived as more difficult by less experienced radiologists may

  13. Correlational structure of ‘frontal’ tests and intelligence tests indicates two components with asymmetrical neurostructural correlates in old age

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Nissan, Jack; Royle, Natalie A.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both general fluid intelligence (gf) and performance on some ‘frontal tests’ of cognition decline with age. Both types of ability are at least partially dependent on the integrity of the frontal lobes, which also deteriorate with age. Overlap between these two methods of assessing complex cognition in older age remains unclear. Such overlap could be investigated using inter-test correlations alone, as in previous studies, but this would be enhanced by ascertaining whether frontal test performance and gf share neurobiological variance. To this end, we examined relationships between gf and 6 frontal tests (Tower, Self-Ordered Pointing, Simon, Moral Dilemmas, Reversal Learning and Faux Pas tests) in 90 healthy males, aged ~ 73 years. We interpreted their correlational structure using principal component analysis, and in relation to MRI-derived regional frontal lobe volumes (relative to maximal healthy brain size). gf correlated significantly and positively (.24 ≤ r ≤ .53) with the majority of frontal test scores. Some frontal test scores also exhibited shared variance after controlling for gf. Principal component analysis of test scores identified units of gf-common and gf-independent variance. The former was associated with variance in the left dorsolateral (DL) and anterior cingulate (AC) regions, and the latter with variance in the right DL and AC regions. Thus, we identify two biologically-meaningful components of variance in complex cognitive performance in older age and suggest that age-related changes to DL and AC have the greatest cognitive impact. PMID:25278641

  14. Race Differences on the Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration, the Slosson Intelligence Test, and the ABC Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooler, Douglas L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes preschoolers' scores on the Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration (VMI), the Slosson Intelligence Test (SIT), and the ABC Inventory (ABCI). Separate ANOVAs reveal no race effect on the VMI. Race differences favoring Whites are found for SIT and ABCI. There were no effects for sex on any measure. (Author)

  15. Relating emotional abilities to social functioning: a comparison of self-report and performance measures of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Brackett, Marc A; Rivers, Susan E; Shiffman, Sara; Lerner, Nicole; Salovey, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Three studies used J. D. Mayer and P. Salovey's (1997) theory of emotional intelligence (EI) as a framework to examine the role of emotional abilities (assessed with both self-report and performance measures) in social functioning. Self-ratings were assessed in ways that mapped onto the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), a validated performance measure of EI. In Study 1, self-ratings and MSCEIT scores were not strongly correlated. In Study 2, men's MSCEIT scores, but not self-ratings, correlated with perceived social competence after personality measures were held constant. In Study 3, only the MSCEIT predicted real-time social competence, again, just for men. Implications for analyzing how emotional abilities contribute to social behavior are discussed, as is the importance of incorporating gender into theoretical frameworks and study designs.

  16. Relationships Between the Gesell School Readiness Test and Standardized Achievement and Intelligence Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Deborah

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the Gesell School Readiness Test and standarized achievement and intelligence measures were examined. Children were tested before kindergarten, at the end of kindergarten, and at the end of first grade. Correlation coefficients varied from grade to grade, but did not show a higher correlation between related measures.…

  17. Treatment of Not-Administered Items on Individually Administered Intelligence Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wei; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2012-01-01

    In administration of individually administered intelligence tests, items are commonly presented in a sequence of increasing difficulty, and test administration is terminated after a predetermined number of incorrect answers. This practice produces stochastically censored data, a form of nonignorable missing data. By manipulating four factors…

  18. Gray Matter Correlates of Fluid, Crystallized, and Spatial Intelligence: Testing the P-FIT Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colom, Roberto; Haier, Richard J.; Head, Kevin; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Quiroga, Maria Angeles; Shih, Pei Chun; Jung, Rex E.

    2009-01-01

    The parieto-frontal integration theory (P-FIT) nominates several areas distributed throughout the brain as relevant for intelligence. This theory was derived from previously published studies using a variety of both imaging methods and tests of cognitive ability. Here we test this theory in a new sample of young healthy adults (N = 100) using a…

  19. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  20. Meta-Analysis of Fluid Intelligence Tests of Children from the Chinese Mainland with Learning Difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fang; Fu, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the differences in fluid intelligence tests between normal children and children with learning difficulties in China. Method PubMed, MD Consult, and other Chinese Journal Database were searched from their establishment to November 2012. After finding comparative studies of Raven measurements of normal children and children with learning difficulties, full Intelligent Quotation (FIQ) values and the original values of the sub-measurement were extracted. The corresponding effect model was selected based on the results of heterogeneity and parallel sub-group analysis was performed. Results Twelve documents were included in the meta-analysis, and the studies were all performed in mainland of China. Among these, two studies were performed at child health clinics, the other ten sites were schools and control children were schoolmates or classmates. FIQ was evaluated using a random effects model. WMD was −13.18 (95% CI: −16.50–−9.85). Children with learning difficulties showed significantly lower FIQ scores than controls (P<0.00001); Type of learning difficulty and gender differences were evaluated using a fixed-effects model (I2 = 0%). The sites and purposes of the studies evaluated here were taken into account, but the reasons of heterogeneity could not be eliminated; The sum IQ of all the subgroups showed considerable heterogeneity (I2 = 76.5%). The sub-measurement score of document A showed moderate heterogeneity among all documents, and AB, B, and E showed considerable heterogeneity, which was used in a random effect model. Individuals with learning difficulties showed heterogeneity as well. There was a moderate delay in the first three items (−0.5 to −0.9), and a much more pronounced delay in the latter three items (−1.4 to −1.6). Conclusion In the Chinese mainland, the level of fluid intelligence of children with learning difficulties was lower than that of normal children. Delayed development in sub-items of C, D, and E

  1. Intelligence, IQ, Tests, and Assessments: What Do Parents Need to Know? What Should They Tell Their Kids?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dona; Foster, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Embarking on the standardized testing process often leads parents of gifted children to other questions about intelligence, tests, and assessment practices. What is intelligence? Do IQ tests measure it? Are there better ways of deciding who needs gifted programming? What can parents request by way of results and their interpretation? Should…

  2. The impact of emotional intelligence on managers’ performance: Evidence from hospitals located in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Gorgi, Hasan Abolghasem; Ahmadi, Ahmad; Shabaninejad, Hosein; Tahmasbi, Ali; Baratimarnani, Ahmad; Mehralian, Gholamhossein

    2015-01-01

    Context: Most of the studies show that emotional intelligence (EI) is an important factor for effective leadership and team performance in organizations. Aims: This research paper aims to provide an exploratory analysis of EI in the hospitals managers located in Tehran, and examine its relation to their performance. Settings and Design: The present research was an analytical and cross-sectional study. Setting of the study was hospitals located in Tehran, Iran. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study from a matched sample of 120 managers and 360 subordinates in hospitals located in Tehran. Cyberia shrink EI measure was used for assessing the EI of the participants. Moreover, a management performance Questionnaire is specifically developed for the present study. The total of 480 questionnaires analyzed throughout Kolmogorov–Smirnov, Mann–Whitney, and Kruskal–Wallis tests in SPSS. Results: The findings suggested a poor EI among hospital managers. As for EI subscales, social skills and self-motivation were in the highest and lowest levels respectively. Moreover, the results indicated that EI increases with experience. The results also showed there is no significant relationship between the components of EI and the performance of hospital managers. Conclusions: Present research indicated that higher levels of EI did not necessarily lead to better performance in hospital managers. PMID:26430690

  3. Assessing social-cognitive deficits in schizophrenia with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Greeno, Catherine G; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Newhill, Christina E; Hogarty, Gerard E; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2010-03-01

    The emotion management subscale of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) has recently been recommended by the National Institute of Mental Health Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia committee as the sole measure of social cognition for trials of cognitive enhancement in schizophrenia, yet the psychometric properties of this subscale and the larger instrument in schizophrenia patients have not been thoroughly examined. This research presents a psychometric investigation of the MSCEIT in a sample of 64 early course outpatients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or schizophreniform disorder. Results demonstrated that the MSCEIT possesses adequate internal consistency reliability among its branch and total scales and that patients' branch and overall test performance was significantly below normative levels. Estimates of discriminant and concurrent validity indicated that the MSCEIT diverged from measures of neurocognitive functioning and psychopathology, but was only modestly related with objective measures of functional outcome. Convergent validity estimates suggested that, contrary to expectations, the MSCEIT did not correlate with a behavioral measure of social cognition. Finally, exploratory factor analyses suggested the possibility of a shift in the latent structure of emotional intelligence in schizophrenia, compared with studies with healthy individuals. These findings support the use of the MSCEIT as a reliable and potentially valid method of assessing the emotional components of social cognition in schizophrenia, but also point to a need for additional measurement development efforts to assess broader social-cognitive domains that may exhibit stronger relations with functional outcome. Further investigation is warranted to examine the instrument's latent factor structure and convergence with other measures of social cognition.

  4. Emotional Intelligence of Instructors and the Quality of Their Instructional Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dev, Smitha; Nair, Sreethi; Dwivedi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Quality of instructional performance is the key skill needed for every teaching faculty for achieving the level of pedigree in the present educational scenario. However, the truth is that there are minimal studies to analyze the competency linking emotional intelligence to quality of instructional performance. Therefore the present attempt is to…

  5. The Impact of Students' Perceived Emotional Intelligence, Social Attitudes and Teacher Expectations on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez-Morales, M. Isabel; Lopez-Zafra, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to analyze the role that Perceived Emotional Intelligence and social competences have on academic performance. Furthermore, we analyze the role of teacher's expectancies on performance in secondary school students. Method: One hundred ninety three students (50.7% male and 49.3 % female) from the first and…

  6. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence, Self-Efficacy, and Clinical Performance in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eileen W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy, an individual's beliefs about his or her ability to perform a series of tasks, and emotional intelligence, an individual's ability to perceive, use, understand, and manage emotions, as predictors for successful clinical performance in nursing students. The participants were 49 female and 7…

  7. Emotional Intelligence and its Relationship with Gender, Academic Performance and Intellectual Abilities of Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valadez Sierra, Maria de los Dolores; Borges del Rosal, Maria Africa; Ruvalcaba Romero, Norma; Villegas, Karina; Lorenzo, Maryurena

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Emotional intelligence has been linked to several variables, such as gender, and academic performance. In the area of high intellectual abilities, the literature shows controversy, without a unanimous result on the relationship between both variables. In the present study we analyzed the modulatory effect has academic performance in…

  8. Intelligence and Scientific-Creative Thinking: Their Convergence in the Explanation of Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Maria Jose; Bermejo, Rosario; Ferrando, Mercedes; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Sainz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Academic performance is usually generally explained by student's intelligence, although other factors such as personality and motivation also account for it. Factors associated with a more complex thought process in adolescence are also beginning to gain importance in the prediction of academic performance. Among these forms of…

  9. Development of a Test Battery to Assess Mental Flexibility Based on Sternberg’s Theory of Successful Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Technical Report 1222 Development of a Test Battery to Assess Mental Flexibility Based on Sternberg’s Theory of Successful Intelligence Cynthia T...GRANT NUMBER Development of a Test Battery to Assess Mental Flexibility Based on DASW01-03-K-0001 Sternberg’s Theory of Successful Intelligence 5b...flexibility was developed based on Sternberg’s theory successful intelligence (1985). New mental flexibility assessment instruments were developed and

  10. Usability, learnability and performance evaluation of Intelligent Research and Intervention Software: A delivery platform for eHealth interventions.

    PubMed

    Wozney, Lori; McGrath, Patrick J; Newton, Amanda; Huguet, Anna; Franklin, Marcia; Perri, Kaitlin; Leuschen, K; Toombs, Elaine; Lingley-Pottie, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of an eHealth platform, Intelligent Research and Intervention Software was undertaken via cross-sectional survey of staff users and application performance monitoring. The platform is used to deliver psychosocial interventions across a range of clinical contexts, project scopes, and delivery modalities (e.g. hybrid telehealth, fully online self-managed, randomized control trials, and clinical service delivery). Intelligent Research and Intervention Software supports persuasive technology elements (e.g. tailoring, reminders, and personalization) as well as staff management tools. Results from the System Usability Scale involving 30 Staff and Administrative users across multiple projects were positive with overall mean score of 70 ("Acceptable"). The mean score for "Usability" sub-scale was 82 and for "Learnability" sub-scale 61. There were no significant differences in perceptions of usability across user groups or levels of experience. Application performance management analytics (e.g. Application Performance Index scores) across two test sites indicate the software platform is robust and reliable when compared to industry standards. Intelligent Research and Intervention Software is successfully operating as a flexible platform for creating, delivering, and evaluating eHealth interventions.

  11. Feasibility of Turing-Style Tests for Autonomous Aerial Vehicle "Intelligence"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    A new approach is suggested to define and evaluate key metrics as to autonomous aerial vehicle performance. This approach entails the conceptual definition of a "Turing Test" for UAVs. Such a "UAV Turing test" would be conducted by means of mission simulations and/or tailored flight demonstrations of vehicles under the guidance of their autonomous system software. These autonomous vehicle mission simulations and flight demonstrations would also have to be benchmarked against missions "flown" with pilots/human-operators in the loop. In turn, scoring criteria for such testing could be based upon both quantitative mission success metrics (unique to each mission) and by turning to analog "handling quality" metrics similar to the well-known Cooper-Harper pilot ratings used for manned aircraft. Autonomous aerial vehicles would be considered to have successfully passed this "UAV Turing Test" if the aggregate mission success metrics and handling qualities for the autonomous aerial vehicle matched or exceeded the equivalent metrics for missions conducted with pilots/human-operators in the loop. Alternatively, an independent, knowledgeable observer could provide the "UAV Turing Test" ratings of whether a vehicle is autonomous or "piloted." This observer ideally would, in the more sophisticated mission simulations, also have the enhanced capability of being able to override the scripted mission scenario and instigate failure modes and change of flight profile/plans. If a majority of mission tasks are rated as "piloted" by the observer, when in reality the vehicle/simulation is fully- or semi- autonomously controlled, then the vehicle/simulation "passes" the "UAV Turing Test." In this regards, this second "UAV Turing Test" approach is more consistent with Turing s original "imitation game" proposal. The overall feasibility, and important considerations and limitations, of such an approach for judging/evaluating autonomous aerial vehicle "intelligence" will be discussed from a

  12. Stability of scores for the Slosson Full-Range Intelligence Test.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas O; Eaves, Ronald C; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Mariano, Gina

    2007-08-01

    The test-retest stability of the Slosson Full-Range Intelligence Test by Algozzine, Eaves, Mann, and Vance was investigated with test scores from a sample of 103 students. With a mean interval of 13.7 mo. and different examiners for each of the two test administrations, the test-retest reliability coefficients for the Full-Range IQ, Verbal Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Memory were .93, .85, .80, .80, and .83, respectively. Mean differences from the test-retest scores were not statistically significantly different for any of the scales. Results suggest that Slosson scores are stable over time even when different examiners administer the test.

  13. Evidence for the importance of openness to experience on performance of a fluid intelligence task by physically active and inactive participants.

    PubMed

    Lochbaum, Marc R; Karoly, Paul; Landers, Daniel M

    2002-12-01

    The cross-sectional relationship between exercise training history and performance on a fluid intelligence test was examined. In addition, openness to experience was included as a potential trait-based contributor to predicting cognitive performance. Results supported past literature demonstrating that aerobically trained or active participants performed significantly better on the fluid intelligence task than aerobically untrained or inactive participants. Hierarchical regression analysis results revealed, as predicted, that openness to experience was a significant predictor of fluid intellectual performance. When entered into the hierarchical regression equation, openness to experience accounted for 16.0% of unique variance in Culture Fair Intelligence Test performance. By contrast, participants' exercise training history, which initially and significantly (p < .05) accounted for approximately 12.0% of the variance in cognitive performance, accounted for 5.0% (p > .05) after openness was entered. Participants were, on average, more open than inactive participants. Results are discussed in terms of the possible mechanisms aerobic exercise training and openness to experience share in regard to brain functioning and performance of fluid intelligence tasks. Future research is suggested that examines biological factors known to influence cognitive performance in exercise settings.

  14. Relationship of the Vane Kindergarten Test and Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, S. S.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Vane Kindergarten Test and WPPSI scores of 33 kindergarten children were compared. Obtained results suggest that the VKT is promising method to assess intelligence in a reasonably brief period of time and provides results comparable to those of the more time-consuming WPPSI. (Author)

  15. Do We Really Become Smarter When Our Fluid-Intelligence Test Scores Improve?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Taylor R; Petrov, Alexander A; Sederberg, Per B

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports of training-induced gains on fluid intelligence tests have fueled an explosion of interest in cognitive training-now a billion-dollar industry. The interpretation of these results is questionable because score gains can be dominated by factors that play marginal roles in the scores themselves, and because intelligence gain is not the only possible explanation for the observed control-adjusted far transfer across tasks. Here we present novel evidence that the test score gains used to measure the efficacy of cognitive training may reflect strategy refinement instead of intelligence gains. A novel scanpath analysis of eye movement data from 35 participants solving Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices on two separate sessions indicated that one-third of the variance of score gains could be attributed to test-taking strategy alone, as revealed by characteristic changes in eye-fixation patterns. When the strategic contaminant was partialled out, the residual score gains were no longer significant. These results are compatible with established theories of skill acquisition suggesting that procedural knowledge tacitly acquired during training can later be utilized at posttest. Our novel method and result both underline a reason to be wary of purported intelligence gains, but also provide a way forward for testing for them in the future.

  16. Validity of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test: Youth Version-Research Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Christine; Kranzler, John H.; Rossen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the criterion-related validity evidence of scores on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test: Youth Version-Research Version. The authors also investigate the relationship between scores on the MSCEIT-YV and chronological age. Results provide initial support for the construct validity of the MSCEIT-YV but also…

  17. A Use of Confirmatory Factor Analysis in the Evaluation of Intelligence Testing Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John; Fitzgerald, Don

    Four alternative theoretical models of intellectual competence were assessed, using confirmatory factor analysis to account for the correlation patterns derived from Wechsler intelligence tests. It was argued that the difference between the chi-square goodness of fit statistics that are provided when using confirmatory factor analysis gives a…

  18. [Evaluation of intelligence with non-verbal tests in aphasic patients].

    PubMed

    Ceschin, J S; Melaragno Filho, R; Brauer, M J; Parente, M A

    1979-09-01

    Eight patients with cerebral vascular disease and aphasia were studied just after the stroke. The clinical, neuropsychiatric, EEG and neuro-radiological aspects were evaluated. The patients were submitted to the psychological and phonoaudiological studies. The authors correlated the neurological lesions to the structural alteration of the intelligence, to the praxic and estheognostic alterations and also to the language disturbances. The criterions adopted by the World Health Organization and the genetics classification of Jean Piaget were used for the intellectual level classification. The results suggest that the intelligence evaluated through Leither's non-verbal test is better preserved in some asphasics.

  19. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for the Estimation of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasiloglu, Abdulsamet; Aras, Ömür; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems are well known artificial intelligence techniques used for black-box modelling of complex systems. In this study, Feed-forward artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) are used for modelling the performance of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Current density (I), fuel cell temperature (T), methanol concentration (C), liquid flow-rate (q) and air flow-rate (Q) are selected as input variables to predict the cell voltage. Polarization curves are obtained for 35 different operating conditions according to a statistically designed experimental plan. In modelling study, various subsets of input variables and various types of membership function are considered. A feed -forward architecture with one hidden layer is used in ANN modelling. The optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using twelve hidden neurons and sigmoidal activation function. On the other hand, first order Sugeno inference system is applied in ANFIS modelling and the optimum performance is obtained with the input set (I, T, C, q) using sixteen fuzzy rules and triangular membership function. The test results show that ANN model estimates the polarization curve of DMFC more accurately than ANFIS model.

  20. Adolescents' Conceptions of Ability and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, John G.

    Adolescents' developing sense of competence is based on two domains, ability and intelligence. Intelligence testing generally presumes a conception of ability as current capacity that limits the extent to which effort can improve performance. Conceptions of intelligence, and other skills, involve implications about the nature of different forms of…

  1. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance testing and test methods... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a) Demonstration of compliance. The owner or operator shall conduct an initial performance test for each process...

  2. Emotional Intelligence throughout Portuguese Secondary School: A Longitudinal Study Comparing Performance and Self-Report Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Ana; Faria, Luísa

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the developmental trajectories of ability and trait emotional intelligence (EI) in the Portuguese secondary school. Within a three-wave longitudinal design, 395 students (M[subscript age] = 15.4; SD = 0.74) completed both the Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire (ESCQ) and the Vocabulary of Emotions Test (VET). Results…

  3. Effects of an Intelligent Web-Based English Instruction System on Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, J.; Chen, Y.; Ding, Z.; Bai, Y.; Yang, B.; Li, M.; Qi, J.

    2013-01-01

    This research conducted quasi-experiments in four middle schools to evaluate the long-term effects of an intelligent web-based English instruction system, Computer Simulation in Educational Communication (CSIEC), on students' academic attainment. The analysis of regular examination scores and vocabulary test validates the positive impact of CSIEC,…

  4. An integrated knowledge system for wind tunnel testing - Project Engineers' Intelligent Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.; Shi, George Z.; Hoyt, W. A.; Steinle, Frank W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Project Engineers' Intelligent Assistant (PEIA) is an integrated knowledge system developed using artificial intelligence technology, including hypertext, expert systems, and dynamic user interfaces. This system integrates documents, engineering codes, databases, and knowledge from domain experts into an enriched hypermedia environment and was designed to assist project engineers in planning and conducting wind tunnel tests. PEIA is a modular system which consists of an intelligent user-interface, seven modules and an integrated tool facility. Hypermedia technology is discussed and the seven PEIA modules are described. System maintenance and updating is very easy due to the modular structure and the integrated tool facility provides user access to commercial software shells for documentation, reporting, or database updating. PEIA is expected to provide project engineers with technical information, increase efficiency and productivity, and provide a realistic tool for personnel training.

  5. Academic performance and intelligence scores of primary school-aged children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ezenwosu, Osita; Emodi, Ifeoma; Ikefuna, Anthony; Chukwu, Barth

    2013-11-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are faced with complications which may interfere with their educational activities including academic performance. Reports on their academic performance are mainly from developed countries and the results have been inconsistent. This study aimed to determine the academic performance of primary school-aged children with SCA in Nigeria and compare findings with a group of controls. Ninety children with SCA aged 5-11 years were consecutively recruited at the SCA clinic of UNTH Enugu and their age- and sex-matched normal classmates were enrolled as controls. Academic performance of the children with SCA was studied using the overall scores achieved in the three term examinations in the preceding academic year (2009/2010), while their intelligence quotient (IQ) was determined using the Draw-A-Person Test. The findings were compared with that of 90 controls. The mean overall academic score of the children with SCA of 62.71 ± 19.43% was similar to 67.47 ± 16.42% in the controls (P = .077). However, a significantly higher number of children with SCA (32.2% vs. 16.7% of the controls; P = .015) scored below 50%, thus, had poor performance. The mean IQ of the subjects (91.41 ±16.61%) was similar to that of the controls (95.56 ±17.31%, P = .103). However, more SCA patients had lower IQ scores than controls though not statistically significant (P = 0.083). The overall academic performance of children with SCA, therefore, compares favorably with that of controls although there is a higher prevalence of poor performance among them.

  6. Estimating premorbid general cognitive functioning for children and adolescents using the American Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition: demographic and current performance approaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, Mike R; Lange, Rael T; Brickell, Tracey A; Saklofske, Donald H

    2007-04-01

    Neuropsychologic evaluation requires current test performance be contrasted against a comparison standard to determine if change has occurred. An estimate of premorbid intelligence quotient (IQ) is often used as a comparison standard. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is a commonly used intelligence test. However, there is no method to estimate premorbid IQ for the WISC-IV, limiting the test's utility for neuropsychologic assessment. This study develops algorithms to estimate premorbid Full Scale IQ scores. Participants were the American WISC-IV standardization sample (N = 2172). The sample was randomly divided into 2 groups (development and validation). The development group was used to generate 12 algorithms. These algorithms were accurate predictors of WISC-IV Full Scale IQ scores in healthy children and adolescents. These algorithms hold promise as a method to predict premorbid IQ for patients with known or suspected neurologic dysfunction; however, clinical validation is required.

  7. Intelligibility Performance of Narrowband Linear Predictive Vocoders in the Presence of Bit Errors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    BPS 61 APPENDIX C. INTELLIGIBILITY DATA FOR SUSTENTION FEATURE C.l. DRT test words for sustention 62 C.2. Data table: Sustention intelligibility...scores for LPC and PLPC processors 63 C.3. Analysis of variance summaries: C.3.1. Sustention (Total) 66 C.3.2. Sustention (voiced) 67 C.3.3... Sustention (unvoiced) 68 C.4. Cumulative distributions: DRT scores for sustention C.4.1. LPC-10 at 2400 BPS with bit errors 69 C.4.2. PLPC at

  8. Cut performance levels and testing.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Bill; Moreland, Jeff

    2011-11-01

    While the ISEA performance levels and general recommendations detailed above can help tp provide guidance when selecting hand protection products, the responsibility for testing products for specific end-user applications still rests with the end user. We can indicate, for example, that a medium-weight, uncoated Kevlar glove will typically have an ISEA cut rating of 3, but we cannot say the glove will provide the level of protection needed for the range of jobs on an automobile assembly line. Another Level 3 glove might be better suited to an application the require the worker to have an oil grip. As glove manufacturers, we know gloves. We do not know the details about every workplace. We therefore, must look to our customers to provide us the properties they need for hand protection products that will sufficiently protect their workers on the job.

  9. Listening Comprehension Performance Viewed in the Light of Emotional Intelligence and Foreign Language Listening Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Alavinia, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    The researchers in the current study were after probing the potential relationship between emotional intelligence, foreign language listening anxiety (FLLA), and listening comprehension performance of Iranian EFL learners. To this end, 233 participants, studying English language and literature at three different Universities in Urmia, were…

  10. Using an Intelligent Tutor and Math Fluency Training to Improve Math Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arroyo, Ivon; Royer, James M.; Woolf, Beverly P.

