Science.gov

Sample records for intense field exposure

  1. [Exposure of nursing personnel to electromagnetic fields in neonatal intensive care].

    PubMed

    Valerio, Bellieni C; Nadia, Franci; Manola, Giunti; Barbara, Tecce; Beatrice, Ricci; Sandra, Gagliardini; Marco, Fortunato; Franco, Bagnoli

    2002-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) are recognised as a source of environmental pollution for workers and people resident in exposed areas. The level of exposure to EMFs of the nurses working in the Siena Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, during two workdays was recorded and peak levels > 10 mG (1 microT) were registered well above an almost permanence exposure at > 2 mg G. The application of existing standard, cautionary criteria and rules would suggest protective or restrictive measures against EMF exposure for these workers.

  2. Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

  3. High-intensity static magnetic field exposure devices for in vitro experiments on biopharmaceutical plant factories in aerospace environments.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    Three high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) exposure devices have been designed and realized for application to in vitro experimental research on hairy root cultures, supposed to grow in extreme environments- as those of space aircrafts- for producing biopharmaceutical molecules. The devices allow the exposure at two different levels of induction magnetic (B) field (250 mT and 500 mT) plus sham for blind exposure. The exposure levels can be considered representative of possible B-fields experienced within the habitat of a spacecraft in presence of active magnetic shielding systems. Each device can house a single 85-mm diameter Petri dish. Numerical simulations have been performed to accurately evaluate the B-field distribution in the biological target. Numerical results have been confirmed by measured data, proving that designed setups allows exposure to SMFs with a homogeneity better than 90%. The exposure devices will be employed for experiments scheduled within BIOxTREME research project, funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  4. Impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses following exposure to intensity modulated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Coffey, Caroline B.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    To limit toxicity to normal tissues adjacent to the target tumour volume, radiotherapy is delivered using fractionated regimes whereby the total prescribed dose is given as a series of sequential smaller doses separated by specific time intervals. The impact of fractionation on out-of-field survival and DNA damage responses was determined in AGO-1522 primary human fibroblasts and MCF-7 breast tumour cells using uniform and modulated exposures delivered using a 225 kVp x-ray source. Responses to fractionated schedules (two equal fractions delivered with time intervals from 4 h to 48 h) were compared to those following acute exposures. Cell survival and DNA damage repair measurements indicate that cellular responses to fractionated non-uniform exposures differ from those seen in uniform exposures for the investigated cell lines. Specifically, there is a consistent lack of repair observed in the out-of-field populations during intervals between fractions, confirming the importance of cell signalling to out-of-field responses in a fractionated radiation schedule, and this needs to be confirmed for a wider range of cell lines and conditions.

  5. [The problem of participation of different brain regions in the reactions to the low-intensity magnetic and electromagnetic field exposure].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianova, S N; Merkulov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Experimental analysis of the integral and pulsed bioelectric activity of the rabbit's various brain regions shows an ambiguous extent of their participation in the central nervous system reactions to low-intensity magnetic and electromagnetic fields with different parameters and conditions of exposure. This difference is determined not only by the location of brain structures in the head or by the field intensity, but, above all, by its functional state, which is reflected in the background. Artificial changes in the functioning of the original structures (administration of caffeine or adrenaline) altered the extent of their participation in the brain reaction, according to the drug action mechanism. The presence and severity of response depended on the structure and the biological significance of the impact, which is largely determined by the mode and conditions of exposure. Changing these parameters influenced the participation of the brain in its reaction in accordance with the adaptive response of the organism.

  6. Multipole expansions and intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1984-02-01

    In the context of two-body bound-state systems subjected to a plane-wave electromagnetic field, it is shown that high field intensity introduces a distinction between long-wavelength approximation and electric dipole approximation. This distinction is gauge dependent, since it is absent in Coulomb gauge, whereas in "completed" gauges of Göppert-Mayer type the presence of high field intensity makes electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole terms of importance equal to electric dipole at long wavelengths. Another consequence of high field intensity is that multipole expansions lose their utility in view of the equivalent importance of a number of low-order multipole terms and the appearance of large-magnitude terms which defy multipole categorization. This loss of the multipole expansion is gauge independent. Also gauge independent is another related consequence of high field intensity, which is the intimate coupling of center-of-mass and relative coordinate motions in a two-body system.

  7. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  8. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  9. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  10. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  11. Thermoregulation in intense microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelson, S.M.

    1981-10-01

    These studies clearly indicate the thermoregulatory capacity of the dog to withstand exposure to high microwave fields at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 3.7 and 6.1 W/kg. It appears that adequate thermoregulation takes place at an SAR of 3.7 W/kg but only transiently at 6.1 W/kg. These values, compared with the standardized resting metabolic rate of 3.29 W/kg (0.75), provide a basis for assessing the relationship of the thermal burden and thermo-regulatory disruption by microwaves in the dog. To elucidate the thermal potential of microwave exposure, it was helpful to conduct these exposures at various ambient temperatures in which the normal body temperature remained stable, thus permitting comparison of heat production and dissipation with our without microwaves. The zone of the thermal neutrality or thermoneutral zone of vasomotor activity, 22-26.5 deg C, where body temperature is regulated by changes in vasomotor tonus, fulfilled this requirement.

  12. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  13. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2001-06-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  14. Molecules and Clusters in Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posthumus, Jan

    2009-09-01

    Preface; 1. Ultra-high intensity based on Ti:Sapphire Philip F. Taday and Andrew J. Langley; 2. Diatomic molecules in intense laser fields Jan H. Posthumus and James F. McCann; 3. Small polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields C. Cornaggia; 4. Coherent control in intense laser fields Eric Charron and Brian Sheehy; 5. Experimental studies of laser-heated rare gas clusters M. Lezius and M. Schmidt; 6. Single cluster explosions and high harmonic generation John W. G. Tisch and Emma Springate; 7. Intense laser interaction with extended cluster media Roland A. Smith and Todd Ditmire.

  15. Mechanism of biological effects observed in honey bees (Apis mellifera, L. ) hived under extra-high-voltage transmission lines: implications derived from bee exposure to simulated intense electric fields and shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    This work explores mechanisms for disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765 kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) observed in previous studies. Proposed mechanisms fell into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields and perception of shock from induced currents. The adverse biological effects could be reproduced in simulations where only the worker bees were exposed to shock or to E field in elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). We now report the results of full-scale experiments using the tunnel exposure scheme, which assesses the contribution of shock and intense E field to colony disturbance. Exposure of worker bees (1400 h) to 60-Hz E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a nonconductive tunnel causes no deleterious affect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees in conductive (e.g., wet) tunnels produces bee disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. We propose that this substrate dependence of bee disturbance is the result of perception of shock from coupled body currents and enhanced current densities postulated to exist in the legs and thorax of bees on conductors. Similarly, disturbance occurs when bees are exposed to step-potential-induced currents. At 275-350 nA single bees are disturbed; at 600 nA bees begin abnormal propolization behavior; and stinging occurs at 900 nA. We conclude that biological effects seen in bee colonies under a transmission line are primarily the result of electric shock from induced hive currents. This evaluation is based on the limited effects of E-field exposure in tunnels, the observed disturbance thresholds caused by shocks in tunnels, and the ability of hives exposed under a transmission line to source currents 100-1,000 times the shock thresholds.

  16. Gauges for intense-field electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1980-08-01

    For all gauges of the Göppert-Mayer type, the two-body Schrödinger equation for charged particles in a plane-wave electromagnetic field fails to separate into center-of-mass and relative-coordinate equations when the field is sufficiently intense.

  17. Field and intensity correlation in random media

    PubMed

    Sebbah; Pnini; Genack

    2000-11-01

    We have obtained the spectral and spatial field correlation functions, C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax), respectively, from measurement of the microwave field spectrum at a series of points along a line on the output of a random dielectric medium. C(E)(Deltaomega) and C(E)(Deltax) are shown to be the Fourier transforms, respectively, of the time of flight distribution, obtained from pulsed measurements, and of the specific intensity. Unlike C(E)(Deltaomega), the imaginary part of C(E)(Deltax) is shown to vanish as a result of the isotropy of the correlation function in the output plane. The complex square of the field correlation function gives the short-range or C1 contribution to the intensity correlation function C. Longer-range contributions to the intensity correlation function are obtained directly by subtracting C1 from C and are in good agreement with theory.

  18. Characterizing the intensity of changes made to reduce mechanical exposure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Richard; Laing, Andrew; Cole, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Interventions to prevent musculoskeletal disorders by reducing mechanical exposures may range from equipment adjustments, through changing workstations and equipment or implementing administrative controls, to the design and redesign of work processes. Although generally positive, the literature reports mixed results for the effects of such workplace interventions on musculoskeletal disorders. We propose that an important factor which influences these results is the change intensity. This construct includes: the body part(s) affected, the size of exposure magnitude reduction in the particular task or tasks involved in the change, the time fraction of the job to which the change applies, the coverage of the change (proportion of the workforce affected), and the adherence (if applicable) by the workforce to the change. The intensities of changes recently completed as part of a participatory ergonomics research program were characterized using this approach. Intensity scores were estimated based upon these parameters for peak and cumulative mechanical exposures. Changes affecting a production system re-design and re-configuration were judged to have medium to high intensity, while most other changes were judged to be of small intensity. Comparisons are made to the intensity of changes determined from reports in the published literature. Factors which maximize intensity as well as potential barriers to achieving higher intensities are described. PMID:20037230

  19. Intensity of exposure and incidence of melioidosis in Thai children.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Peacock, Sharon J

    2008-12-01

    There is a high background seroprevalence of antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei in Thailand that limits its use as a diagnostic tool. It is believed that this results from childhood exposure to the bacterium in mud and surface water. The increasing prevalence of antibodies with age is a marker of the intensity of exposure. A susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model was calibrated with data on seroprevalence in children (<15 years) in Udon Thani and Ubon Ratchathani (n=2214). In this mathematical model, children were assumed to gain antibodies at a constant rate related to exposure events, and waning antibody response occurred at a constant rate. The intensity of exposure appeared to be higher in Udon Thani than in Ubon Ratchathani, with 24% vs. 11% of patients becoming seropositive each year. In Udon Thani children, antibodies appeared to be long-lasting, compared with those in Ubon Ratchathani, where the mean duration was 5.2 years. Based on an estimated paediatric disease incidence in Ubon Ratchathani of 4.15 per 100,000 population, it is estimated that approximately 1 in 4600 antibody-producing exposures results in clinical infection. Childhood seroprevalence can be used as a marker of intensity of exposure. Further work to separate the effect of exposure to B. thailandensis and cross-reactivity to B. pseudomallei is proposed.

  20. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T < B < 8 T were applied to immobilized (non-swimming) Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  1. Electromagnetic-field exposure and cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, H D; Chattopadhyay, S K

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic fields are a ubiquitous part of man's environment. Natural sources of energy have been present, and possibly have contributed to the processes of the evolution of living forms. In very recent time, however, exploitation of the properties of the electromagnetic spectrum, has added variables in intensity, frequency, modulation frequency, and alterations in contributions of electrical and magnetic components. Biological impact has been little studied and poorly defined. Animal carcinogenesis studies and human epidemiological data indicate that exposure to nonionizing radiation can play a role in cancer causation. Numerous effects at the physiological and biochemical level have been reported; many are of such a nature that a relationship to the causation of neoplastic transformation can rationally be hypothesized. Many bioeffects of electromagnetic fields can be adequately and economically explained in terms of heat effects alone. However, observations of frequency-, pulse form or modulation-, and intensity-specificity as well as effects opposite to that known for temperature-rise, imply direct interaction of radiant energy with biomolecules. The possibility of such direct interaction has been shown in quantum mechanical models.

  2. Sex Differences in Math-Intensive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Stephen J.; Williams, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite impressive employment gains in many fields of science, women remain underrepresented in fields requiring intensive use of mathematics. Here we discuss three potential explanations for women's underrepresentation: (a) male–female mathematical and spatial ability gaps, (b) sex discrimination, and (c) sex differences in career preferences and lifestyle choices. Synthesizing findings from psychology, endocrinology, sociology, economics, and education leads to the conclusion that, among a combination of interrelated factors, preferences and choices—both freely made and constrained—are the most significant cause of women's underrepresentation. PMID:21152367

  3. A magnetic field exposure facility for evaluation of animal carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, P S; Harvey, S M; Jutras, P; Goulet, D; Mandeville, R

    2000-09-01

    Several animal studies have been carried out at the Institut Armand Frappier (IAF) to determine whether chronic exposure to 60 Hz linearly polarized sinusoidal magnetic fields might increase the risk of cancer development of female Fisher rats. The magnetic field exposure facility was developed to meet the requirements of the study protocol for chronic exposure of large number of animals to field intensities of sham < 0.2 microT, 2 microT, 20 microT, 200 microT, and 2000 microT. At each exposure level, including sham, the animals are distributed in a group of four exposure units. Each exposure unit contains two exposure volumes having uniform distribution of magnetic fields for the animals, while the magnetic field external to the unit falls off rapidly due to the "figure-eight" coil topography used. A program of "shake down" tests, followed by verification and calibration of the exposure facility, was carried out prior to starting the animal experiments. Continuous monitoring of the magnetic field and other environmental parameters was an important part in the overall quality assurance program adopted.

  4. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  5. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  6. A Template for an Intensive Ecohydrology Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, R. E.; McGlynn, B. L.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the greatest challenges in the earth and environmental sciences are complex and interdisciplinary in nature. Ecohydrology exemplifies the type of holistic inquiry needed to address these challenges because it spans and integrates earth science, biological science and, often, social science. Ecohydrology courses can prepare the next generation of scientists, decision-makers and informed citizens to understand and address these challenges, and field courses in particular can play an important role in this preparation. Ecohydrology field course instructors have unique opportunities to convey interwoven theoretical and applied principles through a variety of modes that include lecture, discussion, immersion, and hands-on activity. In this presentation, we report on our experience co-teaching the Mountain Ecohydrology Field Course, a full-credit course taught 3 times in the past 5 years to more than 30 students representing 6 universities. The course, which has ranged from 1-2 weeks in length, has given students in-depth exposure to intensively instrumented ecohydrological field sites in the southern Appalachian and northern Rocky Mountains. Students learn fundamental principles in ecohydrology and related fields of watershed hydrology, soil biogeochemistry, micrometeorology and plant ecophysiology. They gain hands-on experience in a variety of cutting edge field techniques, tools and analyses while practicing presentation and communication of science. Students and instructors deal with real-world challenges of conducting fieldwork in remote settings. We offer our experience as one potential template for others interested in developing or refining ecohydrology field courses elsewhere.

  7. Real exposure: field measurement of chemical plumes in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David D; Moore, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    In fluvial systems, organismic exposure to nonpoint source pollutants will fluctuate in frequency (exposure events), intensity (concentration), and duration. The reliance on lethal concentrations and static exposure in many laboratory studies does not adequately represent nor address exposure to in situ chemical plumes of fluvial habitats. To adequately address field exposure in a laboratory setting, one needs an understanding of the physics of chemical transmission within moving fluids. Because of the chaotic nature of turbulence, chemical plumes introduced to fluvial systems have a spatial and temporal microstructure with fluxes in chemical concentration. Consequently, time-averaged static exposure models are not ecologically relevant for the major reason of in situ distribution. The purpose of this study was to quantify in situ chemical distribution and dispersion within two physically different streams. Dopamine was introduced as a chemical tracer mimicking groundwater runoff. Chemical fluxes and stream hydrodynamics were simultaneously measured using a microelectrode and an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, respectively, at three heights of three downstream locations at each research site. Fine-scale measurements of the dopamine plume microstructure showed that organisms could be exposed to chemical fluctuations where concentrations are significantly greater than the overall time-averaged concentration. These measurements demonstrate that rather than relying on static exposure, standards for pollution must consider the concept of exposure being interdependently linked to flow of the fluid medium. The relationship between fluid dynamics, pollution exposure, and organism physiology are complex and must be evaluated in ways to mimic natural systems.

  8. Human melatonin during continuous magnetic field exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Riffle, D.W.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the third in a series of double-blind, laboratory-based studies that were aimed at determining the effects of nocturnal exposure to power frequency magnetic fields on blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers. The two earlier studies evaluated effects on melatonin of intermittent exposure to 60 Hz circularly polarized magnetic fields at 10 and 200 mG. No overall effects on melatonin levels were found. In the present study, men were exposed continuously rather than intermittently through the night to the same 200 mG magnetic field condition that was used previously; again, no overall effects on melatonin levels were found. The authors conclude that the intermittent and continuous exposure conditions used in the laboratory to date are not effective in altering nocturnal blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers.

  9. The question of health effects from exposure to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, W.R.; Boteler, J.C.

    1994-02-01

    Possible health effects of exposure to low-intensity electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) are receiving increased attention in the scientific literature and, especially, in the public media. Laboratory research at the cellular and whole animal level has demonstrated various biological effects that may be related in some manner to the effects of EMF exposure on people. However, the exact mechanisms of this relationship are far from clear. The studies suggest that EMFs might be cancer promoters but are unlikely to be cancer initiators. At the level of human epidemiology, approximately 50 studies have examined the possible correlation of EMF exposures with adult and childhood cancers. Although the possibility of a correlation is weak, it cannot be discounted, and further research is needed. In the meantime, a practice of {open_quotes}prudent avoidance{close_quotes} of prolonged exposure to EMFs is warranted. 89 refs.

  10. Effects of low intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on electrical activity in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, J E; Scott, I R; Wood, S J; Nettell, J J; Bevir, M K; Wang, Z; Somasiri, N P; Chen, X

    2001-06-15

    Slices of rat hippocampus were exposed to 700 MHz continuous wave radiofrequency (RF) fields (25.2-71.0 V m(-1), 5-15 min exposure) in a stripline waveguide. At low field intensities, the predominant effect on the electrically evoked field potential in CA1 was a potentiation of the amplitude of the population spike by up to 20%, but higher intensity fields could produce either increases or decreases of up to 120 and 80%, respectively, in the amplitude of the population spike. To eliminate the possibility of RF-induced artefacts due to the metal stimulating electrode, the effect of RF exposure on spontaneous epileptiform activity induced in CA3 by 4-aminopyridine (50-100 microM) was investigated. Exposure to RF fields (50.0 V m(-1)) reduced or abolished epileptiform bursting in 36% of slices tested. The maximum field intensity used in these experiments, 71.0 V m(-1), was calculated to produce a specific absorption rate (SAR) of between 0.0016 and 0.0044 W kg(-1) in the slices. Measurements with a Luxtron fibreoptic probe confirmed that there was no detectable temperature change (+/- 0.1 degrees C) during a 15 min exposure to this field intensity. Furthermore, imposed temperature changes of up to 1 degrees C failed to mimic the effects of RF exposure. These results suggest that low-intensity RF fields can modulate the excitability of hippocampal tissue in vitro in the absence of gross thermal effects. The changes in excitability may be consistent with reported behavioural effects of RF fields.

  11. An Updated Algorithm for Estimation of Pesticide Exposure Intensity in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    An algorithm developed to estimate pesticide exposure intensity for use in epidemiologic analyses was revised based on data from two exposure monitoring studies. In the first study, we estimated relative exposure intensity based on the results of measurements taken during the app...

  12. Enhancement of invertase production by Aspergillus niger OZ-3 using low-intensity static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Mesut; Esim, Nevzat; Genisel, Mucip; Ortucu, Serkan; Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Canli, Ozden; Erdal, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activity and growth on different newly identified molds. The most positive effect of SMFs on invertase activity and growth was observed for Aspergillus niger OZ-3. The submerged production of invertase was performed with the spores obtained at the different exposure times (120, 144, 168, and 196 hr) and magnetic field intensities (0.45, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mT). The normal magnetic field of the laboratory was assayed as 0.45 mT (control). Optimization of magnetic field intensity and exposure time significantly increased biomass production and invertase activity compared to 0.45 mT. The maximum invertase activity (51.14 U/mL) and biomass concentration (4.36 g/L) were achieved with the spores obtained at the 144 hr exposure time and 5 mT magnetic field intensity. The effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activities of molds was investigated for the first time in the present study. As an additional contribution, a new hyper-invertase-producing mold strain was isolated.

  13. Intense field electron excitation in transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modoran, Georgia C.

    The propagation of an intense laser through transparent materials can only be understood by considering a wide range of nonlinear effects and their simultaneous interaction. Electron plasma formation plays a crucial role and is the focus of this work. The mechanisms of the nonlinear ionization are not well understood. There are two proposed interactions that contribute to electron plasma formation: photoionization and avalanche ionization, but the individual contribution of each of these ionization processes is controversial. Keldysh theory has been proposed as a description of photoionization. Two models for avalanche ionization are used in the literature, but with different intensity dependence. We address and resolve these issues. In this thesis we present a spectrally resolved pump-probe experiment that directly measures the nonlinear ionization rates and plasma evolution in solid state media. Both pump and probe are derived from an 800 nm, 120 fs laser. The maximum ionization rates were obtained in sapphire (˜1.9x10 18 fs-1 ·cm-3), while in water (˜7.2x1017 fs-1 ·cm -3), fused silica (˜8.6x1017 fs -1 ·cm-3) and methanol (˜6.6x10 17 fs-1 ·cm-3) the ionization rates were slightly different. Our measured ionization rates are consistently larger that the theoretical rate given by Keldysh theory, suggesting that this theory does not correctly describe the photoionization process. We also present measurements that separate the two excitation processes and identify the role played by each in the ionization of media. The idea underneath these experiments is a very simple one: since the two ionization processes have different intensity dependence, the absorption of light in the medium should differ similarly. Therefore it should be possible to distinguish the two mechanisms by looking at the energy dependence of the absorption. From our result we find that avalanche and multiphoton ionization have varying relative contributions, depending on the band gap. For

  14. Magnetic field exposure and behavioral monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A W; Drost, D J; Prato, F S

    2001-09-01

    To maximize the availability and usefulness of a small magnetic field exposure laboratory, we designed a magnetic field exposure system that has been used to test human subjects, caged or confined animals, and cell cultures. The magnetic field exposure system consists of three orthogonal pairs of coils 2 m square x 1 m separation, 1.751 m x 0.875 m separation, and 1.5 m x 0.75 m separation. Each coil consisted of ten turns of insulated 8 gauge stranded copper conductor. Each of the pairs were driven by a constant-current amplifier via digital to analog (D/A) converter. A 9 pole zero-gain active Bessel low-pass filter (1 kHz corner frequency) before the amplifier input attenuated the expected high frequencies generated by the D/A conversion. The magnetic field was monitored with a 3D fluxgate magnetometer (0-3 kHz, +/- 1 mT) through an analog to digital converter. Behavioral monitoring utilized two monochrome video cameras (viewing the coil center vertically and horizontally), both of which could be video recorded and real-time digitally Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) encoded to CD-ROM. Human postural sway (standing balance) was monitored with a 3D forceplate mounted on the floor, connected to an analog to digital converter. Lighting was provided by 12 offset overhead dimmable fluorescent track lights and monitored using a digitally connected spectroradiometer. The dc resistance, inductance of each coil pair connected in series were 1.5 m coil (0.27 Omega, 1.2 mH), 1.75 m coil (0.32 Omega, 1.4 mH), and 2 m coil (0.38 Omega, 1.6 mH). The frequency response of the 1.5 m coil set was 500 Hz at +/- 463 microT, 1 kHz at +/- 232 microT, 150 micros rise time from -200 microT(pk) to + 200 microT(pk) (square wave) and is limited by the maximum voltage ( +/- 146 V) of the amplifier (Bessel filter bypassed). PMID:11536281

  15. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  16. Globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hoabin; Yu, Yongjae; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Ran Hee; Park, Jingyu; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Sung, Hyongmi

    2013-12-01

    High-fidelity geomagnetic field intensity determination was carried out using 191 baked fragments collected from 20 kilns or hearths with ages ranging between ∼1200 BC and ∼AD 1725 in South Korea. Geomagnetic field intensity variation displayed three narrow minima at ∼800-700 BC, ∼AD 700, and ∼AD 1600 and two maxima at ∼1200-1100 BC and ∼AD 1000-1100. In most time intervals, virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) variation is confined within 20% of the present VADM. However, geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is nearly 40% larger than the present value. Such high VADMs circa 3000 yr ago are in phase with those in other longitudinal bands in northern hemisphere centered at 5E (France), 30E (the Middle East) and 200E (Hawaii). Although strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago is globally synchronous, the highest VADM occurs at slightly different time intervals in different locations. Hence it is possible that the globally strong geomagnetic field intensity circa 3000 yr ago reflects the migration of persistent hemispheric flux in northern hemisphere or an episode of geomagnetic field hemispheric asymmetry.

  17. Control of a resonant tunneling structure by intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, S.; Kes, H.; Boz, F. K.; Okan, S. E.

    2016-10-01

    The intense laser field effects on a resonant tunneling structure were studied using computational methods. The considered structure was a GaAs/InxGa1-xAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As/InyGa1-yAs/AlAs/GaAs well-barrier system. In the presence of intense laser fields, the transmission coefficient and the dwell time of the structure were calculated depending on the depth and the width of InGaAs wells. It was shown that an intense laser field provides full control on the performance of the device as the geometrical restrictions on the resonant tunneling conditions overcome. Also, the choice of the resonant energy value becomes possible depending on the field strength.

  18. Intense electron beam propagation across a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Striffler, C.D.; Yao, R.L.; Destler, W.W.; Reiser, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we consider the propagation of an intense electron-ion beam across an applied magnetic field. In the absence of the applied field, the beam system is in a Bennett equilibrium state that involves electrons with both large axial and thermal velocities and a cold stationary space-charge neutralizing ion species. Typical parameters under consideration are V{sub o} {approximately} 1 MV, I {approximately} 5 kA, T{sub e} {approximately} 100 keV, and beam radii {approximately} 1 cm. We find that in the intense beam regime, the propagation is limited due to space-charge depression caused by the deflection of the electron beam by the transverse field. This critical field is of the order of the peak self-magnetic field of the electron beam which is substantially higher than the single particle cut-off field. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Introduction to Atomic Dynamics in Intense Light Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, Farhad H. M.

    A brief description is given of the early developments leading to the discovery of some of the basic phenomena that occur during the interaction of intense light fields with atomic systems - such as multiphoton ionization (MPI), above-threshold ionization (ATI), and high harmonic generation (HHG). Also outlined are the related theoretical concepts and the nonperturbative "KFR model" for interpreting the phenomena. Recent observation of the breakdown of a popular "tunneling model" (Keldysh γ < 1) is noted and the role of discrete photon effects that can account for the observed parallel momentum distribution is given. Next, the role of e-e correlation in intense-field processes in many-electron atomic systems is discussed. A systematic analysis of intense-field problems using the "intense-field many-body S-matrix theory" (IMST) is outlined. To this end, the basic motivation behind and the derivation of IMST is discussed, and its use is illustrated by application to the problem of nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) that provided a fully quantum analysis of the mechanism behind the NSDI process. Also discussed is how NSDI and its opposite, sequential double ionization (SDI), can both occur in intense fields depending, respectively, on near-infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths of the light field used. A mechanism for multiple ionization is suggested by the IMST diagrams, which can provide a good estimate of the known experimental observations of the ion states vs. intensity in noble gases. Finally, an example is given of the spatial distributions of the charge states that can be produced in the focal region (a "flying reaction vessel"!) of an intense Ti:sapphire laser.