    2011-01-01

    This article integrates research in intelligent tutors with psychology studies of memory and math fluency (the speed to retrieve or calculate answers to basic math operations). It describes the impact of computer software designed to improve either strategic behavior or math fluency. Both competencies are key to improved performance and both…

  11. Performance on Temporal Information Processing as an Index of General Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Brandler, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The relation between general intelligence (psychometric "g") and temporal resolution capacity of the central nervous system was examined by assessing performance on eight different temporal tasks in a sample of 100 participants. Correlational and principal component analyses suggested a unitary timing mechanism, referred to as temporal "g".…

  12. The Role of Invitational Education and Intelligence Beliefs in Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossein, Mahdian; Asadzadeh, Hassan; Shabani, Hassan; Ahghar, Ghodsi; Ahadi, Hassan; Shamir, Abootaleb Seadatee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the role of Invitational Education and intelligence beliefs in the academic performance of high school students. The research population comprised all male and female students studying at high schools in the academic year of 2009-2010 in Kashmar, a city in Iran. Selected through multi-stage random…

  13. Intelligent Use of Intelligence Tests: Empirical and Clinical Support for Canadian WAIS-IV Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jessie L.; Weiss, Lawrence G.; Beal, A. Lynne; Saklofske, Donald H.; Zhu, Jianjun; Holdnack, James A.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that Canadians produce higher raw scores than their U.S. counterparts on intellectual assessments. As a result of these differences in ability along with smaller variability in the population's intellectual performance, Canadian normative data will yield lower standard scores for most raw score points compared to U.S. norms.…

  14. A Valid Culture-Fair Test of Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    test and class grades along with Kuder - Richardson 21 reliabilities for each measure. 11 Table 6 SA... test of new learning, the brief SAT test , and class grades along with estimates of reliability based on Kuder - Richardson formula 21. Table 8 Estimates...estimates of reliability based on Kuder - Richardson formula 21, (Cronbach, 1960) are listed in Table 2 for the total sample of 484 participants. Table

  15. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis of U.S. and Italian Children's Performance on the PASS Theory of Intelligence as Measured by the Cognitive Assessment System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Taddei, Stefano; Williams, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined Italian and U.S. children's performance on the English and Italian versions, respectively, of the Cognitive Assessment System (CAS; Naglieri & Conway, 2009; Naglieri & Das, 1997), a test based on a neurocognitive theory of intelligence entitled PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive; Naglieri & Das,…

  16. Integrating Symbolic and Statistical Methods for Testing Intelligent Systems Applications to Machine Learning and Computer Vision

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Sumit Kumar; Pullum, Laura L; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Embedded intelligent systems ranging from tiny im- plantable biomedical devices to large swarms of autonomous un- manned aerial systems are becoming pervasive in our daily lives. While we depend on the flawless functioning of such intelligent systems, and often take their behavioral correctness and safety for granted, it is notoriously difficult to generate test cases that expose subtle errors in the implementations of machine learning algorithms. Hence, the validation of intelligent systems is usually achieved by studying their behavior on representative data sets, using methods such as cross-validation and bootstrapping.In this paper, we present a new testing methodology for studying the correctness of intelligent systems. Our approach uses symbolic decision procedures coupled with statistical hypothesis testing to. We also use our algorithm to analyze the robustness of a human detection algorithm built using the OpenCV open-source computer vision library. We show that the human detection implementation can fail to detect humans in perturbed video frames even when the perturbations are so small that the corresponding frames look identical to the naked eye.

  17. 40 CFR 60.8 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance tests. 60.8 Section 60.8... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.8 Performance tests. (a) Except as specified in... conduct performance test(s) and furnish the Administrator a written report of the results of...

  18. 40 CFR 60.8 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Performance tests. 60.8 Section 60.8... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.8 Performance tests. (a) Except as specified in... conduct performance test(s) and furnish the Administrator a written report of the results of...

  19. 40 CFR 60.8 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance tests. 60.8 Section 60.8... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.8 Performance tests. (a) Except as specified in... conduct performance test(s) and furnish the Administrator a written report of the results of...

  20. Predicting Second Grade Achievement Scores with the Slosson Intelligence Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test, Developmental Test of Visual Motor and the Metropolitan Readiness Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Timothy M.

    The predictive validity of the Slosson Intelligence Test, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test, Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration, and the Metropolitan Readiness Test was evaluated for use with kindergarten children. The criterion measure was the California Achievement Tests administered when the children…

  1. Artificial Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornburg, David D.

    1986-01-01

    Overview of the artificial intelligence (AI) field provides a definition; discusses past research and areas of future research; describes the design, functions, and capabilities of expert systems and the "Turing Test" for machine intelligence; and lists additional sources for information on artificial intelligence. Languages of AI are…

  2. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry - hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO - uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques - precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially 'weak-embryotoxic' and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as 'non-embryotoxic'. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for which TiO2

  3. Testing Intelligently Includes Double-Checking Wechsler IQ Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuentzel, Jeffrey G.; Hetterscheidt, Lesley A.; Barnett, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The rigors of standardized testing make for numerous opportunities for examiner error, including simple computational mistakes in scoring. Although experts recommend that test scoring be double-checked, the extent to which independent double-checking would reduce scoring errors is not known. A double-checking procedure was established at a…

  4. Measuring Intelligence with the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Linda Howard

    1981-01-01

    Critically evaluates the literature through 1977 on the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test. Areas reviewed are administration and standardization of the man and woman scales, test ceiling, sex differences, the Quality scale, reliability, criterion validity, validity with measures of academic achievement, cultural variables, and use with the learning…

  5. Exploring the validity of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) with established emotions measures.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard D; Schulze, Ralf; O'Brien, Kristin; MacCann, Carolyn; Reid, John; Maul, Andy

    2006-11-01

    Emotions measures represent an important means of obtaining construct validity evidence for emotional intelligence (EI) tests because they have the same theoretical underpinnings. Additionally, the extent to which both emotions and EI measures relate to intelligence is poorly understood. The current study was designed to address these issues. Participants (N = 138) completed the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), two emotions measures, as well as four intelligence tests. Results provide mixed support for the model hypothesized to underlie the MSCEIT, with emotions research and EI measures failing to load on the same factor. The emotions measures loaded on the same factor as intelligence measures. The validity of certain EI components (in particular, Emotion Perception), as currently assessed, appears equivocal.

  6. What is the Ability Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) good for? An evaluation using item response theory.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Marina; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mikolajczak, Moira; Luminet, Olivier; Hansenne, Michel; Rossier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The ability approach has been indicated as promising for advancing research in emotional intelligence (EI). However, there is scarcity of tests measuring EI as a form of intelligence. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT, is among the few available and the most widespread measure of EI as an ability. This implies that conclusions about the value of EI as a meaningful construct and about its utility in predicting various outcomes mainly rely on the properties of this test. We tested whether individuals who have the highest probability of choosing the most correct response on any item of the test are also those who have the strongest EI ability. Results showed that this is not the case for most items: The answer indicated by experts as the most correct in several cases was not associated with the highest ability; furthermore, items appeared too easy to challenge individuals high in EI. Overall results suggest that the MSCEIT is best suited to discriminate persons at the low end of the trait. Results are discussed in light of applied and theoretical considerations.

  7. What Is the Ability Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) Good for? An Evaluation Using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Marina; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mikolajczak, Moira; Luminet, Olivier; Hansenne, Michel; Rossier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The ability approach has been indicated as promising for advancing research in emotional intelligence (EI). However, there is scarcity of tests measuring EI as a form of intelligence. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT, is among the few available and the most widespread measure of EI as an ability. This implies that conclusions about the value of EI as a meaningful construct and about its utility in predicting various outcomes mainly rely on the properties of this test. We tested whether individuals who have the highest probability of choosing the most correct response on any item of the test are also those who have the strongest EI ability. Results showed that this is not the case for most items: The answer indicated by experts as the most correct in several cases was not associated with the highest ability; furthermore, items appeared too easy to challenge individuals high in EI. Overall results suggest that the MSCEIT is best suited to discriminate persons at the low end of the trait. Results are discussed in light of applied and theoretical considerations. PMID:24901541

  8. Relating children's attentional capabilities to intelligence, memory, and academic achievement: a test of construct specificity in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Annett, Robert D; Bender, Bruce G; Gordon, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between attention, intelligence, memory, achievement, and behavior in a large population (N = 939) of children without neuropsychologic problems was investigated in children with mild and moderate asthma. It was hypothesized that different levels of children's attentional capabilities would be associated with different levels of intellectual, memory, and academic abilities. Children ages 6-12 at the eight clinical centers of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) were enrolled in this study. Standardized measures of child neuropsychological and behavioral performance were administered to all participants, with analyses examining both the developmental trajectory of child attentional capabilities and the associations between Continuous Performance Test (CPT) scores and intellectual functioning, and measures of memory, academic achievement, and behavioral functioning. Findings demonstrated that correct responses on the CPT increase significantly with age, while commission errors decrease significantly with age. Performance levels on the CPT were associated with differences in child intellectual function, memory, and academic achievement. Overall these findings reveal how impairments in child attention skills were associated with normal levels of performance on measures of children's intelligence, memory, academic achievement, and behavioral functioning, suggesting that CPT performance is a salient marker of brain function.

  9. Stereotype Threat, Test Anxiety, and Mathematics Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Tobias; Neumann, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of stereotype threat and trait test anxiety on mathematics test performance. Stereotype threat and test anxiety interacted with each other in affecting performance. Trait test anxiety predicted performance only in a diagnostic condition that prevented stereotype threat by stereotype denial. A state measure of…

  10. Cognitive Determinants of Analogical Reasoning on Intelligence Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzman, Thomas G.; And Others

    The cognitive determinants of number analogy performance were studied by systematically manipulating the processing demands imposed by the items. To explore sources of developmental differences in analogical reasoning, subjects were included from two age levels, grades 4 and 5 and college. To allow the investigation of individual differences in…

  11. Implementation of Wireless and Intelligent Sensor Technologies in the Propulsion Test Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Junell, Justin C.; Shumard, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    From the first Saturn V rocket booster (S-II-T) testing in 1966 and the routine Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing beginning in 1975, to more recent test programs such as the X-33 Aerospike Engine, the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) program, and the Hybrid Sounding Rocket (HYSR), Stennis Space Center (SSC) continues to be a premier location for conducting large-scale propulsion testing. Central to each test program is the capability for sensor systems to deliver reliable measurements and high quality data, while also providing a means to monitor the test stand area to the highest degree of safety and sustainability. As part of an on-going effort to enhance the testing capabilities of Stennis Space Center, the Test Technology and Development group is developing and applying a number of wireless and intelligent sensor technologies in ways that are new to the test existing test environment.

  12. Validating a UAV artificial intelligence control system using an autonomous test case generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy; Huber, Justin

    2013-05-01

    The validation of safety-critical applications, such as autonomous UAV operations in an environment which may include human actors, is an ill posed problem. To confidence in the autonomous control technology, numerous scenarios must be considered. This paper expands upon previous work, related to autonomous testing of robotic control algorithms in a two dimensional plane, to evaluate the suitability of similar techniques for validating artificial intelligence control in three dimensions, where a minimum level of airspeed must be maintained. The results of human-conducted testing are compared to this automated testing, in terms of error detection, speed and testing cost.

  13. Artificial intelligence techniques for ground test monitoring of rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis; Gupta, U. K.

    1990-01-01

    An expert system is being developed which can detect anomalies in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) sensor data significantly earlier than the redline algorithm currently in use. The training of such an expert system focuses on two approaches which are based on low frequency and high frequency analyses of sensor data. Both approaches are being tested on data from SSME tests and their results compared with the findings of NASA and Rocketdyne experts. Prototype implementations have detected the presence of anomalies earlier than the redline algorithms that are in use currently. It therefore appears that these approaches have the potential of detecting anomalies early eneough to shut down the engine or take other corrective action before severe damage to the engine occurs.

  14. 40 CFR 610.63 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance tests. 610.63 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.63 Performance tests... 0 to 60 mph acceleration tests (at normal ambient temperatures) on the baseline...

  15. 40 CFR 610.63 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Performance tests. 610.63 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.63 Performance tests... 0 to 60 mph acceleration tests (at normal ambient temperatures) on the baseline...

  16. 40 CFR 610.63 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Performance tests. 610.63 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.63 Performance tests... 0 to 60 mph acceleration tests (at normal ambient temperatures) on the baseline...

  17. 40 CFR 610.63 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance tests. 610.63 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Special Test Procedures § 610.63 Performance tests... 0 to 60 mph acceleration tests (at normal ambient temperatures) on the baseline...

  18. Can We Learn to Treat One Another Better? A Test of a Social Intelligence Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen Ecija; Velasco, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the first test of the value of an online curriculum in social intelligence (SI). Built from current social and cognitive neuroscience research findings, the 50 session SI program was administered, with facilitation in Spanish by classroom instructors, to 207 students from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid as part of their undergraduate classes. All materials were translated into Castilian Spanish, including outcome measures of SI that have been used in prior studies to provide valid estimates of two key components of social intelligence: 1) Sensitivity to others and 2) confidence in one’s capacity to manage social situations. Pre- and Posttest were administered to participants in the SI training, and also to 87 students in similar classes who did not receive the program who served as the control group. Gender and emotional intelligence levels at pretest also were examined as potential individual differences that might affect the impact of the program on study outcomes. Repeated measures ANOVAs on study outcomes revealed significant increases, from pre to post, in most measures of social intelligence for program participants in comparison to controls, with no effects of gender or age on program effectiveness. Prior scores on emotional intelligence were not a prerequisite for learning from the program. Some findings suggest ways the program may be improved to have stronger effects. Nonetheless, the findings indicate that the SI program tested here shows considerable promise as a means to increase the willingness of young adults to take the perspective of others and enhance their efficacy for initiating and sustaining positive social connections. PMID:26076133

  19. Can We Learn to Treat One Another Better? A Test of a Social Intelligence Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Zautra, Eva K; Zautra, Alex J; Gallardo, Carmen Ecija; Velasco, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the first test of the value of an online curriculum in social intelligence (SI). Built from current social and cognitive neuroscience research findings, the 50 session SI program was administered, with facilitation in Spanish by classroom instructors, to 207 students from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos in Madrid as part of their undergraduate classes. All materials were translated into Castilian Spanish, including outcome measures of SI that have been used in prior studies to provide valid estimates of two key components of social intelligence: 1) Sensitivity to others and 2) confidence in one's capacity to manage social situations. Pre- and Posttest were administered to participants in the SI training, and also to 87 students in similar classes who did not receive the program who served as the control group. Gender and emotional intelligence levels at pretest also were examined as potential individual differences that might affect the impact of the program on study outcomes. Repeated measures ANOVAs on study outcomes revealed significant increases, from pre to post, in most measures of social intelligence for program participants in comparison to controls, with no effects of gender or age on program effectiveness. Prior scores on emotional intelligence were not a prerequisite for learning from the program. Some findings suggest ways the program may be improved to have stronger effects. Nonetheless, the findings indicate that the SI program tested here shows considerable promise as a means to increase the willingness of young adults to take the perspective of others and enhance their efficacy for initiating and sustaining positive social connections.

  20. Ambient Intelligence Application Based on Environmental Measurements Performed with an Assistant Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Dani; Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Marco, Santiago; Palacín, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of an autonomous assistant mobile robot in order to monitor the environmental conditions of a large indoor area and develop an ambient intelligence application. The mobile robot uses single high performance embedded sensors in order to collect and geo-reference environmental information such as ambient temperature, air velocity and orientation and gas concentration. The data collected with the assistant mobile robot is analyzed in order to detect unusual measurements or discrepancies and develop focused corrective ambient actions. This paper shows an example of the measurements performed in a research facility which have enabled the detection and location of an uncomfortable temperature profile inside an office of the research facility. The ambient intelligent application has been developed by performing some localized ambient measurements that have been analyzed in order to propose some ambient actuations to correct the uncomfortable temperature profile. PMID:24681671

  1. Ambient intelligence application based on environmental measurements performed with an assistant mobile robot.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dani; Teixidó, Mercè; Font, Davinia; Moreno, Javier; Tresanchez, Marcel; Marco, Santiago; Palacín, Jordi

    2014-03-27

    This paper proposes the use of an autonomous assistant mobile robot in order to monitor the environmental conditions of a large indoor area and develop an ambient intelligence application. The mobile robot uses single high performance embedded sensors in order to collect and geo-reference environmental information such as ambient temperature, air velocity and orientation and gas concentration. The data collected with the assistant mobile robot is analyzed in order to detect unusual measurements or discrepancies and develop focused corrective ambient actions. This paper shows an example of the measurements performed in a research facility which have enabled the detection and location of an uncomfortable temperature profile inside an office of the research facility. The ambient intelligent application has been developed by performing some localized ambient measurements that have been analyzed in order to propose some ambient actuations to correct the uncomfortable temperature profile.

  2. An intelligent tutoring system for the investigation of high performance skill acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Pamela K.; Herren, L. Tandy; Regian, J. Wesley

    1991-01-01

    The issue of training high performance skills is of increasing concern. These skills include tasks such as driving a car, playing the piano, and flying an aircraft. Traditionally, the training of high performance skills has been accomplished through the use of expensive, high-fidelity, 3-D simulators, and/or on-the-job training using the actual equipment. Such an approach to training is quite expensive. The design, implementation, and deployment of an intelligent tutoring system developed for the purpose of studying the effectiveness of skill acquisition using lower-cost, lower-physical-fidelity, 2-D simulation. Preliminary experimental results are quite encouraging, indicating that intelligent tutoring systems are a cost-effective means of training high performance skills.

  3. Trinity Acceptance Tests Performance Summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, Mahesh

    2015-12-01

    Ensuring Real Applications perform well on Trinity is key to success. Four components: ASC applications, Sustained System Performance (SSP), Extra-Large MiniApplications problems, and Micro-benchmarks.

  4. Benchmarking Global Food Safety Performances: The Era of Risk Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Valleé, Jean-Charles Le; Charlebois, Sylvain

    2015-10-01

    Food safety data segmentation and limitations hamper the world's ability to select, build up, monitor, and evaluate food safety performance. Currently, there is no metric that captures the entire food safety system, and performance data are not collected strategically on a global scale. Therefore, food safety benchmarking is essential not only to help monitor ongoing performance but also to inform continued food safety system design, adoption, and implementation toward more efficient and effective food safety preparedness, responsiveness, and accountability. This comparative study identifies and evaluates common elements among global food safety systems. It provides an overall world ranking of food safety performance for 17 Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries, illustrated by 10 indicators organized across three food safety risk governance domains: risk assessment (chemical risks, microbial risks, and national reporting on food consumption), risk management (national food safety capacities, food recalls, food traceability, and radionuclides standards), and risk communication (allergenic risks, labeling, and public trust). Results show all countries have very high food safety standards, but Canada and Ireland, followed by France, earned excellent grades relative to their peers. However, any subsequent global ranking study should consider the development of survey instruments to gather adequate and comparable national evidence on food safety.

  5. Midsagittal Brain Shape Correlation with Intelligence and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruner, Emiliano; Martin-Loeches, Manuel; Burgaleta, Miguel; Colom, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Brain shape might influence cognitive performance because of the relationships between functions, spatial organization, and differential volumetric development of cortical areas. Here we analyze the relationships between midsagittal brain shape variation and a set of basic psychological measures. Coordinates in 2D from 102 MRI-scanned young adult…

  6. Potential Predictors of Student Teaching Performance: Considering Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, P. Cougar; West, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to increase teacher quality have focused on increasing both the admission and graduation standards required for students entering the profession. This study examined the relationship between common standards, such as college GPA, ACT scores, and Praxis exam scores, with student teacher performance as measured by an assessment rubric based…

  7. 78 FR 7820 - Notice of Intelligent Mail Indicia Performance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    .... The PES environment has changed substantially with the availability of new PES products designed to.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Overview Current product submission procedures, the Performance Criteria and Security... Service published (and requested comments on) a proposed change that will replace the current PES...

  8. Conscientiousness, Achievement Striving, and Intelligence as Performance Predictors in a Sample of German Psychology Students: Always a Linear Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Matthias; Knogler, Maximilian; Buhner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the interface between cognitive ability (intelligence) and personality in the prediction of academic performance have yielded mixed results so far. Especially an interaction between conscientiousness (and its facet achievement striving) and intelligence has been investigated. The hypothesis is that conscientiousness enhances the impact…

  9. Trait Emotional Intelligence and Academic Performance: Controlling for the Effects of IQ, Personality, and Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Almeida, Leandro S.; Ferrandiz, Carmen; Bermejo, Rosario; Lopez-Pina, Jose Antonio; Hernandez, Daniel; Sainz, Marta; Fernandez, Mari-Carmen

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the relationship between trait emotional intelligence and academic performance, controlling for the effects of IQ, personality, and self-concept dimensions. A sample of 290 preadolescents (11-12 years old) took part in the study. The instruments used were (a) Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Adolescents Short Form…

  10. Working Memory, Inhibition, and Fluid Intelligence as Predictors of Performance on Tower of Hanoi and London Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zook, N.A.; Davalos, D.B.; DeLosh, E.L.; Davis, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of working memory, inhibition, and fluid intelligence to performance on the Tower of Hanoi (TOH) and Tower of London (TOL) were examined in 85 undergraduate participants. All three factors accounted for significant variance on the TOH, but only fluid intelligence accounted for significant variance on the TOL. When the…

  11. Exploring the Flynn effect in mentally retarded adults by using a nonverbal intelligence test for children.

    PubMed

    Nijman, E E; Scheirs, J G M; Prinsen, M J H; Abbink, C D; Blok, J B

    2010-01-01

    Increases in the scores on IQ tests across generations have been called the Flynn effect (FE). One of the unresolved questions is whether the FE affects all subsamples of the intellectual ability distribution equally. The present study was aimed at determining the size of the FE in moderately mentally retarded individuals. A nonverbal intelligence test developed for children, the Snijders-Oomen Nonverbal Intelligence Test (SON), was administered to 32 retarded adults with a mental age of 3-6 years. Sixty-nine children with a biological age in the same range and with normal intelligence served as a comparison group. Both an older and a more recent version of the SON were presented to all participants in a counterbalanced order. The proportion of items answered correctly was taken as a measure of the dependent variable. It was found that a FE existed in both the group of children and in the group of retarded adults, but that the FE was largest in the latter group. The importance of not using obsolete test norms when diagnosing mental retardation was stressed, and possible causes of the Flynn effect were discussed.

  12. Variability in Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV subtest performance across age.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Nick M; Mignogna, Joseph; Collins, Robert L

    2012-06-01

    Normal Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS)-IV performance relative to average normative scores alone can be an oversimplification as this fails to recognize disparate subtest heterogeneity that occurs with increasing age. The purpose of the present study is to characterize the patterns of raw score change and associated variability on WAIS-IV subtests across age groupings. Raw WAIS-IV subtest means and standard deviations for each age group were tabulated from the WAIS-IV normative manual along with the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of score dispersion calculated by dividing the standard deviation by the mean and multiplying by 100. The CV further informs the magnitude of variability represented by each standard deviation. Raw mean scores predictably decreased across age groups. Increased variability was noted in Perceptual Reasoning and Processing Speed Index subtests, as Block Design, Matrix Reasoning, Picture Completion, Symbol Search, and Coding had CV percentage increases ranging from 56% to 98%. In contrast, Working Memory and Verbal Comprehension subtests were more homogeneous with Digit Span, Comprehension, Information, and Similarities percentage of the mean increases ranging from 32% to 43%. Little change in the CV was noted on Cancellation, Arithmetic, Letter/Number Sequencing, Figure Weights, Visual Puzzles, and Vocabulary subtests (<14%). A thorough understanding of age-related subtest variability will help to identify test limitations as well as further our understanding of cognitive domains which remain relatively steady versus those which steadily decline.

  13. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition performance in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Joseph J; Gontkovsky, Samuel T; Kreiner, David S; Tree, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    Forty patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) completed the 10 core Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Means for age and education were 42.05 years (SD = 9.94) and 14.33 years (SD = 2.40). For all participants, the native language was English. The mean duration of MS diagnosis was 8.17 years (SD = 7.75), and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS; Kurtzke, 1983 ) score was 3.73 (SD = 1.41) with a range from 2.0 to 6.5. A control group of healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics also completed the WAIS-IV and were provided by the test publisher. Compared to controls, patients with MS earned significantly lower subtest and composite scores. The patients' mean scores were consistently in the low-average to average range, and the patterns of performance across groups did not differ significantly, although there was a trend towards higher scores on the Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) and lower scores on the Processing Speed Index (PSI). Approximately 78% of patients had actual Full Scale IQs that were significantly lower than preillness, demographically based IQ estimates.

  14. Relationships Among an Individual Intelligence Test and Two Air Force Screening and Selection Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrevy, David F.; And Others

    With the implementation of the all volunteer force concept, the Air Force must ensure that the objectively measurable range of ability in its manpower pool is being utilized. This is especially true for minority groups who have been categorized and channeled into military career areas based on their performance on two selection tests: the Armed…

  15. Confidence and Cognitive Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the nature of confidence in relation to abilities, personality, and metacognition. Confidence scores were collected during the administration of Reading and Listening sections of the Test of English as a Foreign Language Internet-Based Test (TOEFL iBT) to 824 native speakers of English. Those confidence scores were correlated…

  16. Emotional intelligence and clinical interview performance of dental students.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Annette; Lim, Bee T; Ayers, Kathryn M S

    2009-09-01

    One hundred and sixteen third-year dental students participating in a consultation skills course in Dunedin, New Zealand, completed a standardized psychometric Social Skills Inventory (SSI) and were assessed by tutors, simulated patients, and themselves. Students with higher social skills abilities obtained higher performance scores and demonstrated better interview structure. Patients reported being more likely to return to students for a dental consultation following the second interview, and students' consultation skills were rated (by tutors, patients, and students) higher at the end of the course than the beginning. Female students had higher global social skills abilities and were more emotionally expressive and sensitive than male students, while the latter had better emotional control. Female students performed better in the first interview than male students, but there was no significant gender difference in the second interview. Tutor and simulated patient ratings suggested that a consultation skills course can increase the ability of students in general, and English as a second language students in particular, to relate to their patients, manage anxiety, identify ethical issues, and recognize significant psychosocial issues that lead to more accurate diagnosis and treatment processes, ensuring the effective delivery of patient-centered dental education.

  17. 47 CFR 76.601 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Performance tests. 76.601 Section 76.601... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.601 Performance tests. (a) The operator of each cable... cable television system shall conduct complete performance tests of that system at least twice...

  18. 47 CFR 76.601 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance tests. 76.601 Section 76.601... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Technical Standards § 76.601 Performance tests. (a) The operator of each cable... cable television system shall conduct complete performance tests of that system at least twice...

  19. Application of the Online Hearing Screening Test “Earcheck”: Speech Intelligibility in Noise in Teenagers and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Marya Sheikh; Leensen, Monique C.J.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to describe the speech intelligibility in noise test results among Dutch teenagers and young adults aged 12–24 years, using a national online speech reception threshold (SRT) test, the Earcheck. A secondary objective was to assess the effect of age and gender on speech intelligibility in noise. Design: Cross-sectional SRT data were collected over a 5-year period (2010–2014), from participants of Earcheck. Regression analyses were performed, with SRT as the dependent variable, and age and gender as explaining variables. To cross-validate the model, data from 12- to 24-year olds from the same test distributed by a hearing aid dispenser (Hoorscan) were used. Results: In total, 96,803 valid test results were analyzed. The mean SRT score was −18.3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) (standard deviation (SD) = 3.7). Twenty-five percent of the scores was rated as insufficient or poor. SRT performance significantly improved with increasing age for teenagers aged 12–18 years by 0.49 dB SNR per age-year. A smaller age-effect (0.09 dB SNR per age-year) was found for young adults aged 19–24 years. Small differences between male and female users were found. Conclusion: Earcheck generated large quantities of national SRT data. The data implied that a substantial number of users of Earcheck may have some difficulty in understanding speech in noise. Furthermore, the results of this study showed an effect of gender and age on SRT performance, suggesting an ongoing maturation of speech-in-noise performance into late adolescence. This suggests the use of age-dependent reference values, but for this purpose, more research is required. PMID:27991462

  20. Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Intelligence Test Performance at Age 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt, Lidush; Richardson, Gale A.; Willford, Jennifer; Day, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted on lower income population women who were moderate users of marijuana to examine the effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on children's intellectual development at the age of six. Results concluded that the Cognitive deficits noticed at the age of six were specific to verbal and quantitative reasoning and short-term memory.

  1. Intelligence and Creativity in Problem Solving: The Importance of Test Features in Cognition Research

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsveld, Saskia; Lachmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of three features of psychometric tests for cognition research: construct definition, problem space, and knowledge domain. Definition of constructs, e.g., intelligence or creativity, forms the theoretical basis for test construction. Problem space, being well or ill-defined, is determined by the cognitive abilities considered to belong to the constructs, e.g., convergent thinking to intelligence, divergent thinking to creativity. Knowledge domain and the possibilities it offers cognition are reflected in test results. We argue that (a) comparing results of tests with different problem spaces is more informative when cognition operates in both tests on an identical knowledge domain, and (b) intertwining of abilities related to both constructs can only be expected in tests developed to instigate such a process. Test features should guarantee that abilities can contribute to self-generated and goal-directed processes bringing forth solutions that are both new and applicable. We propose and discuss a test example that was developed to address these issues. PMID:28220098

  2. The effect of pranayama on test anxiety and test performance

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In an educational setting, anxiety is often experienced by students when taking a test; which is called ‘test anxiety’. This study intends to investigate the effect of doing pranayama on test anxiety and test performance. Materials and Methods: The participants consisted of 107 MA students who were randomly assigned to the control and experimental groups. The students of the experimental group practiced pranayama for one full semester. Sarason's (1980) test anxiety scale was given to both the control and experimental groups in the final session, before taking the examination. Results: After practicing pranayama, only 33% of the participants of the experimental group experienced high test anxiety, while this percentage was nearly twice in the control group (66.7%). Furthermore, the result of the t-test for test anxiety and test performance showed that the students of the experimental group had significantly lower mean test anxiety scores (M = 16.00) as compared to the students of the control group (M = 19.31). Also, the test performance scores of the experimental group were higher when compared with the control group. There was a negative correlation between the final test performance and test anxiety (r = −.204, P < .05). Conclusions: Pranayama seems to have a significant positive effect on test anxiety and test performance. It could be used as an important technique by students prior to their examinations, to reduce their test anxiety and increase their test performance. PMID:23439436

  3. Emotional Intelligence and Organizational Performance: Implications for Performance Consultants and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Svetlana; Jones, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Economic value of Emotional Intelligence (EI) has been mentioned extensively in recent organizational behavior research. In the age of information and highly specialized work teams, EI is becoming a vital skill as people must accomplish their work by collaborating with each other, and their ability to communicate effectively becomes as critical,…

  4. Emotional Intelligence Meets Traditional Standards for an Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, John D.; Caruso, David R.; Salovey, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Results of 2 studies involving 503 adults and 229 adolescents show that emotional intelligence, as measured by the Multifactor Emotional Intelligence Scale, a new ability test of emotional intelligence, meets 3 classical criteria of a standard intelligence. (SLD)

  5. Performance Analysis of Intelligent Robust Facility Layout Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslemipour, G.; Lee, T. S.; Loong, Y. T.

    2017-03-01

    Design of a robust production facility layout with minimum handling cost (MHC) presents an appropriate approach to tackle facility layout problems in a dynamic volatile environment, in which product demands randomly change in each planning period. The objective of the design is to find the robust facility layout with minimum total material handling cost over the entire multi-period planning horizon. This paper proposes a new mathematical model for designing robust machine layout in the stochastic dynamic environment of manufacturing systems using quadratic assignment problem (QAP) formulation. In this investigation, product demands are assumed to be normally distributed random variables with known expected value, variance, and covariance that randomly change from period to period. The proposed model was verified and validated using randomly generated numerical data and benchmark examples. The effect of dependent product demands and varying interest rate on the total cost function of the proposed model has also been investigated. Sensitivity analysis on the proposed model has been performed. Dynamic programming and simulated annealing optimization algorithms were used in solving the modeled example problems.

  6. The Effects of Test Anxiety on Listening Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    In'nami, Yo.

    2006-01-01

    Although decisions or inferences we make based on test scores depend both on characteristics of test-takers and of testing situations, little research has been undertaken on the effects of these characteristics on test performance (e.g., Alderson and Banerjee, 2002). This study focuses on one of the personal characteristics of test-takers, namely…

  7. Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, Ann C.; Brandt, James M.; Tucker, Thomas; Thompson, David

    2011-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia Level II milestone 'Develop feedback system for intelligent dynamic resource allocation to improve application performance'. This milestone demonstrates the use of a scalable data collection analysis and feedback system that enables insight into how an application is utilizing the hardware resources of a high performance computing (HPC) platform in a lightweight fashion. Further we demonstrate utilizing the same mechanisms used for transporting data for remote analysis and visualization to provide low latency run-time feedback to applications. The ultimate goal of this body of work is performance optimization in the face of the ever increasing size and complexity of HPC systems.

  8. Assessing the relationship between perceived emotional intelligence and academic performance of medical students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasingam, Uma; Suat-Cheng, Peh; Aung, Thidar; Dipolog-Ubanan, Genevieve; Wei, Wee Kok

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the association between emotional intelligence and its influence on academic performance on medical students to see if emotional intelligence emerges as a significant influencer of academic achievement. The instrument used is the Trait-Meta Mood Scale (TMMS), a 30-item self-report questionnaire designed to measure an individual's perceived emotional intelligence (PEI). Participants are required to rate the extent to which they agree with each item on a 5-point Likert scale. The TMMS consists of three subscales - Attention to Feelings (which measures the extent to which individuals notice and think about their feelings, Clarity (which measures the extent to which an individual is able to discriminate among different moods) and Mood Repair (related to an individual's ability to repair/terminate negative moods or maintain pleasant ones). Of special interest is whether high scores in the Clarity and Repair subscales correlate positively with academic performance, and whether high scores on the Attention subscale, without correspondingly high scores in the Clarity and Mood Repair subscales, correlates negatively with academic performance. Sample population includes all medical students (Years 1-5) of the MD program in UCSI University, Malaysia. Preliminary analysis indicates no significant relationship between overall TMMS scores and academic performance; however, the Attention subscale is significantly correlated to academic performance. Therefore even though PEI has to be ruled out as an influencer on academic performance for this particular sample, the fact that Attention has a significant relationship with academic performance may give some insight into the factors that possibly influence medical students' academic performance.

  9. Ethnic differences in children's intelligence test scores: role of economic deprivation, home environment, and maternal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Gunn, J; Klebanov, P K; Duncan, G J

    1996-04-01

    We examine differences in intelligence test scores of black and white 5-year-olds. The Infant Health and Development Program data set includes 483 low birthweight premature children who were assessed with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. These children had been followed from birth, with data on neighborhood and family poverty, family structure, family resources, maternal characteristics, and home environment collected over the first 5 years of life. Black children's IQ scores were 1 SD lower than those of white children. Adjustments for ethnic differences in poverty reduced the ethnic differential by 52%. Adjustments for maternal education and whether the head of household was female did not reduce the ethnic difference further. However, differences in home environment reduced the ethnic differential by an additional 28%. Adjustments for economic and social differences in the lives of black and white children all but eliminate differences in the IQ scores between these two groups.

  10. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) Establishment of hydrochloric acid regeneration plant operating parameters. (1) During the performance test for hydrochloric acid regeneration plants, the owner or operator shall establish site-specific operating...

  11. PNNI Performance Validation Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimond, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    Two Private Network-Network Interface (PNNI) neighboring peers were monitored with a protocol analyzer to understand and document how PNNI works with regards to initialization and recovery processes. With the processes documented, pertinent events were found and measured to determine the protocols behavior in several environments, which consisted of congestion and/or delay. Subsequent testing of the protocol in these environments was conducted to determine the protocol's suitability for use in satellite-terrestrial network architectures.

  12. The Squad Performance Test Bed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Army, ARDEC, Target Behavioral Response Laboratory,RDAR-EIQ-SD,Building 3518, Picatinny Arsenal,NJ...K; DeMarco, R; Reidener, J. Active Shooter Training Evaluation: West Orange Police Department (TBRL-WOASTR- 14-001). Picatinny Arsenal, NJ: Target...Master title style UNCLASSIFIED Questions? US Army - Target Behavioral Response Lab Mr. Gladstone V. Reid Jr. Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

  13. Comparison of credible patients of very low intelligence and non-credible patients on neurocognitive performance validity indicators.

    PubMed

    Smith, Klayton; Boone, Kyle; Victor, Tara; Miora, Deborah; Cottingham, Maria; Ziegler, Elizabeth; Zeller, Michelle; Wright, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this archival study was to identify performance validity tests (PVTs) and standard IQ and neurocognitive test scores, which singly or in combination, differentiate credible patients of low IQ (FSIQ ≤ 75; n = 55) from non-credible patients. We compared the credible participants against a sample of 74 non-credible patients who appeared to have been attempting to feign low intelligence specifically (FSIQ ≤ 75), as well as a larger non-credible sample (n = 383) unselected for IQ. The entire non-credible group scored significantly higher than the credible participants on measures of verbal crystallized intelligence/semantic memory and manipulation of overlearned information, while the credible group performed significantly better on many processing speed and memory tests. Additionally, credible women showed faster finger-tapping speeds than non-credible women. The credible group also scored significantly higher than the non-credible subgroup with low IQ scores on measures of attention, visual perceptual/spatial tasks, processing speed, verbal learning/list learning, and visual memory, and credible women continued to outperform non-credible women on finger tapping. When cut-offs were selected to maintain approximately 90% specificity in the credible group, sensitivity rates were highest for verbal and visual memory measures (i.e., TOMM trials 1 and 2; Warrington Words correct and time; Rey Word Recognition Test total; RAVLT Effort Equation, Trial 5, total across learning trials, short delay, recognition, and RAVLT/RO discriminant function; and Digit Symbol recognition), followed by select attentional PVT scores (i.e., b Test omissions and time to recite four digits forward). When failure rates were tabulated across seven most sensitive scores, a cut-off of ≥ 2 failures was associated with 85.4% specificity and 85.7% sensitivity, while a cut-off of ≥ 3 failures resulted in 95.1% specificity and 66.0% sensitivity. Results are discussed in light of

  14. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry – hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO – uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques – precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially ‘weak-embryotoxic’ and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as ‘non-embryotoxic’. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for

  15. Performance Test on Polymer Waste Form - 12137

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Se Yup

    2012-07-01

    Polymer solidification was attempted to produce stable waste form for the boric acid concentrates and the dewatered spent resins. The polymer mixture was directly injected into the mold or drum which was packed with the boric acid concentrates and the dewatered spent resins, respectively. The waste form was produced by entirely curing the polymer mixture. A series of performance tests was conducted including compressive strength test, water immersion test, leach test, thermal stability test, irradiation stability test and biodegradation stability test for the polymer waste forms. From the results of the performance tests for the polymer waste forms, it is believed that the polymer waste form is very stable and can satisfy the acceptance criteria for permanent disposal. At present, performance tests with full scale polymer waste forms are being carried out in order to obtain qualification certificate by the regulatory institute in Korea. Polymer waste forms were prepared with the surrogate of boric acid concentrates and the surrogate of spent ion exchange resins respectively. Waste forms were also made in lab scale and in full scale. Lab. scale waste forms were directly subjected to a series of the performance tests. In the case of full scale waste form, the test specimens for the performance test were taken from a part of waste form by coring. A series of performance tests was conducted including compressive strength test, thermal stability test, irradiation stability test and biodegradation stability test, water immersion test, leach test, and free standing water for the polymer waste forms. In addition, a fire resistance test was performed on the waste forms by the requirement of the regulatory institute in Korea. Every polymer waste forms containing the boric acid concentrates and the spent ion exchange resins had exhibited excellent structural integrity of more than 27.58 MPa (4,000 psi) of compressive strength. On thermal stability testing, biodegradation

  16. Astronaut Scott Carpenter tests balance mechanism performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter's balance mechanism performance is tested by his walking on a narrow board in his bare feet. He is performing this test at the School of Aviation Medicine, Pensicola, Florida (04570); Carpenter walks a straight line by putting one foot directly in front of the other to test his balance (04571).

  17. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1161 Performance testing and test methods. (a...) or measure the concentration of HCl (and Cl2 for hydrochloric acid regeneration plants) in gases... to the initial test or tests. (c) Establishment of hydrochloric acid regeneration plant...

  18. Business intelligence: using insight to improve the value and performance of your practice.

    PubMed

    Coan, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Using information to improve the value of your practice can be a great way to create leverage and improve the performance of your practice. Business intelligence (BI) is the result of a complete system that produces meaningful insights by providing the information necessary to make business decisions. Changes made from these insights improve both the performance and value of your practice. It is important to identify the key elements required of a good BI system and the areas within a practice that can directly benefit from an effective BI system.

  19. Acoustical and Intelligibility Test of the Vocera(Copyright) B3000 Communication Badge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Ronald; Litaker, Harry; Chu, Shao-Sheng R.; Simon, Cory; Romero, Andy; Moses, Haifa

    2012-01-01

    To communicate with each other or ground support, crew members on board the International Space Station (ISS) currently use the Audio Terminal Units (ATU), which are located in each ISS module. However, to use the ATU, crew members must stop their current activity, travel to a panel, and speak into a wall-mounted microphone, or use either a handheld microphone or a Crew Communication Headset that is connected to a panel. These actions unnecessarily may increase task times, lower productivity, create cable management issues, and thus increase crew frustration. Therefore, the Habitability and Human Factors and Human Interface Branches at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently investigating a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless communication system, Vocera(C), as a near-term solution for ISS communication. The objectives of the acoustics and intelligibility testing of this system were to answer the following questions: 1. How intelligibly can a human hear the transmitted message from a Vocera(c) badge in three different noise environments (Baseline = 20 dB, US Lab Module = 58 dB, Russian Module = 70.6 dB)? 2. How accurate is the Vocera(C) badge at recognizing voice commands in three different noise environments? 3. What body location (chest, upper arm, or shoulder) is optimal for speech intelligibility and voice recognition accuracy of the Vocera(C) badge on a human in three different noise environments?

  20. A high-speed and low-noise intelligent test system for infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tianshi; Xue, Yulong; Cui, Kun; Kong, Fansheng

    2016-11-01

    With the development of infrared focal plane technology, the scale of the detector becomes larger and larger, and the pixel noise level is lower and lower. We designed and implemented a set of infrared high-speed low noise intelligent test system based on OPENVPX standard, which is used to test the index, long term monitoring and life test of infrared detector. The system is mainly composed of main control board, image acquisition board, temperature acquisition board and the high speed back board, which has high speed image acquisition, processing, temperature monitoring and alarm function. Through testing and simulation, the results show that the system noise is less than 100uV, the dynamic range reaches 100dB, and the data throughput rate reaches 4Gbps, which can meet the requirements of the infrared detector test currently.

  1. Test Anxiety, Test Comfort and Student Achievement Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyans, Leslie J., Jr.

    The Illinois Inventory of Educational Progress (IIEP) Test Comfort Scale was administered and test results were studied in terms of student achievement and correlates of achievement. Using the revised, seven-item scale, it was determined that: in grade 4, there was no main significant effect for sex or ethnic differences, although Orientals and…

  2. Intelligent adaptive nonlinear flight control for a high performance aircraft with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Savran, Aydogan; Tasaltin, Ramazan; Becerikli, Yasar

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the development of a neural network (NN) based adaptive flight control system for a high performance aircraft. The main contribution of this work is that the proposed control system is able to compensate the system uncertainties, adapt to the changes in flight conditions, and accommodate the system failures. The underlying study can be considered in two phases. The objective of the first phase is to model the dynamic behavior of a nonlinear F-16 model using NNs. Therefore a NN-based adaptive identification model is developed for three angular rates of the aircraft. An on-line training procedure is developed to adapt the changes in the system dynamics and improve the identification accuracy. In this procedure, a first-in first-out stack is used to store a certain history of the input-output data. The training is performed over the whole data in the stack at every stage. To speed up the convergence rate and enhance the accuracy for achieving the on-line learning, the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method with a trust region approach is adapted to train the NNs. The objective of the second phase is to develop intelligent flight controllers. A NN-based adaptive PID control scheme that is composed of an emulator NN, an estimator NN, and a discrete time PID controller is developed. The emulator NN is used to calculate the system Jacobian required to train the estimator NN. The estimator NN, which is trained on-line by propagating the output error through the emulator, is used to adjust the PID gains. The NN-based adaptive PID control system is applied to control three angular rates of the nonlinear F-16 model. The body-axis pitch, roll, and yaw rates are fed back via the PID controllers to the elevator, aileron, and rudder actuators, respectively. The resulting control system has learning, adaptation, and fault-tolerant abilities. It avoids the storage and interpolation requirements for the too many controller parameters of a typical flight control

  3. Performance test procedures for thermal collectors - Outdoor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillett, W. B.

    A review of outdoor solar collector test methods is presented, based largely on the CEC Recommendations for European Solar Collector Test Methods. Test facility design and instrumentation are discussed, with reference to their influence on measured collector efficiencies. Steady state outdoor testing, mixed indoor/outdoor testing and transient testing are reviewed, and it is concluded that although the testing of simple flat plate water heaters is fairly well understood, more work is now required to develop test methods for the new high performance collectors which are coming onto the market.

  4. Emotional intelligence and academic performance in university students of natural science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Cuellar, Jose Habacuc

    This research presents the concept of emotional intelligence, more specifically of John D. Mayer, Peter Salovey and David R. Caruso, as an important element to be applied in learning science. It is an explanatory-correlation study between emotional intelligence and academic performance of students in natural sciences from the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras campus. The population is approximately 2,539 students, with a sample of approximately 337 students. The instrument used to calculate the IE is the TMSS-24 composted of three dimensions of the original scale: Attention, Clarity and Repair. It was validated by Fernandez, B. P., Extremera, N. and Natalio, R. (2004), with reliability in Attention of (0.86), Clarity (0.90) and Repair (0.86). For the calculation of academic achievement (RA) was used an average of the courses seen by the students in the academic semester of 2007. The variables emotional intelligence and its components with academic achievement (RA), Index of general application of the student, gender, age and studies concentration were correlated but it was founded no correlation between them. It was founded a difference in the attention on gender, where it is concluded that woman express better and more the feelings than men.

  5. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Perception of Job Performance among Nurses in North West of Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Maryam; Namdar Areshtanab, Hossein; Arshadi Bostanabad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence skills help nurses to cope with the emotional demands of healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between emotional intelligence and perception of job performance among nurses. Using a correlational descriptive design with stratified random sampling, 338 registered nurses from teaching hospitals in North West of Iran were surveyed. Emotional intelligence and perception of job performance were measured using validated self-report measures. The collected data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential methods using SPSS/13. The mean of nurses' emotional intelligence and their perception of job performance was, respectively, 235.83 ± 37.98 and 157.63 ± 33.23. There was no significant relationship between nurses' emotional intelligence and their perception of job performance. Although there was a significant relationship between intrapersonal subscale of emotional intelligence and job performance, there was none with other subscales. In order to get rid of the physical and psychological effects of stressful work in wards, it seems that nurses just do routine activities and refuse working closely with the patients. It seems that fitting the patient to nurse ratio, dividing work between nurses, and supporting each other are necessary.

  6. The Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Perception of Job Performance among Nurses in North West of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vahidi, Maryam; Namdar Areshtanab, Hossein; Arshadi Bostanabad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence skills help nurses to cope with the emotional demands of healthcare environment. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between emotional intelligence and perception of job performance among nurses. Using a correlational descriptive design with stratified random sampling, 338 registered nurses from teaching hospitals in North West of Iran were surveyed. Emotional intelligence and perception of job performance were measured using validated self-report measures. The collected data were analyzed through descriptive and inferential methods using SPSS/13. The mean of nurses' emotional intelligence and their perception of job performance was, respectively, 235.83 ± 37.98 and 157.63 ± 33.23. There was no significant relationship between nurses' emotional intelligence and their perception of job performance. Although there was a significant relationship between intrapersonal subscale of emotional intelligence and job performance, there was none with other subscales. In order to get rid of the physical and psychological effects of stressful work in wards, it seems that nurses just do routine activities and refuse working closely with the patients. It seems that fitting the patient to nurse ratio, dividing work between nurses, and supporting each other are necessary. PMID:27433375

  7. Comparisons of Auditory Performance and Speech Intelligibility after Cochlear Implant Reimplantation in Mandarin-Speaking Users

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chung-Feng; Ko, Hui-Chen; Tsou, Yung-Ting; Chan, Kai-Chieh; Fang, Hsuan-Yeh; Wu, Che-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the causes, hearing, and speech performance before and after cochlear implant reimplantation in Mandarin-speaking users. Methods. In total, 589 patients who underwent cochlear implantation in our medical center between 1999 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Data related to demographics, etiologies, implant-related information, complications, and hearing and speech performance were collected. Results. In total, 22 (3.74%) cases were found to have major complications. Infection (n = 12) and hard failure of the device (n = 8) were the most common major complications. Among them, 13 were reimplanted in our hospital. The mean scores of the Categorical Auditory Performance (CAP) and the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) obtained before and after reimplantation were 5.5 versus 5.8 and 3.7 versus 4.3, respectively. The SIR score after reimplantation was significantly better than preoperation. Conclusions. Cochlear implantation is a safe procedure with low rates of postsurgical revisions and device failures. The Mandarin-speaking patients in this study who received reimplantation had restored auditory performance and speech intelligibility after surgery. Device soft failure was rare in our series, calling attention to Mandarin-speaking CI users requiring revision of their implants due to undesirable symptoms or decreasing performance of uncertain cause. PMID:27413753

  8. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop, Modules 6 - 11

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, Janice; Torres, Teresa M.

    2012-10-01

    These modules cover performance testing of: Interior Detection Systems; Access Controls; Exterior Detection Systems; Video Assessment Systems; SNM / Contraband Detection Systems; Access Delay Elements

  9. 40 CFR 63.1161 - Performance testing and test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... section. An owner or operator may conduct multiple performance tests to establish alternative compliant... owner or operator may conduct multiple performance tests to establish alternative compliant operating... moisture content of the stack gas; and (v) Method 26A, “Determination of Hydrogen Halide and...

  10. Applications of Artificial Intelligence to Information Search and Retrieval: The Development and Testing of an Intelligent Technical Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Francis A.

    This paper describes the evolution and development of an intelligent information system, i.e., a knowledge base for steel structures being undertaken as part of the Technical Information Center for Steel Structures at Lehigh University's Center of Advanced Technology for Large Structural Systems (ATLSS). The initial development of the Technical…

  11. The Effect of Cartooning Instruction in a Full-Inclusive Setting on Rural Children's Performances on the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test: Selected Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, G. Franklin; Obringer, S. John

    Many researchers have attempted to link children's drawings to intelligence. The Goodenough-Harris Draw-a-Man (DAM) and Draw-a-Woman (DAW) test has been accepted as an indicator of intelligence. This study, via examination of specific cases, explored the effect that instruction in drawing cartoons had on the DAM and DAW performance of 16…

  12. Semantic structure in schizophrenia as assessed by the category fluency test: effect of verbal intelligence and age of onset.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, C; Matsui, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Yamashita, I; Sumiyoshi, S; Kurachi, M

    2001-12-31

    It has been reported that long-term memory function, including the semantic structure of category, is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. The present study was performed to determine: (1) whether the deficit in semantic structure in schizophrenia is independent of cultural backgrounds, and (2) the effect of age of onset and verbal intelligence on the degradation of semantic structure in these patients. Fifty-seven Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 33 normal control subjects entered the study. The semantic structure was derived by Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) analysis based on data from the ANIMAL category fluency test. The semantic structure was compared between: (1) schizophrenic patients as a whole vs. normal control subjects; (2) earlier onset (age of onset <20 years) vs. later-onset groups of patients; and (3) high Vocabulary score (score of the Vocabulary subtest from the WAIS-R>7) vs. low Vocabulary score patient groups. Normal control subjects demonstrated the domestic/size dimension in semantic structure, while no such dimension was obtained in patients with schizophrenia. The subgroup comparisons revealed that the later onset or the high Vocabulary score group maintained a relatively intact semantic structure compared with the earlier onset or the low Vocabulary score group, respectively. These findings suggest that the deficit in semantic structure in patients with schizophrenia is commonly observed irrespective of cultural backgrounds, and that age of onset and the level of verbal intelligence are closely related to severity of degradation of the semantic structure in schizophrenia.

  13. A PERFORMANCE TEST OF TEACHING EFFECTIVENESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAKER, EVA L.; POPHAM, V. JAMES

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES THE INITIAL VALIDATION OF PERFORMANCE TESTS OF TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS--USING PUPIL GAINS AS THE CRITERION OF EFFECTIVENESS--AND THE STEPS TAKEN IN RECOGNITION OF THE PROPRIETY OF SUCH MEASURES ONLY IF ALL TEACHERS ARE TEACHING FOR THE SAME OBJECTIVES. AS A FIRST STEP, IT WAS HYPOTHESIZED THAT A VALID PERFORMANCE TEST OF…

  14. BSN Program Admittance Criteria: Should Emotional Intelligence Be Included?

    PubMed

    Smith, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to identify and monitor emotions and remain aware of how emotions affect thoughts and actions. Emotional intelligence has been discussed as a better predictor of personal and occupational success than performance on intellectual intelligence tests.