  20. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  1. Near-field dust exposure from cotton field tilling and harvesting.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, April L; Miller, David R; Holmén, Britt A; Yang, Wenli; Wang, Junming

    2008-01-01

    The frequency and intensities of dust exposures in and near farm fields, which potentially contribute to high intensity human exposure events, are undocumented due to the transient nature of local dust plumes and the difficulties of making accurate concentration measurements. The objective of this study is to measure near-field spatial concentrations of the dust plumes emitted during tilling and harvesting of an irrigated cotton field outside of Las Cruces, NM (soil class: fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, thermic Typic Calciargid). A comparison of remote lidar measurements of plumes emitted from cotton field operations with in situ samplers shows a strong agreement between the two techniques: r2 = 0.79 for total suspended particulates (TSP) and r2 = 0.61 for particulate matter with diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10). Plume movement was dependent on the short-term wind field and atmospheric stability. Horizontal spread rate of the plumes, determined from lidar measured Gaussian dispersion parameters, was less than expected by a factor of 7. Thus, in-plume downwind concentrations were higher than expected. Vertical dispersion was dependent on the rise of "cells" of warm air convecting off the soil surface. On a windy day, discing the field showed TSP and PM10 concentrations at the source itself of up to 176 microg m(-3) and 120 microg m(-3), respectively. These resulted in in-plume peak TSP concentrations of about 1.22 microg m(-3) at 10 m downwind and 0.33 microg m(-3) at 100 m downwind. The measured concentrations highlight a potential exposure risk to people in and around farming operations. PMID:18396540

  2. Lighting direction and visual field modulate perceived intensity of illumination

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Mark E.; Blakeslee, Barbara; Padmanabhan, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    When interpreting object shape from shading the visual system exhibits a strong bias that illumination comes from above and slightly from the left. We asked whether such biases in the perceived direction of illumination might also influence its perceived intensity. Arrays of nine cubes were stereoscopically rendered where individual cubes varied in their 3D pose, but possessed identical triplets of visible faces. Arrays were virtually illuminated from one of four directions: Above-Left, Above-Right, Below-Left, and Below-Right (±24.4° azimuth; ±90° elevation). Illumination intensity possessed 15 levels, resulting in mean cube array luminances ranging from 1.31–3.45 cd/m2. A “reference” array was consistently illuminated from Above-Left at mid-intensity (mean array luminance = 2.38 cd/m2). The reference array's illumination was compared to that of matching arrays which were illuminated from all four directions at all intensities. Reference and matching arrays appeared in the left and right visual field, respectively, or vice versa. Subjects judged which cube array appeared to be under more intense illumination. Using the method of constant stimuli we determined the illumination level of matching arrays required to establish subjective equality with the reference array as a function of matching cube visual field, illumination elevation, and illumination azimuth. Cube arrays appeared significantly more intensely illuminated when they were situated in the left visual field (p = 0.017), and when they were illuminated from below (p = 0.001), and from the left (p = 0.001). An interaction of modest strength was that the effect of illumination azimuth was greater for matching arrays situated in the left visual field (p = 0.042). We propose that objects lit from below appear more intensely illuminated than identical objects lit from above due to long-term adaptation to downward lighting. The amplification of perceived intensity of illumination for stimuli situated

  3. Tls Field Data Based Intensity Correction for Forest Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, J.; Huber, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is increasingly used for forestry applications. Besides the three dimensional point coordinates, the 'intensity' of the reflected signal plays an important role in forestry and vegetation studies. The benefit of the signal intensity is caused by the wavelength of the laser that is within the near infrared (NIR) for most scanners. The NIR is highly indicative for various vegetation characteristics. However, the intensity as recorded by most terrestrial scanners is distorted by both external and scanner specific factors. Since details about system internal alteration of the signal are often unknown to the user, model driven approaches are impractical. On the other hand, existing data driven calibration procedures require laborious acquisition of separate reference datasets or areas of homogenous reflection characteristics from the field data. In order to fill this gap, the present study introduces an approach to correct unwanted intensity variations directly from the point cloud of the field data. The focus is on the variation over range and sensor specific distortions. Instead of an absolute calibration of the values, a relative correction within the dataset is sufficient for most forestry applications. Finally, a method similar to time series detrending is presented with the only pre-condition of a relative equal distribution of forest objects and materials over range. Our test data covers 50 terrestrial scans captured with a FARO Focus 3D S120 scanner using a laser wavelength of 905 nm. Practical tests demonstrate that our correction method removes range and scanner based alterations of the intensity.

  4. Identification of patterns in diffraction intensities affected by radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Borek, Dominika; Dauter, Zbigniew; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2013-01-01

    In an X-ray diffraction experiment, the structure of molecules and the crystal lattice changes owing to chemical reactions and physical processes induced by the absorption of X-ray photons. These structural changes alter structure factors, affecting the scaling and merging of data collected at different absorbed doses. Many crystallographic procedures rely on the analysis of consistency between symmetry-equivalent reflections, so failure to account for the drift of their intensities hinders the structure solution and the interpretation of structural results. The building of a conceptual model of radiation-induced changes in macromolecular crystals is the first step in the process of correcting for radiation-induced inconsistencies in diffraction data. Here the complexity of radiation-induced changes in real and reciprocal space is analysed using matrix singular value decomposition applied to multiple complete datasets obtained from single crystals. The model consists of a resolution-dependent decay correction and a uniform-per-unique-reflection term modelling specific radiation-induced changes. This model is typically sufficient to explain radiation-induced effects observed in diffraction intensities. This analysis will guide the parameterization of the model, enabling its use in subsequent crystallographic calculations.

  5. Occupational magnetic field exposure among women in Stockholm County, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Forssen, U; Mezei, G; Nise, G; Feychting, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Most epidemiological studies on adverse health effects among women in relation to occupational magnetic field exposure have been based on information about men's exposure. Aims: To create a job-exposure matrix for occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields among women. Methods and Results: Measurements were performed using personal magnetic field meters (Emdex Lite) carried by the subjects for 24 hours on a normal workday. Subjects were volunteer women working in the occupations identified as common among women in Stockholm County based on the 1980 census. A total of 471 measurements were made in 49 different occupations, with a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 24 measurements in each occupation. The included occupations cover about 85% of the female population gainfully employed in 1980. Parameters representing average and peak magnetic field exposures, temporal change in the exposure, and proportion of time spent above certain exposure levels were calculated both for the workday and for the total 24 hour period grouped by occupational titles. The occupations with higher than average exposure were cashiers, working proprietors in retail trade, air stewardesses, dental nurses, cooks, post-office clerks and kitchen maids. Conclusions: This new job-exposure matrix substantially increases the knowledge about magnetic field exposure among women and can be used for exposure assessment in future studies. PMID:15208375

  6. Investigating the QED vacuum with ultra-intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-05-01

    In view of the increasingly stronger available laser fields it is becoming feasible to employ them to probe the nonlinear dielectric properties of the vacuum as predicted by quantum electrodynamics (QED) and to test QED in the presence of intense laser beams. First, we discuss vacuum-polarization effects that arise in the collision of a high-energy proton beam with a strong laser field. In addition, we investigate the process of light-by-light diffraction mediated by the virtual electron-positrons of the vacuum. A strong laser beam "diffracts" a probe laser field due to vacuum polarization effects, and changes its polarization. This change of the polarization is shown to be in principle measurable. Also, the possibility of generating harmonics by exploiting vacuum-polarization effects in the collision in vacuum of two ultra-strong laser beams is discussed. Moreover, when two strong parallel laser beams collide with a probe electromagnetic field, each photon of the probe may interact through the "polarized" quantum vacuum with the photons of the other two fields. Analogously to "ordinary" double-slit set-ups involving matter, the vacuum-scattered probe photons produce a diffraction pattern, which is the envisaged observable to measure the quantum interaction between the probe and strong field photons. We have shown that the diffraction pattern becomes visible in a few operating hours, if the strong fields have an intensity exceeding 1024W/cm2.

  7. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease.

  8. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease. PMID:12929156

  9. Zeeman degeneracy effects in collisional intense-field resonance fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Burnett, K.

    1980-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence due to intense laser fields from a Zeeman degenerate atom being perturbed by collisional interactions is calculated in the impact regime by using the quantum-fluctuation-regression theorem. Various interesting effects are found. For example, the scattered intensity spectrum for a J = 0 to J = 1 transition for polarization parallel to the laser polarization is essentially an asymmetric triplet, whereas for a perpendicular polarization due to collisions the spectrum is essentially a doublet (whose frequencies do not correspond with any of those of the triplet). Further, the width of the fluorescent component (whose frequency is close to the unperturbed frequency) actually decreases with increasing laser power.

  10. Exposure assessment for power frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T D

    1993-04-01

    Over the past decade considerable data have been collected on electric and magnetic fields in occupational environments. These data have taken the form of area measurements, source characterizations, and personal exposure measurements. Occupational EMF levels are highly variable in space and time. Exposures associated with these fields exhibit similar large variations during a day, between days, and between individuals within a group. The distribution of exposure measures is skewed over several decades with only a few values occurring at the maximum field levels. The skewness of exposure measures implies that large sample sizes may be required for assessments and that multiple statistical descriptors are preferred to describe individual and group exposures. Except for the relatively few occupational settings where high voltage sources are prevalent, electric fields encountered in the workplace are probably similar to residential exposures. Consequently, high electric field exposures are essentially limited to utility environments and occupations. Within the electric utility industry, it is definitely possible to identify occupations with high electric field exposures relative to those of office workers or other groups. The highly exposed utility occupations are linemen, substation operators, and utility electricians. The distribution of electric field exposures in the utility worker population is very skewed even within a given occupation. As with electric fields, magnetic fields in the workplace appear to be comparable with residential levels, unless a clearly defined high-current source is present. Since high-current sources are more prevalent than high-voltage sources, environments with relatively high magnetic field exposures encompass a more diverse set of occupations than do those with high electric fields. Within the electric utility industry, it is possible to identify occupational environments with high magnetic field exposure relative to the office

  11. Molecules in intense laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Bandrauk, A. D.; Lu, H. Z.

    2006-01-15

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for a Born-Oppenheimer (static nuclei) three-dimensional H{sub 2}{sup +} in super intense laser fields (I=4x10{sup 18}, 10{sup 19}, and 4x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) at wavelength {lambda}{sub L}=45 nm and 25 nm to assess the influence of nondipolar (magnetic) effects on high order harmonic generation spectra in molecules. It is found that even harmonics appear due to the magnetic field component direction perpendicular to the electric field polarization with intensities about two orders of magnitude less than the odd harmonics emitted along the electric field polarization. The even harmonics exhibit plateaus with cutoffs which exceed in intensity the odd harmonic plateaus and maximum energies predicted by semiclassical electron recollision models. Although the spectra are weak, the wavelength of the recollision electron in the maximum energy regions correspond to subatomic dimensions and the corresponding emitted photons have subnanometer wavelengths.

  12. Investigation of uniformity field generated from freeform lens with UV LED exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciou, F. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Pan, C. T.; Lin, P. H.; Lin, P. H.; Hsu, F. T.

    2015-03-01

    In the exposure process, the intensity and uniformity of light in the exposure area directly influenced the precision of products. UV-LED (Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode) exposure system was established to reduce the radiation leakage and increase the energy efficiency for energy saving. It is a trend that conventional mercury lamp could be replaced with UV-LED exposure system. This study was based on the law of conservation of energy and law of refraction of optical field distributing on the target plane. With these, a freeform lens with uniform light field of main exposure area could be designed. The light outside the exposure area could be concentrated into the area to improve the intensity of light. The refraction index and UV transmittance of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is 1.43 at 385 nm wavelength and 85-90%, respectively. The PDMS was used to fabricate the optics lens for UV-LEDs. The average illumination and the uniformity could be obtained by increasing the number of UV-LEDs and the spacing of different arrangement modes. After exposure process with PDMS lens, about 5% inaccuracy was obtained. Comparing to 10% inaccuracy of general exposure system, it shows that it is available to replace conventional exposure lamp with using UV-LEDs.

  13. Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) with centrally blocked rotational fields.

    PubMed

    Cotrutz, C; Kappas, C; Webb, S

    2000-08-01

    A new technique for intensity-modulated beam (IMB) delivery that combines the features of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) with the use of 'classical blocks' is proposed. The role of the blocks is to realize the high-gradient modulation of the intensity profile corresponding to the region to be protected within the body contour, while the MLC leaves or the secondary collimator defines the rest of the field and delivers intensity-modulated multiple rotational segments. The centrally blocked radiation fields are applied sequentially, in several rotations. Each rotation of the gantry is responsible for delivering one segment of the optimal intensity profile. The new IMAT technique is applied for a treatment geometry represented by an annular target volume centrally located within a circular body contour. The annulus encompasses a circular critical structure, which is to be protected. The beam opening and corresponding weight of each segment are determined in two ways. The first method applies a linear optimization algorithm to precalculated centrally blocked radial dose profiles. These radial profiles are calculated for a set of beam openings, ranging from the largest field that covers the whole planning target volume (PTV) to the smallest, which is 1 cm larger than the width of the central block. The optimization is subjected to dose homogeneity constraints imposed on a linear combination of these profiles and finally delivers the dimensions and weights of the rotational beams to be used in combination. The second method decomposes into several subfields the fluence profile of a rotational beam known to deliver a constant dose level to PTV. This fluence profile is determined by using the analytical method proposed by Brahme for the case of the annular PTV and the concentric organ at risk (OAR). The proper segmentation of this intensity profile provides the field sizes and corresponding weights of the subfields to be used in combination. Both methods show that

  14. Electron Dynamics in Intense Laser Fields: A Bohmian Mechanics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    We study the electron quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen under intense near infrared laser fields by means of the De Broglie-Bohm's framework of Bohmian mechanics. This method is used to study the mechanism of the multiple plateau generation and the cut-off extension, as the main characteristic features of high order harmonic generation spectrum. Electron multiple recollision dynamics under intense mid-infrared laser fields is also investigated. In this case, the resulting patterns in the high-order harmonic generation and the above-threshold ionization spectra are analyzed by comprehensive picture provided by Bohmian mechanics. The time evolution of individual trajectories is closely studied to address some of the major structural features of the photoelectron angular distributions. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  15. Electron emission and fragmentation of molecules in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Prümper, G.; Hatamoto, T.; Okunishi, M.; Mathur, D.

    2007-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for high-resolution electron spectroscopy and electron-ion coincidence experiments on gas-phase molecules in intense laser fields. The apparatus comprises an electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer and an ion TOF spectrometer with a position detector, placed on either side of an effusive molecular beam. The ionizing radiation is either the fundamental (800 nm wavelength) of a Ti:sapphire laser or frequency doubled 400-nm light, with pulse durations of ~ 150 fs and the repetition rate of 1 kHz. We have investigated the electron emission and fragmentation of linear alcohol molecules, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol, in laser fields with peak intensities up to ~ 1×10 14 W/cm2. Details of our apparatus are described along with an overview of some recent results.

  16. Two-photon Compton process in pulsed intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, Daniel; Kämpfer, Burkhard

    2012-05-01

    Based on strong-field QED in the Furry picture we use the Dirac-Volkov propagator to derive a compact expression for the differential emission probability of the two-photon Compton process in a pulsed intense laser field. The relation of real and virtual intermediate states is discussed, and the natural regularization of the on-shell contributions due to the finite laser pulse is highlighted. The inclusive two-photon spectrum is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than expected from a perturbative estimate.

  17. How do protozoa respond to intense magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    2005-03-01

    Most microorganisms such as Paramecium Caudatum, swim in helical paths in nature. In the absence of any external stimuli (e.g. obstacles, electric field, heat, etc.) the axes of these helical paths, which define the trajectories, are straight lines and are distributed in random directions. Our experiments reveal that these trajectories can be manipulated by applying intense DC magnetic fields of the order of several Tesla. Swimming paramecia, for example, align their trajectories with magnetic fields in excess of about 7 Tesla in fraction of a second. We will describe this phenomenon in fields up to 25 T. We will address whether this effect is an active or passive response to the magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic structures in Paramecium. In addition we will present results for other species as they are obtained.

  18. Intensity calibration and flat-field correction for fluorescence microscopes.

    PubMed

    Model, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Standardization in fluorescence microscopy involves calibration of intensity in reproducible units and correction for spatial nonuniformity of illumination (flat-field or shading correction). Both goals can be achieved using concentrated solutions of fluorescent dyes. When a drop of a highly concentrated fluorescent dye is placed between a slide and a coverslip it produces a spatially uniform field, resistant to photobleaching and with reproducible quantum yield; it can be used as a brightness standard for wide-field and confocal microscopes. For wide-field microscopes, calibration can be further extended to absolute molecular units. This can be done by imaging a solution of known concentration and known depth; the latter can be prepared by placing a small spherical lens in a diluted solution of the same fluorophore that is used in the biological specimen.

  19. Intense magnetic field generation by solidification and crustal delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that asteroidal magnetic fields are a common feature of the early solar system [1,2]. The iron cores of different asteroids may solidify in different ways [3]. For the IVA iron meteorite parent body the rapid cooling rates and correlation with Ni concentrations further suggest that their parent body was entirely metal, and that solidification of their parent asteroid proceeded from the top down. Here we present model constraints on the thermo-chemical evolution of such rapidly cooled iron asteroids. We show that the temperature of the liquid is rapidly well mixed, and equal to the composition-dependent freezing point, and that thermal convection contributes only at early times to generation of intense magnetic fields and is therefore not sufficient to explain the generation of a dynamo. Instead, we propose that viscous delamination [4] at the base of the solidifying, dense crust provides a sufficient buoyancy flux to generate a magnetic field with properties consistent with those inferred from paleomagnetic measurements of the two IVA meteorites [5]. A model that captures the aggregate effect of episodic delamination events predicts the evolution of the crust and the formation and growth of the asteroid core, the intensity and directional evolution of the magnetic field through time, and the times at which magnetic field generation ceases and total asteroid solidification occur. These predictions can be compared directly with recent measurements of IVA iron meteorites [5] with implications for top-down solidification, the solid structure of the IVA parent core, and magnetic field generation both on the IVA parent body, and wider implications for top-down core solidification generally. [1] Weiss et al. Space Sci. Rev. 152, 341-390 (2010). [2] Tarduno et al. Science. 338, 939-942 (2012). [3] Williams Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 564-569 (2009) [4] Molnar et al. Geophys. J. Int. 133, 568-584 (1998) [5] Bryson et

  20. Technical brief: Constant intense light exposure to lesion and initiate regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Kamya; Summerbell, Emily R; Patton, James G

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish are capable of robust and spontaneous regeneration of injured retina. Constant intense light exposure to adult albino zebrafish specifically causes apoptosis of rod and cone photoreceptor cells and is an excellent model to study the molecular mechanisms underlying photoreceptor regeneration. However, this paradigm has only been applied to lesion zebrafish of the nonpigmented albino genetic background, which precludes the use of numerous transgenic reporter lines that are widely used to study regeneration. Here, we explored the effectiveness of constant intense light exposure in causing photoreceptor apoptosis and stimulating regeneration in normally pigmented zebrafish retinas. We show that constant intense light exposure causes widespread photoreceptor damage in the dorsal-central retinas of pigmented zebrafish. Photoreceptor loss triggers dedifferentiation and proliferation of Müller glia as well as progenitor cell proliferation. We also demonstrate that the timeline of regeneration response is comparable between the albino and the pigmented retinas. PMID:25324680

  1. An industrial radiography exposure device based on measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polee, C.; Chankow, N.; Srisatit, S.; Thong-Aram, D.

    2015-05-01

    In film radiography, underexposure and overexposure may happen particularly when lacking information of specimen material and hollowness. This paper describes a method and a device for determining exposure in industrial gamma-ray radiography based on quick measurement of transmitted gamma-ray intensity with a small detector. Application software was developed for Android mobile phone to remotely control the device and to display counting data via Bluetooth communication. Prior to film exposure, the device is placed behind a specimen to measure transmitted intensity which is inversely proportional to the exposure. Unlike in using the conventional exposure curve, correction factors for source decay, source-to- film distance, specimen thickness and kind of material are not needed. The developed technique and device make radiographic process economic, convenient and more reliable.

  2. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields. PMID:26444190

  3. Near-field radiofrequency electromagnetic exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Nina; Perov, Sergey; Belaya, Olga; Kuster, Niels; Balzano, Quirino

    2015-09-01

    Personal wireless telecommunication devices, such as radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic field (EMF) sources operated in vicinity of human body, have possible adverse health effects. Therefore, the correct EMF assessment is necessary in their near field. According to international near-field measurement criteria, the specific absorption rate (SAR) is used for absorbed energy distribution assessment in tissue simulating liquid phantoms. The aim of this investigation is to validate the relationship between the H-field of incident EMF and absorbed energy in phantoms. Three typical wireless telecommunication system frequencies are considered (900, 1800 and 2450 MHz). The EMF source at each frequency is an appropriate half-wave dipole antenna and the absorbing medium is a flat phantom filled with the suitable tissue simulating liquid. Two methods for SAR estimation have been used: standard procedure based on E-field measured in tissue simulating medium and a proposed evaluation by measuring the incident H-field. Compared SAR estimations were performed for various distances between sources and phantom. Also, these research data were compared with simulation results, obtained by using finite-difference time-domain method. The acquired data help to determine the source near-field space characterized by the smallest deviation between SAR estimation methods. So, this region near the RF source is suitable for correct RF energy absorption assessment using the magnetic component of the RF fields.

  4. Apoptotic cell death during Drosophila oogenesis is differentially increased by electromagnetic radiation depending on modulation, intensity and duration of exposure.

    PubMed

    Sagioglou, Niki E; Manta, Areti K; Giannarakis, Ioannis K; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini S; Margaritis, Lukas H

    2016-01-01

    Present generations are being repeatedly exposed to different types and doses of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) from wireless technologies (FM radio, TETRA and TV stations, GSM and UMTS phones/base stations, Wi-Fi networks, DECT phones). Although there is controversy on the published data regarding the non-thermal effects of NIR, studies have convincingly demonstrated bioeffects. Their results indicate that modulation, intensity, exposure duration and model system are important factors determining the biological response to irradiation. Attempting to address the dependence of NIR bioeffectiveness on these factors, apoptosis in the model biological system Drosophila melanogaster was studied under different exposure protocols. A signal generator was used operating alternatively under Continuous Wave (CW) or Frequency Modulation (FM) emission modes, at three power output values (10 dB, 0, -10 dB), under four carrier frequencies (100, 395, 682, 900 MHz). Newly emerged flies were exposed either acutely (6 min or 60 min on the 6th day), or repeatedly (6 min or 60 min daily for the first 6 days of their life). All exposure protocols resulted in an increase of apoptotic cell death (ACD) observed in egg chambers, even at very low electric field strengths. FM waves seem to have a stronger effect in ACD than continuous waves. Regarding intensity and temporal exposure pattern, EMF-biological tissue interaction is not linear in response. Intensity threshold for the induction of biological effects depends on frequency, modulation and temporal exposure pattern with unknown so far mechanisms. Given this complexity, translating such experimental data into possible human exposure guidelines is yet arbitrary.

  5. Palaeomagnetic field intensity variations suggest Mesoproterozoic inner-core nucleation.

    PubMed

    Biggin, A J; Piispa, E J; Pesonen, L J; Holme, R; Paterson, G A; Veikkolainen, T; Tauxe, L

    2015-10-01

    The Earth's inner core grows by the freezing of liquid iron at its surface. The point in history at which this process initiated marks a step-change in the thermal evolution of the planet. Recent computational and experimental studies have presented radically differing estimates of the thermal conductivity of the Earth's core, resulting in estimates of the timing of inner-core nucleation ranging from less than half a billion to nearly two billion years ago. Recent inner-core nucleation (high thermal conductivity) requires high outer-core temperatures in the early Earth that complicate models of thermal evolution. The nucleation of the core leads to a different convective regime and potentially different magnetic field structures that produce an observable signal in the palaeomagnetic record and allow the date of inner-core nucleation to be estimated directly. Previous studies searching for this signature have been hampered by the paucity of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements, by the lack of an effective means of assessing their reliability, and by shorter-timescale geomagnetic variations. Here we examine results from an expanded Precambrian database of palaeomagnetic intensity measurements selected using a new set of reliability criteria. Our analysis provides intensity-based support for the dominant dipolarity of the time-averaged Precambrian field, a crucial requirement for palaeomagnetic reconstructions of continents. We also present firm evidence for the existence of very long-term variations in geomagnetic strength. The most prominent and robust transition in the record is an increase in both average field strength and variability that is observed to occur between a billion and 1.5 billion years ago. This observation is most readily explained by the nucleation of the inner core occurring during this interval; the timing would tend to favour a modest value of core thermal conductivity and supports a simple thermal evolution model for the Earth. PMID:26450058

  6. Field assessment of an aluminum intensive passenger car

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Ford Motor Co. has made a small batch of ``aluminum intensive vehicles`` (AIV), consisting of mid-size cars (Taurus/Sable) with all-aluminum bodies. The first twenty vehicles were made for internal evaluation at Ford, but the second batch of twenty has been placed on the hands of selected independent users, primarily automotive suppliers, for long term field assessment. The mass reduction achieved in the body of an AIV is shown, and compared with an equivalent standard steel body. Argonne obtained one of these vehicles last October; this is an assessment of the fuel consumption and other operational characteristics of this type of car to date.

  7. Comparison of personal exposure meter placement for the determination of office worker ELF magnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Cutler, T L; Breysse, P N; Schiffman, A; Kanchanaraksa, S; Rooney, B C

    1999-01-01

    This article compares extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposures measured by placing EMDEX Lite personal exposure meters (PEMs) at the head, chest, and waist level for a group of office workers. Twenty-three volunteers were solicited to wear three PEMs simultaneously; one was attached to a baseball cap worn on the head, one was attached to a band and worn around the neck (positioned on the chest), and one was worn in a belted pouch around the waist (positioned on the right side of the hip). The effect of PEM placement was evaluated by comparing full-shift average exposures and daily maximum or peak exposure. The results of this investigation indicate that time-weighted average magnetic field exposures determined at the hip provide the highest mean exposure estimates. Averages of the full-shift mean magnetic field measurements taken at hip and head levels were statistically greater than measurements taken at the chest level by 33 and 22%, respectively. Comparisons of the maximum or peak magnetic field exposures by body position indicate that the hip position produced an average exposure estimate that was 136% greater than the average head-level measurement. Results suggest that for office workers PEM meter placement on the body does not produce large differences in full-shift average ELF magnetic flux density exposures. However, the hip position produced the largest daily maximum or peak exposures. It is recommended that PEMs be placed on the hip for exposure assessments in office environments, because this placement is the most commonly used, the most convenient, and resulted in the highest magnetic field exposures.

  8. Human disease resulting from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) include everything from cosmic rays through visible light to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electricity. While the high frequency fields have sufficient energy to cause cancer, the question of whether there are human health hazards associated with communication radiofrequency (RF) EMFs and those associated with use of electricity remains controversial. The issue is more important than ever given the rapid increase in the use of cell phones and other wireless devices. This review summarizes the evidence stating that excessive exposure to magnetic fields from power lines and other sources of electric current increases the risk of development of some cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, and that excessive exposure to RF radiation increases risk of cancer, male infertility, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The relative impact of various sources of exposure, the great range of standards for EMF exposure, and the costs of doing nothing are also discussed.

  9. Human disease resulting from exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) include everything from cosmic rays through visible light to the electric and magnetic fields associated with electricity. While the high frequency fields have sufficient energy to cause cancer, the question of whether there are human health hazards associated with communication radiofrequency (RF) EMFs and those associated with use of electricity remains controversial. The issue is more important than ever given the rapid increase in the use of cell phones and other wireless devices. This review summarizes the evidence stating that excessive exposure to magnetic fields from power lines and other sources of electric current increases the risk of development of some cancers and neurodegenerative diseases, and that excessive exposure to RF radiation increases risk of cancer, male infertility, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The relative impact of various sources of exposure, the great range of standards for EMF exposure, and the costs of doing nothing are also discussed. PMID:24280284

  10. Induction heating and operator exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stuchly, M A; Lecuyer, D W

    1985-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields are used in industry for induction heating of metals and semiconductors. Relatively high power, typically of a few to a few hundred of kW is used, and a frequency of operation ranges from 60 Hz to a few tens of MHz. A survey of the magnetic field strengths to which the operators are exposed has shown that these exposures are, in many instances, high compared with recommended exposure limits.