  15. A psychology for pedagogy: intelligence testing in USSR in the 1920s.

    PubMed

    Leopoldoff, Irina

    2014-08-01

    This article examines a case of intelligence testing conducted in the mid-1920s, while considering the broader political and scientific context of Soviet life. Guided by questions about the status and influence of mental measurement in Russian society, previously and after the revolution, as well as asking about the main actors in the fields linked to testing, such as psychology, pedagogy, and pedology, during this tumultuous period. To answer these questions, journals and difficult-to-access archival sources were used, which provided evidence regarding the enthusiasm psychological testing had on scholars in the 1920s and the institutional support they received for their surveys. The article offers some hints concerning why this was so and why this situation changed completely a decade later. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The impact of trait emotional intelligence on nursing team performance and cohesiveness.

    PubMed

    Quoidbach, Jordi; Hansenne, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Claims about the positive influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on work team performance are very numerous, both in commercial and scientific literature. However, despite the huge interest that media and business consultants put in EI and its fast-growing use in organizations, there is very little empirical evidence to support these claims. In this study, we investigated the relationships between EI, performance, and cohesiveness in 23 nursing teams. EI was assessed using the modified version of the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale and cohesiveness with the Group Cohesiveness Scale. Finally, nursing team performance was measured at four different levels: job satisfaction, chief nursing executives' rating, turnover rate, and health care quality. Results showed that health care quality was positively correlated with emotion regulation. Emotion regulation was also positively correlated with group cohesiveness. Surprisingly, it also appears that emotion appraisal was negatively correlated with the health care quality provided by teams. These results suggest that EI and, more specifically, Emotional Regulation may provide an interesting new way of enhancing nursing teams' cohesion and patient/client outcomes.

  17. Intelligent irrigation performance: evaluation and quantifying its ability for conserving water in arid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghobari, Hussein M.; Mohammad, Fawzi S.

    2011-12-01

    Intelligent irrigation technologies have been developed in recent years to apply irrigation to turf and landscape plants. These technologies are an evapotranspiration (ET)-based irrigation controller, which calculates ET for local microclimate. Then, the controller creates a program for loading and communicating automatically with drip or sprinkler system controllers. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the new ET sensors in ability to irrigate agricultural crops and to conserve water use for crop in arid climatic conditions. This paper presents the case for water conservation using intelligent irrigation system (IIS) application technology. The IIS for automating irrigation scheduling was implemented and tested with sprinkle and drip irrigation systems to irrigate wheat and tomato crops. Another irrigation scheduling system was also installed and operated as another treatment, which is based on weather data that retrieved from an automatic weather station. This irrigation control system was running in parallel to the former system (IIS) to be control experiments for comparison purposes. However, this article discusses the implementation of IIS, its installation, testing and calibration of various components. The experiments conducted for one growing season 2009-2010 and the results were represented and discussed herein. Data from all plots were analyzed, which were including soil water status, water consumption, and crop yield. The initial results indicate that up to 25% water saving by intelligent irrigation compared to control method, while maintaining competing yield. Results show that the crop evapotranspiration values for control experiments were higher than that of ET-System in consistent trend during whole growth season. The analysis points out that the values of the two treatments were somewhat close to each other's only in the initial development stages. Generally, the ET-System, with some modification was precise in

  18. Perform Ultrasonic Testing on Cs Capsule Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIS, S.J.

    2000-04-06

    This procedure provides a safe, uniform method for the performance of the ultrasonic weld inspection of the Cesium capsule overpacks. The inspection system will detect cracks, lack of fusion, and lack of penetration. This computer controlled automated system will perform the examination once the capsule overpack has been placed in the pool cell. Examination of the capsule overpacks will be in accordance with drawing H-283014, REV. 0 ,and a certified NDE examiner will perform the test procedure, provide analysis, and test documentation.

  19. Construct validity of the Italian version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) v2.0.

    PubMed

    Curci, Antonietta; Lanciano, Tiziana; Soleti, Emanuela; Zammuner, Vanda Lucia; Salovey, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In 2 studies, we assessed the construct validity of the Italian version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) version 2.0. In Study 1, we administered the MSCEIT together with measures of crystallized and fluid intelligence, personality, and affect. In Study 2, we administered the MSCEIT together with indexes of dispositional coping, emotion regulation strategies, alexithymia, state-trait anxiety, depression, and depressive rumination. We evaluated the factorial structure of the MSCEIT with a confirmatory factor analysis model using data combined from Study 1 and 2. The results confirm that the MSCEIT Italian version satisfactorily discriminates emotional intelligence ability from crystallized and fluid intelligence, personality, and affect, and exhibits significant correlations with various psychological well-being criteria. Furthermore, data from both studies confirm that the factorial structure of MSCEIT is consistent with the theory on which it is based, although it was difficult to rule out alternative structures.

  20. Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Performance Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; And Others

    Although the belief has been expressed that performance assessments are intrinsically more fair than multiple-choice measures, some forms of performance assessment may in fact be more likely than conventional tests to tap construct-irrelevant factors. As performance assessment grows in popularity, it will be increasingly important to monitor the…

  1. Predictors of neuropsychological effort test performance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morra, Lindsay F; Gold, James M; Sullivan, Sara K; Strauss, Gregory P

    2015-03-01

    There is some evidence that insufficient effort may be common in schizophrenia, posing significant threats to the validity of neuropsychological test results. Low effort may account for a significant proportion of variance in neuropsychological test scores and the generalized cognitive deficit that characterizes the disorder. The current study evaluated clinical predictors of insufficient effort in schizophrenia using an embedded effort measure, the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) Effort Index (EI). Participants were 330 patients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or another psychotic disorder who received a battery of neuropsychological tests, including: Wechsler Test of Adult Reading (WTAR), Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI), and RBANS. Clinical assessments designed to measure functional outcome and symptoms were also obtained. Results indicated that 9.4% of patients failed the EI. Patients who failed had lower full-scale, verbal, and performance IQ, as well as poorer performance on RBANS domains not included in the EI (immediate memory, language, and visuospatial/construction). Patients who failed the EI also displayed poorer community-based vocational outcome, greater likelihood of having "deficit schizophrenia" (i.e., primary and enduring negative symptoms), and increased severity of positive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that insufficient effort was most significantly predicted by a combination of low IQ, negative symptoms, and positive symptoms. Findings suggest that although insufficient effort may be relatively uncommon in schizophrenia, it is associated with important clinical outcomes. The RBANS EI may be a useful tool in evaluating insufficient effort in schizophrenia.

  2. [The impact of malnutrition on brain development, intelligence and school work performance].

    PubMed

    Leiva Plaza, B; Inzunza Brito, N; Pérez Torrejón, H; Castro Gloor, V; Jansana Medina, J M; Toro Díaz, T; Almagiá Flores, A; Navarro Díaz, A; Urrutia Cáceres, M S; Cervilla Oltremari, J; Ivanovic Marincovich, D

    2001-03-01

    The findings from several authors confirm that undernutrition at an early age affects brain growth and intellectual quotient. Most part of students with the lowest scholastic achievement scores present suboptimal head circumference (anthropometric indicator of past nutrition and brain development) and brain size. On the other hand, intellectual quotient measured through intelligence tests (Weschler-R, or the Raven Progressives Matrices Test) has been described positively and significantly correlated with brain size measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); in this respect, intellectual ability has been recognized as one of the best predictors of scholastic achievement. Considering that education is the change lever for the improvement of the quality of life and that the absolute numbers of undernourished children have been increasing in the world, is of major relevance to analyse the long-term effects of undernutrition at an early age. The investigations related to the interrelationships between nutritional status, brain development, intelligence and scholastic achievement are of greatest importance, since nutritional problems affect the lowest socioeconomic stratum with negative consequences manifested in school-age, in higher levels of school dropout, learning problems and a low percentage of students enrolling into higher education. This limits the development of people by which a clear economic benefit to increase adult productivity for government policies might be successful preventing childhood malnutrition.

  3. Emotional intelligence and mental disorder.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Janine; Schütz, Astrid; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich

    2009-09-01

    Emotional abilities were measured with a performance test of emotional intelligence (The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002) in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder, substance abuse disorder, or borderline personality disorder (BPD), and a nonclinical control group. Findings showed that all clinical groups differed from controls with respect to their overall emotional intelligence score, which dovetails with previous findings from self-report measures. Specifically, we found that the ability to understand emotional information and the ability to regulate emotions best distinguished the groups. Findings showed that patients with substance abuse disorder and BPD patients were most impaired.

  4. Emotional intelligence: its relationship to stress, coping, well-being and professional performance in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Por, Jitna; Barriball, Louise; Fitzpatrick, Joanne; Roberts, Julia

    2011-11-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been highlighted as an important theoretical and practical construct. It has the potential to enable individuals to cope better and experience less stress thus contributing to a healthy and stable workforce. The study aimed to explore the EI of nursing students (n=130, 52.0%) and its relationship to perceived stress, coping strategies, subjective well-being, perceived nursing competency and academic performance. Students were on the adult pathway of a nursing diploma or degree programme in one Higher Education Institution (HEI) in the United Kingdom (UK). A prospective correlational survey design was adopted. Three methods of data collection were used: i) A self-report questionnaire; ii) an audit of students' academic performance; and iii) mapping of EI teaching in the curricula. Emotional intelligence was positively related to well-being (p<0.05), problem-focused coping (p<0.05) and perceived nursing competency (p<0.05), and negatively related to perceived stress (p<0.05). The findings suggest that increased feelings of control and emotional competence assist nursing students to adopt active and effective coping strategies when dealing with stress, which in turn enhances their subjective well-being. This study highlights the potential value of facilitating the EI of students of nursing and other healthcare professions.

  5. Is the Speech Transmission Index (STI) a robust measure of sound system speech intelligibility performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapp, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Although RaSTI is a good indicator of the speech intelligibility capability of auditoria and similar spaces, during the past 2-3 years it has been shown that RaSTI is not a robust predictor of sound system intelligibility performance. Instead, it is now recommended, within both national and international codes and standards, that full STI measurement and analysis be employed. However, new research is reported, that indicates that STI is not as flawless, nor robust as many believe. The paper highlights a number of potential error mechanisms. It is shown that the measurement technique and signal excitation stimulus can have a significant effect on the overall result and accuracy, particularly where DSP-based equipment is employed. It is also shown that in its current state of development, STI is not capable of appropriately accounting for a number of fundamental speech and system attributes, including typical sound system frequency response variations and anomalies. This is particularly shown to be the case when a system is operating under reverberant conditions. Comparisons between actual system measurements and corresponding word score data are reported where errors of up to 50 implications for VA and PA system performance verification will be discussed.

  6. Situational Judgment Test Research: Informing the Debate on Practical Intelligence Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Michael A.; Whetzel, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    [Gottfredson, L. S. (2003). Dissecting practical intelligence theory: Its claims and evidence. Intelligence, 31, 343-397.] provided a detailed critique of Sternberg's [Sternberg, R. J., Fotsythe, G. B., Hedlund, J., Horvath, J. A., Wagner, R. K., Williams, W. M., Snook, S. A., Grigorenko, E. L. (2000). Practical intelligence in everyday life. New…

  7. The Science of Intelligence Testing: Commentary on the Evolving Nature of Interpretations of the Wechsler Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Intelligence has been defined in multiple ways throughout history. In the last 100 years a psychometric approach to define the concept of intelligence has come to dominate the concept. This Commentary provides a brief overview of the history and concepts of intelligence with an emphasis on intellectual assessment. Particular focus is placed on the…

  8. Interpreting the "g" Loadings of Intelligence Test Composite Scores in Light of Spearman's Law of Diminishing Returns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The linear loadings of intelligence test composite scores on a general factor ("g") have been investigated recently in factor analytic studies. Spearman's law of diminishing returns (SLODR), however, implies that the "g" loadings of test scores likely decrease in magnitude as g increases, or they are nonlinear. The purpose of…

  9. Development, Administration and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Secondary School Test Based on the Theory of Successful Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zbainos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    The present study attempted to investigate an application of the theory of Successful Intelligence (Sternberg, 1997) in lower Greek secondary schools, through a school tests believing that school assessments should be based on solid, empirically investigated theoretical foundations. The test was administered to 2663 students with a mean age of…

  10. The Relationship between Speed of Information Processing as Measured by Timed Paper-and-Pencil Tests and Psychometric Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Richard H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between speed of information processing and Intelligence Quotient (IQ) was examined in 62 college students using timed paper-and-pencil substitution tests to measure processing speed. A psychometrically better IQ test showed a strong linear relationship between mean time to code and its correlation with IQ; this relationship was…

  11. Assessing Follow Through: Changes in Intelligence Test Scores over Two and Three Years of Experience in the Responsive Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayder, Nicolas; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Four Wechsler subscales were administered in a longitudinal design to children from the Responsive Model Follow Through Program. On the first testing, subjects' average intelligence scores were significantly lower, but on subsequent tests equivalent to or higher than national norms, calling into question Deutsch's cumulative-deficit hypothesis.…

  12. SI PC104 Performance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Montelongo, S

    2005-12-16

    The Spectral Instruments (SI) PC104 systems associated with the SI-1000 CCD camera exhibited intermittent power problems during setup, test and operations which called for further evaluation and testing. The SI PC104 System is the interface between the SI-1000 CCD camera and its associated Diagnostic Controller (DC). As such, the SI PC104 must be a reliable, robust system capable of providing consistent performance in various configurations and operating conditions. This SI PC104 system consists of a stackable set of modules designed to meet the PC104+ Industry Standard. The SI PC104 System consists of a CPU module, SI Camera card, Media converter card, Video card and a I/O module. The root cause of power problems was identified as failing solder joints at the LEMO power connector attached to the SI Camera Card. The recommended solution was to provide power to the PC104 system via a PC104+ power supply module configured into the PC104 stack instead of thru the LEMO power connector. Test plans (2) were developed to test SI PC104 performance and identify any outstanding issues noted during extended operations. Test Plan 1 included performance and image acquisition tests. Test Plan 2 verified performance after implementing recommendations. Test Plan 2 also included verifying integrity of system files and driver installation after bootup. Each test plan was implemented to fully test against each set of problems noted. Test Plan presentations and Test Plan results are attached as appendices. Anticipated test results will show successful operation and reliable performance of the SI PC104 system receiving its power via a PC104 power supply module. A SI PC104 Usage Recommendation Memo will be sent out to the SI PC104 User Community. Recommendation memo(s) are attached as appendices.

  13. Implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement: testing alternative models.

    PubMed

    Gonida, Eleftheria; Kiosseoglou, Grigoris; Leondari, Angeliki

    2006-01-01

    In the present study 3 alternative causal models concerning the relationships between implicit theories of intelligence, perceived academic competence, and school achievement were tested. The direction of changes in implicit theories and perceived competence during early adolescence also was examined. A total of 187 fifth and sixth graders were tested and retested a year later, when they were sixth and seventh graders, respectively. Cross-lagged regression analyses indicated that school achievement determined the adoption of a particular implicit theory through the mediation of perceived competence. Implicit theories were found to change toward the adoption of more incremental beliefs and perceived academic competence declined; however, high achievers, as compared with their low- and middle-level classmates, adopted more incremental beliefs and had significantly higher perceived competence.

  14. Psychometrics of Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) scores.

    PubMed

    Brannick, Michael T; Wahi, Monika M; Goldin, Steven B

    2011-08-01

    A sample of 183 medical students completed the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0). Scores on the test were examined for evidence of reliability and factorial validity. Although Cronbach's alpha for the total scores was adequate (.79), many of the scales had low internal consistency (scale alphas ranged from .34 to .77; median = .48). Previous factor analyses of the MSCEIT are critiqued and the rationale for the current analysis is presented. Both confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses of the MSCEIT item parcels are reported. Pictures and faces items formed separate factors rather than loading on a Perception factor. Emotional Management appeared as a factor, but items from Blends and Facilitation failed to load consistently on any factor, rendering factors for Emotional Understanding and Emotional Facilitation problematic.

  15. Investigating the Association between Turkish Freshman's Multiple Intelligence Profiles and University Entrance Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atas, Sait; Erisen, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Even though curriculum designers in Turkey considered Gardner's multiple intelligence theory as one of the most important theories during the curricula reform in 2005, the university entrance examination system is still on the basis of the two intelligence areas only, mathematical-logical and linguistics intelligence. The aim of this study was to…

  16. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  17. The National Adult Reading Test: restandardisation against the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth edition.

    PubMed

    Bright, Peter; Hale, Emily; Gooch, Vikki Jayne; Myhill, Thomas; van der Linde, Ian

    2016-09-14

    Since publication in 1982, the 50-item National Adult Reading Test (NART; Nelson, 1982 ; NART-R; Nelson & Willison, 1991 ) has remained a widely adopted method for estimating premorbid intelligence both for clinical and research purposes. However, the NART has not been standardised against the most recent revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III; Wechsler, 1997 , and WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008 ). Our objective, therefore, was to produce reliable standardised estimates of WAIS-IV IQ from the NART. Ninety-two neurologically healthy British adults were assessed and regression equations calculated to produce population estimates of WAIS-IV full-scale IQ (FSIQ) and constituent index scores. Results showed strong NART/WAIS-IV FSIQ correlations with more moderate correlations observed between NART error and constituent index scores. FSIQ estimates were closely similar to the published WAIS and WAIS-R estimates at the high end of the distribution, but at the lower end were approximately equidistant from the highly discrepant WAIS (low) and WAIS-R (high) values. We conclude that the NART is likely to remain an important tool for estimating the impact of neurological damage on general cognitive ability. We advise caution in the use of older published WAIS and/or WAIS-R estimates for estimating premorbid WAIS-IV FSIQ, particularly for those with low NART scores.

  18. Emotional intelligence, teamwork effectiveness, and job performance: the moderating role of job context.

    PubMed

    Farh, Crystal I C Chien; Seo, Myeong-Gu; Tesluk, Paul E

    2012-07-01

    We advance understanding of the role of ability-based emotional intelligence (EI) and its subdimensions in the workplace by examining the mechanisms and context-based boundary conditions of the EI-performance relationship. Using a trait activation framework, we theorize that employees with higher overall EI and emotional perception ability exhibit higher teamwork effectiveness (and subsequent job performance) when working in job contexts characterized by high managerial work demands because such contexts contain salient emotion-based cues that activate employees' emotional capabilities. A sample of 212 professionals from various organizations and industries indicated support for the salutary effect of EI, above and beyond the influence of personality, cognitive ability, emotional labor job demands, job complexity, and demographic control variables. Theoretical and practical implications of the potential value of EI for workplace outcomes under contexts involving managerial complexity are discussed.

  19. Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  20. Performance Testing in Electronic Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Bert; Pedersen, Joe F.

    This set of 21 performance tests in electronics technology was developed on the basis of a review of commercial and noncommercial instructional materials dealing with electronics technology. The tests, which were reviewed by a group of community college instructors and an advisory committee for electronics technology, address the following…

  1. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01

    Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

  2. Design and performance test of spacecraft test and operation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohua; Cui, Yan; Wang, Shuo; Meng, Xiaofeng

    2011-06-01

    Main test processor (MTP) software is the key element of Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) for spacecraft test and operation used in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) for years without innovation. With the increasing demand for a more efficient and agile MTP software, the new MTP software was developed. It adopts layered and plug-in based software architecture, whose core runtime server provides message queue management, share memory management and process management services and forms the framework for a configurable and open architecture system. To investigate the MTP software's performance, the test case of network response time, test sequence management capability and data-processing capability was introduced in detail. Test results show that the MTP software is common and has higher performance than the legacy one.

  3. Stereotype threat and group differences in test performance: a question of measurement invariance.

    PubMed

    Wicherts, Jelte M; Dolan, Conor V; Hessen, David J

    2005-11-01

    Studies into the effects of stereotype threat (ST) on test performance have shed new light on race and sex differences in achievement and intelligence test scores. In this article, the authors relate ST theory to the psychometric concept of measurement invariance and show that ST effects may be viewed as a source of measurement bias. As such, ST effects are detectable by means of multi-group confirmatory factor analysis. This enables research into the generalizability of ST effects to real-life or high-stakes testing. The modeling approach is described in detail and applied to 3 experiments in which the amount of ST for minorities and women was manipulated. Results indicate that ST results in measurement bias of intelligence and mathematics tests.

  4. 47 CFR 76.601 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specified subscriber terminals may be required by the Commission or the local franchiser to secure...-performance test points chosen shall be balanced to represent all geographic areas served by the cable system... network: Provided, that data shall be included to relate the measured performance of the system as...

  5. 47 CFR 76.601 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specified subscriber terminals may be required by the Commission or the local franchiser to secure...-performance test points chosen shall be balanced to represent all geographic areas served by the cable system... network: Provided, that data shall be included to relate the measured performance of the system as...

  6. 47 CFR 76.601 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specified subscriber terminals may be required by the Commission or the local franchiser to secure...-performance test points chosen shall be balanced to represent all geographic areas served by the cable system... network: Provided, that data shall be included to relate the measured performance of the system as...

  7. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  8. The Nature of Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    to he a plausible, although Partial, onc.. In the Cattell -Horn terminology. crystallized ability includes the know]Oedte and skills measured by tests ...34Motivational Aspects of Changes in IQ Test Performance of Culturally Deprived Nursery School Children," Child De- velopment 39 (1968): 1-14. 16. Robert J...l.AFICATtOt4 or TIAIS PAGE (When f’iat& EmotIed) .:ponents and microcomponents of intelligence are, and examines the extent to which IQ tests measure these

  9. The relationship between characteristics of nursing performance and years of experience in nurses with high emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Yuriko; Tanaka, Michiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate characteristics of nursing performance among nurses with high emotional intelligence (EI) and examine the influence of years of experience on nursing performance and EI. A survey, including The Emotional Intelligence Scale and the Six-Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance, was administered to 1395 nurses working at general hospitals in Japan from November 2010 to March 2011. We received 1045 responses (76% response rate). There was a significant positive correlation between EI and nursing performance. Nurses with high EI reported more professional development activities, suggesting that they continue learning, attain licenses and actively improve their nursing skills. High-performing nurses had high situational abilities and showed improved nursing performance with experience. However, nurses with low situational abilities demonstrated no improvement in nursing performance related to experience. EI involves skills that can be acquired from training. Therefore, educational programmes to improve EI could improve nursing performance.

  10. Performance Test for the SIGMA Communication System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seonyeong; Lee, Hyojeong; Lee, Seongwhan; Shin, Jehyuck; Lee, Jungkyu; Jin, Ho

    2016-12-01

    Scientific CubeSat with Instruments for Global Magnetic Fields and Radiations (SIGMA) is a 3-U size CubeSat that will be operated in low earth orbit (LEO). The SIGMA communication system uses a very high frequency (VHF) band for uplink and an ultra high frequency (UHF) band for downlink. Both frequencies belong to an amateur band. The ground station that communicates with SIGMA is located at Kyung Hee Astronomical Observatory (KHAO). For reliable communication, we carried out a laboratory (LAB) test and far-field tests between the CubeSat and a ground station. In the field test, we considered test parameters such as attenuation, antenna deployment, CubeSat body attitude, and Doppler frequency shift in transmitting commands and receiving data. In this paper, we present a communication performance test of SIGMA, a link budget analysis, and a field test process. We also compare the link budget with the field test results of transmitting commands and receiving data.

  11. Knowledge acquisition and representation for the Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seamster, Thomas L.; Eike, David R.; Ames, Troy J.

    1990-01-01

    This presentation concentrates on knowledge acquisition and its application to the development of an expert module and a user interface for an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS). The Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) ITS is being developed to assist NASA control center personnel in learning a command and control language as it is used in mission operations rooms. The objective of the tutor is to impart knowledge and skills that will permit the trainee to solve command and control problems in the same way that the STOL expert solves those problems. The STOL ITS will achieve this object by representing the solution space in such a way that the trainee can visualize the intermediate steps, and by having the expert module production rules parallel the STOL expert's knowledge structures.

  12. Cortical thickness correlates of specific cognitive performance accounted for by the general factor of intelligence in healthy children aged 6 to 18.

    PubMed

    Karama, Sherif; Colom, Roberto; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J; Haier, Richard; Waber, Deborah P; Lepage, Claude; Ganjavi, Hooman; Jung, Rex; Evans, Alan C

    2011-04-15

    Prevailing psychometric theories of intelligence posit that individual differences in cognitive performance are attributable to three main sources of variance: the general factor of intelligence (g), cognitive ability domains, and specific test requirements and idiosyncrasies. Cortical thickness has been previously associated with g. In the present study, we systematically analyzed associations between cortical thickness and cognitive performance with and without adjusting for the effects of g in a representative sample of children and adolescents (N=207, Mean age=11.8; SD=3.5; Range=6 to 18.3 years). Seven cognitive tests were included in a measurement model that identified three first-order factors (representing cognitive ability domains) and one second-order factor representing g. Residuals of the cognitive ability domain scores were computed to represent g-independent variance for the three domains and seven tests. Cognitive domain and individual test scores as well as residualized scores were regressed against cortical thickness, adjusting for age, gender and a proxy measure of brain volume. g and cognitive domain scores were positively correlated with cortical thickness in very similar areas across the brain. Adjusting for the effects of g eliminated associations of domain and test scores with cortical thickness. Within a psychometric framework, cortical thickness correlates of cognitive performance on complex tasks are well captured by g in this demographically representative sample.

  13. Cortical Thickness Correlates of Specific Cognitive Performance Accounted for by the General Factor of Intelligence in Healthy Children Aged 6 to 18

    PubMed Central

    Karama, Sherif; Colom, Roberto; Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J.; Haier, Richard; Waber, Deborah P.; Lepage, Claude; Ganjavi, Hooman; Jung, Rex; Evans, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    Prevailing psychometric theories of intelligence posit that individual differences in cognitive performance are attributable to three main sources of variance: the general factor of intelligence (g), cognitive ability domains, and specific test requirements and idiosyncrasies. Cortical thickness has been previously associated with g. In the present study, we systematically analyzed associations between cortical thickness and cognitive performance with and without adjusting for the effects of g in a representative sample of children and adolescents (N = 207, Mean age = 11.8; SD = 3.5; Range = 6 to 18.3 years). Seven cognitive tests were included in a measurement model that identified three first-order factors (representing cognitive ability domains) and one second-order factor representing g. Residuals of the cognitive ability domain scores were computed to represent g-independent variance for the three domains and seven tests. Cognitive domain and individual test scores as well as residualized scores were regressed against cortical thickness, adjusting for age, gender and a proxy measure of brain volume. g and cognitive domain scores were positively correlated with cortical thickness in very similar areas across the brain. Adjusting for the effects of g eliminated associations of domain and test scores with cortical thickness. Within a psychometric framework, cortical thickness correlates of cognitive performance on complex tasks are well captured by g in this demographically representative sample. PMID:21241809

  14. Performance testing of feedwater pump turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Finck, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    Utilities acknowledge that steam turbine drives for feedwater pumps outperform motor drives in improving station heat rate. Rising fuel prices frequently make steam costs the determining factor in evaluating feedwater pump drive turbines. Decisions made on efficiency differences as small as 0.2 percent often necessitate accurate performance testing to verify quoted efficiencies, making it imperative that accurate tests of turbine throttle flow, shaft speed and torque, and other parameters be run to ensure meaningful results. A highly specialized feed pump turbine manufacturers test facility is the most accurate testing method as well as the most convenient and potentially the most economical. 4 figures.