  11. Estimating worker exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzl, T.B.

    1992-01-01

    For a case-control study of brain cancer at a large automobile transmission plant, a strategy was developed to use two types of instruments to measure personal exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields. A representative group of 81 workers were asked to wear a data-logging dosimeter for one-half shift apiece. This instrument recorded 3-axis magnetic field values every 4 seconds. With little clarity about the biologic process which might connect these magnetic fields to cancer promotion, several indices summarizing exposure variability over time were computed. A new index of [open quotes]jaggedness[close quotes] was also computed, since some human studies suggest very uneven exposure profiles are the most biologically active, possibly via interference with melatonin synthesis in the pineal gland. Comparisons between the several exposure indices showed moderately high correlations between indices which were sensitive to peak exposures, but other indices were less well correlated. To test a simpler measurement strategy, a hand-held direct reading instrument was also used, with multiple measurements taken at the head and waist for most workstations. These were averaged and combined with time estimates to give[open quote] built-up[close quote] average exposures. Correlations were high (r = 0.8) between these built-up averages and averages derived from the datalogger records. It was possible to assign job titles to three distinct exposure categories based on measures of the central tendency of the distributions of measured exposures. By ranking job groups by their average exposures, electricians and non-production grinders were placed in a high exposure category, assemblers and material handlers were placed in a low category, and all other jobs were placed in a medium exposure category. Analysis of variance, with influence analysis, was used to determine that these categories had significant exposure differences from one another.

  12. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  13. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  14. Exposure scheme separates effects of electric shock and electric field for honey bees, Apis mellifera L

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.; Gauger, J.R.; Greenberg, B.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms to explain disturbance of honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) fall into two categories: direct bee perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same adverse biological effects previously observed in honey bee colonies exposed under a 765-kV transmission line can be reproduced by exposing worker bees to shock or E field within elongated hive entranceways (= tunnels). Exposure to intense E field caused disturbance only if bees were in contact with a conductive substrate. E-field and shock exposure can be separated and precisely defined within tunnels, eliminating dosimetric vagaries that occur when entire hives are exposed to E field.

  15. Office worker exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hiebert, D.G.

    1994-05-01

    A study of office worker exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF MF) was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The main purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess ELF MF exposures. A secondary objective was to determine whether or not exposures to ELF MF can be reduced by implementing administrative controls and educating workers on the sources of such fields. EMDEX dosimeters were used to determine full shift personal exposures for 12 volunteers from two personnel sections and one training section. In addition, using the EMDEX meter in survey mode, office area evaluations were conducted. Administrative controls and training were implemented in an attempt to reduce exposures. Post control monitoring was conducted to determine if a reduction in ELF MF occurred among the workers. On average, baseline office worker exposures to ELF MF were 2.3 mG, ranging from 0.6 to 9.7 mG. The post control exposures averaged 1.1 mG with a range from 0.5 to 2.2 mG. A reduction of 53% overall was seen after implementation of administrative controls and training. The office area survey indicated that many sources of ELF MF influence exposure and that magnetic field strengths vary not only from one type of equipment to another, but also vary between two similar pieces of equipment.

  16. Gigagauss Magnetic Field Generation from High Intensity Laser Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcik, J.; Perry, M. D.; Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Cowan, T.; Hammer, J.; Hatchett, S.; Hunt, A.; Key, M. H.; Moran, M.; Pennington, D.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.; Wilks, S. C.

    2004-11-01

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strengths in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation (γ,n) from giant resonance interactions. High-resolution radiographs through ρr ≥ 165 gm/cm2 have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields are discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations are presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  17. Chronic exposure to ELF fields may induce depression

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric or magnetic fields has been postulated as a potentially contributing factor in depression. Epidemiologic studies have yielded positive correlations between magnetic- and/or electric-field strengths in local environments and the incidence of depression-related suicide. Chronic exposure to ELF electric or magnetic fields can disrupt normal circadian rhythms in rat pineal serotonin-N-acetyltransferase activity as well as in serotonin and melatonin concentrations. Such disruptions in the circadian rhythmicity of pineal melatonin secretion have been associated with certain depressive disorders in human beings. In the rat, ELF fields may interfere with tonic aspects of neuronal input to the pineal gland, giving rise to what may be termed functional pinealectomy. If long-term exposure to ELF fields causes pineal dysfunction in human beings as it does in the rat, such dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression or may exacerbate existing depressive disorders. 85 references.

  18. Magnetic field exposure in a nondestructive testing operation.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Julia F; Lacey, Steven E; Kennedy, Kathleen J; Esmen, Nurtan A; Buchanich, Jeanine M; Marsh, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive testing is any technique used to inspect the integrity of a manufactured item without diminishing its future usefulness. Magnetic particle inspection is one type of nondestructive testing that uses electromagnetism in the inspection procedure, thus potentially exposing the operator to magnetic fields. During magnetic particle inspection, investigators took peak magnetic field measurements of 8 turbine engine shafts at a turbine engine overhaul and repair center. They recorded 95 peak magnetic field measurements, ranging from < 0.1 to 29.27 mT. The exposure values measured were among the highest reported in the occupational setting. Further work is needed to characterize magnetic field exposures in magnetic particle inspection operations--in particular, by differentiating magnetic field magnitude by current frequency--and to understand exposure as it relates to different types of magnetic particle inspection devices.

  19. Effect of intense sound exposure on cochlear microphonics and whole nerve action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Ohno, H.; Saitoh, Y.

    1989-06-01

    An investigation was carried out to determine whether or not the critical band with Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS) is affected by exposure to high frequency sound. The function of the cochlea and the 8th nerve in guinea pigs was estimated by the intensity function and maximum output voltage of cochlear microphonics (CM) and by whole nerve action potential (Ap). Our results showed that both the intensity function and the maximum output voltage of CM and Ap decreased. Ap obtained at the test frequency higher, by half an octave, than the center frequency of the exposure noise was especially lowered. These results suggest that the critical band with TTS of both Ap and CM may be affected in exposure to high frequency sound.

  20. Exposure time-dependent thermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure on the whole body of rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Hattori, Kenji; Kunugita, Naoki; Wang, Jianqing; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the thermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) on the variation in core temperature and gene expression of some stress markers in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2.14 GHz wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of 4 W/kg, which causes behavioral disruption in laboratory animals, and 0.4 W/kg, which is the limit for the occupational exposure set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guideline. It is important to understand the possible in vivo effects derived from RF-EMF exposures at these intensities. Because of inadequate data on real-time core temperature analyses using free-moving animal and the association between stress and thermal effects of RF-EMF exposure, we analyzed the core body temperature under nonanesthetic condition during RF-EMF exposure. The results revealed that the core temperature increased by approximately 1.5°C compared with the baseline and reached a plateau till the end of RF-EMF exposure. Furthermore, we analyzed the gene expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and heat-shock transcription factors (Hsf) family after RF-EMF exposure. At WBA-SAR of 4 W/kg, some Hsp and Hsf gene expression levels were significantly upregulated in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum following exposure for 6 hr/day but were not upregulated after exposure for 3 hr/day. On the other hand, there was no significant change in the core temperature and gene expression at WBA-SAR of 0.4 W/kg. Thus, 2.14-GHz RF-EMF exposure at WBA-SAR of 4 W/kg induced increases in the core temperature and upregulation of some stress markers, particularly in the cerebellum. PMID:27665775

  1. Exposure time-dependent thermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure on the whole body of rats.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Shin; Ushiyama, Akira; Maeda, Machiko; Hattori, Kenji; Kunugita, Naoki; Wang, Jianqing; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the thermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) on the variation in core temperature and gene expression of some stress markers in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2.14 GHz wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) RF signals at a whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of 4 W/kg, which causes behavioral disruption in laboratory animals, and 0.4 W/kg, which is the limit for the occupational exposure set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guideline. It is important to understand the possible in vivo effects derived from RF-EMF exposures at these intensities. Because of inadequate data on real-time core temperature analyses using free-moving animal and the association between stress and thermal effects of RF-EMF exposure, we analyzed the core body temperature under nonanesthetic condition during RF-EMF exposure. The results revealed that the core temperature increased by approximately 1.5°C compared with the baseline and reached a plateau till the end of RF-EMF exposure. Furthermore, we analyzed the gene expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and heat-shock transcription factors (Hsf) family after RF-EMF exposure. At WBA-SAR of 4 W/kg, some Hsp and Hsf gene expression levels were significantly upregulated in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum following exposure for 6 hr/day but were not upregulated after exposure for 3 hr/day. On the other hand, there was no significant change in the core temperature and gene expression at WBA-SAR of 0.4 W/kg. Thus, 2.14-GHz RF-EMF exposure at WBA-SAR of 4 W/kg induced increases in the core temperature and upregulation of some stress markers, particularly in the cerebellum.

  2. Evidence for the initiation of decompression sickness by exposure to intense underwater sound

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Dror; Shachar-Bener, Hofit; Hershkovitz, Dov; Arieli, Yehuda

    2015-01-01

    Mass stranding of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), in close association with the activity of naval sonar systems, has been reported on numerous occasions. Necropsy showed bubble-associated lesions similar to those described in human decompression sickness (DCS). We examined the hypothesis that exposure to underwater sound may potentiate DCS. Rats were subjected to immersion and simulated dives with and without simultaneous acoustic transmissions at pressure levels and frequencies of 204 dB/8 kHz and 183.3 dB/15 kHz. DCS severity was assessed using the rotating wheel method. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) was employed under general anesthesia as an electrophysiological measure of neurologic insult. A significantly higher rate of decompression sickness was found among animals exposed to the 204-dB/8-kHz sound field. Significantly higher pathological SSEPs scores were noted for both underwater sound protocols. Pathological SSEPs scores in animals immersed during the acoustic transmissions, but without changes in ambient pressure, were comparable to those observed in animals exposed to the dive profile. The results demonstrate induction of neurological damage by intense underwater sound during immersion, with a further deleterious effect when this was combined with decompression stress. The study outcome has potential implications for human diving safety and may provide an explanation for the mass stranding of cetaceans purportedly associated with sonar activity. PMID:26133802

  3. Evidence for the initiation of decompression sickness by exposure to intense underwater sound.

    PubMed

    Tal, Dror; Shachar-Bener, Hofit; Hershkovitz, Dov; Arieli, Yehuda; Shupak, Avi

    2015-09-01

    Mass stranding of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), in close association with the activity of naval sonar systems, has been reported on numerous occasions. Necropsy showed bubble-associated lesions similar to those described in human decompression sickness (DCS). We examined the hypothesis that exposure to underwater sound may potentiate DCS. Rats were subjected to immersion and simulated dives with and without simultaneous acoustic transmissions at pressure levels and frequencies of 204 dB/8 kHz and 183.3 dB/15 kHz. DCS severity was assessed using the rotating wheel method. Recording of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) was employed under general anesthesia as an electrophysiological measure of neurologic insult. A significantly higher rate of decompression sickness was found among animals exposed to the 204-dB/8-kHz sound field. Significantly higher pathological SSEPs scores were noted for both underwater sound protocols. Pathological SSEPs scores in animals immersed during the acoustic transmissions, but without changes in ambient pressure, were comparable to those observed in animals exposed to the dive profile. The results demonstrate induction of neurological damage by intense underwater sound during immersion, with a further deleterious effect when this was combined with decompression stress. The study outcome has potential implications for human diving safety and may provide an explanation for the mass stranding of cetaceans purportedly associated with sonar activity.

  4. Representative electromagnetic field intensities near the Clam Lake, Wisconsin and Republic, Michigan ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields produced by ELF antennas and commercial power lines at Clam Lake, WI, and by commercial power lines at Republic, MI, have been measured at residences, businesses and forest recreational areas for the continuing assessment of the Navy's ELF Communications Program. The ELF fields from existing antennas at Clam Lake, and from power lines in both states are low. Introducing ELF antenna fields at Republic, MI in several years will not significantly change the electromagnetic environment there. The existing field intensities are interpreted and compared with independent expert, judgment, professional standards-setting and judicial and administrative law opinions regarding safe exposure of the public to ELF electromagnetic fields.

  5. Studies of exposure of rabbits to electromagnetic pulsed fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, S.F.; Nickless, F.; Liu, L.M.; Hoffman, R.

    1980-01-01

    Dutch rabbits were acutely exposed to electromagnetic pulsed (EMP) fields (pulse duration 0.4 mus, field strengths of 1--2 kV/cm and pulse repetition rates in the range of 10 to 38 Hz) for periods of up to two hours. The dependent variables investigated were pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and serum chemistry (including serum triglycerides, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) isoenzymes, and sodium and potassium). Core temperature measured immediately pre-exposure and postexposure revealed no exposure-related alterations. Over the range of field strengths and pulse durations investigated no consistent, statistically significant alterations were found in the end-points investigated.

  6. Fetal exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cech, R.; Leitgeb, N.; Pediaditis, M.

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields with pregnant women and in particular with the fetus, an anatomical voxel model of an 89 kg woman at week 30 of pregnancy was developed. Intracorporal electric current density distributions due to exposure to homogeneous 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields were calculated and results were compared with basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP guidelines. It could be shown that the basic restriction is met within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother at exposure to reference level of either electric or magnetic fields. However, within the fetus the basic restriction is considerably exceeded. Revision of reference levels might be necessary.

  7. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  8. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Davanipour, Z.; Sobel, E.; Bowman, J.D.; Qian, Z.; Will, A.D.

    1997-03-01

    In an hypothesis-generating case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, lifetime occupational histories were obtained. The patients (n = 28) were clinic based. The occupational exposure of interest in this report is electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This is the first and so far the only exposure analyzed in this study. Occupational exposure up to 2 years prior to estimated disease symptom onset was used for construction of exposure indices for cases. Controls (n = 32) were blood and nonblood relatives of cases. Occupational exposure for controls was through the same age as exposure for the corresponding cases. Twenty (71%) cases and 28 (88%) controls had at least 20 years of work experience covering the exposure period. The occupational history and task data were used to classify blindly each occupation for each subject as having high, medium/high, medium, medium/low, or low EMF exposure, based primarily on data from an earlier and unrelated study designed to obtain occupational EMF exposure information on workers in ``electrical`` and ``nonelectrical`` jobs. By using the length of time each subject spent in each occupation through the exposure period, two indices of exposure were constructed: total occupational exposure (E{sub 1}) and average occupational exposure (E{sub 2}). For cases and controls with at least 20 years of work experience, the odds ratio (OR) for exposure at the 75th percentile of the E{sub 1} case exposure data relative to minimum exposure was 7.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.4--38.1) and the corresponding OR for E{sub 2} was 5.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.3--22.5). For all cases and controls, the ORs were 2.5 (P < 0.1; 95% CI, 0.9--8.1) for E{sub 1} and 2.3 (P = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.8--6.6) for E{sub 2}. This study should be considered an hypothesis-generating study. Larger studies, using incident cases and improved exposure assessment, should be undertaken.

  9. Slope stability improvement using low intensity field electrosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armillotta, Pasquale

    2014-05-01

    The electrosmosis technique has been introduced in the past for slope stabilization. However, its application to real cases has been scarce due to several drawbacks mostly related to the high intensity electric field needed (1.0 V/cm or higher): the rapid degradation of the electrodes, the high system management cost, the heating and cracking of the soil and the reduction of its colloidal fraction. Thanks to the introduction of new materials, the technique is currently applied to decrease the consolidation time of saturated clay soils (forcing the elimination of water), consequently improving its mechanical strength. In clay soils, the volume variation is influenced by the presence of smectites. The clay compressibility decreases with the increasing of electrolytes concentration. Soil containing smectites that have interacted with calcium showed a reduction or the absence of swelling during hydration with distilled water and a positive increase of their shear strength. The different values of pH between the anode (acid) and the cathode (basic), induced by the electrosmosis create the conditions for the precipitation of CaCO3 near the cathode. The injection of solutions containing calcium in soils and their diffusion induced by the electrosmosis, lead to calcium precipitation and consequential increase of the shear strength. The material technological advances and the laboratory experiences described in this paper, demonstrate that the use low electric field (0.1 V/cm or lower) intensity electrosmosis (LEFE in acronym) can be effective for soil dewatering and shear strength increase while reducing its adverse effect. The LEFE can be used to: reduce the potential for swelling of active clay minerals through the introduction of ions and the precipitation of hardening substances; induce the "dewatering" in cohesive soils. Several Lab activities were carried out, using custom made electrosmosis equipment. These activities can be divided in two phases: Phase 1

  10. Seismic Risk Assessment of Active Faults in Japan in Terms of Population Exposure to Seismic Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Nobuoto; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Yutaka; Okumura, Toshihiko; Miyakoshi, Junichi

    This study evaluates and compares seismic risks associated with inland crustal earthquakes in Japan on the basis of published data available on the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS). First, taking account of prediction uncertainty of the attenuation law of seismic intensity, the evaluation method for population exposure (PEX) to seismic intensity is presented. The method is applied to 333 seismic events potentially caused by main active faults (154 cases) and other active faults (179 cases). The relationship between population exposure and the probability of occurrence of seismic events ("P-PEX relation") and the resultant seismic risk curves are obtained. Generalized risk index which incorporates the effects of focusing on urgency (probability) or significance (PEX) is defined, producing various risk rankings of active faults.

  11. Early pregnancy loss and exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, J.; Matilainen, P.; Saarikoski, S.; Laeaerae Esuo; Suonio, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of an association of early pregnancy loss (EPL) with residential exposure to ELF magnetic fields was investigated in a case-control study. Eighty-nine cases and 102 controls were obtained from the data of an earlier study aimed at investigating the occurrence of EPL in a group of women attempting to get pregnant. Magnetic-field exposure was characterized by measurements in residences. Strong magnetic fields were measured more often in case than in control residences. In an analysis based on fields measured at the front door, a cutoff score of 0.5 A/m (0.63 microT) resulted in an odds ratio of 5.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0-25). The results should be interpreted cautiously due to the small number of highly exposed subjects and other limitations of the data.

  12. Cationic Peptide Exposure Enhances Pulsed-Electric-Field-Mediated Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Stephen M.; Aiken, Erik J.; Beres, Kaytlyn A.; Hahn, Adam R.; Kamin, Samantha J.; Hagness, Susan C.; Booske, John H.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to irreversibly electroporate cells is a promising approach for destroying undesirable cells. This approach may gain enhanced applicability if the intensity of the PEF required to electrically disrupt cell membranes can be reduced via exposure to a molecular deliverable. This will be particularly impactful if that reduced PEF minimally influences cells that are not exposed to the deliverable. We hypothesized that the introduction of charged molecules to the cell surfaces would create regions of enhanced transmembrane electric potential in the vicinity of each charged molecule, thereby lowering the PEF intensity required to disrupt the plasma membranes. This study will therefore examine if exposure to cationic peptides can enhance a PEF’s ability to disrupt plasma membranes. Methodology/Principal Findings We exposed leukemia cells to 40 μs PEFs in media containing varying concentrations of a cationic peptide, polyarginine. We observed the internalization of a membrane integrity indicator, propidium iodide (PI), in real time. Based on an individual cell’s PI fluorescence versus time signature, we were able to determine the relative degree of membrane disruption. When using 1–2 kV/cm, exposure to >50 μg/ml of polyarginine resulted in immediate and high levels of PI uptake, indicating severe membrane disruption, whereas in the absence of peptide, cells predominantly exhibited signatures indicative of no membrane disruption. Additionally, PI entered cells through the anode-facing membrane when exposed to cationic peptide, which was theoretically expected. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to cationic peptides reduced the PEF intensity required to induce rapid and irreversible membrane disruption. Critically, peptide exposure reduced the PEF intensities required to elicit irreversible membrane disruption at normally sub-electroporation intensities. We believe that these cationic peptides, when coupled with

  13. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  14. Magnetic-field Exposures in the Workplace: Reference Distribution and Exposures in Occupational Groups.

    PubMed

    Floderus; Persson; Stenlund

    1996-07-01

    Exposures to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields were assessed by taking personal measurements with a dosimeter calibrated at 50 Hz with a bandwidth of 40-400 Hz. The study group was a population-based random sample of 1,098 Swedish men. Exposures were determined as workday mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation, and the time fraction of the day when exposures exceeded 0.20 µT. For workday means, the 50th percentile was 0.17 µT, and the 75th percentile was 0.27 µT. For median values, the 50th percentile was 0.11 µT and the 75th percentile was 0.16 µT. The strongest correlation (Spearman rank correlation = r&infs;) found was between the workday mean and the fraction of time above 0.20 µT (r&infs; = 0.89). The authors used the same data to estimate exposures for the 100 most common occupations according to the 1990 Swedish census. A minimum of four independent measurements for each occupation was required. Among occupations with low workday mean values were earth-moving machine operator, health care worker, and concrete worker. Among occupations with high workday mean exposures were welder and electrical or electronics engineer or technician. High exposure levels were also found in occupations outside the study base, such as train engine driver and glass, ceramic, or brick worker. Exposures to magnetic fields vary widely, since levels of exposure are strongly affected by factors such as duration of exposure and distance from the source. Large variations often found between individuals within occupations could reflect variations in tasks across different workdays for the particular occupations and/or local conditions such as tools and installations, and/or how the work is organized and performed.

  15. Validating a model for detecting magnetic field intensity using dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian K

    2016-11-01

    Several animals use properties of Earth's magnetic field as a part of their navigation toolkit to accomplish tasks ranging from local homing to continental migration. Studying these behaviors has led to the postulation of both a magnetite-based sense, and a chemically based radical-pair mechanism. Several researchers have proposed models aimed at both understanding these mechanisms, and offering insights into future physiological experiments. The present work mathematically implements a previously developed conceptual model for sensing and processing magnetite-based magnetosensory feedback by using dynamic neural fields, a computational neuroscience tool for modeling nervous system dynamics and processing. Results demonstrate the plausibility of the conceptual model's predictions. Specifically, a population of magnetoreceptors in which each individual can only sense directional information can encode magnetic intensity en masse. Multiple populations can encode both magnetic direction, and intensity, two parameters that several animals use in their navigational toolkits. This work can be expanded to test other magnetoreceptor models.

  16. Validating a model for detecting magnetic field intensity using dynamic neural fields.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian K

    2016-11-01

    Several animals use properties of Earth's magnetic field as a part of their navigation toolkit to accomplish tasks ranging from local homing to continental migration. Studying these behaviors has led to the postulation of both a magnetite-based sense, and a chemically based radical-pair mechanism. Several researchers have proposed models aimed at both understanding these mechanisms, and offering insights into future physiological experiments. The present work mathematically implements a previously developed conceptual model for sensing and processing magnetite-based magnetosensory feedback by using dynamic neural fields, a computational neuroscience tool for modeling nervous system dynamics and processing. Results demonstrate the plausibility of the conceptual model's predictions. Specifically, a population of magnetoreceptors in which each individual can only sense directional information can encode magnetic intensity en masse. Multiple populations can encode both magnetic direction, and intensity, two parameters that several animals use in their navigational toolkits. This work can be expanded to test other magnetoreceptor models. PMID:27521527

  17. Electromagnetic field exposure assessment in Europe radiofrequency fields (10 MHz-6 GHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Wiart, Joe; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Thuróczy, György

    2015-01-01

    Average levels of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of the general public in Europe are difficult to summarize, as exposure levels have been reported differently in those studies in which they have been measured, and a large proportion of reported measurements were very low, sometimes falling below detection limits of the equipment used. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the scientific literature on RF EMF exposure in Europe and to characterize exposure within the European population. A comparative analysis of the results of spot or long-term RF EMF measurements in the EU indicated that mean electric field strengths were between 0.08 V/m and 1.8 V/m. The overwhelming majority of measured mean electric field strengths were <1 V/m. It is estimated that <1% were above 6 V/m and <0.1% were above 20 V/m. No exposure levels exceeding European Council recommendations were identified in these surveys. Most population exposures from signals of radio and television broadcast towers were observed to be weak because these transmitters are usually far away from exposed individuals and are spatially sparsely distributed. On the other hand, the contribution made to RF exposure from wireless telecommunications technology is continuously increasing and its contribution was above 60% of the total exposure. According to the European exposure assessment studies identified, three population exposure categories (intermittent variable partial body exposure, intermittent variable low-level whole-body (WB) exposure and continuous low-level WB exposure) were recognized by the authors as informative for possible future risk assessment.

  18. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children's picture book.

    PubMed

    Masataka, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. Next, as the narration of each digitized page proceeded, the character exactly corresponding to that pronounced by the narrator at that moment became highlighted in red. When the subjects' literacy capability with respect to the syllabic script of the Japanese language (kana) was evaluated before and after the exposure, their performance score was found to increase after the exposure to the digital book, whereas such a change was not recorded in children who experienced exposure to the printed version of the same picture book read to them by their mother. These effects were confirmed when the children were retested 4 weeks later. Although preliminary, the current study represents the first experimental evidence for a positive effect of exposure to digital books upon any aspect of child development. PMID:24822051

  19. Development of reading ability is facilitated by intensive exposure to a digital children's picture book.

    PubMed

    Masataka, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    Here the author presents preliminary evidence supporting the possibility that the reading ability of 4-year-old children can be improved as a consequence of intensive exposure to the narrative in a digital picture book over a consecutive 5-day period. When creating the digital version used here, two additional functions were provided with it. First, the entire story was voice-recorded by a professional narrator and programmed so that it was played as narration from the speaker of an iPad. Next, as the narration of each digitized page proceeded, the character exactly corresponding to that pronounced by the narrator at that moment became highlighted in red. When the subjects' literacy capability with respect to the syllabic script of the Japanese language (kana) was evaluated before and after the exposure, their performance score was found to increase after the exposure to the digital book, whereas such a change was not recorded in children who experienced exposure to the printed version of the same picture book read to them by their mother. These effects were confirmed when the children were retested 4 weeks later. Although preliminary, the current study represents the first experimental evidence for a positive effect of exposure to digital books upon any aspect of child development.

  20. Exposure to oscillating magnetic fields influences sensitivity to electrical stimuli. 2: Experiments on humans

    SciTech Connect

    Papi, F.; Del Seppia, C.; Luschi, P.; Ghione, S.; Rosa, C.

    1995-12-01

    To assess the effect of a magnetic treatment on pain perception, the authors compared the sensory threshold in 18 healthy volunteers. They determined the threshold by noninvasive electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp and skin before and after exposure to an altered magnetic field of low intensity and to a sham treatment. Five different parameters were recorded: the sensory and pain thresholds for the tooth and the sensory, pain, and tolerance thresholds for the skin. Two hours of exposure to a weak, oscillating magnetic field induced a significant decrease in three parameters (dental sensory and cutaneous pain and tolerance thresholds), whereas the other two parameters showed a similar tendency. When the same subjects were exposed to a sham treatment, only marginal, nonsignificant variations in all parameters were observed. These results represent the first piece of evidence that weak alterations of the magnetic field may induce hyperalgesia in humans.

  1. Exposure to oscillating magnetic fields influences sensitivity to electrical stimuli. II. Experiments on humans.

    PubMed

    Papi, F; Ghione, S; Rosa, C; Del Seppia, C; Luschi, P

    1995-01-01

    To assess the effect of a magnetic treatment on pain perception, we compared the sensory threshold in 18 healthy volunteers. We determined the threshold by noninvasive electrical stimulation of the tooth pulp and skin before and after exposure to an altered magnetic field of low intensity and to a sham treatment. Five different parameters were recorded: the sensory and pain thresholds for the tooth and the sensory, pain, and tolerance thresholds for the skin. Two hours of exposure to a weak, oscillating magnetic fields induced a significant decrease in three parameters (dental sensory and cutaneous pain and tolerance thresholds), whereas the other two parameters showed a similar tendency. When the same subjects were exposed to a sham treatment, only marginal, nonsignificant variations in all parameters were observed. These results represent the first piece of evidence that weak alterations of the magnetic field may induce hyperalgesia in humans.

  2. Low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field exposure can alter neuroprocessing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, John A.; Théberge, Jean; Weller, Julie; Drost, Dick J.; Prato, Frank S.; Thomas, Alex W.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (from DC to 300 Hz) have been shown to affect pain sensitivity in snails, rodents and humans. Here, a functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrates how the neuromodulation effect of these magnetic fields influences the processing of acute thermal pain in normal volunteers. Significant interactions were found between pre- and post-exposure activation between the sham and exposed groups for the ipsilateral (right) insula, anterior cingulate and bilateral hippocampus/caudate areas. These results show, for the first time, that the neuromodulation induced by exposure to low-intensity low-frequency magnetic fields can be observed in humans using functional brain imaging and that the detection mechanism for these effects may be different from those used by animals for orientation and navigation. Magnetoreception may be more common than presently thought. PMID:19656823

  3. Setting prudent public health policy for electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O; Sage, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) permeate our environment, coming both from such natural sources as the sun and from manmade sources like electricity, communication technologies and medical devices. Although life on earth would not be possible without sunlight, increasing evidence indicates that exposures to the magnetic fields associated with electricity and to communication frequencies associated with radio, television, WiFi technology, and mobile cellular phones pose significant hazards to human health. The evidence is strongest for leukemia from electricity-frequency fields and for brain tumors from communication-frequency fields, yet evidence is emerging for an association with other diseases as well, including neurodegenerative diseases. Some uncertainty remains as to the mechanism(s) responsible for these biological effects, and as to which components of the fields are of greatest importance. Nevertheless, regardless of whether the associations are causal, the strengths of the associations are sufficiently strong that in the opinion of the authors, taking action to reduce exposures is imperative, especially for the fetus and children. Inaction is not compatible with the Precautionary Principle, as enunciated by the Rio Declaration. Because of ubiquitous exposure, the rapidly expanding development of new EMF technologies and the long latency for the development of such serious diseases as brain cancers, the failure to take immediate action risks epidemics of potentially fatal diseases in the future. PMID:18763539

  4. Setting prudent public health policy for electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O; Sage, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMF) permeate our environment, coming both from such natural sources as the sun and from manmade sources like electricity, communication technologies and medical devices. Although life on earth would not be possible without sunlight, increasing evidence indicates that exposures to the magnetic fields associated with electricity and to communication frequencies associated with radio, television, WiFi technology, and mobile cellular phones pose significant hazards to human health. The evidence is strongest for leukemia from electricity-frequency fields and for brain tumors from communication-frequency fields, yet evidence is emerging for an association with other diseases as well, including neurodegenerative diseases. Some uncertainty remains as to the mechanism(s) responsible for these biological effects, and as to which components of the fields are of greatest importance. Nevertheless, regardless of whether the associations are causal, the strengths of the associations are sufficiently strong that in the opinion of the authors, taking action to reduce exposures is imperative, especially for the fetus and children. Inaction is not compatible with the Precautionary Principle, as enunciated by the Rio Declaration. Because of ubiquitous exposure, the rapidly expanding development of new EMF technologies and the long latency for the development of such serious diseases as brain cancers, the failure to take immediate action risks epidemics of potentially fatal diseases in the future.

  5. Exposure to movie smoking, antismoking ads and smoking intensity: an experimental study with a factorial design

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, Zeena; Engels, Rutger C M E; Vohs, Kathleen; van Baaren, Rick B; Sargent, James

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examines whether smoking portrayal in movies or antismoking advertisements affect smoking intensity among young adults. Methods We conducted an experimental study in which 84 smokers were randomly assigned using a two (no-smoking versus smoking portrayal in the movie) by three (two prosocial ads, two antismoking ads or one of each) factorial design. Participants viewed a 60-minute movie with two commercial breaks and afterwards completed a questionnaire. Smoking during the session was allowed and observed. Results Exposure to the movie with smoking had no effect on smoking intensity. Those who viewed two antismoking ads had significantly lower smoking intensity compared with those who viewed two prosocial ads. There was no interaction between movie smoking and antismoking ads. Baseline CO (carbon monoxide) level had the largest effect on smoking intensity. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence to support antismoking ads placed with movies because of their possible effect on young adult smoking behaviour. However, caution is warranted, because nicotine dependence appears to be the primary predictor of smoking intensity among young adult smokers in this study. PMID:20008155

  6. Magnetic field exposure from electric appliances and childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; John, E.M.; Kleckner, R.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The effect on childhood cancer of prolonged exposure to 60-H magnetic fields from electric appliances was examined using interview data from a recently completed case-control study. Exposures of children aged 0-14 years whose incident cancers were diagnosed between 1976 and 1983 and who resided in the Denver, Colorado, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area were compared with those of controls selected by random digit dialing, matched on age, sex, and telephone exchange area. Parents of 252 cases and 222 controls were interviewed at home about the use of electric appliances by the mother during pregnancy (prenatal exposure) and by the child (postnatal exposure). After adjustment for income, prenatal electric blanket exposure was associated with a small increase in the incidence of childhood cancers (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.2) that was more pronounced for leukemia (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 0.8-3.6) and brain cancer (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.5). Postnatal exposure to electric blankets was also weakly associated with childhood cancer (OR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.6-3.4), with a larger but imprecise association with acute lymphocytic leukemia (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 0.6-6.5). Water beds and bedside electric clocks were unrelated to childhood cancer incidence. Results are limited by nonresponse and imprecision resulting from the rarity of appliance use, especially for subgroups of cases. Nonetheless, electric blankets, one of the principal sources of prolonged magnetic field exposure, were weakly associated with childhood cancer and warrant a more thorough evaluation.

  7. Exposure of fish to high-intensity sonar does not induce acute pathology.

    PubMed

    Kane, A S; Song, J; Halvorsen, M B; Miller, D L; Salierno, J D; Wysocki, L E; Zeddies, D; Popper, A N

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated immediate effects of intense sound exposure associated with low-frequency (170-320 Hz) or with mid-frequency (2.8-3.8 kHz) sonars on caged rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus and hybrid sunfish Lepomis sp. in Seneca Lake, New York, U.S.A. This study focused on potential effects on inner ear tissues using scanning electron microscopy and on non-auditory tissues using gross and histopathology. Fishes were exposed to low-frequency sounds for 324 or 628 s with a received peak signal level of 193 dB re 1 microPa (root mean square, rms) or to mid-frequency sounds for 15 s with a received peak signal level of 210 dB re 1 microPa (rms). Although a variety of clinical observations from various tissues and organ systems were described, no exposure-related pathologies were observed. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of high-intensity sonar on fish tissues in vivo. Data from this study indicate that exposure to low and midfrequency sonars, as described in this report, might not have acute effects on fish tissues.

  8. Observations of an intense field-aligned thermal ion flow and associated intense narrow band electric field oscillations. [at auroral arc edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.; Kelley, M. C.; Mozer, F. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the conditions encountered during a Javelin sounding rocket experiment conducted on Apr. 3, 1970 at Fort Churchill, Canada. Evidence is presented that near the equatorward edge of the auroral arc an intense beam of cold plasma ions was flowing parallel to the earth's magnetic field. The beam was associated with intense narrow band electric field oscillations near the local ion gyrofrequency. The data support the hypothesis that intense electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were driven unstable by field-aligned currents.

  9. Reported respiratory symptom intensity in asthmatics during exposure to aerosolized Florida red tide toxins.

    PubMed

    Milian, Alexyz; Nierenberg, Kate; Fleming, Lora E; Bean, Judy A; Wanner, Adam; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C; Jayroe, David; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Florida red tides are naturally occurring blooms of the marine dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces natural toxins called brevetoxins. Brevetoxins become part of the marine aerosol as the fragile, unarmored cells are broken up by wave action. Inhalation of the aerosolized toxin results in upper and lower airway irritation. Symptoms of brevetoxin inhalation include: eye, nose, and throat irritation, coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Asthmatics appear to be more sensitive to the effects of inhaled brevetoxin. This study examined data from 97 asthmatics exposed at the beach for 1 hour during K. brevis blooms, and on separate occasions when no bloom was present. In conjunction with extensive environmental monitoring, participants were evaluated utilizing questionnaires and pulmonary function testing before and after a 1-hour beach walk. A modified Likert scale was incorporated into the questionnaire to create respiratory symptom intensity scores for each individual pre- and post-beach walk. Exposure to Florida red tide significantly increased the reported intensity of respiratory symptoms; no significant changes were seen during an unexposed period. This is the first study to examine the intensity of reported respiratory symptoms in asthmatics after a 1-hour exposure to Florida red tide.

  10. [Effect of weak and superweak magnetic fields on intensity and asexual reproduction of the planarian Dugesia tigrina].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V V; Sheĭman, I M; Fesenko, E E

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that the exposure to combined weak and extraweak magnetic fields (permanent component 42 microT; variable component of an amplitude of 100 nT, frequency 1-60 Hz) increases the intensity of asexual propagation of planarians Dugesia tigrina. The effect of combined magnetic fields is most pronounced at frequencies of 1, 3.7, and 32 Hz. The presence of concomitant technogeneous fields (50 Hz, 30 nT) does not markedly influence the effects of weak magnetic fields with a small variable component. Upon realization of effects of weak magnetic fields, their both components are of great importance; the absence of one (permanent) component changes the sing of the effect to the opposite. The transfer of the effect to planarians through water pretreated with magnetic fields probably indicates that aqueous medium is involved in the realization of biological effects of weak magnetic fields.

  11. Radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Suhail S.; Jha, Ashish; Konar, Nambiraj; Ranganathan, Priya; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: With the expanding use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiological modalities in critically ill patients, doctors working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are increasingly exposed to ionizing radiation. This risk of radiation exposure occurs not only during bedside radiologic procedures, but also when ICU physicians accompany patients to radiology suites. The aim of this study was to quantify levels of radiation exposure among medical professionals working in the ICU. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out prospectively over 6 months in the ICU of a tertiary-referral cancer hospital. Two teams consisting of 4 ICU resident doctors each were instructed to wear thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during their duty shifts. Standard radiation protection precautions were used throughout the study period. TLDs were also placed in selected areas of the ICU to measure the amount of scattered radiation. TLDs were analyzed at the end of every 3 months. Results: The readings recorded on TLDs placed in the ICU were almost immeasurable. The mean value of residents' radiation exposure was 0.059 mSv, though the highest individual reading approached 0.1 mSv. The projected maximum yearly radiation exposure was 0.4 mSv. Conclusions: If standard radiation safety precautions are followed, the cumulative radiation exposure to ICU resident doctors is well within permissible limits and is not a cause of concern. However, with the increasing use of radiological procedures in the management of critically ill patients, there is a need to repeat such audits periodically to monitor radiation exposure. PMID:25249743

  12. Frequency and intensity of exposure mediate resistance to experimental infection with the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Dylan; Manickam, Nisha; Simms, Benjamin T.; Harrison, Lisa M.; Vermeire, Jon J.; Cappello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hookworms are bloodfeeding intestinal nematodes that are a major cause of anemia in resource-limited countries. Despite repeated exposure beginning in early childhood, humans retain lifelong susceptibility to infection without evidence of sterilizing immunity. In contrast, experimental infection of laboratory animals is typically characterized by varying degrees of resistance following primary infection, although the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown. In this study, hamsters subjected to a single drug-terminated infection with 100 third stage hookworm larvae were confirmed to be resistant to pathological effects following a subsequent challenge. In a second experiment, hamsters infected twice-weekly with 10 third stage larvae (low inoculum) exhibited clinical and parasitological evidence of continued susceptibility, while those given 100 L3 (high inoculum) developed apparent resistance within 3 days following the initial exposure. The kinetics of parasite-specific IgA, IgM, and IgG antibody production varied by group, which suggests that the humoral immune response to hookworm infection is stimulated by the nature (frequency and intensity) of larval exposure. These results suggest that intermittent low-inoculum larval exposure, which is characterized by prolonged susceptibility to infection, may serve as a more representative model of human hookworm disease for studies of pathogenesis, as well as drug and vaccine development. PMID:23232252

  13. Investigation of fertility and in utero effects in rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Walker, C.F.

    1984-11-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate subtle bioeffects in Sprague-Dawley rats chronically exposed to a 60-Hz electric field at 80 kV/m unperturbed intensity. The details of our exposure facility, artifact considerations, environmental conditions, and exposure protocol are reported in this paper. Results of electric field exposure on reproduction and prenatal and postnatal development of rats over four generations are discussed. Statistical analysis of data from 305 females, 213 pregnancies, and 2683 births revealed no effects of electric field exposure on fertility, fecundity, nurturing, survival, or sex ratio of off-spring. In the final generation, 51 pregnant females were euthanized between days 16 and 20 of gestation, and 681 fetuses were carefully examined for gross malformations. Statistical analysis indicated that exposure to the electric field produced no significant increase in gross malformations, nor were any differences noted in resorptions, orientation of fetus in utero, sex ratio, or differential frequencies of uterine horn implantation. A detailed discussion of statistical power and sensitivity is included.

  14. Proteomic Changes in the Photoreceptor Outer Segment Upon Intense Light Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hajkova, Dagmar; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Palamalai, Vikram; Rao, K. C. Sekhar; Yuan, Chao; Sheng, Quanhu; Tang, Haixu; Zeng, Rong; Darrow, Ruth M.; Organisciak, Daniel T.; Miyagi, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    Acute light-induced photoreceptor degeneration has been studied in experimental animals as a model for photoreceptor cell loss in human retinal degenerative diseases. Light absorption by rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor outer segments (OS) induces oxidative stress and initiates apoptotic cell death. However, the molecular events that induce oxidative stress and initiate the apoptotic cascade remain poorly understood. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of light-induced photoreceptor cell death, we studied the proteomic changes in OS upon intense light exposure by using a proteolytic 18O labeling method. Of 171 proteins identified, the relative abundance of 98 proteins in light-exposed and unexposed OS was determined. The quantities of 11 proteins were found to differ by more than 2-fold between light-exposed OS and those remaining in darkness. Among the 11 proteins, 8 were phototransduction proteins and 7 of these were altered such that the efficiency of phototransduction would be reduced or quenched during light exposure. In contrast, the amount of OS rhodopsin kinase was reduced by 2-fold after light exposure, suggesting attenuation in the mechanism of quenching phototransduction. Liquid chromatography multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) was performed to confirm this reduction in the quantity of rhodopsin kinase. As revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy, this reduction of rhodopsin kinase is not a result of protein translocation from the outer to the inner segment. Collectively, our findings suggest that the absolute quantity of rhodopsin kinase in rod photoreceptors is reduced upon light stimulation and that this reduction may be a contributing factor to light-induced photoreceptor cell death. This report provides new insights into the proteomic changes in the OS upon intense light exposure and creates a foundation for understanding the mechanisms of light-induced photoreceptor cell death. PMID:20020778

  15. Addition of magnetic field capability to existing extremely-low-frequency electric field exposure systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Miller, M C; Kaune, W T

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic field systems were added to existing electric field exposure apparatuses for exposing cell suspensions in vitro and small animals in vivo. Two horizontally oriented, rectangular coils, stacked one directly above the other, have opposite electric currents. This configuration minimizes leakage fields and allows sham- and field-exposure systems to be placed in the same room or incubator. For the in vitro system, copper plates formed the loop-pair, with up to 900 A supplied by a 180:1 transformer. Electric fields were supplied via electrodes at the ends of cell-culture tubes, eight of which can be accommodated by each exposure system. Two complete systems are situated in an incubator to allow simultaneous sham and field exposure up to 1 mT. For the in vivo system, four pairs of 0.8 x 2.7-m coils made of copper bus bar are employed. This arrangement is energized from the power grid via a 30:1 transformer; horizontal magnetic flux densities up to 1 mT can be generated. Pairs of electrode plates spaced 30.5 cm apart provide electric field exposure of up to 130 kV/m. Four systems with a capacity of 48 rats each are located in one room. For both the in vitro and in vivo systems, magnetic exposure fields are uniform to within +/- 2.5%, and sham levels are at least 2,500-fold lower than exposure levels. Potential confounding factors, such as heating and vibration, were examined and found to be minimal. PMID:2712843

  16. Opinion on potential health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    In January 2015, the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) published its final opinion on "Potential health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields." The purpose of this document was to update previous SCENIHR opinions in the light of recently available information since then, and to give special consideration to areas that had not been dealt with in the previous opinions or in which important knowledge gaps had been identified.

  17. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  18. Intense field double detachment of atomic versus molecular anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeck, Y.; Lerner, G.; Kandhasamy, D. M.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Strasser, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with atomic F- and with molecular S F6 - anions is directly compared. The double-detachment mechanism is investigated by a systematic variation of peak intensity, polarization ellipticity, and pulse shape. For both systems, the observed weak polarization ellipticity dependence is not consistent with a rescattering-based mechanism. A double-detachment saturation intensity of 22 ±4 ×1013W /c m2 is determined for the atomic anion, which is significantly higher than the 9 ±2 ×1013W /c m2 of the analogous molecular system. The different atomic and molecular responses to spectral chirp and third-order dispersion induced pulse shapes are discussed in the context of the double-detachment time scale.

  19. Lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by high-intensity focused ultrasound as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A; Xu, Jin; Stessman, Dan J; Yao, Linxing; Spalding, Martin H; Wang, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient lysis of microalgae for lipid extraction is an important concern when processing biofuels. Historically, ultrasound frequencies in the range of 10-40 kHz have been utilized for this task. However, greater efficiencies might be achievable if higher frequencies could be used. In our study, we evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound to lyse microalgae for biofuel production while using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz (3.6% duty cycle). The time-average acoustic power output was 26.2 W while the spatial-peak-pulse-average intensity (ISPPA) for each tone burst was 41 kW/cm(2). The peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the focus were 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The exposure time was varied for the different cases in the experiments from 5s to 9 min and cell lysis was assessed by quantifying the percentage of protein and chlorophyll release into the supernate as well as the lipid extractability. Free radical generation and lipid oxidation for the different ultrasound exposures were also determined. We found that there was a statistically significant increase in lipid extractability for all of the exposures compared to the control. The longer exposures also completely fragmented the cells releasing almost all of the protein and chlorophyll into the supernate. The cavitation activity did not significantly increase lipid oxidation while there was a minor trend of increased free radical production with increased ultrasound exposure.

  20. Scatter radiation intensities around full-field digital mammography units.

    PubMed

    Judge, M A; Keavey, E; Phelan, N

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the scatter radiation intensity around digital mammography systems and apply these data to standard shielding calculations to reveal whether shielding design of existing breast screening rooms is adequate for the use of digital mammography systems. Three digital mammography systems from GE Healthcare, Hologic and Philips were employed in the study. A breast-equivalent phantom was imaged under clinical workload conditions and scatter radiation intensities around the digital mammography systems were measured for a range of angles in three planes using an ionisation chamber. The results were compared with those from previous studies of film-screen systems. It may be deduced from the results that scattering in the backward direction is significant for all three systems, while scattering in the forward direction can be significant for some planes around the GE and Hologic systems. Measurements at typical clinical settings on each system revealed the Philips system to have markedly lower scatter radiation intensities than the other systems. Substituting the measured scattered radiation intensity into shielding calculations yielded barrier requirements similar to those already in place at the screening centres operating these systems. Current radiation protection requirements based on film-screen technology remain sufficient when applied to rooms with digital mammography installations and no alteration is required to the structural shielding.

  1. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  2. Magnetic Cloud Field Intensities and Solar Wind Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Walter D.; Clau de Gonzalez, Alicia D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Arballo, John K.

    1997-01-01

    For the sets of magnetic clouds studied in this work we have shown that there is a general relationship between their magnetic fields strength and velocities. With a clear tendency that the faster the speed of the cloud the higher the magnetic field.

  3. Electric and magnetic field exposures for people living near a 735-Kilovolt power line

    SciTech Connect

    Levallois, P.; Gauvin, D.; St. Laurent, J.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 735-kV transmission line on the electric and magnetic field exposures of people living at the edge of the line`s right of way. Exposure of 18 adults, mostly white-collar workers, living in different bungalows located 190-240 feet from the line (exposed subjects) was compared to that of 17 adults living in similar residences far away from any transmission line. Each subject carried a Positron meter for 24 hr during 1 workday, which measured 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields every minute. All measurements were carried out in parallel for exposed and unexposed subjects during the same weeks between September and December. During measurements the average loading on the line varied between 600 and 1100 A. The average magnetic field intensity while at home was 4.4 times higher among exposed subjects than unexposed (7.1 versus 1.6 Mg, p=0.0001) and 6.2 times higher when considering only the sleeping period (6.8 versus 1.1 mG, p=0.0001). Based on the 24-hr measurement, average magnetic field exposure was three times higher among the exposed was positively correlated with the loading on the line (r=0.8, p+0.001). Percentage of time above a magnetic field threshold F(2 mG or 7.8 mG) was a good indicator to distinguish the two types of exposure. Percentage of time above 20 V/m was significantly different, but percentage of time above 78 V/m was rare and comparable for the two groups. Variability of exposure was very low. This study demonstrates that a 735-kV line contributes significantly to residential 60-Hz magnetic field exposure and, to a lesser extent, electric fields for people living at the edge of the right way. Because of the limited size of our sample, caution is recommended before generalizing these results. Nevertheless, due to the uncertainty on the risks associated with such an unusual high residential exposure, research is needed on its possible effects. 30 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  4. Biological effects and exposure criteria for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This report, which begins with a discussion of fundamental studies at the molecular level, presents a review of the subject matter covered in NCRP Report No. 67 on mechanisms of interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic (RFEM) fields with tissue. The discussion continues to progressively larger scales of interaction, beginning with macromolecular and cellular effects, chromosomal and mutagenic effects, and carcinogenic effects. The scope of the subject matter is then expanded to include systemic effects such as those on reproduction, growth, and development, hematopoiesis and immunology, endocrinology and autonomic nervous function, cardiovascular effects and cerebrovascular effects. The interaction of electromagnetic fields with the central nervous system and special senses is also discussed. Also included are epidemiological studies, a discussion of thermoregulation, and a history of therapeutic applications of RFEM fields. The report concludes with human exposure criteria and rationale.

  5. Effect Modification of the Association of Cumulative Exposure and Cancer Risk by Intensity of Exposure and Time Since Exposure Cessation: A Flexible Method Applied to Cigarette Smoking and Lung Cancer in the SYNERGY Study

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Schüz, Joachim; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Consonni, Dario; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Tardón, Adonina; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peters, Susan; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985–2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20–30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive. PMID:24355332

  6. Effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure and time since exposure cessation: a flexible method applied to cigarette smoking and lung cancer in the SYNERGY Study.

    PubMed

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Schüz, Joachim; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Consonni, Dario; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Tardón, Adonina; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peters, Susan; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-02-01

    The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985-2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20-30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive.

  7. Exposure to low levels of jet-propulsion fuel impairs brainstem encoding of stimulus intensity.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, O'neil W; Xu, Helen; Wong, Brian A; McInturf, Shawn M; Reboulet, Jim E; Ortiz, Pedro A; Mattie, David R

    2014-01-01

    Jet propulsion fuel-8 (JP-8) is a kerosene-based fuel that is used in military jets. The U.S. Armed Services and North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries adopted JP-8 as a standard fuel source and the U.S. military alone consumes more than 2.5 billion gallons annually. Preliminary epidemiologic data suggested that JP-8 may interact with noise to induce hearing loss, and animal studies revealed damage to presynaptic sensory cells in the cochlea. In the current study, Long-Evans rats were divided into four experimental groups: control, noise only, JP-8 only, and JP-8 + noise. A subototoxic level of JP-8 was used alone or in combination with a nondamaging level of noise. Functional and structural assays of the presynaptic sensory cells combined with neurophysiologic studies of the cochlear nerve revealed that peripheral auditory function was not affected by individual exposures and there was no effect when the exposures were combined. However, the central auditory nervous system exhibited impaired brainstem encoding of stimulus intensity. These findings may represent important and major shifts in the theoretical framework that governs current understanding of jet fuel and/or jet fuel + noise-induced ototoxicity. From an epidemiologic perspective, results indicate that jet fuel exposure may exert consequences on auditory function that may be more widespread and insidious than what was previously shown. It is possible that a large population of military personnel who are suffering from the effects of jet fuel exposure may be misidentified because they would exhibit normal hearing thresholds but harbor a "hidden" brainstem dysfunction.

  8. Personal UV exposure on a ski-field at an alpine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, A. M.; Casale, G. R.; Diémoz, H.; Agnesod, G.; Kimlin, M. G.; Lang, C. A.; Colosimo, A.

    2008-02-01

    Mountain sites experience enhanced ambient UV radiation levels due to the concurrent effects of shorter radiation path-length, low aerosol load and high reflectivity of the snow surfaces. This study was encouraged by the possibility to collect data of personal UV exposure in the mountainous areas of Italy, for the first time. Personal UV exposure (expressed in terms of Exposure Ratio, ER) of two groups of volunteers (ski instructors and skiers) at the Alpine site of La Thuile (Valle d'Aosta region, Italy) was assessed using polysulphone dosimetry which was tested in a mountainous snow-covered environment. In addition measurements of biological markers of individual response to UV exposure such as skin colorimetric parameters were carried out. It was found that snow and altitude of study site affect calibration curves of polysulphone dosimeters in comparison to a situation without snow. The median ER, taking into account the whole sample, is 0.60 in winter, with a range of 0.29 to 1.46, and 1.02 in spring, ranging from 0.46 to 1.72. There are no differences in exposures across skiers and instructors in spring while in winter skiers experience lower values. UV exposures are not sensitive to the use of sunscreen across instructor/skier group by day or by seasons or by photo-type. With regard to colorimetric parameters, the main result was that both skiers and instructors had on average significantly lower values of L* and b* after exposure i.e. becoming darker but the inappropriate sunscreen use did not reveal any changes in skin colorimetric parameters except in one spring day. In conclusions UV intensities on the ski-fields are often significantly higher than those on horizontal surfaces. Given the high levels of exposure observed in the present study, dedicated public heath messages on the correct sunscreen use should be adopted.

  9. The effects of exposure to electromagnetic field on rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kiray, Amac; Tayefi, Hamid; Kiray, Muge; Bagriyanik, Husnu Alper; Pekcetin, Cetin; Ergur, Bekir Ugur; Ozogul, Candan

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) causes increased adverse effects on biological systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EMF on heart tissue by biochemical and histomorphological evaluations in EMF-exposed adult rats. In this study, 28 male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were used. The rats were divided into two groups: sham group (n = 14) and EMF group (n = 14). Rats in sham group were exposed to same conditions as the EMF group except the exposure to EMF. Rats in EMF group were exposed to a 50-Hz EMF of 3 mT for 4 h/day and 7 days/week for 2 months. After 2 months of exposure, rats were killed; the hearts were excised and evaluated. Determination of oxidative stress parameters was performed spectrophotometrically. To detect apoptotic cells, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry were performed. In EMF-exposed group, levels of lipid peroxidation significantly increased and activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased compared with sham group. The number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-3 immunoreactivity increased in EMF-exposed rats compared with sham. Under electron microscopy, there were mitochondrial degeneration, reduction in myofibrils, dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and perinuclear vacuolization in EMF-exposed rats. In conclusion, the results show that the exposure to EMF causes oxidative stress, apoptosis and morphologic damage in myocardium of adult rats. The results of our study indicate that EMF-related changes in rat myocardium could be the result of increased oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether the exposure to EMF can induce adverse effects on myocardium.

  10. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  11. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  12. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  14. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1317 High-intensity Radiated Fields...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section,...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... Equipment General § 23.1308 High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. (a) Except as provided in... reduce the capability of the airplane or the ability of the flightcrew to respond to an adverse...