  15. Electronic collaboration: Some effects of telecommunication media and machine intelligence on team performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellens, A. Rodney

    1991-01-01

    Both NASA and DoD have had a long standing interest in teamwork, distributed decision making, and automation. While research on these topics has been pursued independently, it is becoming increasingly clear that the integration of social, cognitive, and human factors engineering principles will be necessary to meet the challenges of highly sophisticated scientific and military programs of the future. Images of human/intelligent-machine electronic collaboration were drawn from NASA and Air Force reports as well as from other sources. Here, areas of common concern are highlighted. A description of the author's research program testing a 'psychological distancing' model of electronic media effects and human/expert system collaboration is given.

  16. Virtual Shaker Testing: Simulation Technology Improves Vibration Test Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, Stefano; Peeters, Bart; Fetter, Rebecca; Boland, Doug; Debille, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In the field of vibration testing, the interaction between the structure being tested and the instrumentation hardware used to perform the test is a critical issue. This is particularly true when testing massive structures (e.g. satellites), because due to physical design and manufacturing limits, the dynamics of the testing facility often couples with the test specimen one in the frequency range of interest. A further issue in this field is the standard use of a closed loop real-time vibration control scheme, which could potentially shift poles and change damping of the aforementioned coupled system. Virtual shaker testing is a novel approach to deal with these issues. It means performing a simulation which closely represents the real vibration test on the specific facility by taking into account all parameters which might impact the dynamic behavior of the specimen. In this paper, such a virtual shaker testing approach is developed. It consists of the following components: (1) Either a physical-based or an equation-based coupled electro-mechanical lumped parameter shaker model is created. The model parameters are obtained from manufacturer's specifications or by carrying out some dedicated experiments; (2) Existing real-time vibration control algorithm are ported to the virtual simulation environment; and (3) A structural model of the test object is created and after defining proper interface conditions structural modes are computed by means of the well-established Craig-Bampton CMS technique. At this stage, a virtual shaker test has been run, by coupling the three described models (shaker, control loop, structure) in a co-simulation routine. Numerical results have eventually been correlated with experimental ones in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology.

  17. The Positive Effects of Trait Emotional Intelligence during a Performance Review Discussion – A Psychophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Performance review discussions of real manager–subordinate pairs were examined in two studies to investigate the effects of trait emotional intelligence (EI) on dyad member’s felt and expressed emotions. Altogether there were 84 managers and 122 subordinates in two studies using 360 measured and self-reported trait EI. Facial electromyography, and frontal electroencephalography (EEG) asymmetry were collected continuously. Manager’s high trait EI was related to increased positive valence emotional facial expressions in the dyad during the discussions. The managers also had more EEG frontal asymmetry indicating approach motivation, than the subordinates. In addition, actor and partner effects and actor × partner interactions, and interactions between the role and actor or partner effect of trait EI were observed. Both actor and partner trait EI were related to more positive self-reported emotional valence. The results imply that trait EI has a role in organizational social interaction.

  18. Survey of Expert Opinion on Intelligence: Causes of International Differences in Cognitive Ability Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rindermann, Heiner; Becker, David; Coyle, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Following Snyderman and Rothman (1987, 1988), we surveyed expert opinions on the current state of intelligence research. This report examines expert opinions on causes of international differences in student assessment and psychometric IQ test results. Experts were surveyed about the importance of culture, genes, education (quantity and quality), wealth, health, geography, climate, politics, modernization, sampling error, test knowledge, discrimination, test bias, and migration. The importance of these factors was evaluated for diverse countries, regions, and groups including Finland, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, the Arabian-Muslim world, Latin America, Israel, Jews in the West, Roma (gypsies), and Muslim immigrants. Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions). PMID:27047425

  19. Artificial Intelligence: An Analysis of Potential Applications to Training, Performance Measurement, and Job Performance Aiding. Interim Report for Period September 1982-July 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, J. Jeffrey

    This paper is part of an Air Force planning effort to develop a research, development, and applications program for the use of artificial intelligence (AI) technology in three target areas: training, performance measurement, and job performance aiding. The paper is organized in five sections that (1) introduce the reader to AI and those subfields…

  20. Test Review: Wechsler, D. (2005). "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish." San Antonio, TX: Harcourt Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braden, Jeffery P.; Iribarren, Jacqueline A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish (WISC-IV Spanish), a Spanish translation and adaptation of the WISC-IV. The test was developed to measure the intellectual ability of Spanish-speaking children in the United States ages 6 years, 0 months, through 16 years, 11 months. These…

  1. Is Variability in Mate Choice Similar for Intelligence and Personality Traits? Testing a Hypothesis about the Evolutionary Genetics of Personality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Emily A.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Buss, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis presented by Penke, Denissen, and Miller (2007a) that condition-dependent traits, including intelligence, attractiveness, and health, are universally and uniformly preferred as characteristics in a mate relative to traits that are less indicative of condition, including personality traits. We analyzed…

  2. Comparison of the General Ability Measure for Adults and the Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, Kerry S.; Matthews, T. Darin; Bell, Nancy L.; Maher, Carrie M.

    2002-01-01

    Ninety-four college students were administered the General Ability Measure for Adults (GAMA) and Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT). GAMA IQs were significantly and moderately correlated with KAIT Fluid, Crystallized and Composite IQs, supporting the convergent validity of this instrument. Although significant correlations…

  3. Implicit Theories of Intelligence, Goal Orientation, Cognitive Engagement, and Achievement: A Test of Dweck's Model with Returning to School Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupeyrat, Caroline; Marine, Claudette

    2005-01-01

    This study tested and extended Dweck's social-cognitive theory of motivation with adults who deliberately chose to face the challenge of returning to school. We examined the relationships among beliefs (implicit theories) on the nature of intelligence, goal orientation, cognitive engagement in learning, and achievement using path analyses.…

  4. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Scholtens, Brekke E.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient methods for characterizing thermal performance of materials under cryogenic and vacuum conditions have been developed. These methods provide thermal conductivity data on materials under actual-use conditions and are complementary to established methods. The actual-use environment of full temperature difference in combination with vacuum-pressure is essential for understanding insulation system performance. Test articles include solids, foams, powders, layered blankets, composite panels, and other materials. Test methodology and apparatus design for several insulation test cryostats are discussed. The measurement principle is liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry. Heat flux capability ranges from approximately 0.5 to 500 watts per square meter; corresponding apparent thermal conductivity values range from below 0.01 up to about 60 mW/m- K. Example data for different insulation materials are also presented. Upon further standardization work, these patented insulation test cryostats can be available to industry for a wide range of practical applications.

  5. The relationship of speech intelligibility with hearing sensitivity, cognition, and perceived hearing difficulties varies for different speech perception tests.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Antje; Henshaw, Helen; Ferguson, Melanie A

    2015-01-01

    Listeners vary in their ability to understand speech in noisy environments. Hearing sensitivity, as measured by pure-tone audiometry, can only partly explain these results, and cognition has emerged as another key concept. Although cognition relates to speech perception, the exact nature of the relationship remains to be fully understood. This study investigates how different aspects of cognition, particularly working memory and attention, relate to speech intelligibility for various tests. Perceptual accuracy of speech perception represents just one aspect of functioning in a listening environment. Activity and participation limits imposed by hearing loss, in addition to the demands of a listening environment, are also important and may be better captured by self-report questionnaires. Understanding how speech perception relates to self-reported aspects of listening forms the second focus of the study. Forty-four listeners aged between 50 and 74 years with mild sensorineural hearing loss were tested on speech perception tests differing in complexity from low (phoneme discrimination in quiet), to medium (digit triplet perception in speech-shaped noise) to high (sentence perception in modulated noise); cognitive tests of attention, memory, and non-verbal intelligence quotient; and self-report questionnaires of general health-related and hearing-specific quality of life. Hearing sensitivity and cognition related to intelligibility differently depending on the speech test: neither was important for phoneme discrimination, hearing sensitivity alone was important for digit triplet perception, and hearing and cognition together played a role in sentence perception. Self-reported aspects of auditory functioning were correlated with speech intelligibility to different degrees, with digit triplets in noise showing the richest pattern. The results suggest that intelligibility tests can vary in their auditory and cognitive demands and their sensitivity to the challenges that

  6. The quadratic relationship between difficulty of intelligence test items and their correlations with working memory

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Tomasz; Chuderski, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Fluid intelligence (Gf) is a crucial cognitive ability that involves abstract reasoning in order to solve novel problems. Recent research demonstrated that Gf strongly depends on the individual effectiveness of working memory (WM). We investigated a popular claim that if the storage capacity underlay the WM–Gf correlation, then such a correlation should increase with an increasing number of items or rules (load) in a Gf-test. As often no such link is observed, on that basis the storage-capacity account is rejected, and alternative accounts of Gf (e.g., related to executive control or processing speed) are proposed. Using both analytical inference and numerical simulations, we demonstrated that the load-dependent change in correlation is primarily a function of the amount of floor/ceiling effect for particular items. Thus, the item-wise WM correlation of a Gf-test depends on its overall difficulty, and the difficulty distribution across its items. When the early test items yield huge ceiling, but the late items do not approach floor, that correlation will increase throughout the test. If the early items locate themselves between ceiling and floor, but the late items approach floor, the respective correlation will decrease. For a hallmark Gf-test, the Raven-test, whose items span from ceiling to floor, the quadratic relationship is expected, and it was shown empirically using a large sample and two types of WMC tasks. In consequence, no changes in correlation due to varying WM/Gf load, or lack of them, can yield an argument for or against any theory of WM/Gf. Moreover, as the mathematical properties of the correlation formula make it relatively immune to ceiling/floor effects for overall moderate correlations, only minor changes (if any) in the WM–Gf correlation should be expected for many psychological tests. PMID:26379594

  7. Neuropsychological test performance in illiterate subjects.

    PubMed

    Ostrosky-Solis, F; Ardila, A; Rosselli, M; Lopez-Arango, G; Uriel-Mendoza, V

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to further analyze the effects of education across different age ranges on neuropsychological test performance. Two different analyses were performed. The first analysis was conducted in order to pinpoint the impact of school attendance on neuropsychological testing. A group of 64 illiterate normal subjects was selected in the Mexican Republic. Their performance was compared with two barely schooled control groups (1-2 and 3-4 years of schooling). The subjects' ages ranged from 16 to 85 years. In the second analysis, the illiterate subjects were further matched by age and sex with individuals with 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10 to 19 years of formal education. The Spanish version of the NEUROPSI neuropsychological test battery (Ostrosky, Ardila, & Rosselli, 1997) was used. Results indicated a significant educational effect on most of the tests. Largest educational effect was noted in constructional abilities (copying of a figure), language (comprehension), phonological verbal fluency, and conceptual functions (similarities, calculation abilities, and sequences). Aging effect was noted in visuoperceptual (visual detection) and memory scores. In the first subject sample, it was evident that, despite using such limited educational range (from 0-4 years of formal education), and such a wide age range (from 16-85 years), schooling represented a stronger variable than age. It is proposed that education effect on neuropsychological test performance represents a negatively accelerated curve, tending to a plateau.

  8. Referred Students' Performance on the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Oliver W.; Paulin, Rachel V.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the convergent relations of the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV). Data from counterbalanced administrations of each instrument to 48 elementary school students referred for psychoeducational testing were examined. Analysis of the 96…

  9. Estimation of premorbid intelligence in Spanish people with the Word Accentuation Test and its application to the diagnosis of dementia.

    PubMed

    Del Ser, T; González-Montalvo, J I; Martínez-Espinosa, S; Delgado-Villapalos, C; Bermejo, F

    1997-04-01

    The Word Accentuation Test assesses the accentuation of 30 infrequent Spanish words written without the accentuation mark and is an easy-to-use tool for estimating premorbid intelligence of Spanish-speaking people. Its intraobserver (0.97) and interobserver (0.93) reliabilities and its correlation with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (.837) and Raven's Progressive Matrices (.655) are high, offering a good prediction of general intelligence. It is resistant to mental deterioration; 20 demented and 40 controls matched by sex, age, and education obtained similar scores. The discrepancies between current and predicted scores in Raven's scale can diagnose mild-moderate dementia with 0.79 accuracy (sensitivity, 0.78; specificity, 0.82).

  10. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  11. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2014-01-29

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  12. BepiColombo Laser Altimeter performance tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouman, J.; Thomas, N.; Marti, K. S.; Beck, T.; Péteut, A.; Pommerol, A.

    2014-04-01

    The first European laser altimeter designed for interplanetary flight, BELA (BepiColombo Laser Altimeter) is ready to be integrated on the BepiColombo spacecraft to be launched to Mercury in July 2016 [1]. The flight instrument is currently installed in its calibration laboratory at the University of Bern where it is being tested to assess its performance. This abstract describes the different tests, run using data from Mercury and the Moon. Results on these ongoing tests will be presented in detail at the conference.

  13. SAS molecular tests Salmonella detection kit. Performance tested method 021202.

    PubMed

    Bapanpally, Chandra; Montier, Laura; Khan, Shah; Kasra, Akif; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The SAS Molecular tests Salmonella Detection method, a Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification method, performed as well as or better than the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods for ground beef, beef trim, ground turkey, chicken carcass rinses, bagged mixed lettuce, and fresh spinach. The ground beef (30% fat, 25 g test portion), poultry matrixes and leafy greens were validated in a 6-7 h enrichment, and ground beef (30% fat, 375 g composite test portion) and beef trim (375 g composite test portion) were validated in a 16-20 h enrichment. The method performance for meat and leafy green matrixes was shown to be acceptable under conditions of co-enrichment with Escherichia coli 0157. Thus, after a short 6-7 h co-enrichment step, ground beef, beef trim, lettuce, and spinach can be tested for both Salmonella and E. coli O157. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 30 non-Salmonella species examined. The method was shown to be robust when enrichment time, DNA extract hold time, and DNA volume were varied.

  14. Who Are the Children Most Vulnerable to Social Exclusion? The Moderating Role of Self-Esteem, Popularity, and Nonverbal Intelligence on Cognitive Performance Following Social Exclusion.

    PubMed

    Tobia, Valentina; Riva, Paolo; Caprin, Claudia

    2016-07-26

    Social exclusion has a profound emotional impact on children. However, there is still limited and partly conflicting experimental evidence for the possible effect of social exclusion on children's cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the possibility that some children are more vulnerable than others to the negative effects of social exclusion on cognitive performance. We selected 4 potential candidates that could moderate the effects of social exclusion: relational self-esteem, peer ratings of popularity, rejection sensitivity and nonverbal intelligence. Individual differences in these 4 potential moderating factors were first assessed in a sample of 318 children (45.6 % females; mean age = 9.92 years). Then, in a subsequent experimental session, the participants were either socially included or excluded using a typical manipulation (i.e., the Cyberball paradigm). Following the manipulation, the children's cognitive performance was assessed using a logical reasoning test. The results showed that the children with lower scores for relational self-esteem (the bottom 37.46 % of the sample), lower popularity (43.49 %) or weaker nonverbal intelligence (37.80 %) performed worse on the logical reasoning test following social exclusion. Moreover, children with combined low self-esteem, popularity and nonverbal intelligence were the most affected by social exclusion. This study identified factors that make some children more vulnerable to the negative effects of social exclusion. Overall, the present work underscores the value of considering basic cognitive and relational individual differences when developing interventions aimed at preventing the negative effects of social exclusion among children.

  15. A performance benchmark test for geodynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Heien, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years, a number of numerical dynamo models have successfully represented basic characteristics of the geomagnetic field. As new models and numerical methods continue to be developed, it is important to update and extend benchmarks for testing these models. The first dynamo benchmark of Christensen et al. (2001) was applied to models based on spherical harmonic expansion methods. However, only a few groups have reported results of the dynamo benchmark using local methods (Harder and Hansen, 2005; Matsui and Okuda, 2005; Chan et al., 2007) because of the difficulty treating magnetic boundary conditions based on the local methods. On the other hand, spherical harmonics expansion methods perform poorly on massively parallel computers because global data communications are required for the spherical harmonics expansions to evaluate nonlinear terms. We perform benchmark tests to asses various numerical methods for the next generation of geodynamo simulations. The purpose of this benchmark test is to assess numerical geodynamo models on a massively parallel computational platform. To compare among many numerical methods as possible, we consider the model with the insulated magnetic boundary by Christensen et al. (2001) and with the pseudo vacuum magnetic boundary, because the pseudo vacuum boundaries are implemented easier by using the local method than the magnetic insulated boundaries. In the present study, we consider two kinds of benchmarks, so-called accuracy benchmark and performance benchmark. In the accuracy benchmark, we compare the dynamo models by using modest Ekman and Rayleigh numbers proposed by Christensen et. al. (2001). We investigate a required spatial resolution for each dynamo code to obtain less than 1% difference from the suggested solution of the benchmark test using the two magnetic boundary conditions. In the performance benchmark, we investigate computational performance under the same computational environment. We perform these

  16. College Student Performance on the General Ability Measure for Adults and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults-Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassiter, Kerry S.; Bell, Nancy L.; Hutchinson, Melody B.; Matthews, T. Darin

    2001-01-01

    Examines the concurrent validity of the General Ability Measure for Adults (GAMA) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III). A comparison of the sample's mean scores indicates similar GAMA and WAIS-III Performance IQ scores. In contrast, the sample's mean GAMA IQ score was significantly lower than the sample's mean Full…

  17. Sex Differences in Performance over 7 Years on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised among Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, P.; Krinsky-McHale, S. J.; Devenny, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes related to sex differences on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised (WISC-R) subtest performance over a 7-year interval in middle-aged adults with intellectual disability (ID). Cognitive sex differences have been extensively studied in the general population, but there are few reports…

  18. The Relationship between of Teacher Competence, Emotional Intelligence and Teacher Performance Madrasah Tsanawiyah at District of Serang Banten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahyuddin, Wawan

    2016-01-01

    This study wants to examine the relationship between teacher competence and emotional intelligence that held by teachers to increase the teacher performance Madrasah Tsanawiyah at district of Serang Banten. This research was conducted with the quantitative method, through analysis descriptive and inferential. Samples the research were teachers…

  19. The Relationships between Human Capital, Implicit Views of Intelligence, and Literacy Performance: Implications for the Obama Education Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Rihana S.; Ari, Omer; Dortch, Cedrick

    2011-01-01

    African American adolescents from families with low levels of human capital (i.e., caregiver level of education) are at risk for poor early adult outcomes. The current study examined the relationships among 48 African American high school students' literacy performance (e.g., reading and vocabulary), their implicit views of intelligence, their…

  20. Does Emotional Intelligence Change during Medical School Gross Anatomy Course? Correlations with Students' Performance and Team Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Michelle A.; Porter, Samuel G.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Juskewitch, Justin E.; Lachman, Nirusha

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been associated with increased academic achievement, but its impact on medical education is relatively unexplored. This study sought to evaluate change in EI, performance outcomes, and team cohesion within a team-based medical school anatomy course. Forty-two medical students completed a pre-course and post-course…

  1. Motivation and Test Anxiety in Test Performance across Three Testing Contexts: The CAEL, CET, and GEPT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Liying; Klinger, Don; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine; Jin, Yan; Wu, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This study examined test-takers' motivation, test anxiety, and test performance across a range of social and educational contexts in three high-stakes language tests: the Canadian Academic English Language (CAEL) Assessment in Canada, the College English Test (CET) in the People's Republic of China, and the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT)…

  2. Recent Advances in the Theory and Measurement of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysenck, Hans

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates kinds of intelligence tests, discussing factors indicating intelligence: genetics, reaction time, latency and amplitude, and variability. Lists the advantages and disadvantages of the intelligence tests mentioned. (CI)

  3. A Litmus Test for Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin D.; Beaver, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents 10 guidelines for developing performance-based assessment items. Presents a sample activity developed from the guidelines. The activity tests students ability to observe, classify, and infer, using red and blue litmus paper, a pH-range finder, vinegar, ammonia, an unknown solution, distilled water, and paper towels. (PR)

  4. Test Review: Review of the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrimmon, Adam W.; Smith, Amanda D.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Second Edition (WASI-II; Wechsler, 2011), published by Pearson, is a newly updated abbreviated measure of cognitive intelligence designed for individuals 6 to 90 years of age. Primarily used in clinical, psychoeducational, and research settings, the WASI-II was developed to quickly and accurately…

  5. Test Review: Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Fourth Edition: Canadian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Melissa A.; McCrimmon, Adam W.

    2013-01-01

    The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition: Canadian (WPPSI-IVCDN; Wechsler, 2012), published by NCS Pearson, is a newly updated, individually administered measure of cognitive intelligence for children aged 2:6 through 7:7. Suitable for educational, clinical, and research settings, the purposes of the WPPSI-IVCDN are…

  6. Automation of Cyber Penetration Testing Using the Detect, Identify, Predict, React Intelligence Automation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    With increased computing power available, intelligent automation is a clear choice for simplifying the lives of both administrators and developers...with manual cyber penetration [1]. With increased computing power available, intelligent automation is a clear choice for simplifying the lives... power intensive, and basic automation has the limitation of only finding the specific vulnerabilities which it is programmed to find. Penetration

  7. ITS-NANO - Prioritising nanosafety research to develop a stakeholder driven intelligent testing strategy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the risk of all nanomaterials (NMs) on a case-by-case basis is challenging in terms of financial, ethical and time resources. Instead a more intelligent approach to knowledge gain and risk assessment is required. Methods A framework of future research priorities was developed from the accorded opinion of experts covering all major stake holder groups (government, industry, academia, funders and NGOs). It recognises and stresses the major topics of physicochemical characterisation, exposure identification, hazard identification and modelling approaches as key components of the current and future risk assessment of NMs. Results The framework for future research has been developed from the opinions of over 80 stakeholders, that describes the research priorities for effective development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS) to allow risk evaluation of NMs. In this context, an ITS is a process that allows the risks of NMs to be assessed accurately, effectively and efficiently, thereby reducing the need to test NMs on a case-by-case basis. For each of the major topics of physicochemical characterisation, exposure identification, hazard identification and modelling, key-priority research areas are described via a series of stepping stones, or hexagon diagrams structured into a time perspective. Importantly, this framework is flexible, allowing individual stakeholders to identify where their own activities and expertise are positioned within the prioritisation pathway and furthermore to identify how they can effectively contribute and structure their work accordingly. In other words, the prioritisation hexagon diagrams provide a tool that individual stakeholders can adapt to meet their own particular needs and to deliver an ITS for NMs risk assessment. Such an approach would, over time, reduce the need for testing by increasing the reliability and sophistication of in silico approaches. The manuscript includes an appraisal of how this framework

  8. Reserve capacity of the elderly in aging sensitive tests of fluid intelligence: a reanalysis via a structural equation modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Raykov, T

    1989-01-01

    In the last decade there has been a growing interest among developmental psychologists to investigate whether the cognitive performance of older adults can be improved by means of training programs. A number of cognitive training studies involving aging sensitive abilities of fluid intelligence have been performed with healthy older adults (Willis et al. 1981; Baltes et al., 1984/1986). In this paper we reanalyse data from Baltes et al. (1986) concerning the ADEPT Induction, ADEPT Figural Relations, Induction Standard and the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices Tests. In contrast to the above study, where the data analysis was based on a MANOVA approach, usually carried out when experimental data were gathered, this discussion implements an approach to change measurement for which the structural equation of different aspects of change in means as manifested in the moment matrices. The results here confirm these by Baltes et al. (1986), and suggest conclusions concerning change in means over time in the experimental and control groups, which are not implied by their study.

  9. Effects of Noise Suppression on Intelligibility: Experts' Opinions and Naive Normal-Hearing Listeners' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston L. M.; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Huckvale, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated how well experts can adjust the settings of a commercial noise-reduction system to optimize the intelligibility for naive normal-hearing listeners. Method: In Experiment 1, 5 experts adjusted parameters for a noise-reduction system while aiming to optimize intelligibility. The stimuli consisted of…

  10. How Students' Beliefs about Their Intelligence Influence Their Academic Performance. Information Capsule. Volume 1012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2011-01-01

    Students' academic success may be influenced not only by their actual ability, but also by their beliefs about their intelligence. Studies have found that students enter a classroom with one of two distinct conceptions of their intellectual ability: some students believe their intelligence is expandable (growth mindset), while others believe their…

  11. The design of an intelligent human-computer interface for the test, control and monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoaff, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The graphical intelligence and assistance capabilities of a human-computer interface for the Test, Control, and Monitor System at Kennedy Space Center are explored. The report focuses on how a particular commercial off-the-shelf graphical software package, Data Views, can be used to produce tools that build widgets such as menus, text panels, graphs, icons, windows, and ultimately complete interfaces for monitoring data from an application; controlling an application by providing input data to it; and testing an application by both monitoring and controlling it. A complete set of tools for building interfaces is described in a manual for the TCMS toolkit. Simple tools create primitive widgets such as lines, rectangles and text strings. Intermediate level tools create pictographs from primitive widgets, and connect processes to either text strings or pictographs. Other tools create input objects; Data Views supports output objects directly, thus output objects are not considered. Finally, a set of utilities for executing, monitoring use, editing, and displaying the content of interfaces is included in the toolkit.

  12. An Innovative Method for Testing Children's Achievement-Related Reactions: Recording Feelings of Helplessness by Means of an Intelligence Test-Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titscher, Anna; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2008-01-01

    The present study, based on the work of Dweck (2000) and her description of helpless and mastery-orientated children, was designed to find a new, simple and economic way of assessing helplessness while testing a child's intelligence. Two hundred and thirty-two Austrian grammar-school children, previously classified as either helpless or…

  13. The Three Models of Emotional Intelligence and Performance in a Hot and Cool go/no-go Task in Undergraduate Students.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María J; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand and regulate emotions, appears to be helpful in the performance of "hot" (i.e., emotionally laden) cognitive tasks when using performance-based ability models, but not when using self-report EI models. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between EI (as measured through a performance-based ability test, a self-report mixed test and a self-report ability test) and cognitive control ability during the performance of hot and "cool" (i.e., non-emotionally laden) "go/no-go" tasks. An experimental design was used for this study in which 187 undergraduate students (25% men) with a mean age of 21.93 years (standard deviation [SD] = 3.8) completed the three EI tests of interest (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], Trait Meta-Mood Scale [TMMS] and Emotional Quotient Inventory-Short Form [EQi:S]) as well as go/no-go tasks using faces and geometric figures as stimuli. The results provide evidence for negative associations between the "managing" branch of EI measured through the performance-based ability test of EI and the cognitive control index of the hot go/no-go task, although similar evidence was not found when using the cool task. Further, the present study failed to observe consistent results when using the self-report EI instruments. These findings are discussed in terms of both the validity and implications of the various EI models.