  20. Near field light intensity distribution analysis in bimodal polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Gut, K.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents analysis of light intensity distribution and sensitivity in differential interferometer based on bimodal polymer waveguide. Key part is analysis of optimal waveguide layer thickness in structure SiO2/SU-8/H2O for maximum bulk refractive index sensitivity. The paper presents new approach to detecting phase difference between modes through registrations only part of energy propagating in the waveguide. Additionally in this paper the analysis of changes in light distribution when energy in modes is not equal were performed.

  1. Counterintuitive alignment of H2(+) in intense femtosecond laser fields.

    PubMed

    Frasinski, L J; Plumridge, J; Posthumus, J H; Codling, K; Taday, P F; Divall, E J; Langley, A J

    2001-03-19

    The multiphoton ionization of H2 has been studied using laser pulses of 266 nm wavelength, 250 fs duration, and 5x10(13) W/cm(2) peak intensity. Dissociation of H2(+) via one-photon absorption proceeds through two channels with markedly different proton angular distributions. The lower-energy channel (2.6 eV kinetic energy release) is produced in the bond softening mechanism, which generates parallel alignment. The higher-energy channel (3.5 eV) originates from population trapping in a light-induced bound state, where bond hardening generates orthogonal, counterintuitive alignment.

  2. No evidence of harmful effects of long life exposure to 50 Hz electric fields in chickens

    SciTech Connect

    Veicsteinas, A.; Belleri, M. ); Conti, R.; Nicolini, P. )

    1992-02-26

    It has been suggested that long life exposure to electromagnetic fields may induce negative effects on living organisms. Hens' fertility and embryo malformation, growth curve of chicken, egg laying frequency and egg weight have been evaluated in three groups of chickens during exposure in natural environment at 5 kV/m for 8 hr/day (group A); 12 kV/m for 3 hr/day (group B) and O kV/m (group C, sham-exposed). After 4.1 years of exposure for 5 days/week, at sacrifice blood analysis and macro- and microscopic evaluation of liver, heart, spleen, testis were assessed. When allowance is made for occasional and not consistent differences in egg fertility, embryo malformations and egg productivity among groups, no statistical changes between exposed and controls in the variables considered were observed. The authors conclude that exposure to high intensity electric field from 10% to 30% of the life span does not include harmful effects on chicken. A similar study on the second generation is in progress.

  3. [Biological effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields: introduction].

    PubMed

    Pira, E

    2003-01-01

    A widespread agreement on the presence, if any, of an association between non deterministic effects and exposure to electromagnetic fields (ELF and RF-MW) has not been reached yet. Some critical points of the pooled analyses of data that lead to the conclusion of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) are examined. While waiting for more well planned scientific studies, it seems important for scientific experts to give the most sober interpretation of current data, considering the widespread and growing attention of the general population for this subject.

  4. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Joseph P.; Mcdaniel, Oliver H.

    1990-01-01

    Observed spectral data from supersonic jet aircraft are known to contain much more high frequency energy than can be explained by linear acoustic propagation theory. It is believed that the high frequency energy is an effect of nonlinear distortion due to the extremely high acoustic levels generated by the jet engines. The objective, to measure acoustic waveform distortion for spherically diverging high intensity noise, was reached by using an electropneumatic acoustic source capable of generating sound pressure levels in the range of 140 to 160 decibels (re 20 micro Pa). The noise spectrum was shaped to represent the spectra generated by jet engines. Two microphones were used to capture the acoustic pressure waveform at different points along the propagation path in order to provide a direct measure of the waveform distortion as well as spectral distortion. A secondary objective was to determine that the observed distortion is an acoustic effect. To do this an existing computer prediction code that deals with nonlinear acoustic propagation was used on data representative of the measured data. The results clearly demonstrate that high intensity jet noise does shift the energy in the spectrum to the higher frequencies along the propagation path. In addition, the data from the computer model are in good agreement with the measurements, thus demonstrating that the waveform distortion can be accounted for with nonlinear acoustic theory.

  5. Free-field propagation of high intensity noise. [supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, O. H.; Roth, S. D.; Welz, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Research on high intensity (finite amplitude) acoustic waves shows that nonlinear distortion effects generally result in a shift of energy to higher frequencies. The higher intensities associated with supersonic jets would therefore indicate that high frequency enhancement of the spectrum should occur, resulting in the differences observed between subsonic and supersonic jets. A 10,000 acoustic watt source installed in an anechoic chamber generates sound levels such that acoustic shocks are readily observable. Dual frequency excitation of the source produces a strong parametric effect with a difference frequency comparable in level to the primary frequency. The test set up and recording equipment being used to determine the finite amplitude noise representative of an actual supersonic jet are described as well as the development of a computer program based on Burger's equation. The spectra of 1/2 octave band, 1 kHz sine wave, and dual frequency input and output are presented in graphs along with waveforms at Z = .025, 0.1, and 1.0.

  6. Effects of maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposure on CEM T-lymphoblastoid human cell growth and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, K.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields similar to those produced by maglev vehicles (combined ac and dc components) was studied for the ability to alter cell growth and chemically induced cellular differentiation processes in cultured human CEM Tlymphoblastoid leukemia cells. A series of continuous and intermittent magnetic field (MF) exposures for varying lengths of time were tested at intensities up to 7-fold greater than that produced by the German TR07 maglev vehicle. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or mycophenolic acid were used to induce cell differentiation. Changes in cell number, morphology, and fluorescence expression of antigenic markers of differentiation were monitored. The results indicated that maglev-spectrum magnetic field exposures up to 2 gauss had little effect on culture growth or chemically induced cellular differentiation when exposed to maglev-spectrum magnetic fields compared to chemically treated but MF-unexposed controls.

  7. Effects of low intensity static electromagnetic radiofrequency fields on leiomyosarcoma and smooth muscle cell lines.

    PubMed

    Karkabounas, Spyridon; Havelas, Konstantinos; Kostoula, Olga K; Vezyraki, Patra; Avdikos, Antonios; Binolis, Jayne; Hatziavazis, George; Metsios, Apostolos; Verginadis, Ioannis; Evangelou, Angelos

    2006-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of low intensity static radiofrequency electromagnetic field (EMF) causing no thermal effects, on leiomyosarcoma cells (LSC), isolated from tumors of fifteen Wistar rats induced via a 3,4-benzopyrene injection. Electromagnetic resonance frequencies measurements and exposure of cells to static EMF were performed by a device called multi channel dynamic exciter 100 V1 (MCDE). The LSC were exposed to electromagnetic resonance radiofrequencies (ERF) between 10 kHz to 120 kHz, for 45 min. During a 24h period, after the exposure of the LSC to ERF, there was no inhibition of cells proliferation. In contrast, at the end of a 48 h incubation period, LSC proliferation dramatically decreased by more than 98% (P<0.001). At that time, the survived LSC were only 2% of the total cell population exposed to ERF, and under the same culture conditions showed significant decrease of proliferation. These cells were exposed once again to ERF for 45 min (totally 4 sessions of exposure, of 45 min duration each) and tested using a flow cytometer. Experiments as above were repeated five times. It was found that 45% of these double exposed to ERF, LSC (EMF cells) were apoptotic and only a small percentage 2%, underwent mitosis. In order to determinate their metastatic potential, these EMF cells were also counted and tested by an aggregometer for their ability to aggregate platelets and found to maintain this ability., since they showed no difference in platelet aggregation ability compared to the LSC not exposed to ERF (control cells). In conclusion, exposure of LSC to specific ERF, decreases their proliferation rate and induces cell apoptosis. Also, the LSC that survived after exposed to ERF, had a lower proliferation rate compared to the LSC controls (P<0.05) but did not loose their potential for metastases (platelet aggregation ability). The non-malignant SMC were not affected by the EMF exposure (P<0.4). The specific ERF generated from the MCDE

  8. Nonlinear transmission of an intense terahertz field through monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Hafez, H. A.; Ibrahim, A.; Ozaki, T.; Al-Naib, I.; Dignam, M. M.; Oguri, K.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Cooke, D. G.; Tanaka, S.; Komori, F.

    2014-11-15

    We report nonlinear terahertz (THz) effects in monolayer graphene, giving rise to transmission enhancement of a single-cycle THz pulse when the incident THz peak electric field is increased. This transmission enhancement is attributed to reduced photoconductivity, due to saturation effects in the field-induced current and increased intraband scattering rates arising from transient heating of electrons. We have developed a tight-binding model of the response using the length gauge interaction Hamiltonian that provides good qualitative agreement. The model fully accounts for the nonlinear response arising from the linear dispersion energy spectrum in graphene. The results reveal a strong dependence of the scattering time on the THz field, which is at the heart of the observed nonlinear response.

  9. Effects of exposure to a 60-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field on the social behavior of baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Easley, S.P.; Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Rogers, W.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors found in a previously reported study that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field had significant effects on the social behavior of baboons. However, it was not established whether or not the effects were related specifically to the 30-kV/m intensity of the field. A new experiment was conducted to determine whether or not exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 60 kV/m would produce like changes in the baboons' social behavior. They exposed one group of eight male baboons to an electric field 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, for 6 weeks. A second group of eight animals was maintained under sham-exposure (control) conditions. Rates of performing on each of six categories of social behavior and on four categories of nonsocial behavior were used as criteria for comparing exposed with unexposed subjects and for within-group comparisons during three six-week experimental periods: Pre-Exposure, Exposure, and Post-Exposure. The results indicate that (1) during the exposure period, exposed animals exhibited statistically significant differences from controls in means of performance rates based on several behavioral categories; (2) across all three periods, within-group comparisons revealed that behaviors of exposed baboons were significantly affected by exposure to the electric field; (3) changes in performance levels probably reflect a stress response to the electric field; and (4) the means of response rates of animals exposed at 60 kV/m were higher, but not double, those of animals exposed at 30 kV/m. As in the 30-kV/m experiment, animals exposed at 60 kV/m exhibited significant differences in performances of Passive Affinity, Tension, and Stereotypy. Mean rates of performing these categories were 122% (Passive Affinity), 48% (Tension), and 40% (Stereotypy) higher in the exposed group than in the control group during exposure to the 60-kV/m field.

  10. Computer Analysis of Electromagnetic Field Exposure Hazard for Space Station Astronauts during Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Kelley, James S.; Panneton, Robert B.; Arndt, G. Dickey

    1995-01-01

    In order to estimate the RF radiation hazards to astronauts and electronics equipment due to various Space Station transmitters, the electric fields around the various Space Station antennas are computed using the rigorous Computational Electromagnetics (CEM) techniques. The Method of Moments (MoM) was applied to the UHF and S-band low gain antennas. The Aperture Integration (AI) method and the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) method were used to compute the electric field intensities for the S- and Ku-band high gain antennas. As a result of this study, The regions in which the electric fields exceed the specified exposure levels for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) electronics equipment and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) astronaut are identified for various Space Station transmitters.

  11. OLD-FIELD SUCCESSIONAL DYNAMICS FOLLOWING INTENSIVE HERBIVORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community composition and successional patterns can be altered by disturbance and exotic species invasions. Our objective was to describe vegetation dynamics following cessation of severe disturbance, which was heavy grazing by cattle, in an old-field grassland subject to invasi...

  12. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­energy-­density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­energy-­density plasma the ideas for steady-­state current drive developed for low-­energy-­density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­energy-­density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  13. Controversies related to electromagnetic field exposure on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Say, Ferhat; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Coşkun, Sina; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Yıldız, Çağrı; Altun, Gamze; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Kaya, Sefa Ersan; Pişkin, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a pervasive environmental presence in modern society. In recent years, mobile phone usage has increased rapidly throughout the world. As mobile phones are generally held close to the head while talking, studies have mostly focused on the central and peripheral nervous system. There is a need for further research to ascertain the real effect of EMF exposure on the nervous system. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that EMF emitted by cell phones could affect the systems of the body as well as functions. However, the adverse effects of EMF emitted by mobile phones on the peripheral nerves are still controversial. Therefore, this review summarizes current knowledge on the possible positive or negative effects of electromagnetic field on peripheral nerves.

  14. Comparison of electric field exposure measurement methods under power lines.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Tarao, Hiroo; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2014-01-01

    The object of the study was to investigate extremely low frequency (ELF) electric field exposure measurement methods under power lines. The authors compared two different methods under power lines: in Method A, the sensor was placed on a tripod; and Method B required the measurer to hold the meter horizontally so that the distance from him/her was at least 1.5 m. The study includes 20 measurements in three places under 400 kV power lines. The authors used two commercial three-axis meters, EFA-3 and EFA-300. In statistical analyses, they did not find significant differences between Methods A and B. However, in the future, it is important to take into account that measurement methods can, in some cases, influence ELF electric field measurement results, and it is important to report the methods used so that it is possible to repeat the measurements.

  15. Controversies related to electromagnetic field exposure on peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Say, Ferhat; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Coşkun, Sina; Deniz, Ömür Gülsüm; Yıldız, Çağrı; Altun, Gamze; Kaplan, Arife Ahsen; Kaya, Sefa Ersan; Pişkin, Ahmet

    2016-09-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) is a pervasive environmental presence in modern society. In recent years, mobile phone usage has increased rapidly throughout the world. As mobile phones are generally held close to the head while talking, studies have mostly focused on the central and peripheral nervous system. There is a need for further research to ascertain the real effect of EMF exposure on the nervous system. Several studies have clearly demonstrated that EMF emitted by cell phones could affect the systems of the body as well as functions. However, the adverse effects of EMF emitted by mobile phones on the peripheral nerves are still controversial. Therefore, this review summarizes current knowledge on the possible positive or negative effects of electromagnetic field on peripheral nerves. PMID:26718608

  16. Human exposure risk to heavy metals through groundwater used for drinking in an intensively irrigated river delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrimurugan, E.; Brindha, K.; Elango, L.; Ndwandwe, Osman Muzi

    2016-09-01

    Drinking water containing heavy metals above the maximum permissible limits cause potential risk to human health. The aim of this study was to determine the groundwater suitability for drinking use based on heavy metal concentration and the associated human exposure risk in an intensively irrigated part of the Cauvery river basin, Tamil Nadu, India. Sixteen heavy metals analysed were in the order of dominance of chromium < zinc < copper < cadmium < cobalt < iron < aluminium < nickel < titanium < zirconium < boron < silver < manganese < lead < lithium < silicon in groundwater. Chromium and zinc were within permissible limits of the Bureau of Indian Standards for drinking water quality, and silver, lead and nickel were above limits in all the groundwater samples. In less than 50 % of the groundwater samples, aluminium, boron, cadmium, copper, iron and manganese exceeded their individual permissible limits. Heavy metal pollution index based on 11 heavy metals indicated that groundwater quality of this area is poor-to-unsuitable. Non-carcinogenic risk for humans due to ingestion of groundwater through drinking water pathway was very high for infants, children and adults. Silver, lead, nickel, cadmium and manganese largely contributed to the health hazard. Sources of heavy metals were identified to be geological and from human activities, i.e., application of fertilizers in agricultural fields, seawater intrusion due to intensive pumping for agriculture and wastewater from industries. Groundwater and surface water in this area pose large threat due to high levels of heavy metals, and it is necessary to avoid this water for drinking due to potential risk of health hazard. This study also demonstrated the application of HPI and human exposure hazard index to study the groundwater quality based on heavy metals' concentration.

  17. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi S; Huang, Lei; Csiszar, Susan A; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products through product use and environmental emissions over the product life cycle. Exposure pathways are often complex, where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during use or exchange between various indoor and outdoor compartments until sub-fractions reach humans. To consistently evaluate exposure pathways along product life cycles, a flexible mass balance-based assessment framework is presented structuring multimedia chemical transfers in a matrix of direct inter-compartmental transfer fractions. By matrix inversion, we quantify cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific product intake fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical in a product. Combining product intake fractions with chemical mass in the product yields intake estimates for use in life cycle impact assessment and chemical alternatives assessment, or daily intake doses for use in risk-based assessment and high-throughput screening. Two illustrative examples of chemicals used in personal care products and flooring materials demonstrate how this matrix-based framework offers a consistent and efficient way to rapidly compare exposure pathways for adult and child users and for the general population. This framework constitutes a user-friendly approach to develop, compare and interpret multiple human exposure scenarios in a coupled system of near-field ('user' environment), far-field and human intake compartments, and helps understand the contribution of individual pathways to overall human exposure in various product application contexts to inform decisions in different science-policy fields for which exposure quantification is relevant. PMID:27318619

  18. Coupled near-field and far-field exposure assessment framework for chemicals in consumer products.

    PubMed

    Fantke, Peter; Ernstoff, Alexi S; Huang, Lei; Csiszar, Susan A; Jolliet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Humans can be exposed to chemicals in consumer products through product use and environmental emissions over the product life cycle. Exposure pathways are often complex, where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during use or exchange between various indoor and outdoor compartments until sub-fractions reach humans. To consistently evaluate exposure pathways along product life cycles, a flexible mass balance-based assessment framework is presented structuring multimedia chemical transfers in a matrix of direct inter-compartmental transfer fractions. By matrix inversion, we quantify cumulative multimedia transfer fractions and exposure pathway-specific product intake fractions defined as chemical mass taken in by humans per unit mass of chemical in a product. Combining product intake fractions with chemical mass in the product yields intake estimates for use in life cycle impact assessment and chemical alternatives assessment, or daily intake doses for use in risk-based assessment and high-throughput screening. Two illustrative examples of chemicals used in personal care products and flooring materials demonstrate how this matrix-based framework offers a consistent and efficient way to rapidly compare exposure pathways for adult and child users and for the general population. This framework constitutes a user-friendly approach to develop, compare and interpret multiple human exposure scenarios in a coupled system of near-field ('user' environment), far-field and human intake compartments, and helps understand the contribution of individual pathways to overall human exposure in various product application contexts to inform decisions in different science-policy fields for which exposure quantification is relevant.

  19. Facility for chronic exposure of rats to ELF magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Otaka, Y

    1993-01-01

    The facility consists of a 12 x 11.5 x 2.4 m high room containing six sets of exposure apparatus and the other equipment necessary to maintain a pathogen-free system. The apparatus sets produced 5 mT (rms), 0.5 mT, or a sham exposure. The apparatus was arranged in the room to minimize the fringing field of the 5 mT set at the sham position. Each set was 3.85 x 1.80 x 0.66 m in outside dimension, containing 24 cages in the magnetically homogeneous region. The apparatus was designed using Harvey's figure-eight-configuration and generated a horizontal sinusoidal alternating field. In order to save electric power, the coil of the apparatus constituted a 50 Hz LC resonance circuit with a condensor bank to which electric power was supplied to compensate losses. Magnetic flux density was kept constant by controlling the coil current. Although mild steel was used in the skeleton of the building, the fringing flux at the sham was as low as 0.1 to 1 microT. Stainless steel was used for ventilating ducts, racks for the cages, cage covers, feeder baskets, and watering nozzles. The homogeneity of the field was measured to be +/- 10% in the animal residence area, and food and water consumption was found to be unaffected by the field. At 5 mT, the coil current was 370 A, and the hollow coil was cooled by a stream of 20 degrees C water to prevent both heat and dew on the coil surface. Vibration and acoustic noise was prevented by fiber reinforced plastic framework of the coil. High harmonic distortion was not observed at the output terminal of the coil driver. The facility has operated without trouble for 2 years.

  20. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health. PMID:23026448

  1. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health.

  2. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-), which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  3. Inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspended in orange juice using high-intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Escolà-Hernández, Joan; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert C; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2004-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often associated with the spoilage of fruit juices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric field (HIPEF) treatment on the survival of S. cerevisiae suspended in orange juice. Commercial heat-sterilized orange juice was inoculated with S. cerevisiae (CECT 1319) (10(8) CFU/ml) and then treated by HIPEFs. The effects of HIPEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, pulse polarity, frequency, and pulse width) were evaluated and compared to those of heat pasteurization (90 degrees C/min). In all of the HIPEF experiments, the temperature was kept below 39 degrees C. S. cerevisiae cell damage induced by HIPEF treatment was observed by electron microscopy. HIPEF treatment was effective for the inactivation of S. cerevisiae in orange juice at pasteurization levels. A maximum inactivation of a 5.1-log (CFU per milliliter) reduction was achieved after exposure of S. cerevisiae to HIPEFs for 1,000 micros (4-micros pulse width) at 35 kV/cm and 200 Hz in bipolar mode. Inactivation increased as both the field strength and treatment time increased. For the same electric field strength and treatment time, inactivation decreased when the frequency and pulse width were increased. Electric pulses applied in the bipolar mode were more effective than those in the monopolar mode for destroying S. cerevisiae. HIPEF processing inactivated S. cerevisiae in orange juice, and the extent of inactivation was similar to that obtained during thermal pasteurization. HIPEF treatments caused membrane damage and had a profound effect on the intracellular organization of S. cerevisiae.

  4. Plasma Membrane Voltage Changes during Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Frey, W.; White, J. A.; Price, R. O.; Blackmore, P. F.; Joshi, R. P.; Nuccitelli, R.; Beebe, S. J.; Schoenbach, K. H.; Kolb, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    The change in the membrane potential of Jurkat cells in response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields was studied for pulses with a duration of 60 ns and maximum field strengths of ∼100 kV/cm (100 V/cell diameter). Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a fast voltage-sensitive dye, ANNINE-6, which has a subnanosecond voltage response time. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by the excitation of this dye with a tunable laser pulse. The laser pulse was synchronized with the applied electric field to record images at times before, during, and after exposure. When exposing the Jurkat cells to a pulse, the voltage across the membrane at the anodic pole of the cell reached values of 1.6 V after 15 ns, almost twice the voltage level generally required for electroporation. Voltages across the membrane on the side facing the cathode reached values of only 0.6 V in the same time period, indicating a strong asymmetry in conduction mechanisms in the membranes of the two opposite cell hemispheres. This small voltage drop of 0.6–1.6 V across the plasma membrane demonstrates that nearly the entire imposed electric field of 10 V/μm penetrates into the interior of the cell and every organelle. PMID:16513782

  5. Plasma membrane voltage changes during nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Frey, W; White, J A; Price, R O; Blackmore, P F; Joshi, R P; Nuccitelli, R; Beebe, S J; Schoenbach, K H; Kolb, J F

    2006-05-15

    The change in the membrane potential of Jurkat cells in response to nanosecond pulsed electric fields was studied for pulses with a duration of 60 ns and maximum field strengths of approximately 100 kV/cm (100 V/cell diameter). Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a fast voltage-sensitive dye, ANNINE-6, which has a subnanosecond voltage response time. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by the excitation of this dye with a tunable laser pulse. The laser pulse was synchronized with the applied electric field to record images at times before, during, and after exposure. When exposing the Jurkat cells to a pulse, the voltage across the membrane at the anodic pole of the cell reached values of 1.6 V after 15 ns, almost twice the voltage level generally required for electroporation. Voltages across the membrane on the side facing the cathode reached values of only 0.6 V in the same time period, indicating a strong asymmetry in conduction mechanisms in the membranes of the two opposite cell hemispheres. This small voltage drop of 0.6-1.6 V across the plasma membrane demonstrates that nearly the entire imposed electric field of 10 V/mum penetrates into the interior of the cell and every organelle.

  6. Chronic exposure of primates to 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields: II. Neurochemical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seegal, R.F.; Wolpaw, J.R.; Dowman, R.

    1989-01-01

    We exposed Macaca nemestrina (pig-tailed macaques) to electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields ranging in intensity from 3 kV/m and 0.1 G to 30 kV/m and 0.9 G for three 21-day (d) periods. Experimental animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for two 21-d periods, one prior to and one following actual exposure to E and B fields, resulting in a total of five 21-d periods. Control animals were exposed to sham E and B fields for the entire 105-d interval. At the end of each 21-d period cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was obtained by lumbar puncture and analyzed for concentrations of homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), metabolites of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmitters, respectively, by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Results are based on an examination of six experimental and four control animals. Exposure to E and B fields at all strengths was associated with a significant decline in CSF concentrations of both HVA and 5-HIAA when statistical comparisons were made against values obtained at the end of the preexposure interval. However, HVA returned to preexposure levels during the postexposure period, while 5-HIAA did not. No significant change in the concentrations of HVA or 5-HIAA was noted in the control animals. These results strongly suggest that exposure of the nonhuman primate to E and B fields can significantly affect specific biochemical estimates of nervous system function. These effects may involve alterations either in neuronal activity or in the activity of enzymes that catabolize the neurotransmitters.

  7. [Patient exposure to electromagnetic fields in magnetic resonance scanners: a review].

    PubMed

    Guibelalde del Castillo, E

    2013-12-01

    The use of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and static fields, radiofrequencies (RF), and microwaves is fundamental both in modern communication systems and in diagnostic medical imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proliferation of these applications in recent decades has led to intense activity in developing regulations to guarantee their safety and to the establishment of guidelines and legal recommendations for the public, workers, and patients. In April 2012 it was foreseen that the European Parliament and Council would approve and publish a directive on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields, which would modify Directive 2004/40/EC. New studies related to the exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health published in recent years have led to a new postponement, and it is now foreseen that the directive will come into effect in October 2013. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the new version of the directive is the exclusion of the limits of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the clinical use of MRI. In exchange for this exception, physicians and experts in protection against non-ionizing radiation are asked to make additional efforts to train workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation and to establish mechanisms to guarantee the correct application of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in patients, along similar lines to the principles of justification and optimization established for ionizing radiation. On the basis of the most recently published studies, this article reviews some safety-related aspects to take into account when examining patients with MRI with high magnetic fields.

  8. Magnetic field generation during intense laser channelling in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, A. G.; Sarri, G.; Vranic, M.; Amano, Y.; Doria, D.; Guillaume, E.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hicks, G.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Kar, S.; Silva, L. O.; Tanaka, K. A.; Vieira, J.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Channel formation during the propagation of a high-energy (120 J) and long duration (30 ps) laser pulse through an underdense deuterium plasma has been spatially and temporally resolved via means of a proton imaging technique, with intrinsic resolutions of a few μm and a few ps, respectively. Conclusive proof is provided that strong azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields with a strength of around 0.5 MG are created inside the channel, consistent with the generation of a collimated beam of relativistic electrons. The inferred electron beam characteristics may have implications for the cone-free fast-ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion.

  9. Resonant electron-atom bremsstrahlung in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltukhin, A. N.; Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze a resonant mechanism for spontaneous laser-assisted electron bremsstrahlung (BrS) involving the resonant transition (via either laser-assisted electron-ion recombination or electron-atom attachment) into a laser-dressed intermediate quasibound state (corresponding, respectively, to either a field-free neutral atom or a negative-ion bound state) accompanied by ionization or detachment of this state by the laser field. This mechanism leads to resonant enhancement (by orders of magnitude) of the BrS spectral density for emitted photon energies corresponding to those for laser-assisted recombination or attachment. We present an accurate parametrization of the resonant BrS amplitude in terms of the amplitudes for nonresonant BrS, for recombination or attachment to the intermediate state, and for ionization or detachment of this state. The high accuracy of our general analytic parametrization of the resonant BrS cross section is shown by comparison with exact numerical results for laser-assisted BrS spectra obtained within time-dependent effective range theory. Numerical estimates of resonant BrS in electron scattering from a Coulomb potential are also presented.

  10. Assessment of a Pesticide Exposure Intensity Algorithm in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of the exposure assessment is a critical factor in epidemiological investigations of pesticide exposures and health in agricultural populations. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate questionnaire-based exposure metrics. The Agricultural Health Study...