  14. The Three Models of Emotional Intelligence and Performance in a Hot and Cool go/no-go Task in Undergraduate Students

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Cobo, María J.; Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI), or the ability to perceive, use, understand and regulate emotions, appears to be helpful in the performance of “hot” (i.e., emotionally laden) cognitive tasks when using performance-based ability models, but not when using self-report EI models. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between EI (as measured through a performance-based ability test, a self-report mixed test and a self-report ability test) and cognitive control ability during the performance of hot and “cool” (i.e., non-emotionally laden) “go/no-go” tasks. An experimental design was used for this study in which 187 undergraduate students (25% men) with a mean age of 21.93 years (standard deviation [SD] = 3.8) completed the three EI tests of interest (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], Trait Meta-Mood Scale [TMMS] and Emotional Quotient Inventory–Short Form [EQi:S]) as well as go/no-go tasks using faces and geometric figures as stimuli. The results provide evidence for negative associations between the “managing” branch of EI measured through the performance-based ability test of EI and the cognitive control index of the hot go/no-go task, although similar evidence was not found when using the cool task. Further, the present study failed to observe consistent results when using the self-report EI instruments. These findings are discussed in terms of both the validity and implications of the various EI models. PMID:28275343

  15. Thermal Performance Testing Of Cryogenic Piping Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Nagy, Z. F.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal performance measurement of piping systems under actual field conditions is important for space launch development and commercial industry. Knowledge of the true insulating effectiveness is needed in system design, development, and research activities. A new 18-meter-long test apparatus for cryogenic pipelines has been developed. Three different pipelines, rigid or flexible, can be tested simultaneously. Critical factors in heat leak measurements include eliminating heat transfer at end connections and obtaining proper liquid saturation condition. Effects due to variations in the external ambient conditions like wind, humidity, and solar radiation must be minimized. The static method of liquid nitrogen evaporation has been demonstrated, but the apparatus can be adapted for dynamic testing with cryogens, chilled water, or other working fluids. This technology is suited for the development of an industry standard test apparatus and method. Examples of the heat transfer data from testing commercially available pipelines are given. Prototype pipelines are currently being tested and evaluated at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  16. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  17. Performance tests of large thin vacuum windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hall Crannell

    2011-02-01

    Tests of thin composition vacuum windows of the type used for the Tagger in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are described. Three different tests have been performed. These include: (1) measurement of the deformation and durability of a window under long term (>8 years) almost continuous vacuum load, (2) measurement of the deformation as a function of flexing of the window as it is cycled between vacuum and atmosphere, and (3) measurement of the relative diffusion rate of gas through a variety of thin window membranes.

  18. Testing Solutions for Adult Film Performers.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Zachary R

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the nation's adult films are produced in California, and within California, most production occurs in Los Angeles. In order to regulate that content, the County of Los Angeles passed the Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act (Measure B) by way of referendum in November 2012. Measure B requires that adult film producers wishing to film in Los Angeles County obtain permits from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and it also mandates that adult film performers use condoms while filming and "engaging in anal or vaginal sexual intercourse." Nevertheless, between August 2013 and January 2014, several adult film performers in California tested positive for HIV, and the threat of infection remains. Although Measure B is not the best way forward for Los Angeles County, elements of the ordinance should be incorporated into future legislative efforts. Given the economic ramifications of industry flight due to more localized regulations, this Note concludes that California should pass statewide comprehensive reform. Any such new legislation must treat "independent contractors," the classification generally used for adult film performs, as if they were regular employees. Legislation should also couple mandatory testing mechanisms with provisions granting performers the right to choose whether they use condoms. Finally, legislation must include mechanisms that ensure performers' preferences are not improperly tainted by outside forces and pressures. While there will always be risks associated with the production of adult content, if undertaken, these reforms could significantly mitigate those hazards.

  19. The Role of Trait Emotional Intelligence in Academic Performance: Theoretical Overview and Empirical Update.

    PubMed

    Perera, Harsha N

    2016-01-01

    Considerable debate still exists among scholars over the role of trait emotional intelligence (TEI) in academic performance. The dominant theoretical position is that TEI should be orthogonal or only weakly related to achievement; yet, there are strong theoretical reasons to believe that TEI plays a key role in performance. The purpose of the current article is to provide (a) an overview of the possible theoretical mechanisms linking TEI with achievement and (b) an update on empirical research examining this relationship. To elucidate these theoretical mechanisms, the overview draws on multiple theories of emotion and regulation, including TEI theory, social-functional accounts of emotion, and expectancy-value and psychobiological model of emotion and regulation. Although these theoretical accounts variously emphasize different variables as focal constructs, when taken together, they provide a comprehensive picture of the possible mechanisms linking TEI with achievement. In this regard, the article redresses the problem of vaguely specified theoretical links currently hampering progress in the field. The article closes with a consideration of directions for future research.

  20. The Comparability of the Test of Cognitive Skills with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and the Stanford-Binet: Fourth Edition with Gifted Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Eric L.; Nagle, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Of 75 elementary and middle school gifted students, 44 percent of students' Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition (SBIV) Composite scores and 28 percent of students' Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) Full Scale IQ scores were over 10 points different from their Test of Cognitive Skills (TCS) Cognitive Skills…

  1. Testing the Second-Order Factor Structure and Measurement Equivalence of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale across Gender and Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Daniel S.; Van Rooy, David L.; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam; Kraus, Eyran

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the measurement equivalence of a second-order factor model of emotional intelligence (EI). Using scores for 921 job applicants obtained during a personnel selection process, measurement equivalence of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) was tested across ethnic (Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics) and gender…

  2. RHIC Sextant Test -- Physics and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Fischer, W.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents beam physics and machine performance results of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Sextant and AGS-to-RHIC (AtR) transfer line during the Sextant Test in early 1997. Techniques used to measure both machine properties (difference orbits, dispersion, and beamline optics) and beam parameters (energy, intensity, transverse and longitudinal emittances) are described. Good agreement was achieved between measured and design lattice optics. The gold ion beam quality was shown to approach RHIC design requirements.

  3. Testing Devices Garner Data on Insulation Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To develop a test instrument that could garner measurements of the thermal performance of insulation under extreme conditions, researchers at Kennedy Space Center devised the Cryostat 1 and then Cryostat 2. McLean, Virginia-based QinetiQ North America licensed the technology and plans to market it to organizations developing materials for things like piping and storage tank insulation, refrigeration, appliances, and consumer goods.

  4. Flight test of takeoff performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B.; Srivatsan, Raghavachari; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The Takeoff Performance Monitoring System (TOPMS) is a computer software and hardware graphics system that visually displays current runway position, acceleration performance, engine status, and other situation advisory information to aid pilots in their decision to continue or to abort a takeoff. The system was developed at the Langley Research Center using the fixed-base Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) simulator. (The TSRV is a highly modified Boeing 737-100 research airplane.) Several versions of the TOPMS displays were evaluated on the TSRV B-737 simulator by more than 40 research, United States Air Force, airline and industry and pilots who rated the system satisfactory and recommended further development and testing. In this study, the TOPMS was flight tested on the TSRV. A total of 55 takeoff and 30 abort situations were investigated at 5 airfields. TOPMS displays were observed on the navigation display screen in the TSRV research flight deck during various nominal and off-nominal situations, including normal takeoffs; reduced-throttle takeoffs; induced-acceleration deficiencies; simulated-engine failures; and several gross-weight, runway-geometry, runway-surface, and ambient conditions. All tests were performed on dry runways. The TOPMS software executed accurately during the flight tests and the displays correctly depicted the various test conditions. Evaluation pilots found the displays easy to monitor and understand. The algorithm provides pretakeoff predictions of the nominal distances that are needed to accelerate the airplane to takeoff speed and to brake it to a stop; these predictions agreed reasonably well with corresponding values measured during several fully executed and aborted takeoffs. The TOPMS is operational and has been retained on the TSRV for general use and demonstration.

  5. MEMS performance challenges: packaging and shock tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Bin; Lin, Liwei

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes recent advances in the MEMS performance challenges with emphases on packaging and shock tests. In the packaging area, metal to metal bonding processes have been developed to overcome limitations of the glass frit bonding by means of two specific methods: (1) pre-reflow of solder for enhanced bonding adhesion, and (2) the insertion of thin metal layer between parent metal bonding materials. In the shock test area, multiscale analysis for a MEMS package system has been developed with experimental verifications to investigate dynamic responses under drop-shock tests. Structural deformation and stress distribution data are extracted and predicted for device fracture and in-operation stiction analyses for micro mechanical components in various MEMS sensors, including accelerometers and gyroscopes.

  6. On the Need for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Test and Evaluation Methods for Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, D. H.; Hibbitts, C. A.; Chen, M. H.; Paxton, L. J.; Bekker, D. L.

    2017-02-01

    Implementing mature artificial intelligence would create the ability to significantly increase the science return from a mission, while potentially saving costs in mission and instrument operations, and solving currently intractable problems.

  7. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  8. WAIS-R Factors and Performance on the Luria-Nebraska's Intelligence, Memory, and Motor Scales: A Canonical Model of Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Patrick C.; Macciocchi, Stephen N.

    1986-01-01

    Pattern and level of performance on the WAIS-R (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised) and the Luria-Nebraska's Intelligence, Memory, and Motor Scales were examined for 93 neurologically impaired adults. Each set of procedures evidently is indexing the same theoretical constructs. (Author/ABB)

  9. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel....

  10. 42 CFR 493.1421 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... complexity testing; testing personnel. 493.1421 Section 493.1421 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1421 Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; testing personnel....

  11. HyperForest: A high performance multi-processor architecture for real-time intelligent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P. Jr.; Rebeil, J.P.; Pollard, H.

    1997-04-01

    Intelligent Systems are characterized by the intensive use of computer power. The computer revolution of the last few years is what has made possible the development of the first generation of Intelligent Systems. Software for second generation Intelligent Systems will be more complex and will require more powerful computing engines in order to meet real-time constraints imposed by new robots, sensors, and applications. A multiprocessor architecture was developed that merges the advantages of message-passing and shared-memory structures: expendability and real-time compliance. The HyperForest architecture will provide an expandable real-time computing platform for computationally intensive Intelligent Systems and open the doors for the application of these systems to more complex tasks in environmental restoration and cleanup projects, flexible manufacturing systems, and DOE`s own production and disassembly activities.

  12. A Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor with End-to-end Performance Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Michelle M.; Wu, Chase Q.

    2013-11-07

    Next-generation eScience applications often generate large amounts of simulation, experimental, or observational data that must be shared and managed by collaborative organizations. Advanced networking technologies and services have been rapidly developed and deployed to facilitate such massive data transfer. However, these technologies and services have not been fully utilized mainly because their use typically requires significant domain knowledge and in many cases application users are even not aware of their existence. By leveraging the functionalities of an existing Network-Aware Data Movement Advisor (NADMA) utility, we propose a new Workflow-based Intelligent Network Data Movement Advisor (WINDMA) with end-to-end performance optimization for this DOE funded project. This WINDMA system integrates three major components: resource discovery, data movement, and status monitoring, and supports the sharing of common data movement workflows through account and database management. This system provides a web interface and interacts with existing data/space management and discovery services such as Storage Resource Management, transport methods such as GridFTP and GlobusOnline, and network resource provisioning brokers such as ION and OSCARS. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed transport-support workflow system in several use cases based on its implementation and deployment in DOE wide-area networks.

  13. Performance improvement of CGHs for optical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruss, Christof; Reichelt, Stephan; Korolkov, Victor P.; Osten, Wolfgang; Tiziani, Hans J.

    2003-05-01

    The expansion of the field of diffractive optics applications is accompanied by toughening performance requirements for CGHs. Optical testing sets especially high requirements, concerning wavefront accuracy and diffraction efficiency. The key point in fabrication technology is the writing system creating the photomask or the profiled pattern. The diffractive optics fabrication facility at ITO (University of Stuttgart) is based on the circular laser writing system CLWS-300. This flexible and high-accurate tool was originally designed for binary diffractive optics fabrication. This paper presents novel enhancements of this system allowing direct laser writing of a wide range of binary and continuous-relief CGHs on photoresist layers, chromium films and LDW-glass. Main topics of the enhancements were the scanning accuracy and exposure control. Many types of CGHs (binary precision holograms for optical testing, Shack-Hartmann arrays, microlens discs for confocal microscopy, diffractive interferometer objectives, doughnut generators etc.) have been manufactured using the developed algorithms and hardware.

  14. Traditional Chinese version of the Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT-TC): Its validation and application to schizophrenic individuals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei-Chung; Chen, Li-Fen; Chi, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Ching-Hung; Kao, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Yau; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2016-09-30

    Schizophrenia is an illness that impairs a person's social cognition. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) is the most well-known test used to measure emotional intelligence (EI), which is a major component of social cognition. Given the absence of EI ability-based scales adapted to Chinese speakers, we translated the MSCEIT into a Traditional Chinese version (MSCEIT-TC) and validated this scale for use in schizophrenia studies. The specific aims were to validate the MSCEIT-TC, to develop a norm for the MSCEIT-TC, and use this norm to explore the EI performance of schizophrenic individuals. We included in our study seven hundred twenty-eight healthy controls and seventy-six individuals with schizophrenia. The results suggest that the MSCEIT-TC is reliable and valid when assessing EI. The results showed good discrimination and validity when comparing the two study groups. Impairment was the greatest for two branches Understanding and Managing Emotions, which implies that the deficits of schizophrenia individuals involve ToM (theory of mind) tasks. Deficits involving the negative scale of schizophrenia was related to impaired performance when the MSCEIT-TC was used (in branch 2, 3, 4, and the area Strategic). Our findings suggest that the MSCEIT-TC can be used for emotional studies in healthy Chinese and in clinical setting for investigating schizophrenic individuals.

  15. 40 CFR 60.104a - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Performance tests. 60.104a Section 60... tests. (a) The owner or operator shall conduct a performance test for each FCCU, FCU, sulfur recovery....8(d) apply to the initial performance test and to subsequent performance tests required by...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 665 - Tests To Be Performed at the Bus Testing Facility

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or double-lane change test performed at the test track. Bus speed should be held constant throughout... left- and right-hand lane changes should be tested. 4. Performance The performance test should...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 665 - Tests To Be Performed at the Bus Testing Facility

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... or double-lane change test performed at the test track. Bus speed should be held constant throughout... left- and right-hand lane changes should be tested. 4. Performance The performance test should...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 665 - Tests To Be Performed at the Bus Testing Facility

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... or double-lane change test performed at the test track. Bus speed should be held constant throughout... left- and right-hand lane changes should be tested. 4. Performance The performance test should...

  19. Concordance study between the ParaDNA® Intelligence Test, a rapid DNA profiling assay, and a conventional STR typing kit (AmpFlSTR® SGM Plus®).

    PubMed

    Ball, G; Dawnay, N; Stafford-Allen, B; Panasiuk, M; Rendell, P; Blackman, S; Duxbury, N; Wells, S

    2015-05-01

    The ParaDNA® Intelligence Test enables STR profiling directly from human biological samples and evidence items collected from crime scene in 75min. Designed for non-expert use this system allows DNA information to be available to investigators before it would typically be available from a laboratory. The ParaDNA Intelligence Test system amplifies D3S1358, D8S119, D16S539, D18S1358 and TH01 STR loci and the gender typing locus amelogenin and detects the alleles present with HyBeacon® probes. Individual DNA samples from 381 UK Caucasian individuals were analysed using AmpFlSTR® SGM Plus® and the ParaDNA Intelligence Test with the derived STR profiles compared. Here we describe the high level of concordance demonstrated between the two systems and discuss this with reference to allele frequencies and the discriminatory power offered by the ParaDNA Intelligence Test.

  20. Cognitive differences between orang-utan species: a test of the cultural intelligence hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Forss, Sofia I. F.; Willems, Erik; Call, Josep; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2016-01-01

    Cultural species can - or even prefer to - learn their skills from conspecifics. According to the cultural intelligence hypothesis, selection on underlying mechanisms not only improves this social learning ability but also the asocial (individual) learning ability. Thus, species with systematically richer opportunities to socially acquire knowledge and skills should over time evolve to become more intelligent. We experimentally compared the problem-solving ability of Sumatran orang-utans (Pongo abelii), which are sociable in the wild, with that of the closely related, but more solitary Bornean orang-utans (P. pygmaeus), under the homogeneous environmental conditions provided by zoos. Our results revealed that Sumatrans showed superior innate problem-solving skills to Borneans, and also showed greater inhibition and a more cautious and less rough exploration style. This pattern is consistent with the cultural intelligence hypothesis, which predicts that the more sociable of two sister species experienced stronger selection on cognitive mechanisms underlying learning. PMID:27466052

  1. Functional Performance Testing for Power and Return to Sports

    PubMed Central

    Manske, Robert; Reiman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Context: Functional performance testing of athletes can determine physical limitations that may affect sporting activities. Optimal functional performance testing simulates the athlete’s activity. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search from 1960 to 2012 was implemented with the keywords functional testing, functional impairment testing, and functional performance testing in the English language. Each author also undertook independent searches of article references. Conclusion: Functional performance tests can bridge the gap between general physical tests and full, unrestricted athletic activity. PMID:24427396

  2. Relations Between the Intelligibility of Speech in Noise and Psychophysical Measures of Hearing Measured in Four Languages Using the Auditory Profile Test Battery.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, T E M; Dreschler, W A

    2015-12-08

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relations between the intelligibility of speech in noise and measures of auditory resolution, loudness recruitment, and cognitive function. The analyses were based on data published earlier as part of the presentation of the Auditory Profile, a test battery implemented in four languages. Tests of the intelligibility of speech, resolution, loudness recruitment, and lexical decision making were measured using headphones in five centers: in Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Correlations and stepwise linear regression models were calculated. In sum, 72 hearing-impaired listeners aged 22 to 91 years with a broad range of hearing losses were included in the study. Several significant correlations were found with the intelligibility of speech in noise. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that pure-tone average, age, spectral and temporal resolution, and loudness recruitment were significant predictors of the intelligibility of speech in fluctuating noise. Complex interrelationships between auditory factors and the intelligibility of speech in noise were revealed using the Auditory Profile data set in four languages. After taking into account the effects of pure-tone average and age, spectral and temporal resolution and loudness recruitment had an added value in the prediction of variation among listeners with respect to the intelligibility of speech in noise. The results of the lexical decision making test were not related to the intelligibility of speech in noise, in the population studied.

  3. Singlepath Salmonella. Performance Tested Method 060401.

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Charlotte; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Slaghuis, Jörg; Bubert, Andreas; Ossmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Singlepath Salmonella is an immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assay for the presumptive qualitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food. A previous AOAC Performance Tested Method study evaluated Singlepath Salmonella as an effective method for the detection of Salmonella spp. in the following selected foods: dried skimmed milk, black pepper, dried pet food, desiccated coconut, cooked peeled frozen prawns, raw ground beef, and raw ground turkey. In this Emergency Response Validation extension, creamy peanut butter was inoculated with S. enterica. ser. Typhimurium. For low contamination level (1.08 CFU/25 g), a Chi-square value of 0.5 indicated that there was no significant difference between Singlepath Salmonella and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) reference method. For high-level and uninoculated control there was 100% agreement between the methods.

  4. RHIC Sextant Test --- Physics and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Fischer, W.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J. M.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Harrison, M.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W. W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trahern, C. G.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents beam physics and machine performance results of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Sextant and AGS-to-RHIC (ATR) transfer line during the Sextant test in early 1997. Techniques used to measure both machine properties (difference orbits, dispersion, and beamline optics) and beam parameters (energy, intensity, transverse and longitudinal emittances) are described. The flexibility of the ATR and RHIC Sextant lattices is demonstrated by a widely tunable range of phase advance per cell. Longitudinal tomography is employed to reconstruct beam motion in phase space. Digitized two-dimensional video profile monitors are used to measure transverse beam emittances and beamline optics. The gold ion beam parameters are shown to be comparable to the RHIC design requirements.

  5. Evidence of factorial variance of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test across schizophrenia and normative samples.

    PubMed

    Eack, Shaun M; Pogue-Geile, Michael F; Greeno, Catherine G; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2009-10-01

    The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) is a key measure of social cognition recommended by the MATRICS committee. While the psychometric properties of the MSCEIT appear strong, previous evidence suggested its factor structure may have shifted when applied to schizophrenia patients, posing important implications for cross-group comparisons. Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, we explicitly tested the factorial invariance of the MSCEIT across schizophrenia (n=64) and two normative samples (n=2099 and 451). Results indicated that the factor structure of the MSCEIT was significantly different between the schizophrenia and normative samples. Implications for future research are discussed.

  6. Computational Intelligence and Its Impact on Future High-Performance Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This document contains presentations from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Computational Intelligence held at the Virginia Consortium of Engineering and Science Universities, Hampton, Virginia, June 27-28, 1995. The presentations addressed activities in the areas of fuzzy logic, neural networks, and evolutionary computations. Workshop attendees represented NASA, the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, industry, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the state of technology in the Computational intelligence area and to provide guidelines for future research.

  7. Intelligence Assessment: Gardner Multiple Intelligence Theory as an Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Leandro S.; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Ferreira, Aristides I.; Bermejo, Maria Rosario; Ferrando, Mercedes; Ferrandiz, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    In the multiple intelligence framework, newer and more contextualized cognitive tasks are suggested as alternative to more traditional psychometric tests. The purpose of this article is to examine whether or not these two types of instruments converge into a general factor of cognitive performance. Thus, the Battery of General and Differential…

  8. 40 CFR 63.1656 - Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Performance testing, test methods, and...: Ferromanganese and Silicomanganese § 63.1656 Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations. (a) Performance testing. (1) All performance tests must be conducted according to the requirements in § 63.7...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1656 - Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Performance testing, test methods, and...: Ferromanganese and Silicomanganese § 63.1656 Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations. (a) Performance testing. (1) All performance tests must be conducted according to the requirements in § 63.7...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1656 - Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Performance testing, test methods, and...: Ferromanganese and Silicomanganese § 63.1656 Performance testing, test methods, and compliance demonstrations. (a) Performance testing. (1) All performance tests must be conducted according to the requirements in § 63.7...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7 - Performance testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the results of the compliance test. Acceptance of the test results shall constitute a waiver of the... Performance testing requirements. (a) Applicability and performance test dates. (1) The applicability of this... or operator of the affected source must perform such tests within 180 days of the compliance date...

  12. Bilingualism and Non-Verbal Intelligence: A Study of Test Results. Pamphlet No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, E. R.

    This report discusses the relationship between bilingualism and mental development of bilingual children. After a review of the relevant literature, a specific study is described. The linguistic background of 648 children from 29 schools, age 10 through 12 inclusive, was measured with the Welsh Linguistic Background Scale. General intelligence was…

  13. Development and Field Test of the Multiple Intelligences Learning Instruction Congruency Impact Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peifer, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the academic discussion regarding the validity of Multiple Intelligences (MI) theory through focusing on the validity of an important construct embedded in the theory, that of congruence between instructional style and preferred MI style for optimal learning. Currently there is insufficient empirical…

  14. Testing the Theory of Successful Intelligence in Teaching Grade 4 Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Jarvin, Linda; Birney, Damian P.; Naples, Adam; Stemler, Steven E.; Newman, Tina; Otterbach, Renate; Parish, Carolyn; Randi, Judy; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    This study addressed whether prior successes with educational interventions grounded in the theory of successful intelligence could be replicated on a larger scale as the primary basis for instruction in language arts, mathematics, and science. A total of 7,702 4th-grade students in the United States, drawn from 223 elementary school classrooms in…

  15. A cluster analytic study of the Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children-IV in children referred for psychoeducational assessment due to persistent academic difficulties.

    PubMed

    Hale, Corinne R; Casey, Joseph E; Ricciardi, Philip W R

    2014-02-01

    Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children-IV core subtest scores of 472 children were cluster analyzed to determine if reliable and valid subgroups would emerge. Three subgroups were identified. Clusters were reliable across different stages of the analysis as well as across algorithms and samples. With respect to external validity, the Globally Low cluster differed from the other two clusters on Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II Word Reading, Numerical Operations, and Spelling subtests, whereas the latter two clusters did not differ from one another. The clusters derived have been identified in studies using previous WISC editions. Clusters characterized by poor performance on subtests historically associated with the VIQ (i.e., VCI + WMI) and PIQ (i.e., POI + PSI) did not emerge, nor did a cluster characterized by low scores on PRI subtests. Picture Concepts represented the highest subtest score in every cluster, failing to vary in a predictable manner with the other PRI subtests.

  16. Intelligence and Psychopathy Do Not Influence Malingering.

    PubMed

    Demakis, George; Rimland, Casey; Reeve, Charlie; Ward, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of psychopathy and intelligence on malingering in a simulated malingering design. We hypothesized that participants high in both traits would be more adept at evading detection on performance validity tests (PVTs). College students (N = 92) were first administered the Wechsler Test of Adult Reading, a reading measure that estimates intelligence, and the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Short Form under standard conditions. They were then asked to imagine as if they had suffered a concussion a year ago and were instructed to fake or exaggerate symptoms in a believable fashion to improve their settlement as part of a lawsuit. Participants were subsequently administered a brief neuropsychological battery that included the Word Memory Test, Rey 15-Item Test with Recognition, Finger-Tapping Test, and Digit Span from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition. Moderated multiple regressions with hierarchical entry were conducted. Intelligence, psychopathy, and the interaction of intelligence and psychopathy were not related to performance on any of the PVTs. In other words, participants who scored higher on intelligence and psychopathy did not perform differently on these measures compared with other participants. Though a null finding, implications of this study are discussed in terms of the broader research and clinical literature on malingering.

  17. Implementation and Performance Evaluation of Parameter Improvement Mechanisms for Intelligent E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chenn-Jung; Chu, San-Shine; Guan, Chih-Tai

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, designing useful learning diagnosis systems has become a hot research topic in the literature. In order to help teachers easily analyze students' profiles in intelligent tutoring system, it is essential that students' portfolios can be transformed into some useful information to reflect the extent of students' participation in the…

  18. Re-Conceptualizing Procedural Knowledge: The Emergence of "Intelligent" Performances among Equation Solvers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Jon R.