  11. Real-time imaging of membrane potentials during exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Frey, Wolfgang; White, Jody A.; Price, R. O.; Blackmore, Peter F.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Joshi, Ravindra P.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2005-04-01

    The charging of mammalian cell plasma membranes in response to ultrashort pulsed electric fields of 60 ns and field strengths up to 100 kV/cm was investigated. Membranes of Jurkat cells were stained with a potential-sensitive dye, Annine-6 and placed in a microreactor mounted on an inverted fluorescence microscope. Images of changes in the fluorescence intensity during the exposure were recorded with a high-sensitivity CCD-camera. A temporal resolution of 5 ns was achieved by illuminating the cells with a 5 ns laser pulse from a dye-laser. The laser pulse was synchronized with the high voltage pulse to record images at specific times before, during and after exposure to the electric field. When exposing Jurkat cells to a 60 ns, 100 kV/cm pulse, each hemisphere of the plasma membrane (as oriented with respect to the electrodes) responded uniquely to the applied field. From these observations it is possible to draw conclusions on the charging time of the membrane, maximum transmembrane voltages and the onset of poration.

  12. Spacetime foam induced collective bundling of intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniga, Teodora; Wang, Charles H.-T.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of spacetime foam on a broad class of bosonic fields with arbitrary numbers of particles in the low-energy regime is investigated. Based on a recently formulated general description of open quantum gravitational systems, we analyze the propagation of scalar, electromagnetic, and gravitational waves on both long and short time scales with respect to their mean frequencies. For the long time propagation, the Markov approximation that neglects the effects of initial conditions of these waves is employed. In this case, despite intuitively expected decoherence and dissipation from the noisy spacetime, we show that such phenomena turn out to be completely suppressed for scalar bosons, photons, and gravitons, which are coupled to gravity but otherwise free. The short time effects are then recovered through the transient non-Markovian evolution. Focusing on scalar bosons in initially incoherent states, we find that the resulting quantum dissipation depends strongly on the distribution of the particle momentum states. We further identify a hitherto undiscovered collective antidissipation mechanism for a large number of particles. The surprising new effect tends to "bundle" identical particles within sharply distributed momentum states having a width inversely proportional to the particle number due to the thermal fluctuations, or its square root due to the vacuum fluctuations of spacetime.

  13. Exposure to electromagnetic fields from laptop use of "laptop" computers.

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Pinto, I; Bogi, A; Zoppetti, N; Andreuccetti, D; Buonocore, G

    2012-01-01

    Portable computers are often used at tight contact with the body and therefore are called "laptop." The authors measured electromagnetic fields (EMFs) laptop computers produce and estimated the induced currents in the body, to assess the safety of laptop computers. The authors evaluated 5 commonly used laptop of different brands. They measured EMF exposure produced and, using validated computerized models, the authors exploited the data of one of the laptop computers (LTCs) to estimate the magnetic flux exposure of the user and of the fetus in the womb, when the laptop is used at close contact with the woman's womb. In the LTCs analyzed, EMF values (range 1.8-6 μT) are within International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation (NIR) Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines, but are considerably higher than the values recommended by 2 recent guidelines for computer monitors magnetic field emissions, MPR II (Swedish Board for Technical Accreditation) and TCO (Swedish Confederation of Professional Employees), and those considered risky for tumor development. When close to the body, the laptop induces currents that are within 34.2% to 49.8% ICNIRP recommendations, but not negligible, to the adult's body and to the fetus (in pregnant women). On the contrary, the power supply induces strong intracorporal electric current densities in the fetus and in the adult subject, which are respectively 182-263% and 71-483% higher than ICNIRP 98 basic restriction recommended to prevent adverse health effects. Laptop is paradoxically an improper site for the use of a LTC, which consequently should be renamed to not induce customers towards an improper use.

  14. Histological evaluation of high-intensity focused ultrasound with lower-intensity focused ultrasound pre-exposure on the treatment of rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Hairong; Zou Jianzhong; Wang Yan; Ou Xia

    2012-10-03

    This study was to evaluate the effect of pre-exposure lower-intensity focused ultrasound(US), or LIFU, in high-intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) ablation of rabbit VX2 liver tumors . Liver VX2 tumor models were established in 30 rabbits, which were divided randomly into two groups. The liver tumors of rabbits in Group A underwent single HIFU ablation; those in Group B were given LIFU exposure before HIFU treatment. Five rabbits from each of the two groups were sacrificed at 0 hours, 3 days, and 7 days after HIFU ablation. Tissue samples that included targeted and short-range sounding (s-RS, within 5 mm of the targeted) and far-range sounding (f-RS, more than 5 mm of the targeted) tissues were observed using light microscope and transmission electron microscopy. The histological examination indicated that not only the targeted tumor cells became irreversible damage, but also the short-range sounding tumors were severely damaged by the HIFU with LIFU pre-exposure in group B. It is concluded that LIFU pre-exposure can enhance the effects of HIFU ablation on the destruction of cell ultrastructures and can enlarge the region of HIFU ablation.

  15. Transient effect of low-intensity magnetic field on human motor control.

    PubMed

    Legros, Alexandre; Gaillot, Philippe; Beuter, Anne

    2006-10-01

    There is no consensus with respect to how extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) affect biological systems. However, this information is crucial to establishing new guidelines for: (i) the new design of electronic devices, (ii) working conditions of exposed workers (e.g. electric linepersons), and in a general manner (iii) policies for human risk management. This study evaluates the effect of a sinusoidal 50 Hz, 1000 microT MF centered at the level of the head on human postural tremor of the index finger, using the wavelet analysis method. In addition to the detection of transient events in tremor time series linked with MF, this method was used to evaluate the differences between MF "on" and "off" conditions and between real and sham exposure in a counterbalanced protocol. Results indicate that neither transient events nor "off-on" or "on-off" MF transition effects were present in the postural tremor time series. Surprisingly, an unexpected significant time dependent decrease in tremor average power was noted along the 20s recordings. Interestingly, this effect was significantly more pronounced in the presence of MF. These results suggest a relaxing effect of ELF MF on motor control resulting in an attenuation of postural tremor intensity.

  16. Modeling microbial survival during exposure to a lethal agent with varying intensity.

    PubMed

    Peleg, M; Penchina, C M

    2000-03-01

    Traditionally, the efficacy of preservation and disinfection processes has been assessed on the basis of the assumption that microbial mortality follows a first-order kinetic. However, as departures from this assumed kinetics are quite common, various other models, based on higher-order kinetics or population balance, have also been proposed. The database for either type of models is a set of survival curves of the targeted organism or spores determined under constant conditions, that is, constant temperature, chemical agent concentration, etc. Hence, to calculate the outcome of an actual industrial process, where conditions are changing, as in heating and cooling during a thermal treatment or when the agent dissipates as in chlorination or hydrogen peroxide application, one has to integrate the momentary effects of the lethal agent. This involves mathematical models based on assumed mortality kinetics, and simulated or measured history, for example, temperature-time or concentration-time relationships at the "coldest" point. It is shown that the survival curve under conditions where the agent intensity increases, decreases, or oscillates can be constructed without assuming any mortality kinetics and without the use of the traditional D and Z values, which require linear approximation, and without thermal death times, which require extrapolation. The actual survival curves can be compiled from the isothermal survival curves provided that growth and damage repair do not occur over the pertinent time scale and that the mortality rate is a function of only the momentary agent intensity and of the organism's or spore's survival fraction (but not of the rate at which this fraction has been reached). The calculation is greatly facilitated if both the "isothermal" survival curves and the time-dependent agent intensity can be expressed algebraically. The differential equation derived from these considerations can be solved numerically to produce the required survival curve

  17. Chronic exposure to pulsed low-intensity microwaves is carcinogenic and tumorogenic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2004-03-01

    To study health effects of lifetime exposure to low-intensity pulsed radiation >890 MHz, one controlled laboratory study of SPF* rats[1-3] and two of mice[4,5] were conducted, but only one[4] reported that its data showed an association between irradiation and cancer; reports of the other two studies minimized or denied such association. Critical review of these identified data evaluation errors; their correction enables a conclusion of microwave carcinogenicity from each study (the rat study also shows an association with endocrine-system primary malignancies and with a benign tumor of the adrenal medulla), enhancing the credibility of an epidemiological study[6] reporting a brain cancer risk for users of both analog and digital cellular phones. [1] J. Raloff. Science News 126(7):103(1984). [2] K. R. Foster & A. W. Guy. Sci Am 255(3):32-39(1986). [3] C.-K. Chou et al. Bioelectromagnetics 13:469-496(1992). [4] M. H. Repacholi et al. Radiat Res 147:631-640(1990)SPF\\. [5] T. D. Utteridge et al. Radiat Res 158:357-364(2002)non-SPF\\. [6] L. Hardell et al. Int J Oncol 22:399-407(2003). * SPF = specific-pathogen-free

  18. Assessing human exposure to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews published literature and current problems relating to the assessment of occupational and residential human exposures to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Available occupational exposure data suggest that the class of job titles known as electrical workers may be an effective surrogate for time-weighted-average (TWA) magnetic-field (but not electric-field) exposure. Current research in occupational-exposure assessment is directed to the construction of job-exposure matrices based on electric- and magnetic-field measurements and estimates of worker exposures to chemicals and other factors of interest. Recent work has identified five principal sources of residential magnetic fields: electric power transmission lines, electric power distribution lines, ground currents, home wiring, and home appliances. Existing residential-exposure assessments have used one or more of the following techniques: questionnaires, wiring configuration coding, theoretical field calculations, spot electric- and magnetic-field measurements, fixed-site magnetic-field recordings, personal- exposure measurements, and geomagnetic-field measurements. Available normal-power magnetic-field data for residences differ substantially between studies. It is not known if these differences are due to geographical differences, differences in measurement protocols, or instrumentation differences. Wiring codes and measured magnetic fields (but not electric fields) are associated weakly. Available data suggest, but are far from proving, that spot measurements may be more effective than wire codes as predictors of long-term historical magnetic-field exposure. Two studies find that away-from-home TWA magnetic-field exposures are less variable than at-home exposures. The importance of home appliances as contributors to total residential magnetic-field exposure is not known at this time. It also is not known what characteristics (if any) of residential electric and magnetic fields are

  19. Study on CD variation in the vicinity of the exposure field edge in EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seokkyun; Park, Jun-Taek; Hyun, Yoonsuk; Lee, Jong-Su; Koo, Sunyoung; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kang, Hyosang

    2012-03-01

    Intra-field CD uniformity control is one of hurdles in EUV lithography. Reflection imaging system intrinsic to EUV causes CD non-uniformity especially in exposure field edge. To analyze dominant contributors to make this intra-field CD non-uniformity in EUV lithography, influence of flare from adjacent fields and in-band and out of band refection from reticle masking blind(REMA) and mask black border were investigated through intensive sampling of CD measurement. Also mask border condition and REMA open settings are split into various settings to find out the impacts from each contributor. Two ASML EUV scanners, alpha demo tool(ADT) and pre-production tool(PPT) are used for the experiment. Fortunately, DUV out of band(OoB), reflection of REMA and the flare from adjacent fields are found to be not significant in NXE3100. The results presented here lead us to the conclusion that the EUV refection from mask black border is the main contributor and CD non-uniformity of the field edge can be overcome through optimized REMA setting.

  20. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance.

  1. Evaluation of nonuniform field exposures with coupling factors.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Onishi, Teruo

    2015-10-21

    In this study, the safety compliance for nonuniform field exposures is discussed using coupling factor concepts. The coupling factor, which is defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission 62311 standard, is extended to consider the effects of harmonics and also to apply to the specific absorption rate (for frequencies up to 30 MHz). The proposed compliance procedure is applied to and demonstrated for a prototype wireless power transfer (WPT) system with induction coupling operating at the fundamental frequency in 140 kHz band. First, measurements confirm that the perturbation of the external magnetic field strength and S11 parameter of a one-loop antenna by a human-equivalent phantom are sufficiently small, suggesting the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to frequencies up to 30 MHz. Then, the frequency characteristics of the coupling factor are derived for the WPT system. For the prototype system that is not optimized for commercial usage, the maximum allowable transmitting power is relaxed by a factor of 23 with the proposed procedure. The contribution of the harmonics decreased the allowable transmitting power by 39%, indicating their importance for safety compliance. PMID:26439390

  2. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, N

    2008-01-21

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  3. Assessment of multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic field exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, N.

    2008-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields both in daily life and at workplaces exhibit increasingly complex frequency spectra. Present spectral assessment rules proved to be too conservative for health risk assessment. This is because they are based on the assumption that cells would react like linear systems in terms of responding to a sum of frequencies by a sum of independent responses to each individual frequency. Based on numerical investigations with the Hodgkin-Huxley and the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley nerve cell models, it could be shown that accounting for the nonlinear behaviour of cellular excitation processes avoids considerable overestimation of simultaneous exposures to multiple frequency ELF electric and magnetic fields. Besides this, it could be shown that the role of phase relationships is less important than that assumed so far. The present assessment rules lead to non-compliances of marketed electric appliances. For general application, a nonlinear biology-based assessment (NBBA) rule has been proposed, validated and proven advantageous compared with ICNIRP's rule. While staying conservative it avoids unnecessary overestimation and demonstrates compliance even in cases of suspected non-conformities. It is up to responsible bodies to decide upon the adoption of this proposal and the potential need for implementing additional or reducing the already incorporated safety factors.

  4. Effects of Mass Media Campaign Exposure Intensity and Durability on Quit Attempts in a Population-Based Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, M. A.; Spittal, M. J.; Yong, H-H.; Durkin, S. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent to which intensity and timing of televised anti-smoking advertising emphasizing the serious harms of smoking influences quit attempts. Methods: Using advertising gross rating points (GRPs), we estimated exposure to tobacco control and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) advertising in the 3, 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 months…

  5. Net effect of many gravitational fields on the intensity of celestial light sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cipperly, G.E.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis investigates the lens-like action of the gravitational fields of celestial bodies, which can alter the apparent intensity of more distant sources. Previous work in this area has shown that the chance of an individual body being sufficiently well aligned with a source to cause a very large gravitational intensity change is small. The issue addressed in this study is the possibility of there being a significant total change in the intensity of a source due to the combined effects of the gravitational fields of all celestial bodies, and in particular, the potential impact on intensity distance measurements, that is, determination of the distances of celestial light sources by means of intensity comparisons. It is first shown that the problem can be treated in flat space by associating an appropriate index of refraction with gravitational fields. A wave approach is taken in deriving the total deflection of a ray by the field of a single point mass. A statistical analysis is then performed to determine the expression for the mean total change in the intensity of celestial light sources due to the combined fields of all intervening bodies.

  6. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  7. Light fields with an axially expanded intensity distribution for stable three-dimensional optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Susanne; Schaub, Christian; Haist, Tobias; Osten, Wolfgang

    2010-09-13

    We introduce a new kind of light field to improve and simplify the trapping process of axially displaced particles. To this end we employ a light field with an axially expanded intensity distribution, which at the same time enables stable axial trapping. We present simulations of the axial intensity distribution of the novel trapping field and first experimental results, which demonstrate the improvement of the reliability of the axial trapping process. The method can be used to automate trapping of particles that are located outside of the focal plane of the microscope.

  8. Furry picture transition rates in the intense fields at a lepton collider interaction point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect on particle physics processes by intense electromagnetic fields in the charge bunch collisions at future lepton colliders is considered. Since the charge bunch fields are tied to massive sources (the e+e- charges), a reference frame is chosen in which the fields appear to be co-propagating. Solutions of the Dirac equation minimally coupled to the electromagnetic fields reasonably associated with two intense overlapping charge bunches are obtained and found to be a Volkov solution with respect to a null 4-vector whose 3-vector part lies in the common propagation direction. These solutions are used within the Furry interaction picture to calculate the beamstrahlung transition rate for electron radiation due to interaction with the electromagnetic fields of two colliding charge bunches. New analytic expressions are obtained and compared numerically with the beamstrahlung in the electromagnetic field of one charge bunch. The techniques developed will be applied to other collider physics processes in due course.

  9. Cholinergic transmission underlies modulation of frustration by open field exposure.

    PubMed

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba; Justel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Frustration can be defined as an emotional state generated by the omission or devaluation in the quantity or quality of an expected appetitive reward. Thus, reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with the different reinforcer values of that reward. This phenomenon is known as incentive relativity, and can be studied by different paradigms. Although methodologically simple, the exploration of a novel open field (OF) is a complex situation that involves several behavioral processes, including stress induction and novelty detection. OF exposure can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. These experiments evaluated the effect of OF exploration on frustration and the role played by the cholinergic system in this phenomenon. OF exploration before first or second trial of incentive downshift modulated the expression of frustration. This effect of OF was blocked by the administration of scopolamine either before or after OF exploration. These results indicate that the cholinergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of OF information. PMID:26546747

  10. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, Joshua B.; Grant, Jonathan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  11. Development and Application of Integrated Optical Sensors for Intense E-Field Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Bo; Niu, Ben; Yu, Zhanqing

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of intense E-fields is a fundamental need in various research areas. Integrated optical E-field sensors (IOESs) have important advantages and are potentially suitable for intense E-field detection. This paper comprehensively reviews the development and applications of several types of IOESs over the last 30 years, including the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), coupler interferometer (CI) and common path interferometer (CPI). The features of the different types of IOESs are compared, showing that the MZI has higher sensitivity, the CI has a controllable optical bias, and the CPI has better temperature stability. More specifically, the improvement work of applying IOESs to intense E-field measurement is illustrated. Finally, typical uses of IOESs in the measurement of intense E-fields are demonstrated, including application areas such as E-fields with different frequency ranges in high-voltage engineering, simulated nuclear electromagnetic pulse in high-power electromagnetic pulses, and ion-accelerating field in high-energy physics. PMID:23112663

  12. Isoprene emission aids recovery of photosynthetic performance in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum following high intensity acute UV-B exposure.

    PubMed

    Centritto, Mauro; Haworth, Matthew; Marino, Giovanni; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Tsonev, Tsonko; Velikova, Violeta; Nogues, Isabel; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Isoprene emission by terrestrial plants is believed to play a role in mitigating the effects of abiotic stress on photosynthesis. Ultraviolet-B light (UV-B) induces damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, but the role of isoprene in UV-B tolerance is poorly understood. To investigate this putative protective role, we exposed non-emitting (NE) control and transgenic isoprene emitting (IE) Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants to high intensity UV-B exposure. Methanol emissions increased with UV-B intensity, indicating oxidative damage. However, isoprene emission was unaffected during exposure to UV-B radiation, but declined in the 48 h following UV-B treatment at the highest UV-B intensities of 9 and 15 Wm(-2). Photosynthesis and the performance of photosystem II (PSII) declined to similar extents in IE and NE plants following UV-B exposure, suggesting that isoprene emission did not ameliorate the immediate impact of UV-B on photosynthesis. However, after the stress, photosynthesis and PSII recovered in IE plants, which maintained isoprene formation, but not in NE plants. Recovery of IE plants was also associated with elevated antioxidant levels and cycling; suggesting that both isoprene formation and antioxidant systems contributed to reinstating the integrity and functionality of cellular membranes and photosynthesis following exposure to excessive levels of UV-B radiation.

  13. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-), which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  14. Neuronal Cellular Responses to Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure: Implications Regarding Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2−, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  15. Electrodynamics of electron in a superintense laser field: New principles of diagnostics of relativistic laser intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Galkin, A. L.; Klinkov, V. K.; Korobkin, V. V.; Romanovsky, M. Yu.; Shiryaev, O. B.; Kalashnikov, M. P.

    2010-05-15

    The dynamics and energy spectra of electrons driven by a relativistically intense laser pulse are analyzed. The description is based on the numerical solution of the relativistic Newton's equation with the Lorentz force generated by a strong focused optical field. After the interaction with it, electrons retain a considerable fraction of the energy of their oscillations during the interaction. The electron postinteraction energy spectrum is calculated. The energies in the spectrum high-energy tail are determined by the laser pulse intensity at the focal spot. An approach to estimating absolute values of the laser pulse intensity based on the measurement of the energy spectra of the electrons is proposed.

  16. Eight thousand years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, AgnèS.; Gallet, Yves; Margueron, Jean-Claude

    2003-05-01

    Twenty new intensity determinations of the ancient geomagnetic field have been obtained from groups of potsherds and brick fragments from Syria. These artifacts, archeologically well dated from ˜6000 B.C. to approximately A.D. 1200, have been analyzed using the [1959] method as modified by [1967]. Intensity values have been corrected for the effects of anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization and cooling rate. Our results indicate that field intensities were moderate in Syria from ˜6000 B.C. to ˜3500 B.C., with values of ˜30-40 μT. There was a significant increase in intensity by a factor of 2 from ˜3500 B.C. to ˜700 B.C., which was interrupted by a moderate decrease between ˜2550 B.C. and ˜1750 B.C. During more recent periods, our results show an intensity minimum approximately A.D. 200 and a maximum around the tenth century. Comparison with different data sets from the eastern Mediterranean and central Asia shows that geomagnetic field intensity variations were consistent at this large regional scale, at least over the last 5 millennia.

  17. Infrared mapping of ultrasound fields generated by medical transducers: Feasibility of determining absolute intensity levels

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Vera A.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Martin, Eleanor; Sadhoo, Neelaksh; Shaw, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved in the use of infrared (IR) techniques for qualitative mapping of acoustic fields of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers. The authors have previously developed and demonstrated a method based on IR camera measurement of the temperature rise induced in an absorber less than 2 mm thick by ultrasonic bursts of less than 1 s duration. The goal of this paper was to make the method more quantitative and estimate the absolute intensity distributions by determining an overall calibration factor for the absorber and camera system. The implemented approach involved correlating the temperature rise measured in an absorber using an IR camera with the pressure distribution measured in water using a hydrophone. The measurements were conducted for two HIFU transducers and a flat physiotherapy transducer of 1 MHz frequency. Corresponding correction factors between the free field intensity and temperature were obtained and allowed the conversion of temperature images to intensity distributions. The system described here was able to map in good detail focused and unfocused ultrasound fields with sub-millimeter structure and with local time average intensity from below 0.1 W/cm2 to at least 50 W/cm2. Significantly higher intensities could be measured simply by reducing the duty cycle. PMID:23927199

  18. Dalitz plot analysis of Coulomb exploding O3 in ultrashort intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akitaka; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2007-09-01

    The three-body Coulomb explosion of O3, O33+→O++O++O+, in ultrashort intense laser fields (2×1015W/cm2) is studied with two different pulse durations (9 and 40fs) by the coincidence momentum imaging method. In addition to a decrease in the total kinetic energy release, a broadening in the Dalitz plot distribution [Philos. Mag. 44, 1068 (1953)] is observed when the pulse duration is increased from 9 to 40fs. The analysis based on a simple Coulomb explosion model shows that the geometrical structure of O3 remains almost unchanged during the interaction with the few-cycle intense laser fields, while a significant structural deformation along all the three vibrational coordinates, including the antisymmetric stretching coordinate, is identified in the 40fs intense laser fields. The observed nuclear dynamics are discussed in terms of the population transfer to the excited states of O3.

  19. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  20. Control of Goos-Hänchen shift via input probe field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-11-01

    We suggest a scheme to control Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift in an ensemble of strongly interacting Rydberg atoms, which act as super-atoms due to the dipole blockade mechanism. The ensemble of three-level cold Rydberg-dressed (87Rb) atoms follows a cascade configurations where two fields, i.e, a strong control and a weak field are employed [D. Petrosyan, J. Otterbach, and M. Fleischhauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 213601 (2011)]. The propagation of probe field is influenced by two-photon correlation within the blockade distance, which are damped due to the saturation of super-atoms. The amplitude of GH shift in the reflected light depends on the intensity of probe field. We observe large negative GH shift in the reflected light for small values of the probe field intensities.

  1. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  2. Cumulative radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Fiachra; Fama, Daniel; Twomey, Maria; O’Leary, Ruth; Houlihane, Conor; Murphy, Kevin P; O’Neill, Siobhan B; O’Connor, Owen J; Breen, Dorothy; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To quantify cumulative effective dose of intensive care unit (ICU) patients attributable to diagnostic imaging. METHODS: This was a prospective, interdisciplinary study conducted in the ICU of a large tertiary referral and level 1 trauma center. Demographic and clinical data including age, gender, date of ICU admission, primary reason for ICU admission, APACHE II score, length of stay, number of days intubated, date of death or discharge, and re-admission data was collected on all patients admitted over a 1-year period. The overall radiation exposure was quantified by the cumulative effective radiation dose (CED) in millisieverts (mSv) and calculated using reference effective doses published by the United Kingdom National Radiation Protection Board. Pediatric patients were selected for subgroup-analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2737 studies were performed in 421 patients. The total CED was 1704 mSv with a median CED of 1.5 mSv (IQR 0.04-6.6 mSv). Total CED in pediatric patients was 74.6 mSv with a median CED of 0.07 mSv (IQR 0.01-4.7 mSv). Chest radiography was the most commonly performed examination accounting for 83% of all studies but only 2.7% of total CED. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 16% of all studies performed and contributed 97% of total CED. Trauma patients received a statistically significant higher dose [median CED 7.7 mSv (IQR 3.5-13.8 mSv)] than medical [median CED 1.4 mSv (IQR 0.05-5.4 mSv)] and surgical [median CED 1.6 mSv (IQR 0.04-7.5 mSv)] patients. Length of stay in ICU [OR = 1.12 (95%CI: 1.079-1.157)] was identified as an independent predictor of receiving a CED greater than 15 mSv. CONCLUSION: Trauma patients and patients with extended ICU admission times are at increased risk of higher CEDs. CED should be minimized where feasible, especially in young patients. PMID:27158429

  3. Specific Intensity Direct Current (DC) Electric Field Improves Neural Stem Cell Migration and Enhances Differentiation towards βIII-Tubulin+ Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiping; Steiger, Amanda; Nohner, Mitch; Ye, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Control of stem cell migration and differentiation is vital for efficient stem cell therapy. Literature reporting electric field–guided migration and differentiation is emerging. However, it is unknown if a field that causes cell migration is also capable of guiding cell differentiation—and the mechanisms for these processes remain unclear. Here, we report that a 115 V/m direct current (DC) electric field can induce directional migration of neural precursor cells (NPCs). Whole cell patching revealed that the cell membrane depolarized in the electric field, and buffering of extracellular calcium via EGTA prevented cell migration under these conditions. Immunocytochemical staining indicated that the same electric intensity could also be used to enhance differentiation and increase the percentage of cell differentiation into neurons, but not astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that DC electric field of this specific intensity is capable of promoting cell directional migration and orchestrating functional differentiation, suggestively mediated by calcium influx during DC field exposure. PMID:26068466

  4. Determination of the duty cycle of WLAN for realistic radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Pareit, Daan; Vermeeren, Günter; Naudts, Dries; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc; Moerman, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) are commonly deployed in various environments. The WLAN data packets are not transmitted continuously but often worst-case exposure of WLAN is assessed, assuming 100% activity and leading to huge overestimations. Actual duty cycles of WLAN are thus of importance for time-averaging of exposure when checking compliance with international guidelines on limiting adverse health effects. In this paper, duty cycles of WLAN using Wi-Fi technology are determined for exposure assessment on large scale at 179 locations for different environments and activities (file transfer, video streaming, audio, surfing on the internet, etc.). The median duty cycle equals 1.4% and the 95th percentile is 10.4% (standard deviation SD = 6.4%). Largest duty cycles are observed in urban and industrial environments. For actual applications, the theoretical upper limit for the WLAN duty cycle is 69.8% and 94.7% for maximum and minimum physical data rate, respectively. For lower data rates, higher duty cycles will occur. Although counterintuitive at first sight, poor WLAN connections result in higher possible exposures. File transfer at maximum data rate results in median duty cycles of 47.6% (SD = 16%), while it results in median values of 91.5% (SD = 18%) at minimum data rate. Surfing and audio streaming are less intensively using the wireless medium and therefore have median duty cycles lower than 3.2% (SD = 0.5-7.5%). For a specific example, overestimations up to a factor 8 for electric fields occur, when considering 100% activity compared to realistic duty cycles. PMID:23085070

  5. High intensity induced photocurrent polarity switching in lead sulfide nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Peng, Xingyue; Yu, Dong

    2014-05-16

    We report an optoelectronic investigation of lead sulfide nanowires (NWs) by scanning photocurrent microscopy. The photocurrent in p-type lead sulfide NW field effect transistors has demonstrated unusually nonlinear dependence on the intensity of local excitation. Surprisingly, the photocurrent polarity can be reversed under high illumination intensity on the order of 100 W cm(-2). The origin of this photocurrent polarity switching is that the photo-injected carriers flip the direction of the electric field near the contact. These observations shed light on the nonlinear optoelectronic characteristics in semiconductor nanostructures and may provide an innovative method for optically tailoring local band structures.