    This paper explores the development of students' knowledge of mathematical procedures. Students' tendency to develop rote knowledge of procedures has been widely commented on. I postulate an alternative, more "intelligent" endpoint for the development of procedural knowledge, where students choose to deviate from solving patterns on…

  19. Factors Which Influence the Development of Intelligence and Performance Among Nigerian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    Several themes relevant to the personality development and intellectual functioning of children are presented in this position paper. Inferences for the education of Nigerian children are also drawn. Among general factors considered influential in children's intellectual development, three are emphasized: the way in which intelligence is defined,…

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Personality Traits as Predictors of Occupational Therapy students' Practice Education Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Etherington, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated whether occupational therapy students' emotional intelligence and personality traits are predictive of specific aspects of their fieldwork performance. A total of 114 second and third year undergraduate occupational therapy students (86.6% response rate) completed the Genos Emotional Intelligence Inventory (Genos EI) and the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI). Fieldwork performance scores were obtained from the Student Practice Evaluation Form Revised (SPEF-R). Linear regressions were completed with the SPEF-R domains being the dependent variables and the Genos EI and TIPI factors being the independent variables. Regression analysis results revealed that the Genos EI subscales of Emotional Management of Others (EMO), Emotional Awareness of Others (EAO), Emotional Expression (EEX) and Emotional Reasoning (ERE) were significant predictors of various domains of students' fieldwork performance. EAO and ERE were significant predictors of students' Communication Skills accounting for 4.6% of its variance. EMO, EAO, EEX and ERE were significant predictors of students' Documentation Skills explaining 6.8% of its variance. EMO was a significant predictor of students' Professional Behaviour accounting for 3.2% of its variance. No TIPI factors were found to be significant predictors of the SPEF-R domains. Occupational therapy students' emotional intelligence was a significant predictor of components of their fieldwork performance while students' personality traits were not. The convenience sampling approach used, small sample size recruited and potential issue of social desirability of the self-reported Genos EI and TIPI data are acknowledged as study limitations. It is recommended that other studies be completed to investigate if any other relevant constructs or factors are predictive of occupational therapy students' fieldwork performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. WAIS-III Matrix Reasoning test performance in a mixed clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, A T; Sanchez, P N; Rosenbaum, J G; Mahurin, R K; Davis, J M; Townes, B D

    1999-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between the Matrix Reasoning subtest (MRT) of the WAIS-III and a selected number of neuropsychological tests in a heterogeneous clinical sample of English-speaking American (n = 41), and non-English-speaking immigrant (n = 14) adults. A moderate association between the Halstead Category Test and the MRT (-.58) was found in the English-speaking sample. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant association between measures of verbal abstract reasoning and verbal fluency, and performance on the MRT. Among the immigrant sample, the MRT was also found to be significantly associated with verbal fluency task performance, as well as with the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence. Correlational analyses therefore suggest a strong verbal mediation element in the MRT, and that labeling it a nonverbal task may be misleading.

  2. MEGARA: large pupil element tests and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, I.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Pérez-Calpena, A.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Maldonado, X. M.; Gil de Paz, A.; Carrasco, E.; Gallego, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Sánchez-Moreno, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    MEGARA is a third generation spectrograph for the Spanish 10.4m telescope (GTC) providing two observing modes: a large central Integral Field Unit (IFU), called the Large Compact Bundle (LCB), covering a FOV of 12.5 × 11.3 arcsec2, and a Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) with a FOV of 3.5 × 3.5 arcmin2. MEGARA will observe the whole visible range from 3650A to 10000A allowing different spectral resolutions (low, medium and high) with R = 6000, 11000 and 18000 respectively. The dispersive elements are placed at the spectrograph pupil position in the path of the collimated beam and they are composed of a set of volume phase hologram gratings (VPHs) sandwiched between two flat windows and coupled in addition to two prisms in the case of the medium- and high-resolution units. We will describe the tests and setups developed to check the requirements of all units, as well as the obtained performance at laboratory

  3. A Construct Validity Study of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test V2.0 with CASE/Carnegie U.S. "Professor of the Year" Award Winners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganus, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT V2.0) for use as a formative faculty development tool. The MSCEIT was designed to measure emotional intelligence abilities as defined by Mayer-Salovey's EI Ability model. Individuals can deliberately develop emotional intelligence skills; a formative assessment of EI…

  4. Which spatial abilities and strategies predict males' and females' performance in the object perspective test?

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2012-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether different spatial abilities and strategies sustain perspective-taking (PT) performance in males and females. The PT task used was the Object Perspective Test (OPT, Kozhevnikov and Hegarty in Mem Cogn 29:745-756, 2001; Hegarty and Waller in Intelligence 32:175-191, 2004). A sample of 40 males and 40 females completed the OPT and several other visuo-spatial tasks and questionnaires. Multiple regression analysis showed that OPT performance was predicted positively by a spatial imagery preference and negatively by the specific use of mental rotation strategy (i.e. turning the sheet of paper). Gender interacted with the Embedded Figure Test (EFT), a spatial visualization task, since high EFT scores only positively predicted the OPT results in males. Overall, our results show that OPT performance is sustained by specific spatial abilities and strategies modulated, at least in part, by gender.

  5. 49 CFR 572.78 - Performance test conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Performance test conditions. 572.78 Section 572.78... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child § 572.78 Performance test conditions. (a) Conduct performance tests at any temperature from 66 °F to 78 °F, and at...

  6. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    IQ (intelligence quotient) testing is a series of exams used to determine your general intelligence in relation ... Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests ...

  7. The factor structure and psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Extremera, Natalio; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    This research examined evidence regarding the reliability and validity of scores on the Spanish version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, Version 2.0 (MSCEIT; Mayer, Salovey, & Caruso, 2002). In Study 1, we found a close convergence of the Spanish consensus scores and the general and expert consensus scores determined with Mayer, Salovey, Caruso, and Sitarenios (2003) data. The MSCEIT also demonstrated adequate evidence of reliability of test scores as estimated by internal consistency and test-retest correlation after 12 weeks. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 3-level higher factor model with 8 manifest variables (task scores), 4 first-level factors (corresponding to the 4-branch model of Mayer & Salovey [1997], with 2 tasks for each branch), 2 second-level factors (experiential and strategic areas, with 2 branches for each area), and 1 third-level factor (overall emotional intelligence [EI]), and multigroup analyses supported MSCEIT cross-gender invariance. Study 2 found evidence for the discriminant validity of scores on the MSCEIT subscales, which were differentially related to personality and self-reported EI. Study 3 provided evidence of the incremental validity of scores on the MSCEIT, which added significant variance to the prospective prediction of psychological well-being after controlling for personality traits. The psychometric properties of the Spanish MSCEIT are similar to those of the original English version, supporting its use for assessing emotional abilities in the Spanish population. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Enhancing nuclear power plant performance through the use of artifical intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Maren, A.; Miller, L.; Uhrig, R.; Upadhyaya, B.

    1989-06-15

    In the summer of 1988, the Department of Nuclear Engineering (NE) at the University of Tennessee (UT) in Knoxville was selected to carry out a research program in Enhancing the Operation of Nuclear Power plants through the use of Artificial Intelligence, This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research under 10CFR605 for Nuclear Engineering Research. The objective of the research is to advance the state-of-the-art of nuclear power plant control, safety, management, and instrumentation systems through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, including both expert systems and neural networks. The emphasis will be placed on methods that can be implemented on a rapid or real-time basis. A second, but equally important, objective is to build a broadly based critical mass of expertise in the artificial intelligence, field that can be brought to bear on the technology of nuclear power plants. Both of these goals are being met. This overview and the attached technical reports describe the work that is being carried out. Although in some cases, the scope of the work differs somewhat from the specific tasks described in the original proposal, all activities are clearly within the overall scope of the contract.

  9. Enhancing nuclear power plant performance through the use of artifical intelligence. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Maren, A.; Miller, L.; Uhrig, R.; Upadhyaya, B.

    1989-06-15

    In the summer of 1988, the Department of Nuclear Engineering (NE) at the University of Tennessee (UT) in Knoxville was selected to carry out a research program in ``Enhancing the Operation of Nuclear Power plants through the use of Artificial Intelligence, This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research under 10CFR605 for Nuclear Engineering Research. The objective of the research is to advance the state-of-the-art of nuclear power plant control, safety, management, and instrumentation systems through the use of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, including both expert systems and neural networks. The emphasis will be placed on methods that can be implemented on a rapid or real-time basis. A second, but equally important, objective is to build a broadly based critical mass of expertise in the artificial intelligence, field that can be brought to bear on the technology of nuclear power plants. Both of these goals are being met. This overview and the attached technical reports describe the work that is being carried out. Although in some cases, the scope of the work differs somewhat from the specific tasks described in the original proposal, all activities are clearly within the overall scope of the contract.

  10. Test Anxiety and Performance on Reading Competency Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallworth-Clark, Rosemarie; Cochran, Jeff; Nolen, Martha T.; Tuggle, Durelle L.; Scott, Janice S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a 20 item self-report psychometric scale that was used to assess test anxiety levels in 67 students. Reports that the higher the anxiety level, as measured by the Revised Test Anxiety Scale (RTA), the lower the score on a reading and writing competency exam taken subsequently, and that students who received extra time on the reading test…

  11. Emotional intelligence predicts success in medical school.

    PubMed

    Libbrecht, Nele; Lievens, Filip; Carette, Bernd; Côté, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that effective communication and interpersonal sensitivity during interactions between doctors and patients impact therapeutic outcomes. There is an important need to identify predictors of these behaviors, because traditional tests used in medical admissions offer limited predictions of "bedside manners" in medical practice. This study examined whether emotional intelligence would predict the performance of 367 medical students in medical school courses on communication and interpersonal sensitivity. One of the dimensions of emotional intelligence, the ability to regulate emotions, predicted performance in courses on communication and interpersonal sensitivity over the next 3 years of medical school, over and above cognitive ability and conscientiousness. Emotional intelligence did not predict performance on courses on medical subject domains. The results suggest that medical schools may better predict who will communicate effectively and show interpersonal sensitivity if they include measures of emotional intelligence in their admission systems.

  12. Earthquake early warning performance tests for Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, N.; Wenzel, F.; Erdik, M.; Alcik, H.; Mert, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Marmara Region is the most densily populated region in Turkey. The greater area of the mega-city Istanbul inhabits about 14 million people. The city is located in the direct vicinity of the Main Marmara Fault, a dextral strike-slip fault system intersecting the Sea of Marmara, which is the western continuation of the North Anatolian Fault [Le Pichon et al., 2001]. Its closest distance to the city of Istanbul ranges between 15 and 20 km. Recent estimates by Parsons [2004] give a probability of more than 40% of a M ≥ 7 earthquake that will affect Istanbul within the next 30 years. Due to this high seismic risk, earthquake early warning is an important task in disaster management and seismic risk reduction, increasing the safety of millions of people living in and around Istanbul and reducing economic losses. The Istanbul Earthquake Rapid Response and Early Warning System (IERREWS) includes a set of 10 strong-motion sensors used for early warning which are installed between Istanbul and the Main Marmara Fault. The system works on the exceedance of amplitude thresholds, whereas three alarm levels are defined at three different thresholds [Erdik et al., 2003]. In the context of the research project EDIM (Earthquake Disaster Information System for the Marmara Region, Turkey), the early warning network is planned to be extended by an additional set of 10 strong-motion sensors installed around the Sea of Marmara to include the greater Marmara Region into the early warning process. We present performance tests of both the existing and the planned extended early warning network using ground motion simulations for 280 synthetic earthquakes along the Main Marmara Fault with moment magnitudes between 4.5 and 7.5. We apply the amplitude thresholds of IERREWS, as well as, for comparison, an early warning algorithm based on artificial neural networks which estimates hypocentral location and magnitude of the occurring earthquake. The estimates are updated continuously with

  13. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  14. Test Competency as Related to Classroom Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Walter A.; And Others

    This study of student teachers in high school mathematics and science classrooms compares their teaching behaviors and their scores from three pencil-and-paper tests. Data analysis indicates a relative independence between the ratings of teacher classroom behavior and scores on the pencil-and-paper tests. There was little consistent relationship…

  15. Estimating Intelligence in Spanish: Regression Equations With the Word Accentuation Test and Demographic Variables in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Sierra Sanjurjo, Natalia; Montañes, Patricia; Sierra Matamoros, Fabio Alexander; Burin, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Spanish is the fourth most spoken language in the world, and the majority of Spanish speakers have a Latin American origin. Reading aloud infrequently accentuated words has been established as a National Adult Reading Test-like method to assess premorbid intelligence in Spanish. However, several versions have been proposed and validated with small and selected samples, in particular geographical conditions, and they seldom derive a formula for IQ estimation with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ). The objective of this study was to develop equations to estimate WAIS-Third Edition (WAIS-III) FSIQ from the Word Accentuation Test-Revised (WAT-R), demographic variables, and their combination within diverse Latin American samples. Two hundred and forty participants from Argentina and Colombia, selected according to age and years of education strata, were assessed with the WAT-R, the WAIS-III, and a structured questionnaire about demographic and medical information. A combined approach including place of birth, years of education, and WAT-R provided the best equation, explaining 76% of IQ variance. These equations could be useful for estimating premorbid IQ in patients with Latin American Spanish as their birth language.

  16. Comparison of the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, in children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Grondhuis, Sabrina Nicole; Mulick, James A

    2013-01-01

    A review of hospital records was conducted for children evaluated for autism spectrum disorders who completed both the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition (SB5). Participants were between 3 and 12 years of age. Diagnoses were autistic disorder (n  =  26, 55%) and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (n  =  21, 45%). Analysis showed that the full sample received significantly higher scores on the Leiter-R than SB5 (mean discrepancy of 20.91 points), specific diagnosis was not a significant factor, and younger children had a larger discrepancy between tests. These analyses strongly suggest that the Leiter-R and the SB5 may not be equivalent measures of intellectual functioning in children with autism spectrum disorders, and that use of one or the other exclusively could lead to misclassification of intellectual capacity.

  17. 10 CFR 26.168 - Blind performance testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the blind performance test samples submitted to the laboratory must be positive for one or more drugs... blind performance test samples to the HHS-certified laboratory. (1) During the initial 90-day period of... licensee or other entity shall submit blind performance test samples to each HHS-certified laboratory...

  18. 40 CFR 60.8 - Performance tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... access to sampling platform(s). (4) Utilities for sampling and testing equipment. (f) Unless otherwise... there is 95 percent confidence that 90 percent of well qualified labs will produce future results...

  19. Combat System Testing, Training and Performance Monitoring,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    implemented now, while the CG 47 Class AEGIS Cmbat Training System/Operational Readiness Test System (ACTS/ORTS) and the DDG 993 Class Combat Simulation Test...capabilities of the AN/SSQ-91 CSTS presently in the fleet in DDG 993 Class ships, describes similar systems under. .- contract for LHD I and MCM I ship...1-1 1.3 DDG 993 CLASS CSTS ............................................ 1-1 1.4 LHD I CSTS

  20. Intelligent tracking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, T. J.; Abruzzo, J.; Zagardo, V.; Shipley, J.; Kossa, L.

    1980-10-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report under a contract to investigate the design, test, and implementation of a set of algorithms to perform intelligent tracking and intelligent homing on FLIR and TV imagery. The system concept was described. The problem of target aspect determination in support of aimpoint selection was analyzed. Sequences of 875 line FLIR data were extracted from the data base and an example of aspect determination for a maneuvering target in the presence of obscurations was presented. An example was also presented for close in homing (less than 500 meters) and the emergence of interior features, target movement, and scale changes. Hardware implementation in terms of VLSI/VHSIC chips was analyzed.

  1. Bilingualism and performance on two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Linda C; Soveri, Anna; Räsänen, Pekka; Kärnä, Antti; Delatte, Sonia; Lagerström, Emma; Mård, Lena; Steffansson, Mikaela; Lehtonen, Minna; Laine, Matti

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of bilingualism on the two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment, Second Edition (NEPSY-II) in children. The sample consisted of 100 Finland-Swedish children in two age groups. About half (n = 52) of the participants were early simultaneous bilinguals, and the other half (n = 48) were monolinguals. As no Finland-Swedish versions of the tests are available at the moment, both tests were translated and adapted to suit this population. The results revealed no difference in the performance between bilingual and monolingual children. This speaks against a cognitive advantage in bilingual children and indicates that development of separate norms for monolingual and bilingual children is not needed for clinical use.

  2. Effects of listening to Mozart and Bach on the performance of a mathematical test.

    PubMed

    Bridgett, D J; Cuevas, J

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess the effect of listening to Mozart and Bach on the immediate performance of a 10-min. mathematical test. The study consisted of 61 undergraduate participants. Participants were randomly assigned to a control group, a Mozart group, or a Bach group. Participants were then administered a mathematics pretest, listened to a selection of music for 10 min., and were then administered a mathematics posttest. The test was constructed to be similar to items taken from the University Mathematics Placement Examination. Analysis indicated no significant effect on the immediate mathematics test when participants listened to 10 min. of either Mozart or Bach. These findings suggest caution in measuring differences in various cognitive tasks as indicating increases in intelligence scores.

  3. Bilingualism and Performance on Two Widely Used Developmental Neuropsychological Test Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Räsänen, Pekka; Kärnä, Antti; Delatte, Sonia; Lagerström, Emma; Mård, Lena; Steffansson, Mikaela; Lehtonen, Minna; Laine, Matti

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of bilingualism on the two widely used developmental neuropsychological test batteries Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment, Second Edition (NEPSY-II) in children. The sample consisted of 100 Finland-Swedish children in two age groups. About half (n = 52) of the participants were early simultaneous bilinguals, and the other half (n = 48) were monolinguals. As no Finland-Swedish versions of the tests are available at the moment, both tests were translated and adapted to suit this population. The results revealed no difference in the performance between bilingual and monolingual children. This speaks against a cognitive advantage in bilingual children and indicates that development of separate norms for monolingual and bilingual children is not needed for clinical use. PMID:25922937

  4. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  8. Plant intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Lipavská, Helena; Žárský, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The concept of plant intelligence, as proposed by Anthony Trewavas, has raised considerable discussion. However, plant intelligence remains loosely defined; often it is either perceived as practically synonymous to Darwinian fitness, or reduced to a mere decorative metaphor. A more strict view can be taken, emphasizing necessary prerequisites such as memory and learning, which requires clarifying the definition of memory itself. To qualify as memories, traces of past events have to be not only stored, but also actively accessed. We propose a criterion for eliminating false candidates of possible plant intelligence phenomena in this stricter sense: an “intelligent” behavior must involve a component that can be approximated by a plausible algorithmic model involving recourse to stored information about past states of the individual or its environment. Re-evaluation of previously presented examples of plant intelligence shows that only some of them pass our test. “You were hurt?” Kumiko said, looking at the scar. Sally looked down. “Yeah.” “Why didn't you have it removed?” “Sometimes it's good to remember.” “Being hurt?” “Being stupid.”—(W. Gibson: Mona Lisa Overdrive) PMID:19816094

  9. Imaging performance tests of diffractive optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianchao; Su, Yun; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yue; Jin, Jiangao

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical imaging is a new method to realize high-resolution imaging from geostationary orbit(GEO). Technical advantages of diffractive optical imaging is analyzed in the field of space optics. For application of super large diameter space optical system, the system scheme and a new achromatic method is proposed. An imaging system is developed and tested, the result of optical system wavefront is 0.169λ(RMS), optical system MTF is 0.85, and the imaging system MTF is 0.19. Test results show the new achromatic method is feasible. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of super large diameter diffractive optical imaging system.

  10. Modified MTS MRB500 CATALYST PERFORMANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Robert J. Pawelko

    2008-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine if the oxygen supply in a CuO catalyst considered for use in the TMIST-2 irradiation test would be sufficient to convert all the hydrogen isotopes coming from the irradiation test to water. A mixture of 2% H2 in Ar was supplied to a modified MRB 500 stack m onitor from Mound Techology Solutions, Miamisburg, OH. It was found that the catalyst could convert 3.75E-03 moles of H2 before losing its effectiveness. Conversion was found to begin at a catalyst temperature of about 220 deg C and to be fully effective at about 300 deg C.

  11. Intelligence Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    reasoning, rote memory , and the like.” Standardized tests also fall short in terms of assessing other important aspects of intelligence such as creativity...ipEngine made by BrightStar Engineering. Then in 2004 we further evolved to a Compulab 686 CORE with 128 megabytes of memory running at 266 mHz...driver runs in a continuous loop, timing sonar echoes on each pass, storing the resulting range values in memory for on-demand access by other

  12. CHROMagar Salmonella Detection Test Kit. Performance Tested Method 020502.

    PubMed

    Webb, Katana; Ritter, Vicki

    2009-01-01

    BBL CHROMagar Salmonella was evaluated by an external food testing laboratory for the recovery of Salmonella in peanut butter using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (FDA-BAM) procedure. The peanut butter was found to be negative for the presence of Salmonella and, therefore, was seeded with heat-stressed Salmonella at target concentrations of 0.2 and 2 CFU/25 g. The Salmonella-seeded samples remained at room temperature for 14 days before analysis to stabilize the Salmonella in the food environment. Twenty 25 g test portions from each seeded level and five 25 g samples of uninoculated control samples were processed using enrichment broths as outlined in the FDA-BAM procedure. BBL CHROMagar Salmonella-prepared plates were evaluated with the FDA reference method media (bismuth sulfite, xylose lysine desoxycholate, and Hektoen enteric agars). Fractionally positive results were obtained from the lower inoculum level of peanut butter samples. Five positive cultures were recovered from both the BBL CHROMagar Salmonella and reference methods. The two methods gave identical results for all cultures resulting in a method agreement of 100%. McNemar's chi2 test, which assesses the evidence for difference in marginal proportions between two methods, could not be evaluated because it requires one or more discrepant cultures. However, because there were no discrepant cultures, the marginal proportions for the two methods were identical; therefore, there is no evidence of a difference between the methods. This study demonstrates that the results from BBL CHROMagar Salmonella are comparable to the three reference method media for the detection of Salmonella in peanut butter using the FDA-BAM procedures.

  13. Dental air turbine handpiece performance testing.

    PubMed

    Dyson, J E; Darvell, B W

    1995-10-01

    Air turbine handpieces are expected to continue to be widely used as the main means of carrying out dental cutting work and scope exists for further design improvements. An understanding of the theoretical principles governing the performance of these devices seems essential for the systematic development of better handpiece designs and methods of specification. Furthermore, for experimental work on cutting behaviour with air turbine equipment, this knowledge is required for appropriate characterization of the performance of the particular handpiece used with respect to actual rates of energy disposition. The literature relating to air turbine handpiece performance is critically reviewed to assess currently available methods of measuring important variables such as speed, torque, and power. In this, consideration is given to the current state of knowledge of the influence on these variables of air pressure, flow and turbine design features. It is apparent that, although various measurement methods have been described and data for individual handpieces published, no attempt has yet been made to explore the functional relationships that exist between the variables. It is concluded that there is a need to identify the factors influencing turbine performance, to develop measurement systems which would provide adequate accuracy and precision and then to investigate the functional relationships between these relevant variables.

  14. Feasibility Investigation for Performing Fireball Temperature Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Kurtz, Joe

    1997-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested by the Launch Abort Subpanel and the Power Systems Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to investigate the feasibility of using spectroscopic techniques to measure propellant fireball gas temperatures. This report outlines the modeling and experimental approaches and results of this investigation. Descriptions of the theoretical particle temperature and mass effusion models are presented along with the results of the survivability of small plutonium dioxide (less than or equal to 1000 microns diameter) particles entrained in various propellant fireball scenarios. The experimental test systems used to measure the hydroxide radical, water, and particle graybody spectral emissions and absorptions are discussed. Spectral results along with temperatures extracted by analyzing the spectral features are presented for the flames investigated in the laboratory environment. Methods of implementing spectroscopic measurements for future testing using the WSTF Large-scale Hydrogen/Oxygen Explosion Facility are discussed, and the accuracy expected for these measurements is estimated from laboratory measurements.

  15. Use of Microarray Test Data for Toxicogenomic Prediction-Multi-Intelligent Systems for Toxicogenomic Applications (MISTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, J.S.; Lu, P.-Y.

    2005-09-12

    The YAHSGS LLC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory established a CRADA to develop a computational neural network and wavelets software to facilitate providing national needs for toxicity prediction and overcome the voracious drain of resources (money and time) being directed to the development of pharmaceutical agents. The research project was supported through a STTR Phase I task by NIEHS in 2004. The research deploys state-of-the-art computational neural networks and wavelets to make toxicity prediction on three independent bases: (1) quantitative structure-activity relationships, (2) microarray data, and (3) Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing technology. Upon completion of Phase I, a prototype software Multi-Intelligent System for Toxicogenomic and Applications (MISTA) was developed, the utility's feasibility was demonstrated, and a Phase II proposal was jointly prepared and submitted to NIEHS for funding evaluation. The goals and objectives of the program have been achieved.