  6. [Creatinine and calcium in urine and blood after brief exposure to magnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, F; Mannsåker, T; Løvlie, R

    1999-02-10

    In this experimental study, 35 males were exposed to artificial magnetic fields. The fields were produced by a set of Helmholz coils internally isolated by a Faraday cage which effectively eliminated electrical fields. Each participant stayed inside the coils for 40 minutes on two occasions with an interval of seven days, but was actually only once exposed to a static magnetic field (9.6 mT) and oscillating magnetic fields of variable frequency and strength. Urine and blood samples were taken before and after exposure, and before and after non-exposure. Analysis detected significant changes in serum creatinine level after exposure (p < 0.0001). The changes in serum creatinine level in the nonexposed situation were significantly smaller than the changes found in the exposed situation (p < 0.0001). The changes i urine creatinine after 40 minutes of exposure was also found to be significant (p < 0.01). Exposure to magnetic fields may induce biological reactions.

  7. Energetic electron propagation in solid targets driven by the intense electric fields of femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J. F.; Szabo, C. I.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.

    2011-06-15

    An analytical model is used to interpret experimental data on the propagation of energetic electrons perpendicular to and parallel to the propagation direction of intense femtosecond laser pulses that are incident on solid targets. The pulses with {approx_equal}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} intensity are incident normal onto a gadolinium or tungsten wire embedded in an aluminum substrate, and MeV electrons generated in the focal spot propagate along the laser direction into the irradiated wire. Electrons also propagate laterally from the focal spot through the aluminum substrate and into a dysprosium or hafnium spectator wire at a distance up to 1 mm from the irradiated wire. The ratio of the K shell emission from the spectator and irradiated wires is a measure of the numbers and energies of the MeV electrons propagating parallel to and perpendicular to the intense oscillating electric field of the laser pulse. It is found that the angular distribution of electrons from the focal spot is highly non-isotropic, and approximately twice as many electrons are driven by the electric field toward the spectator wire as into the irradiated wire. This quantitative result is consistent with the qualitative experimental observation that the oscillating electric field of an intense femtosecond laser pulse, when interacting with a heavy metal target, preferentially drives energetic electrons in the electric field direction as compared to perpendicular to the field.

  8. The effect of high intensity microwave exposure on enucleation of murine erythroid cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sciandra, J J; Repasky, E; Subjeck, J R; Johnson, R J

    1982-03-01

    We have examined the effects of microwave vs sham exposure on the enucleation phase of murine erythroid cells in vitro. While enucleation occurs rapidly in vivo, it occurs somewhat slower in vitro and can be quantitated in terms of rate. Exposure to 915 MHz electromagnetic radiation is found to significantly reduce the rate of enucleation (P less than 0.001). Exposure is carried out in a TE10 mode energized water-filled temperature-controlled waveguide. It is hypothesized that the effects of the exposure are on cytoplasmic or plasma membrane-associated structures since the nucleus at this stage of maturation is completely condensed and inactive. This assay is of direct interest in itself as well as providing a tool for the investigation of biological response to microwave exposure.

  9. ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-ELECTRON IONIZATION OF HELIUM IN AN INTENSE LASER FIELD.

    SciTech Connect

    LAFON,R.; CHALOUPKA,J.L.; SHEEHY,B.; DIMAURO,L.F.; PAUL,P.M.; AGOSTINI,P.; KULANDER,K.C.

    2000-09-24

    It is well known that a neutral atom interacting with a strong laser field will ionize at sufficiently high intensity even for photon energies well below the ionization threshold. When the required number of photons becomes very large, this process is best described by the suppression of the Coulomb barrier by the laser's oscillating electric field, allowing the electron to tunnel into the continuum. As the laser intensity is increased, more tightly bound electrons may be successively liberated by this mechanism. Such a sequential multiple ionization, long accepted as a reasonable approach to the formidable problem of a multielectron atom interacting nonperturbatively with an intense electromagnetic field, provides fair estimates of the various charge state appearance intensities while the tunneling rates are in excellent agreement with single ionization yields. However, more accurate measurements revealed systematic and very large deviations from the tunneling rates: near appearance intensity under standard experimental conditions, the observed double ion yield is several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the sequential rate. It soon became clear that electrons could not be considered as independent and that electron-electron correlation had to be taken into account. Dynamic correlations have been considered in several theories. First qualitatively in the shakeoff model; then empirically through the e-2e cross-section in the quantum/classical three-step model (tunnel ionization, acceleration by the oscillating electric field and e-2e recollision with the ion); recently through the so-called intense field many-body-S-matrix theory and a purely empirical model of collective tunnel ionization. The validity of these ideas has been examined using numerical models. The measurement of total ion yields over a dynamic range exceeding ten orders of magnitude, a major breakthrough made possible by the availability of high-repetition rate lasers at the beginning of

  10. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.knisely@yale.edu

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients.

  11. The effect of magnetic field intensity and treatment time on graphene / epoxy composites’ fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. Q.; Zhang, L.; Fu, S.; Yuan, R. H.; Dong, Z. W.; Ren, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intensity of the magnetic field and the treatment time on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites is researched. Also, the mechanism of the effect of the magnetic field on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites and a method to improve the impact resistance is explored. Then, three-point bending tests are employed to characterize the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composite. The results show that the intervention of magnetic field could induce GNS to generated orientation arrangement, improving the fracture toughness of the graphene/epoxy composite. When the intensity of the magnetic field was increased, the growth rate of the fracture toughness slowed. However, when 2T magnetic was used to synthetically process the material, and when the processing time was less than 50 min, the fracture toughness of the composite material increased significantly.

  12. Intraband optical absorption in a single quantum ring: Hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    The intraband optical absorption in GaAs/Ga0.7Al0.3As two-dimensional single quantum ring is investigated. Considering the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field the energy of the ground and few excited states has been found using the effective mass approximation and exact diagonalization technique. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the intraband optical transitions are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure for the different values of the laser field parameter. We also investigated the dependencies of the intraband optical absorption coefficient as a function of incident photon energy for different values of hydrostatic pressure and laser field parameter. It is found that the effects of hydrostatic pressure and intense laser field lead to redshift and blueshift of the intraband optical spectrum respectively.

  13. Residential characteristics and radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposures from bedroom measurements in Germany.

    PubMed

    Breckenkamp, J; Blettner, M; Schüz, J; Bornkessel, C; Schmiedel, S; Schlehofer, B; Berg-Beckhoff, G

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess total exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in bedrooms and the contribution of different radioservices (FM radio, analogue TV and DVB-T, TETRA, GSM900 downlink, GSM1800 downlink, UMTS downlink, DECT, and wireless LAN and blue tooth) to the total exposure. Additional aims were to describe the proportion of measuring values above the detection limit of the dosimeters and to characterize the differences in exposure patterns associated with self-reported residential characteristics. Exposure to RF sources in bedrooms was measured using Antennessa(®) EME Spy 120 dosimeters in 1,348 households in Germany; 280 measures were available for each frequency band per household. Mean electrical field strengths and power flux densities were calculated. Power flux densities allow the calculation of proportions of different radioservices on total exposure. Exposure was often below the detection limit (electrical field strength: 0.05 V/m) of the dosimeter. Total exposure varied, depending on residential characteristics (urban vs. rural areas and floor of a building the measurement took place). Major sources of exposure were cordless phones (DECT standard) and wireless LAN/blue tooth contributing about 82% of total exposure (20.5 μW/m(2)). Exposure to RF-EMF is ubiquitous, but exposure levels are-if at all measurable-very low and far below the ICNIRP's exposure reference levels. PMID:21964673

  14. DATA COLLECTED IN THE EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S FIELD MEASUREMENT STUDIES TO EVALUATE AGGREGATE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires children's risk assessments to be conducted using high quality and high quantity data. Currently, data on children's exposures and exposure factors are limited and insufficient to address risk assessments that do not rely heavil...

  15. Binding Energies of Hydrogen-Like Impurities in a Semiconductor in Intense Terahertz Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Xu, W.; Lin, L. B.

    We present a detailed theoretical study of the influence of linearly polarized intense terahertz (THz) laser radiation on energy states of hydrogen-like impurities in semiconductors. The dependence of the binding energy for ground (1s) and first excited (2s) states, E1s and E2s, on the intensity and the frequency of the THz radiation has been examined for a GaAs-based system. It is found that E1s, E2s and E2s-E1s decrease with increasing radiation intensity or with decreasing radiation frequency, which implies that an intense THz field can enhance ionization of dopants in semiconductors. Our analytical and numerical results show that one of the most important results obtained by A. L. A. Fonseca et al. [Phys. Stat. Sol. (b) 186, K57 (1994)] is incorrect.

  16. Permanent-magnet Faraday isolator with the field intensity of 25 kOe

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, E A; Snetkov, I L; Voitovich, A V; Palashov, O V

    2013-08-31

    A Faraday isolator with a single magneto-optical element is constructed and experimentally tested. It provides the isolation ratio of 30 dB at an average laser radiation power of 650 W. These parameters are obtained by increasing the field intensity in the magnetic system of the isolator and employing a low-absorption magneto-optical element. (elements of laser devices)

  17. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General §...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 25.1317 Section 25.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the airplane is exposed to HIRF environment I, as described...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 29.1317 Section 29.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to HIRF environment I, as...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1308 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 23.1308 Section 23.1308 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... HIRF environment I, as described in appendix J to this part; (2) The system automatically...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection. 27.1317 Section 27.1317 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... adversely affected during and after the time the rotorcraft is exposed to HIRF environment I, as...

  3. Operation of calorimeters based on vacuum and gas photodetectors in high intensity magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Luigi

    1984-09-01

    Recent attempts to operate counters for calorimetric use inside high intensity magnetic fields have resulted in interesting developments both in the construction of the counters and in the design of the vacuum photosensitive devices. In particular, a new one-stage photomultiplier has been developed. The present status of the development of gas photodiodes will finally be illustrated.

  4. 14 CFR 25.1317 - High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High-intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1317 High... that performs a function whose failure would significantly reduce the capability of the airplane or...

  5. Factors modifying the response of large animals to low-intensity radiation exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, N. P.; Still, E. T.

    1972-01-01

    In assessing the biological response to space radiation, two of the most important modifying factors are dose protraction and dose distribution to the body. Studies are reported in which sheep and swine were used to compare the hematology and lethality response resulting from radiation exposure encountered in a variety of forms, including acute (high dose-rate), chronic (low dose-rate), combinations of acute and chronic, and whether received as a continuous or as fractionated exposure. While sheep and swine are basically similar in response to acute radiation, their sensitivity to chronic irradiation is markedly different. Sheep remain relatively sensitive as the radiation exposure is protracted while swine are more resistant and capable of surviving extremely large doses of chronic irradiation. This response to chronic irradiation correlated well with changes in radiosensitivity and recovery following an acute, sublethal exposure.

  6. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  7. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-16

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  8. Photoionization of highly charged ions from ultra-intense, ultraviolet and near-infrared radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekanayake, Nagitha

    High intensity laser light was instrumental for notable advances across an exceptional range of disciplines including plasma physics, quantum control, attosecond science, molecular dynamics, inertial confinement fusion, and optical science. Current laser technology has brought about the next generation of ultra-high intensities (1019 W/cm2). Our common understanding of light-matter interactions breaks down at these extreme intensities, especially when the liberated photoelectron becomes relativistic and the effect of the laser magnetic field is no longer negligible. As the ultrastrong laser science frontier involves unprecedented energy scales from 1 keV to 1 MeV and opens up an abundance of new high energy atomic and molecular processes, photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules in super- and ultra-high intensity fields become an area of interest. The work presented in this dissertation is carried out to provide a better answer to the fundamental question "How atoms and molecules interact with super- and ultra-intense light fields?" In particular, the presented work will cover quantitative measurements of ionization products, ions and photoelectrons, from strong- (1013 -- 1016 W/cm2) to ultra-strong (10 16 -- 1019 W/cm2) field ionization of noble gas atoms (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and hydrocarbon molecules (CH4). In order to understand the molecular ionization processes at extreme intensities the ellipticity dependence of the ultrafast photoionization for Cn+ fragments from methane is investigated. The study extends from the strong field (C+, C2+) at 10 14 W/cm2 to the ultrastrong field (C5+) at 1018 W/cm2. The first precision measurements of ionization of Ne and Kr at 400 nm are presented from 1013 to 1017 W/cm2 for charge states up to Kr 8+. The findings indicate that ultraviolet to vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths can give the largest recollision for higher charge states. Experimental photoelectron measurements from single atom photoionization of noble gases

  9. Does exposure to a radiofrequency electromagnetic field modify thermal preference in juvenile rats?

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; de Seze, René; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Some studies have shown that people living near a mobile phone base station may report sleep disturbances and discomfort. Using a rat model, we have previously shown that chronic exposure to a low-intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) was associated with paradoxical sleep (PS) fragmentation and greater vasomotor tone in the tail. Here, we sought to establish whether sleep disturbances might result from the disturbance of thermoregulatory processes by a RF-EMF. We recorded thermal preference and sleep stage distribution in 18 young male Wistar rats. Nine animals were exposed to a low-intensity RF-EMF (900 MHz, 1 V x m(-1)) for five weeks and nine served as non-exposed controls. Thermal preference was assessed in an experimental chamber comprising three interconnected compartments, in which the air temperatures (Ta) were set to 24°C, 28°C and 31°C. Sleep and tail skin temperature were also recorded. Our results indicated that relative to control group, exposure to RF-EMF at 31°C was associated with a significantly lower tail skin temperature (-1.6°C) which confirmed previous data. During the light period, the exposed group preferred to sleep at Ta = 31°C and the controls preferred Ta = 28°C. The mean sleep duration in exposed group was significantly greater (by 15.5%) than in control group (due in turn to a significantly greater amount of slow wave sleep (SWS, +14.6%). Similarly, frequency of SWS was greater in exposed group (by 4.9 episodes.h-1). The PS did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the dark period, there were no significant intergroup differences. We conclude that RF-EMF exposure induced a shift in thermal preference towards higher temperatures. The shift in preferred temperature might result from a cold thermal sensation. The change in sleep stage distribution may involve signals from thermoreceptors in the skin. Modulation of SWS may be a protective adaptation in response to RF-EMF exposure. PMID

  10. Does Exposure to a Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Field Modify Thermal Preference in Juvenile Rats?

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; de Seze, René; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Some studies have shown that people living near a mobile phone base station may report sleep disturbances and discomfort. Using a rat model, we have previously shown that chronic exposure to a low-intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) was associated with paradoxical sleep (PS) fragmentation and greater vasomotor tone in the tail. Here, we sought to establish whether sleep disturbances might result from the disturbance of thermoregulatory processes by a RF-EMF. We recorded thermal preference and sleep stage distribution in 18 young male Wistar rats. Nine animals were exposed to a low-intensity RF-EMF (900 MHz, 1 V.m−1) for five weeks and nine served as non-exposed controls. Thermal preference was assessed in an experimental chamber comprising three interconnected compartments, in which the air temperatures (Ta) were set to 24°C, 28°C and 31°C. Sleep and tail skin temperature were also recorded. Our results indicated that relative to control group, exposure to RF-EMF at 31°C was associated with a significantly lower tail skin temperature (−1.6°C) which confirmed previous data. During the light period, the exposed group preferred to sleep at Ta = 31°C and the controls preferred Ta = 28°C. The mean sleep duration in exposed group was significantly greater (by 15.5%) than in control group (due in turn to a significantly greater amount of slow wave sleep (SWS, +14.6%). Similarly, frequency of SWS was greater in exposed group (by 4.9 episodes.h−1). The PS did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the dark period, there were no significant intergroup differences. We conclude that RF-EMF exposure induced a shift in thermal preference towards higher temperatures. The shift in preferred temperature might result from a cold thermal sensation. The change in sleep stage distribution may involve signals from thermoreceptors in the skin. Modulation of SWS may be a protective adaptation in response to RF-EMF exposure. PMID

  11. Effect of exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields on melatonin levels in calves is seasonally dependent

    PubMed Central

    Kolbabová, Tereza; Pascal Malkemper, E.; Bartoš, Luděk; Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Turčáni, Marek; Burda, Hynek

    2015-01-01

    The question of health effects of extremely low frequency (50/60 Hz) magnetic fields (ELFMF) has been widely discussed, but the mechanisms of interaction of these fields with biological systems for intensities relevant to human and animal exposure are still under question. The melatonin (MLT) hypothesis suggests that exposure to ELFMF might decrease MLT production thereby promoting cancerogenesis. So far, most studies of MLT secretion under exposure to ELFMF reported negative or inconsistent results. Here, we measured salivary MLT in 1–2 months old cattle calves exposed to 50 Hz-MF in the hundreds of nT-range. We found an inhibitory effect of the ELFMF upon MLT secretion in winter (in accordance with the MLT hypothesis). In contrast, in summer, MLT concentration was increased by ELFMF exposure (contrary to the MLT hypothesis). The inhibitory effect in winter was much stronger than the positive effect in summer. We hypothesize that this season-dependent effect upon MLT synthesis might by mediated by an effect of ELFMF upon the serotonin metabolism and conclude that future tests of ELFMF effects should also measure serotonin levels and consider association with the seasonal effects (photoperiod or temperature) during the exposure. PMID:26381579

  12. Data-Model Comparisons of Photoelectron Flux Intensities on the Strong Crustal Field Lines at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael; Trantham, Matthew; Mitchell, David

    2010-05-01

    This study quantifies the factors controlling photoelectron fluxes on strong crustal field lines in the Martian ionosphere. Using data from Mars Global Surveyor's Magnetometer and Electron Reflectometer instruments, dayside electron populations near the strong crustal fields in the southern hemisphere are analyzed versus various controlling parameters. These parameters include a Mars F10.7 proxy, a solar wind pressure proxy, local solar zenith angle, magnetic elevation angle, magnetic field strength. It was found that solar EUV radiation (corrected for solar zenith angle and the Mars-Sun distance) has the strongest influence on the photoelectron fluxes, and during different time periods this radiation has a stronger influence than at others times. Second, fluxes show a slight enhancement when the magnetic elevation angle is near zero degrees (horizontal field lines). Finally, other parameters, such as pressure and magnetic field strength, seem to have no major influence. These measurement-based results are then compared against numerical modeling flux intensities to quantify the physical mechanisms behind the observed relationships. The numerical code used for this study is our superthermal electron transport model, which solves for the electric distribution function along a magnetic field line. The code includes the influence of a variable magnetic field strength, pitch angle scattering and mirror trapping, and collisional energy cascading. The influence of solar EUV flux, atmospheric composition, solar wind dynamic pressure, and the local magnetic field are systematically investigated with this code to understand why some of these parameters have a strong influence on photoelectron flux intensity while others do not.

  13. Dosimetry considerations in far field microwave exposure of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Eagan, P.; Harris, C.R.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    A circulating water bath exposure system has been designed for in vitro radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposure studies in the 915 to 2450 MHz range. A Styrofoam float, in which 10 T-25 plastic tissue culture flasks are embedded, is rotated at approximately 20 rpm in a Plexiglas water bath at a distance beneath a rectangular horn. The continuous circular rotation of the flasks is designed to average out the heterogeneity present in stationary flask exposures. The rotation also serves to prevent the establishment of chemical gradients in the medium within the flasks. Several factors have been demonstrated to affect the specific absorption rate (SAR) measured in the medium in the exposed flasks. These factors include: 1) the position of the exposure flasks relative to the long axis of the antenna horn; 2) whether the flasks are exposed while stationary or in rotation; 3) the volume of the medium contained in the flask; and 4) the depth in the medium in the flask at which temperatures for SAR calculation are measured. The presence of cells in the exposure flask (as attached monolayer or cell suspension) did not result in an SAR different from that measured in the same volume of medium without cells present.

  14. Differential acquisition of human antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum according to intensity of exposure to Anopheles bites.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Jean Biram; Samb, Badara; Sagna, Andre Barembaye; Fortin, Sonia; Doucoure, Souleymane; Sow, Cheikh; Senghor, Simon; Gaayeb, Lobna; Guindo, Soihibou; Schacht, Anne-Marie; Rogerie, François; Hermann, Emmanuel; Dia, Ibrahima; Konate, Lassana; Riveau, Gilles; Remoue, Franck

    2012-08-01

    Malaria immunity is modulated by many environmental and epidemiological factors. This study evaluates the influence of a hitherto unstudied environmental-epidemiological factor, namely the impact of human exposure to Anopheles bites on the isotype profile of acquired antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum. In two Senegalese villages where the intensity of exposure to Anopheles bites was markedly different (high and low exposure), specific IgG1 and IgG3 responses to P. falciparum whole schizont extract (WSE) and circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were evaluated at the peak of Anopheles exposure (September) and later (December) in a cohort of 120 children aged 3-8 years. Multivariate analysis showed a significantly lower IgG1 response against P. falciparum WSE and CSP in children highly exposed to Anopheles bites (Gankette) compared to those who were weakly exposed (Mboula). In contrast, in both villages, parasitemia and increasing age were strongly associated with higher IgG1 and IgG3 levels. We hypothesize that high exposure to Anopheles bites could inhibit IgG1-dependent responsiveness to P. falciparum known to induce protective immune responses against malaria. The impact of mosquito saliva on the regulation of specific protective immunity may need to be taken into account in epidemiological studies and trials for malaria vaccines.

  15. Nonlinear photoresponse of field effect transistors terahertz detectors at high irradiation intensities

    SciTech Connect

    But, D. B.; Drexler, C.; Ganichev, S. D.; Sakhno, M. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Dyakonova, N.; Drachenko, O.; Gutin, A.; Knap, W.

    2014-04-28

    Terahertz power dependence of the photoresponse of field effect transistors, operating at frequencies from 0.1 to 3 THz for incident radiation power density up to 100 kW/cm{sup 2} was studied for Si metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors and InGaAs high electron mobility transistors. The photoresponse increased linearly with increasing radiation intensity up to the kW/cm{sup 2} range. Nonlinearity followed by saturation of the photoresponse was observed for all investigated field effect transistors for intensities above several kW/cm{sup 2}. The observed photoresponse nonlinearity is explained by nonlinearity and saturation of the transistor channel current. A theoretical model of terahertz field effect transistor photoresponse at high intensity was developed. The model explains quantitative experimental data both in linear and nonlinear regions. Our results show that dynamic range of field effect transistors is very high and can extend over more than six orders of magnitudes of power densities (from ∼0.5 mW/cm{sup 2} to ∼5 kW/cm{sup 2})

  16. Phase Correlations at Neighboring Intensity Critical Points in Gaussian Random Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Isaac

    1998-11-01

    Phase correlations are studied for neighboring critical points of the intensity in an isotropic Gaussian random wave field. Significant correlations and anticorrelations are found that extend out to at least the fifth nearest neighbors. A theoretical interpretation of the empirical data is attempted within the framework of the phase autocorrelation and the probability-density functions of extended two-dimensional random phase fields. It is found, however, that adaptations of these theoretical models are unable to account satisfactorily, or even qualitatively, for the extensive phase correlations that are present in these fields.

  17. Neuroendocrine mediated effects of electromagnetic-field exposure: Possible role of the pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.B.; Stevens, R.G.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1989-01-01

    Reports from recent epidemiological studies have suggested a possible association between extremely low frequently (ELF; including 50- or 60-Hz) electric- and magnetic-field exposure, and increased risk of certain cancers, depression, and miscarriage. ELF field-induced pineal gland dysfunction is a possible etiological factor in these effects. Work in our laboratory and elsewhere has shown that ELF electromagnetic-field exposure can alter the normal circadian rhythm of melatonin synthesis and release in the pineal gland. Consequences of reduced or inappropriately timed melatonin release on the endocrine, neuronal, and immune systems are discussed. Laboratory data linking ELF field exposure to changes in pineal circadian rhythms in both animal and humans are reviewed. The authors suggest that the pineal gland, in addition to being a convenient locus for measuring dyschronogenic effects of ELF field exposure, may play a central role in biological response to these fields via alterations in the melatonin signal.

  18. In vivo setup characterization for pulsed electromagnetic field exposure at 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, A.; Perrin, A.; Cretallaz, C.; Pla, S.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Debouzy, J. C.; Leveque, P.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo setup for pulsed electric field exposure at 3 GHz is proposed and characterized in this work. The exposure system allows far field, whole-body exposure of six animals placed in Plexiglas cages with a circular antenna. Chronic exposures under 18 W incident average power (1-4 kW peak power) and acute exposures under 56 W incident average power (4.7 kW peak power) were considered. Numerical and experimental dosimetry of the setup allowed the accurate calculation of specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions under various exposure conditions. From rat model numerical simulations, the whole-body mean SAR values were 1.3 W kg-1 under chronic exposures and 4.1 W kg-1 under acute exposure. The brain-averaged SAR value was 1.8 W kg-1 and 5.7 W kg-1 under chronic and acute exposure, respectively. Under acute exposure conditions, a 10 g specific absorption of 1.8  ±  1.1 mJ · kg-1 value was obtained. With temperature rises below 0.8 °C, as measured or simulated on a gel phantom under typical in vivo exposures, this exposure system provides adequate conditions for in vivo experimental investigations under non-thermal conditions.

  19. In vivo setup characterization for pulsed electromagnetic field exposure at 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, A.; Perrin, A.; Cretallaz, C.; Pla, S.; Arnaud-Cormos, D.; Debouzy, J. C.; Leveque, P.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo setup for pulsed electric field exposure at 3 GHz is proposed and characterized in this work. The exposure system allows far field, whole-body exposure of six animals placed in Plexiglas cages with a circular antenna. Chronic exposures under 18 W incident average power (1–4 kW peak power) and acute exposures under 56 W incident average power (4.7 kW peak power) were considered. Numerical and experimental dosimetry of the setup allowed the accurate calculation of specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions under various exposure conditions. From rat model numerical simulations, the whole-body mean SAR values were 1.3 W kg‑1 under chronic exposures and 4.1 W kg‑1 under acute exposure. The brain-averaged SAR value was 1.8 W kg‑1 and 5.7 W kg‑1 under chronic and acute exposure, respectively. Under acute exposure conditions, a 10 g specific absorption of 1.8  ±  1.1 mJ · kg‑1 value was obtained. With temperature rises below 0.8 °C, as measured or simulated on a gel phantom under typical in vivo exposures, this exposure system provides adequate conditions for in vivo experimental investigations under non-thermal conditions.