  16. Intelligent Condition Diagnosis Method Based on Adaptive Statistic Test Filter and Diagnostic Bayesian Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Qiuju; Wang, Kun; Chen, Peng; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    A new fault diagnosis method for rotating machinery based on adaptive statistic test filter (ASTF) and Diagnostic Bayesian Network (DBN) is presented in this paper. ASTF is proposed to obtain weak fault features under background noise, ASTF is based on statistic hypothesis testing in the frequency domain to evaluate similarity between reference signal (noise signal) and original signal, and remove the component of high similarity. The optimal level of significance α is obtained using particle swarm optimization (PSO). To evaluate the performance of the ASTF, evaluation factor Ipq is also defined. In addition, a simulation experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and robustness of ASTF. A sensitive evaluation method using principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to evaluate the sensitiveness of symptom parameters (SPs) for condition diagnosis. By this way, the good SPs that have high sensitiveness for condition diagnosis can be selected. A three-layer DBN is developed to identify condition of rotation machinery based on the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) theory. Condition diagnosis experiment for rolling element bearings demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26761006

  17. Intelligent Condition Diagnosis Method Based on Adaptive Statistic Test Filter and Diagnostic Bayesian Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Qiuju; Wang, Kun; Chen, Peng; Wang, Huaqing

    2016-01-08

    A new fault diagnosis method for rotating machinery based on adaptive statistic test filter (ASTF) and Diagnostic Bayesian Network (DBN) is presented in this paper. ASTF is proposed to obtain weak fault features under background noise, ASTF is based on statistic hypothesis testing in the frequency domain to evaluate similarity between reference signal (noise signal) and original signal, and remove the component of high similarity. The optimal level of significance α is obtained using particle swarm optimization (PSO). To evaluate the performance of the ASTF, evaluation factor Ipq is also defined. In addition, a simulation experiment is designed to verify the effectiveness and robustness of ASTF. A sensitive evaluation method using principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to evaluate the sensitiveness of symptom parameters (SPs) for condition diagnosis. By this way, the good SPs that have high sensitiveness for condition diagnosis can be selected. A three-layer DBN is developed to identify condition of rotation machinery based on the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN) theory. Condition diagnosis experiment for rolling element bearings demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Use of the Leiter International Performance Scale and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised with Hearing-Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulissi, Stephen Mark; Gibbins, Spencer

    1984-01-01

    Educational records of 40 hearing-impaired children (3-15 years old) given both the Leiter International Performance Scale and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Performance Scale, were reviewed. The Leiter had a standard deviation significantly greater than that reported in the examiner's manual. Care is suggested when…

  19. Reasoning, Problem Solving, and Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    appears. And the test in which it appears is one of "intelligence": the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test ( Terman & Merrill, 1937). The same fluidity of...intelligence, 1938, individual form. London: Lewis , 1938. Raven, J. C. Guide to the standard progressive matrices. London: Lewis , 1960. Ray,. W. S. Complex...New York: Academic Press, 1978. Terman , L. M. Contribution to "Intelligence and its measurement: A symposium." Journal of Educational Psychology, 1921

  20. Performance test results of ETS-6 Ni-Cd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Y.; Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, Hiroaki

    1994-01-01

    The topics covered are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: development schedule; main specification; cell design; production flow; acceptance test (1); acceptance test (2); cell weight; 20 C performance; capacity; overcharge pressure; end of charge voltage; -5 C performance; ETS-VI simulation cycle test; and battery storage.

  1. An investigation of cognitive test performance across conditions of silence, background noise and music as a function of neuroticism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, James; McClelland, Alastair; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of trait neuroticism on cognitive performance under distraction. Seventy participants were given a personality test and then undertook a number of different cognitive tasks in silence, in the presence of popular music and in background noise. It was predicted that performance on a general intelligence test, a test of abstract reasoning, and a mental arithmetic task would be adversely affected by background sounds. It was predicted that neuroticism would be negatively correlated with performance on the mental arithmetic task but only when the individuals were working in the presence of background sound. Stable vs. unstable participant's performance on a mental arithmetic task during noise was significantly higher as predicted. The results provided partial support for the hypotheses and are discussed with respect to previous findings in the literature on personality (particularly introversion-extraversion) and distraction on cognitive task performance. Limitations are noted. PMID:24215564

  2. An investigation of cognitive test performance across conditions of silence, background noise and music as a function of neuroticism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, James; McClelland, Alastair; Furnham, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of trait neuroticism on cognitive performance under distraction. Seventy participants were given a personality test and then undertook a number of different cognitive tasks in silence, in the presence of popular music and in background noise. It was predicted that performance on a general intelligence test, a test of abstract reasoning, and a mental arithmetic task would be adversely affected by background sounds. It was predicted that neuroticism would be negatively correlated with performance on the mental arithmetic task but only when the individuals were working in the presence of background sound. Stable vs. unstable participant's performance on a mental arithmetic task during noise was significantly higher as predicted. The results provided partial support for the hypotheses and are discussed with respect to previous findings in the literature on personality (particularly introversion-extraversion) and distraction on cognitive task performance. Limitations are noted.

  3. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    D-Ai42 488 ARTIFICIAL INEELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS (U) MASSACHUSETTS i/1 INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB M BRADY FEB 84 AI-M-756...Subtile) S. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Artificial Intelligence and Robotics 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER...Identify by block niiniber) -. Since Robotics is the field concerned with the connection of perception to action, Artificial Intelligence must have a

  4. The Consequence of Consequence: Motivation, Anxiety, and Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Lisa F.; Smith, Jeffrey K.

    1995-01-01

    The relationships of test consequence, motivation, anxiety, and performance were studied with 158 undergraduates taking a child development course. Results indicated that test consequence (grade or no grade) had a strong influence on motivation and a modest influence on performance. Motivation and anxiety had opposite effects on performance. (SLD)

  5. The Measurement of Intelligence in the XXI Century using Video Games.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, M A; Román, F J; De La Fuente, J; Privado, J; Colom, R

    2016-12-05

    This paper reviews the use of video games for measuring intelligence differences and reports two studies analyzing the relationship between intelligence and performance on a leisure video game. In the first study, the main focus was to design an Intelligence Test using puzzles from the video game. Forty-seven young participants played "Professor Layton and the curious village"® for a maximum of 15 hours and completed a set of intelligence standardized tests. Results show that the time required for completing the game interacts with intelligence differences: the higher the intelligence, the lower the time (d = .91). Furthermore, a set of 41 puzzles showed excellent psychometric properties. The second study, done seven years later, confirmed the previous findings. We finally discuss the pros and cons of video games as tools for measuring cognitive abilities with commercial video games, underscoring that psychologists must develop their own intelligence video games and delineate their key features for the measurement devices of next generation.

  6. Diagnostic Performance Tests For Elementary Children (Grades 1-4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Donald H.; Garcia, Mary Jane

    1982-01-01

    The basic skills of running, jumping, throwing, and ball handling are of primary importance in physical education programs. A battery of four tests and a chart of average performances are presented for testing elementary students. (CJ)

  7. Performance Evaluation of an Intelligent Sensor Platform for Radiation Monitoring Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Dante; Herman, Cedric; Russ, Bill; Huckins, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Accurate, rugged, and reliable radiation detection systems are important for area and environmental monitoring applications. The desire for spectroscopic capability has increased in monitoring aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle to provide fast characterization of the radiation profile of a situation, such as the planned or unplanned release of material. The reduction or elimination of having to conduct sampling for laboratory analysis can result in significant cost savings for an industry, government agency, or regulatory body. A new system, comprised of a NaI:Tl scintillator and a G-M tube, has been designed and tested, taking into account the following end-user requirements: ease-of-use, capability to network and supervise multiple units, compact form factor, low power consumption, versatility, and stability. The detector sizes were selected to accommodate a dose rate up to 1 Sv/hr. Several algorithms and analysis routines have been developed to incorporate these key needs without sacrificing on accuracy, dynamic range, nuclide identification, and sensitivity. This presentation will introduce the major hardware and software components of the platform, as well as the user interface and data analysis workflow. Key features of the hardware include an environmentally robust housing, low power signal processing electronics, patented LED-based gain stabilization, and an embedded processor for unattended instrument management and data analysis. New and improved algorithms for determining scintillator gamma dose rates, total integrated dose, and nuclide identification will be introduced. The two detector elements were modeled with MCNP and validated experimentally. The results of the radiological testing shall be presented including energy resolution, throughput, dose response, and minimum detectable activities. The dose response has been evaluated in simulations and with measurements to ensure accurate response with respect to energy spectrum of the dose field and

  8. Qualification Plus: Performance and Durability Tests Beyond IEC 61215 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Jordan, J.; Kempe, M.; Miller, D.; Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Hacke, P.; Phillips, N.; Earnest, T.; Romero, R.

    2014-03-01

    Qualification Plus is an accelerated test protocol and quality management system that gives higher confidence in field performance of PV modules compared with conventional qualification testing. The test sequences are being developed as consensus standards, but the early publication of these tests enables the community to begin benefiting from them sooner.

  9. AiResearch QCGAT engine performance and emissions tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results of aerodynamic performance and emission tests, conducted on a specially designed QCGAT engine in the 17,793-N (4,000 lb) thrust class, are presented. Performance of the AiResearch QCGAT engine was excellent throughout all testing. No serious mechanical malfunctions were encountered, and no significant test time was lost due to engine-related problems. Emissions were drastically reduced over similar engines, and the engine exhibited good smoke performance.

  10. Motivational and Cognitive Test-Taking Strategies and Their Influence on Test Performance in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Yun; Hong, Eunsook; Mason, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    A structural equation model of relationships among testing-related motivation variables (test value, effort, self-efficacy, and test anxiety), test-taking strategies (test tactics and metacognitive strategies), gender, and math test performance were examined with a sample of 10th graders (N = 438; 182 males and 256 females). In general, motivation…

  11. An Adaptive Intelligent Integrated Lighting Control Approach for High-Performance Office Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karizi, Nasim

    An acute and crucial societal problem is the energy consumed in existing commercial buildings. There are 1.5 million commercial buildings in the U.S. with only about 3% being built each year. Hence, existing buildings need to be properly operated and maintained for several decades. Application of integrated centralized control systems in buildings could lead to more than 50% energy savings. This research work demonstrates an innovative adaptive integrated lighting control approach which could achieve significant energy savings and increase indoor comfort in high performance office buildings. In the first phase of the study, a predictive algorithm was developed and validated through experiments in an actual test room. The objective was to regulate daylight on a specified work plane by controlling the blind slat angles. Furthermore, a sensor-based integrated adaptive lighting controller was designed in Simulink which included an innovative sensor optimization approach based on genetic algorithm to minimize the number of sensors and efficiently place them in the office. The controller was designed based on simple integral controllers. The objective of developed control algorithm was to improve the illuminance situation in the office through controlling the daylight and electrical lighting. To evaluate the performance of the system, the controller was applied on experimental office model in Lee et al.'s research study in 1998. The result of the developed control approach indicate a significantly improvement in lighting situation and 1-23% and 50-78% monthly electrical energy savings in the office model, compared to two static strategies when the blinds were left open and closed during the whole year respectively.

  12. Association Between Dental Students' Emotional Intelligence and Academic Performance: A Study at Six Dental Colleges in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Puranik, Manjunath P; Sowmya, K R

    2016-05-01

    Since the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in achieving academic excellence requires further research, the aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess EI and its associated factors and to determine any association between EI and academic performance among final-year dental students in Bengaluru, India. In 2015, 208 dental students from six dental colleges in Bengaluru were invited to participate in the study. Their demographic and lifestyle data were collected, and EI was assessed with the 30-item Emotional Quotient Self-Assessment Checklist developed by Sterrett. Academic performance was assessed using grades obtained in the final-year undergraduate examination. The response rate was 96% (N=200). Overall, 54.5% of the participants had high EI scores (≥120), although only 51 (25.5%) had a high EI score in all the domains (≥20). EI was significantly greater in females than males. Gender, sleep, meeting friends, physical exercise, recreational activities, and academic performance were significantly associated with EI and accounted for 42% variance in hierarchical regression analysis. EI was also positively associated with academic performance. Gender and healthy lifestyle habits were positively associated with EI, which in turn influenced these students' academic performance. These findings suggest a possible need for attention to developing dental students' EI.

  13. Priming competence diminishes the link between cognitive test anxiety and test performance. Implications for the interpretation of test scores.

    PubMed

    Lang, Jonas W B; Lang, Jessica

    2010-06-01

    Researchers disagree whether the correlation between cognitive test anxiety and test performance is causal or explainable by skill deficits, which lead to both cognitive test anxiety and lower test performance. Most causal theories of test anxiety assume that individual differences in cognitive test anxiety originate from differences in self-perceived competence. Accordingly, in the present research, we sought to temporarily heighten perceptions of competence using a priming intervention. Two studies with secondary- and vocational-school students (Ns = 219 and 232, respectively) contrasted this intervention with a no-priming control condition. Priming competence diminished the association between cognitive test anxiety and test performance by heightening the performance of cognitively test-anxious students and by lowering the performance of students with low levels of cognitive test anxiety. The findings suggest that cognitively test-anxious persons have greater abilities than they commonly show. Competency priming may offer a way to improve the situation of people with cognitive test anxiety.

  14. Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Jim Benney

    2009-11-30

    The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be done to

  15. Flight Test Results from the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Project with Adaptation to a Simulated Stabilator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be more resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane and subjected to an inflight simulation of a failed (frozen) (unmovable) stabilator. Formation flight handling qualities evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to decouple the roll and pitch response and reestablish good onboard model tracking. Flight evaluation with the simulated stabilator failure and adaptation engaged showed that there was generally improvement in the pitch response; however, a tendency for roll pilot-induced oscillation was experienced. A detailed discussion of the cause of the mixed results is presented.

  16. Flight Test Results from the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Project with Adaptation to a Simulated Stabilator Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Williams-Hayes, Peggy S.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be more resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane and subjected to an inflight simulation of a failed (frozen) (unmovable) stabilator. Formation flight handling qualities evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to decouple the roll and pitch response and reestablish good onboard model tracking. Flight evaluation with the simulated stabilator failure and adaptation engaged showed that there was generally improvement in the pitch response; however, a tendency for roll pilot-induced oscillation was experienced. A detailed discussion of the cause of the mixed results is presented.

  17. Relationships of Cognitive Components of Test Anxiety to Test Performance: Implications for Assessment and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruch, Monroe A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the degree to which components of test-taking strategies, covert self-statements, and subjective anxiety during an exam provide increments in prediction of test performance of undergraduates (N=72). Results showed that only test-taking strategies provided a significant increment to multiple-choice and essay test performance but not math…

  18. Comparing the Effects of Test Anxiety on Independent and Integrated Speaking Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Heng-Tsung Danny; Hung, Shao-Ting Alan

    2013-01-01

    Integrated speaking test tasks (integrated tasks) offer textual and/or aural input for test takers on which to base their subsequent oral responses. This path-analytic study modeled the relationship between test anxiety and the performance of such tasks and explored whether test anxiety would differentially affect the performance of independent…

  19. Test Review: Wechsler, D. (2003). "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV)." San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Alan S.; Flanagan, Dawn P.; Alfonso, Vincent C.; Mascolo, Jennifer T.

    2006-01-01

    Within the field of psychological assessment, the Wechsler scales continue to be the most widely used intelligence batteries. The concepts, methods, and procedures inherent in the design of the Wechsler scales have been so influential that they have guided most of the test development and research in the field for more than a half century. This…

  20. Investigation of the Factor Structure of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2) Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the structure of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2) normative sample using exploratory factor analysis, multiple factor extraction criteria, and higher-order exploratory factor analytic techniques that were not reported in the in the CTONI-2 "Examiner's Manual". Results…

  1. Joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Third Edition, and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition, with a Preschool Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mei; Paulson, Sharon E.; Finch, W. Holmes; Mcintosh, David E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the underlying constructs measured by the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Third Edition (WJ-III COG) and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition (SB5), based on the Cattell-Horn-Carrol (CHC) theory of cognitive abilities. This study reports the results of the first joint confirmatory factor analysis…

  2. Hybrid Intelligent System to Perform Fault Detection on BIS Sensor During Surgeries.

    PubMed

    Casteleiro-Roca, José-Luis; Calvo-Rolle, José Luis; Méndez Pérez, Juan Albino; Roqueñí Gutiérrez, Nieves; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-18

    This paper presents a new fault detection system in hypnotic sensors used for general anesthesia during surgery. Drug infusion during surgery is based on information received from patient monitoring devices; accordingly, faults in sensor devices can put patient safety at risk. Our research offers a solution to cope with these undesirable scenarios. We focus on the anesthesia process using intravenous propofol as the hypnotic drug and employing a Bispectral Index (BIS(TM)) monitor to estimate the patient's unconsciousness level. The method developed identifies BIS episodes affected by disturbances during surgery with null clinical value. Thus, the clinician-or the automatic controller-will not take those measures into account to calculate the drug dose. Our method compares the measured BIS signal with expected behavior predicted by the propofol dose provider and the electromyogram (EMG) signal. For the prediction of the BIS signal, a model based on a hybrid intelligent system architecture has been created. The model uses clustering combined with regression techniques. To validate its accuracy, a dataset taken during surgeries with general anesthesia was used. The proposed fault detection method for BIS sensor measures has also been verified using data from real cases. The obtained results prove the method's effectiveness.

  3. Hybrid Intelligent System to Perform Fault Detection on BIS Sensor During Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Casteleiro-Roca, José-Luis; Calvo-Rolle, José Luis; Méndez Pérez, Juan Albino; Roqueñí Gutiérrez, Nieves; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new fault detection system in hypnotic sensors used for general anesthesia during surgery. Drug infusion during surgery is based on information received from patient monitoring devices; accordingly, faults in sensor devices can put patient safety at risk. Our research offers a solution to cope with these undesirable scenarios. We focus on the anesthesia process using intravenous propofol as the hypnotic drug and employing a Bispectral Index (BISTM) monitor to estimate the patient’s unconsciousness level. The method developed identifies BIS episodes affected by disturbances during surgery with null clinical value. Thus, the clinician—or the automatic controller—will not take those measures into account to calculate the drug dose. Our method compares the measured BIS signal with expected behavior predicted by the propofol dose provider and the electromyogram (EMG) signal. For the prediction of the BIS signal, a model based on a hybrid intelligent system architecture has been created. The model uses clustering combined with regression techniques. To validate its accuracy, a dataset taken during surgeries with general anesthesia was used. The proposed fault detection method for BIS sensor measures has also been verified using data from real cases. The obtained results prove the method’s effectiveness. PMID:28106793

  4. Development of a test protocol for evaluating EVA glove performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine M.

    1992-01-01

    Testing gloved hand performance involves work from several disciplines. Evaluations performed in the course of reenabling a disabled hand, designing a robotic end effector or master controller, or hard-suit design have all yielded relevant information, and, in most cases, produced performance test methods. Most times, these test methods have been primarily oriented toward their parent discipline. For space operations, a comparative test which would provide a way to quantify pressure glove and end effector performance would be useful in dividing tasks between humans and robots. Such a test would have to rely heavily on sensored measurement, as opposed to questionnaires, to produce relevant data. However, at some point human preference would have to be taken into account. This paper presents a methodology for evaluating gloved hand performance which attempts to respond to these issues. Glove testing of a prototype glove design using this method is described.

  5. Intelligent Design and Intelligent Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerman, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Good Evening, my name is Greg Jerman and for nearly a quarter century I have been performing failure analysis on NASA's aerospace hardware. During that time I had the distinct privilege of keeping the Space Shuttle flying for two thirds of its history. I have analyzed a wide variety of failed hardware from simple electrical cables to cryogenic fuel tanks to high temperature turbine blades. During this time I have found that for all the time we spend intelligently designing things, we need to be equally intelligent about understanding why things fail. The NASA Flight Director for Apollo 13, Gene Kranz, is best known for the expression "Failure is not an option." However, NASA history is filled with failures both large and small, so it might be more accurate to say failure is inevitable. It is how we react and learn from our failures that makes the difference.

  6. Intelligent Tutor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA also seeks to advance American education by employing the technology utilization process to develop a computerized, artificial intelligence-based Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) to help high school and college physics students. The tutoring system is designed for use with the lecture and laboratory portions of a typical physics instructional program. Its importance lies in its ability to observe continually as a student develops problem solutions and to intervene when appropriate with assistance specifically directed at the student's difficulty and tailored to his skill level and learning style. ITS originated as a project of the Johnson Space Center (JSC). It is being developed by JSC's Software Technology Branch in cooperation with Dr. R. Bowen Loftin at the University of Houston-Downtown. Program is jointly sponsored by NASA and ACOT (Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow). Other organizations providing support include Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the National Research Council, Pennzoil Products Company and the George R. Brown Foundation. The Physics I class of Clear Creek High School, League City, Texas are providing the classroom environment for test and evaluation of the system. The ITS is a spinoff product developed earlier to integrate artificial intelligence into training/tutoring systems for NASA astronauts flight controllers and engineers.

  7. Writing about testing worries boosts exam performance in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Gerardo; Beilock, Sian L

    2011-01-14

    Two laboratory and two randomized field experiments tested a psychological intervention designed to improve students' scores on high-stakes exams and to increase our understanding of why pressure-filled exam situations undermine some students' performance. We expected that sitting for an important exam leads to worries about the situation and its consequences that undermine test performance. We tested whether having students write down their thoughts about an upcoming test could improve test performance. The intervention, a brief expressive writing assignment that occurred immediately before taking an important test, significantly improved students' exam scores, especially for students habitually anxious about test taking. Simply writing about one's worries before a high-stakes exam can boost test scores.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TRUNK ENDURANCE PLANK TESTS AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE TESTS IN ADOLESCENT SOCCER PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Kaneoka, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background Although it is believed that trunk function is important for athletic performance, few researchers have demonstrated a significant relationship between the trunk function and athletic performance. Recently, the prone plank and side plank tests have been used to assess trunk function. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between trunk endurance plank tests and athletic performance tests, including whether there is a relationship between long distance running and trunk endurance plank tests in adolescent male soccer players. Study design Cross sectional study design. Methods Fifty-five adolescent male soccer players performed prone and side plank tests and seven performance tests: the Cooper test, the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, the step 50 agility test, a 30-m sprint test, a vertical countermovement jump, a standing five-step jump, and a rebound jump. The relationships between each individual plank test, the combined score of both plank tests, and performance tests were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The combined score of plank tests was highly correlated with the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test (r = 0.710, p < 0.001), and was moderately correlated with the Cooper test (r = 0.567, p < 0.001). Poor correlation was observed between the prone plank test and step 50 agility test (r = -0.436, p = 0.001) and no significant correlations were observed between plank tests and jump performance tests. Conclusions The results suggest that trunk endurance plank tests are positively correlated with the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, the Cooper test, and the step 50 agility test. Level of Evidence Level 2 PMID:27757284

  9. The effect of intranasal oxytocin on perceiving and understanding emotion on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Christopher; Ellenbogen, Mark A; Linnen, Anne-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Evidence suggests that intranasal oxytocin enhances the perception of emotion in facial expressions during standard emotion identification tasks. However, it is not clear whether this effect is desirable in people who do not show deficits in emotion perception. That is, a heightened perception of emotion in faces could lead to "oversensitivity" to the emotions of others in nonclinical participants. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of intranasal oxytocin on emotion perception using ecologically valid social and nonsocial visual tasks. Eighty-two participants (42 women) self-administered a 24 IU dose of intranasal oxytocin or a placebo in a double-blind, randomized experiment and then completed the perceiving and understanding emotion components of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. In this test, emotion identification accuracy is based on agreement with a normative sample. As expected, participants administered intranasal oxytocin rated emotion in facial stimuli as expressing greater emotional intensity than those given a placebo. Consequently, accurate identification of emotion in faces, based on agreement with a normative sample, was impaired in the oxytocin group relative to placebo. No such effect was observed for tests using nonsocial stimuli. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that intranasal oxytocin enhances the salience of social stimuli in the environment, but not nonsocial stimuli. The present findings support a growing literature showing that the effects of intranasal oxytocin on social cognition can be negative under certain circumstances, in this case promoting "oversensitivity" to emotion in faces in healthy people.

  10. Topological Entropy Measure of Artificial Grammar Complexity for Use in Designing Experiments on Human Performance in Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2015-0037 TOPOLOGICAL ENTROPY MEASURE OF ARTIFICIAL GRAMMAR COMPLEXITY FOR USE IN DESIGNING EXPERIMENTS ON HUMAN PERFORMANCE IN...INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) TASKS Richard Warren, Ph.D. Human Analyst Augmentation Branch 711 Human Performance Wing...AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY 711TH HUMAN PERFORMANCE WING HUMAN EFFECTIVENESS DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433 AIR FORCE

  11. Understanding the Relationship between School-Based Management, Emotional Intelligence and Performance of Religious Upper Secondary School Principals in Banten Province

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muslihah, Oleh Eneng

    2015-01-01

    The research examines the correlation between the understanding of school-based management, emotional intelligences and headmaster performance. Data was collected, using quantitative methods. The statistical analysis used was the Pearson Correlation, and multivariate regression analysis. The results of this research suggest firstly that there is…

  12. Comparison of the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grondhuis, Sabrina Nicole; Mulick, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A review of hospital records was conducted for children evaluated for autism spectrum disorders who completed both the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R) and Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition (SB5). Participants were between 3 and 12 years of age. Diagnoses were autistic disorder (n = 26, 55%) and pervasive…

  13. New approaches to performance testing of improved cookstoves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael; Edwards, Rufus; Berrueta, Victor; Masera, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of improved cookstove performance is a critical factor in program success; however, consistent evidence indicates water boiling tests and controlled cooking tests are not representative of stove performance during daily cooking activities, and there is no ability to link these tests to kitchen performance tests during normal daily cooking activities. Since emissions from cookstoves contribute heavily to regional estimates of carbonaceous aerosols and other short-lived greenhouse species and given the current importance of stove performance tests as a basis for global climate prediction models and IPCC inventories, improvements in performance testing are critical to derive more representative estimates. Here real-time combustion efficiencies and emissions rates from daily burn cycles of open fires and improved stoves in Mexico are used to propose a new approach to stove performance testing, using simple and economical measurement methods, based on replication of the distribution of emission rates and combustion efficiencies seen during daily cooking activities in homes. This approach provides more relevant information for global climate models and inventories, while also providing a means to recreate representative emissions profiles in a laboratory setting for technical analyses. On the basis of emission rates and combustion efficiencies during normal daily cooking, we suggest performance criteria that can be used as benchmarks for laboratory testing of improved stoves in the absence of site-specific information, although requiring confirmation by field testing during daily cooking activities.

  14. 40 CFR 63.563 - Compliance and performance testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (4), or (d)(2). (3) Operation and maintenance inspections. If the 3-hour or 3-cycle block average... flare, as determined in § 63.564(f). (6) Carbon adsorber. During the initial performance test required... section shall conduct a performance test once each year. (i) Compliance determination for carbon...

  15. 10 CFR 26.168 - Blind performance testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Laboratories Certified by the Department of Health... blind performance test samples to the HHS-certified laboratory. (1) During the initial 90-day period of... licensee or other entity shall submit blind performance test samples to each HHS-certified laboratory...

  16. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Cristina F. B.; Rabelo, Camila M.; Silagi, Marcela L.; Mansur, Letícia L.; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor “years of schooling” was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills. PMID:27013958

  17. 40 CFR 63.805 - Performance test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Performance test methods. 63.805 Section 63.805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.805 Performance test...

  18. 40 CFR 63.805 - Performance test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Performance test methods. 63.805 Section 63.805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.805 Performance test...

  19. 40 CFR 63.805 - Performance test methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance test methods. 63.805 Section 63.805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations § 63.805 Performance test...

  20. 40 CFR 63.606 - Performance tests and compliance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., phosphate rock dryer, and phosphate rock calciner. The owner or operator shall conduct the performance test... phosphate rock calciner. The owner or operator shall conduct the performance test according to the... or operator of a new or existing phosphate rock calciner shall demonstrate compliance with...