  20. In vivo setup characterization for pulsed electromagnetic field exposure at 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Collin, A; Perrin, A; Cretallaz, C; Pla, S; Arnaud-Cormos, D; Debouzy, J C; Leveque, P

    2016-08-21

    An in vivo setup for pulsed electric field exposure at 3 GHz is proposed and characterized in this work. The exposure system allows far field, whole-body exposure of six animals placed in Plexiglas cages with a circular antenna. Chronic exposures under 18 W incident average power (1-4 kW peak power) and acute exposures under 56 W incident average power (4.7 kW peak power) were considered. Numerical and experimental dosimetry of the setup allowed the accurate calculation of specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions under various exposure conditions. From rat model numerical simulations, the whole-body mean SAR values were 1.3 W kg(-1) under chronic exposures and 4.1 W kg(-1) under acute exposure. The brain-averaged SAR value was 1.8 W kg(-1) and 5.7 W kg(-1) under chronic and acute exposure, respectively. Under acute exposure conditions, a 10 g specific absorption of 1.8  ±  1.1 mJ · kg(-1) value was obtained. With temperature rises below 0.8 °C, as measured or simulated on a gel phantom under typical in vivo exposures, this exposure system provides adequate conditions for in vivo experimental investigations under non-thermal conditions. PMID:27436662

  1. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field exposure on adenosine receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Fini, Milena; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Different effects of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) exposure on brain tissue have been described in pre-clinical models and in clinical settings. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action and the possible interaction with membrane receptors such as adenosine receptors (ARs) has not been investigated. The present study focused on the effect of PEMFs on A1 and A2A ARs in the rat cerebral cortex and cortical neurons. Affinity and density of ARs were evaluated by means of saturation binding experiments while mRNA expression was investigated through retro-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PEMF treatment of the intact rat cerebral cortex or cortical neurons at 1.5 mT mediated a transient and significant increase in A2A ARs after 4 h (2.0-fold increase) and 6 h (1.4- and 1.8-fold increase, respectively) of exposure. In addition, PEMF treatment of the rat cerebral cortex and rat cortical neurons at 3 mT upregulated A2A ARs after 2 h (2.0- and 2.2-fold increase, respectively) and 4 h (1.6- and 1.9-fold increase, respectively). The treatment of rat cortex membranes with PEMFs at 1.5 and 3 mT induced an increase in A2A AR density after 2 h (1.9- and 2.2-fold increase, respectively) and was constant at all incubation times investigated. In rat cortical neurons, mRNA levels of A1 and A2A ARs were not affected by PEMF exposure for the times and intensities used. These results suggest that PEMF treatment has different biological effects in whole organs or cells in comparison with isolated membranes.

  2. Field monitoring design considerations for assessing indoor exposures to combustion pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traynor, Gregory W.

    Laboratory and controlled field studies of indoor air quality (IAQ) have characterized pollutant emission rates from combustion sources and have measured other key indoor air pollution parameters such as air exchange rates and indoor reactivity rates for the houses investigated. In addition, several field studies have attempted to measure, with varying degrees of success, pollutant exposures, indoor pollutant concentrations, and other parameters in large populations. To date, there exists no comprehensive strategy for assessing distributions of exposures to combustion pollutants and distributions of factors that affect such exposures in large populations. This paper outlines important parameters that affect combustion-related indoor air pollution concentrations and exposures, delineates weaknesses in our current understanding of exposures and field sampling methodologies, and mentions important considerations in planning appropriate field sampling strategies.

  3. Near-field vector intensity measurements of a small solid rocket motor.

    PubMed

    Gee, Kent L; Giraud, Jarom H; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2010-08-01

    Near-field vector intensity measurements have been made of a 12.7-cm diameter nozzle solid rocket motor. The measurements utilized a test rig comprised of four probes each with four low-sensitivity 6.35-mm pressure microphones in a tetrahedral arrangement. Measurements were made with the rig at nine positions (36 probe locations) within six nozzle diameters of the plume shear layer. Overall levels at these locations range from 135 to 157 dB re 20 microPa. Vector intensity maps reveal that, as frequency increases, the dominant source region contracts and moves upstream with peak directivity at greater angles from the plume axis.

  4. Water intensity assessment of shale gas resources in the Wattenberg field in northeastern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Stephen; Carlson, Ken; Knox, Ken; Douglas, Caleb; Rein, Luke

    2014-05-20

    Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. As the population increases and agriculture and energy needs continue to rise, the pressure on water and other natural resources is expected to intensify. Recent advances in technology have stimulated growth in oil and gas development, as well as increasing the industry's need for water resources. This study provides an analysis of how efficiently water resources are used for unconventional shale development in Northeastern Colorado. The study is focused on the Wattenberg Field in the Denver-Julesberg Basin. The 2000 square mile field located in a semiarid climate with competing agriculture, municipal, and industrial water demands was one of the first fields where widespread use of hydraulic fracturing was implemented. The consumptive water intensity is measured using a ratio of the net water consumption and the net energy recovery and is used to measure how efficiently water is used for energy extraction. The water and energy use as well as energy recovery data were collected from 200 Noble Energy Inc. wells to estimate the consumptive water intensity. The consumptive water intensity of unconventional shale in the Wattenberg is compared with the consumptive water intensity for extraction of other fuels for other energy sources including coal, natural gas, oil, nuclear, and renewables. 1.4 to 7.5 million gallons is required to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells before energy is extracted in the Wattenberg Field. However, when the large short-term total freshwater-water use is normalized to the amount of energy produced over the lifespan of a well, the consumptive water intensity is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2.7 gal/MMBtu and is similar to surface coal mining.

  5. Water intensity assessment of shale gas resources in the Wattenberg field in northeastern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Stephen; Carlson, Ken; Knox, Ken; Douglas, Caleb; Rein, Luke

    2014-05-20

    Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. As the population increases and agriculture and energy needs continue to rise, the pressure on water and other natural resources is expected to intensify. Recent advances in technology have stimulated growth in oil and gas development, as well as increasing the industry's need for water resources. This study provides an analysis of how efficiently water resources are used for unconventional shale development in Northeastern Colorado. The study is focused on the Wattenberg Field in the Denver-Julesberg Basin. The 2000 square mile field located in a semiarid climate with competing agriculture, municipal, and industrial water demands was one of the first fields where widespread use of hydraulic fracturing was implemented. The consumptive water intensity is measured using a ratio of the net water consumption and the net energy recovery and is used to measure how efficiently water is used for energy extraction. The water and energy use as well as energy recovery data were collected from 200 Noble Energy Inc. wells to estimate the consumptive water intensity. The consumptive water intensity of unconventional shale in the Wattenberg is compared with the consumptive water intensity for extraction of other fuels for other energy sources including coal, natural gas, oil, nuclear, and renewables. 1.4 to 7.5 million gallons is required to drill and hydraulically fracture horizontal wells before energy is extracted in the Wattenberg Field. However, when the large short-term total freshwater-water use is normalized to the amount of energy produced over the lifespan of a well, the consumptive water intensity is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2.7 gal/MMBtu and is similar to surface coal mining. PMID:24749865

  6. The contribution of temperature, exposure intensity and visible light to the inhibitory effect of irradiation on acute chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Marti, Hanna; Blenn, Christian; Borel, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) is radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacteria associated with various diseases in both animals and humans. A recent in vitro study demonstrated that wIRA combined with visible light (wIRA/VIS) has potential as a non-chemical method for the treatment of chlamydial infections without adversely affecting the cell viability. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various factors on the effect of wIRA/VIS on acute chlamydial infection, namely the impact of temperature, exposure intensity and infectious dose (multiplicity of infection) as well as the efficacy of the visible light component.We demonstrate that non-thermal effects contribute to the inhibition of acute chlamydial infection. Visible light enhances the inhibitory effect of wIRA on extracellular bacteria (elementary bodies or EBs).Moreover, the inhibitory effect of wIRA/VIS following treatment of EBs prior to infection correlated with increased irradiation intensity. The infectivity of mature chlamydial inclusions was significantly reduced upon wIRA/VIS exposure at all irradiation intensities investigated, suggesting the contribution of host cell factors to the anti-chlamydial effect of wIRA/VIS in the late stage of the developmental cycle. The effect of irradiation was not influenced by the infectious dose.

  7. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. The influence of reduced light intensity on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicide exposure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Lim, Richard P; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide pollution events in aquatic ecosystems often coincide with increased turbidity and reduced light intensity. It is therefore important to determine whether reduced light intensity can influence herbicide toxicity, especially to primary producers such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms collected from 4 rivers were exposed to herbicides in 48 h rapid toxicity tests under high light (100 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) and low light (20 µmol m(-2)  s(-1) ) intensities. The effects of 2 herbicides (atrazine and glyphosate) were assessed on 26 freshwater benthic diatom taxa. There was no significant interaction of light and herbicide effects at the community level or on the majority (22 of 26) of benthic diatom taxa. This indicates that low light levels will likely have only a minor influence on the response of benthic diatoms to herbicides. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2252-2260. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26801964

  9. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  10. Mapping the spatial patterns of field traffic and traffic intensity to predict soil compaction risks at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttmann, Rainer; Kuhwald, Michael; Nolde, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is one of the main threats to cropland soils in present days. In contrast to easily visible phenomena of soil degradation, soil compaction, however, is obscured by other signals such as reduced crop yield, delayed crop growth, and the ponding of water, which makes it difficult to recognize and locate areas impacted by soil compaction directly. Although it is known that trafficking intensity is a key factor for soil compaction, until today only modest work has been concerned with the mapping of the spatially distributed patterns of field traffic and with the visual representation of the loads and pressures applied by farm traffic within single fields. A promising method for for spatial detection and mapping of soil compaction risks of individual fields is to process dGPS data, collected from vehicle-mounted GPS receivers and to compare the soil stress induced by farm machinery to the load bearing capacity derived from given soil map data. The application of position-based machinery data enables the mapping of vehicle movements over time as well as the assessment of trafficking intensity. It also facilitates the calculation of the trafficked area and the modeling of the loads and pressures applied to soil by individual vehicles. This paper focuses on the modeling and mapping of the spatial patterns of traffic intensity in silage maize fields during harvest, considering the spatio-temporal changes in wheel load and ground contact pressure along the loading sections. In addition to scenarios calculated for varying mechanical soil strengths, an example for visualizing the three-dimensional stress propagation inside the soil will be given, using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to construct 2D or 3D maps supporting to decision making due to sustainable field traffic management.

  11. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhichao; Liao, Xuelian; Zhang, Jiangqian; Jia, Lingli

    2016-01-01

    Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p < 0.001), respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p = 0.002). The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r = 0.426; p = 0.006) and length of service (r = −0.403; p < 0.01). Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service. PMID:27556036

  12. High-intensity geomagnetic field 'spike' observed at ca. 3000 cal BP in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark D.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Waters, Michael R.; Lundelius, Ernest; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-05-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions of the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have found extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity at ca. 3000 yr cal BP. These observations have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been preserved in metallurgical slag and fired, mud brick walls. We present a new, fully oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 yr from Hall's Cave, Texas, whose complete, >3.8 m thick sedimentary sequence spans from the present to 16 , 850 ± 110 RC yr BP (Modern to 20,600 cal BP). Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are negligible to non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from a previously excavated stratigraphic section. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 15 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrates, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, starting ca. 3000 yr ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years. This record presents well-dated evidence, obtained using conventional techniques, for the existence of a geomagnetic intensity spike in North America that is contemporaneous with the

  13. Assessment of children's long-term exposure to magnetic fields (The Geomet study)

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, M.D. ); Koontz, M.D.; Mehegan, L.L.; Dietrich, F.M.; Nagda, N.L. )

    1992-11-01

    Past epidemiologic studies have had conflicting results concerning a possible association between childhood cancer and magnetic field exposure, perhaps because indirect measures of exposure were used. This pilot study was conducted to assess day-today and seasonal variations in children's exposure, the contributions of different environments to total exposure, and the level of measurement/observational detail needed to accurately predict or classify children's exposures. Twenty-eight children in two age groups (8 to 11 years and under 4 years) were personally monitored for exposure to magnetic fields. All subjects were monitored for two consecutive days during winter or spring, and 12 of the subjects were monitored during both seasons. Surrogates for exposure were developed from observation of wiring configurations, indoor/outdoor spot measurements of field strength, and continuous stationary monitoring at selected indoor locations in parallel with personal monitoring. The results indicate that a single monitoring episode may be insufficient for characterization of long-term exposure, and spot measurements at one point in time may not be adequate to predict exposure. For this study, wire codes and measures based on parallel stationary monitoring in the child's bedroom were the best surrogates for personal exposure.

  14. Kidney-Sparing Methods for Extended-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) in Cervical Carcinoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kunogi, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Nanae; Terao, Yasuhisa; Sasai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Coplanar extended-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) targeting the whole-pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes in patients with advanced cervical cancer results in impaired creatinine clearance. An improvement in renal function cannot be expected unless low-dose (approximately 10 Gy) kidney exposure is reduced. The dosimetric method should be considered during EF-IMRT planning to further reduce low-dose exposure to the kidneys. To assess the usefulness of non-coplanar EF-IMRT with kidney-avoiding beams to spare the kidneys during cervical carcinoma treatment in dosimetric analysis between non-coplanar and coplanar EF-IMRT, we compared the doses of the target organ and organs at risk, including the kidney, in 10 consecutive patients. To estimate the influence of EFRT on renal dysfunction, creatinine clearance values after treatment were also examined in 18 consecutive patients. Of these 18 patients, 10 patients who were included in the dosimetric analysis underwent extended field radiation therapy (EFRT) with concurrent chemotherapy, and eight patients underwent whole-pelvis radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy to treat cervical carcinoma between April 2012 and March 2015 at our institution. In the dosimetric analysis, non-coplanar EF-IMRT was effective at reducing low-dose (approximately 10 Gy) exposure to the kidneys, thus maintaining target coverage and sparing other organs at risk, such as the small bowel, rectum, and bladder, compared with coplanar EF-IMRT. Renal function in all 10 patients who underwent EFRT, including coplanar EF-IMRT (with kidney irradiation), was low after treatment, and differed significantly from that of the eight patients who underwent WPRT (no kidney irradiation) 6 months after the first day of treatment (P = 0.005). In conclusion, non-coplanar EF-IMRT should be considered in patients with advanced cervical cancer, particularly in patients with a long life expectancy or with pre-existing renal dysfunction. PMID

  15. A Geostatistical Framework for Estimating Rain Intensity Fields Using Dense Rain Gauge Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, L.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Rain gauges provide direct and continuous observations of rain accumulation with a high time resolution (up to 1min). However the representativeness of these measurements is restricted to the funnel where rainwater is collected. Due to the high spatial heterogeneity of rainfall, this poor spatial representativeness is a strong limitation for the detailed reconstruction of rain intensity fields. Here we propose a geostatistical framework that is able to generate an ensemble of simulated rain fields based on data from a dense rain gauge network. When the density of rain gauges is high (sensor spacing in the range 500m to 1km), the spatial correlation between precipitation time series becomes sufficient to identify and track the rain patterns observed at the rain gauge sampling rate. Rain observations derived from such networks can thus be used to reconstruct the rain field with a high resolution in both space and time (i.e. 1min in time, 100m in space). Our method produces an ensemble of realizations that honor the rain intensities measured throughout the rain gauge network and preserve the main features of the rain intensity field at the considered scale, i.e.: the advection and morphing properties of rain cells over time, the intermittency and the skewed distribution of rainfall, and the decrease of the rain rate near the rain cell borders (dry drift). This allows to image the observed rain field and characterize its main features, as well as to quantify the related uncertainty. The obtained reconstruction of the rainfall are continuous in time, and therefore can complement weather radar observations which are snapshots of the rain field. In addition, the application of this method to networks with a spatial extent comparable to the one of a radar pixel (i.e. around 1km2) could allow exploration of the rain field within a single radar pixel.

  16. Analysis of the influence of the cell geometry, orientation and cell proximity effects on the electric field distribution from direct RF exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, J. L.; Muñoz, S.; Sancho, M.; Miranda, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows the importance of using a cell model with the proper geometry, orientation and internal structure to study possible cellular effects from direct radiofrequency exposure. For this purpose, the electric field intensity is calculated, using the finite element numerical technique, in single- and multilayer spherical, cylindrical and ellipsoidal mammalian cell models exposed to linearly polarized electromagnetic plane waves of frequencies 900 and 2450 MHz. An extensive analysis is performed on the influence that the cell geometry and orientation with respect to the external field have in the value of the electric field induced in the membrane and cytoplasm. We also show the significant role that the cytoplasmic and extracellular bound water layers play in determining the electric field intensity for the cylindrical and ellipsoidal cell models. Finally, a study of the mutual interactions between cells shows that polarizing effects between cells significantly modify the values of field intensity within the cell.

  17. Exposure of welders and other metal workers to ELF magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Skotte, J H; Hjøllund, H I

    1997-01-01

    This study assessed exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields of welders and other metal workers and compared exposure from different welding processes. Exposure to ELF magnetic fields was measured for 50 workers selected from a nationwide cohort of metal workers and 15 nonrandomly selected full-time welders in a shipyard. The measurements were carried out with personal exposure meters during 3 days of work for the metal workers and I day of work for the shipyard welders. To record a large dynamic range of ELF magnetic field values, the measurements were carried out with "high/low" pairs of personal exposure meters. Additional measurements of static magnetic fields at fixed positions close to welding installations were done with a Hall-effect fluxmeter. The total time of measurement was 1273 hours. The metal workers reported welding activity for 5.8% of the time, and the median of the work-period mean exposure to ELF magnetic fields was 0.18 microT. DC metal inert or active gas welding (MIG/MAG) was used 80% of the time for welding, and AC manual metal arc welding (MMA) was used 10% of the time. The shipyard welders reported welding activity for 56% of the time, and the median and maximum of the workday mean exposure to ELF magnetic fields was 4.70 and 27.5 microT, respectively. For full-shift welders the average workday mean was 21.2 microT for MMA welders and 2.3 microT for MIG/MAG welders. The average exposure during the effective time of welding was estimated to be 65 microT for the MMA welding process and 7 microT for the MIG/MAG welding process. The time of exposure above 1 microT was found to be a useful measure of the effective time of welding. Large differences in exposure to ELF magnetic fields were found between different groups of welders, depending on the welding process and effective time of welding. MMA (AC) welding caused roughly 10 times higher exposure to ELF magnetic fields compared with MIG/MAG (DC) welding. The measurements of

  18. Impact of high-intensity pulsed electric fields on carotenoids profile of tomato juice made of moderate-intensity pulsed electric field-treated tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Odriozola-Serrano, Isabel; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2013-12-01

    The effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the carotenoid content of tomato juices was studied. First, moderate-intensity PEF (MIPEF) was applied to raw tomatoes. Afterwards, MIPEF-treated and untreated tomatoes were immediately refrigerated at 4 °C for 24 h and then, they were separately ground to produce tomato juices. Juices were treated by heat treatments or by high-intensity PEF (HIPEF) and stored under refrigeration for 56 days. MIPEF treatment of tomatoes increased the content of carotenoid compounds in tomato juices. An enhancement of 63-65% in 15-cis-lycopene was observed in juices prepared with MIPEF-treated tomatoes. A slight increase in cis-lycopene isomers was observed over time, whereas other carotenoids slightly decreased. However, HIPEF treated tomato juices maintained higher carotenoid content (10-20%) through the storage time than thermally and untreated juices. The combination of MIPEF and HIPEF treatments could be used not only to produce tomato juices with high carotenoid content but also, to maintain higher the carotenoid content during storage time. PMID:23871069

  19. Exposure of arctic field scientists to ultraviolet radiation evaluated using personal dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S; Scherer, K; Horneck, G; Rettberg, P; Facius, R; Gugg-Helminger, A; Driscoll, C; Lee, P

    2001-10-01

    During July 2000 we used an electronic personal dosimeter (X-2000) and a biological dosimeter (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt: Biofilm) to characterize the UV radiation exposure of arctic field scientists involved in biological and geological fieldwork. These personnel were working at the Haughton impact structure on Devon Island (75 degrees N) in the Canadian High Arctic under a 24 h photoperiod. During a typical day of field activities under a clear sky, the total daily erythemally weighted exposure, as measured by electronic dosimetry, was up to 5.8 standard erythemal dose (SED). Overcast skies (typically 7-8 okta of stratus) reduced exposures by a mean of 54%. We estimate that during a month of field activity in July a typical field scientist at this latitude could potentially receive approximately 80 SED to the face. Because of body movements the upper body was exposed to a UV regimen that often changed on second-to-second time-scales as assessed by electronic dosimetry. Over a typical 10 min period on vehicle traverse, we found that erythemal exposure could vary to up to 87% of the mean exposure. Time-integrated exposures showed that the type of outdoor field activities in the treeless expanse of the polar desert had little effect on the exposure received. Although absolute exposure changed in accordance with the time of day, the exposure ratio (dose received over horizontal dose) did not vary much over the day. Under clear skies the mean exposure ratio was 0.35 +/- 0.12 for individual activities at different times of the day assessed using electronic dosimetry. Biological dosimetry showed that the occupation was important in determining daily exposures. In our study, scientists in the field received an approximately two-fold higher dose than individuals, such as medics and computer scientists, who spent the majority of their time in tents. PMID:11683037

  20. Real-Time Tracking Method for a Magnetic Target Using Total Geomagnetic Field Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liming; Kang, Chong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wan, Shengwei

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient and effective method for real-time tracking a long-range magnetic target using total geomagnetic field intensity. This method is based on a scalar magnetometer sensor array and an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm. Due to the effect of the geomagnetic field variations, the detection distance range of the method based on the gradient tensor is short. To increase the detection range, the geomagnetic field variations must be eliminated in the method. In this paper, the geomagnetic quasi-gradient calculated from total geomagnetic field intensity in the sensor array is used. We design a sensor array with five magnetometers and use the geomagnetic quasi-gradient to eliminate the geomagnetic field variations. The improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) algorithm, which minimizes the errors of total geomagnetic field values between measurements and calculations, is applied in this real-time tracking method to track a long-range magnetic target position. The detailed principle of the method and the steps of the IPSO algorithm are described in detail. The method is validated with a numerical simulation. The results show that the average relative error of position is less than 2 % and the execution time is less than 1.5 s.

  1. FIRST SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF MOVING MAGNETIC FEATURES IN PHOTOSPHERIC INTENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip

    2012-07-01

    The formation and the temporal evolution of a bipolar moving magnetic feature (MMF) was studied with high-spatial and temporal resolution. The photometric properties were observed with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory using a broadband TiO filter (705.7 nm), while the magnetic field was analyzed using the spectropolarimetric data obtained by Hinode. For the first time, we observed a bipolar MMF simultaneously in intensity images and magnetic field data, and studied the details of its structure. The vector magnetic field and the Doppler velocity of the MMF were also studied. A bipolar MMF with its positive polarity closer to the negative penumbra formed, accompanied by a bright, filamentary structure in the TiO data connecting the MMF and a dark penumbral filament. A fast downflow ({<=}2 km s{sup -1}) was detected at the positive polarity. The vector magnetic field obtained from the full Stokes inversion revealed that a bipolar MMF has a U-shaped magnetic field configuration. Our observations provide a clear intensity counterpart of the observed MMF in the photosphere, and strong evidence of the connection between the MMF and the penumbral filament as a serpentine field.

  2. How Does the Local Electrostatic Field Influence Emitted Wavelengths and Bioluminescent Intensities of Modified Heteroaromatic Luciferins?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Williams, Quinton L; Walters, Wilbur; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-08-20

    The firefly chromophore, oxyluciferin, is in the pocket of the firefly luciferase and is surrounded by the side-chains of some amino acid residues. The charged residues produce the local electrostatic field (LEF) around the oxyluciferin. The emitted wavelengths and intensities of the oxyluciferin and its heterocyclic analogs under the LEF are examined. The common overlapping volumes of the HOMO and LUMO explain why the oscillator strengths vary under the LEF. Three average Ex change rates of the first excited energy are introduced to measure what luciferins are more sensitive to the LEF. The first excited energies and intensities in two enzymatic-like microenvironments are simulated via the LEF. The oscillator strengths and the net electric charges of the O6' and the O4 are applied to explain the experimental bioluminescent intensities. PMID:26218458

  3. Optimization of infrared two-color multicycle field synthesis for intense-isolated-attosecond-pulse generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-11-01

    We present the optimization of the two-color synthesis method for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) in the multicycle regime. By mixing an infrared assistant pulse with a Ti:sapphire main pulse, we show that an IAP can be produced using a multicycle two-color pulse with a duration longer than 30 fs. We also discuss the influence of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) and the relative intensity on the generation of IAPs. By optimizing the wavelength of the assistant field, IAP generation becomes insensitive to the CEP slip. Therefore, the optimized two-color method enables us to relax the requirements of pulse duration and easily produce the IAP with a conventional multicycle laser pulse. In addition, it enables us to markedly suppress the ionization of the harmonic medium. This is a major advantage for efficiently generating intense IAPs from a neutral medium by applying the appropriate phase-matching and energy-scaling techniques.

  4. Optimization of infrared two-color multicycle field synthesis for intense-isolated-attosecond-pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lan Pengfei; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-11-15

    We present the optimization of the two-color synthesis method for generating an intense isolated attosecond pulse (IAP) in the multicycle regime. By mixing an infrared assistant pulse with a Ti:sapphire main pulse, we show that an IAP can be produced using a multicycle two-color pulse with a duration longer than 30 fs. We also discuss the influence of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) and the relative intensity on the generation of IAPs. By optimizing the wavelength of the assistant field, IAP generation becomes insensitive to the CEP slip. Therefore, the optimized two-color method enables us to relax the requirements of pulse duration and easily produce the IAP with a conventional multicycle laser pulse. In addition, it enables us to markedly suppress the ionization of the harmonic medium. This is a major advantage for efficiently generating intense IAPs from a neutral medium by applying the appropriate phase-matching and energy-scaling techniques.

  5. Double ionization of He in an intense laser field via a rescattering process

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, T.; Toshima, N.; Tong, X. M.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the ratio of double to single ionization of He in an intense laser field based on the rescattering model. Folding the rescattering energy spectra with the electron impact inelastic cross sections, we obtain the probability of double ionization due to the nonsequential ionization process. Our results are in reasonable agreement with the experiment [Walker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1227 (1994)]. Furthermore, we investigate the physical insights of the nonsequential double ionization by analyzing the rescattering energy spectra at different intensities and the contributions from individual returns. This study confirms the reliability of the rescattering energy spectra obtained from ab initio calculations. The rescattering information can be used to analyze many other dynamical processes in intense laser-matter interactions, such as molecular imaging.

  6. Holocene geomagnetic field intensity variations: Contribution from the low latitude Canary Islands site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Laj, C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Carracedo, J. C.; Wandres, C.

    2015-11-01

    New absolute paleomagnetic intensity (PI) are investigated from 37 lava flows located at Tenerife and Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). They complete previously published directional results from the same flows and therefore allow to examine the time variations of the full geomagnetic vector. Twenty-eight flows are radiocarbon dated between 1706 AD and about 13 200 BC and one is historical. Eight other flows are not dated but they have stratigraphic links with the dated flows and archeomagnetic ages had been attributed to them based on their paleomagnetic directions. Various mineralogical analyses were conducted, giving access to the nature of the magnetic minerals and to their grain size. We performed the original Thellier and Thellier paleointensity (PI) experiments with a success rate of about 65% coupling this experiment with the strict set of selection criteria PICRIT-03. The mean PIs at the flow level are based on 3 to 12 independent PI determinations except for one site in which only one reliable determination could be obtained. The data indicate some variability in the local field intensity with a prominent PI peak centered around 600 BC and reaching 80 μT (VADM 16 ×1022 Am2), documented for the first time in this region. Combined with the published data obtained from western Africa, Spain, Portugal, Morocco and the Azores within a 2000 km-radius around the Canary Islands, our data allow to construct a curve illustrating the Earth magnetic field intensity fluctuations for Southwestern Europe/Western Africa. This curve, compared to the one produced for the Middle East and one calculated for Central Asia shows that maximum intensity patches have a very large geographical extent. They do not yet appear clearly in the models of variations of the dipolar field intensity.

  7. A Genome-Wide mRNA Expression Profile in Caenorhabditis elegans under Prolonged Exposure to 1750MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dawen; Yu, Zhoulong; Wu, Tongning; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    Objective C. elegans has been used as a biomonitor for microwave-induced stress. However, the RF (radiofrequency) fields that have been used in previous studies were weak (≤1.8W/kg), and the bio-effects on C. elegans were mostly negative or ambiguous. Therefore, this study used more intense RF fields (SAR = 3W/kg) and longer time course of exposure (60h at 25°C, L1 stage through adult stage) to investigate the biological consequences of 1750 MHz RF fields in wild-type worms. Methods The growth rates and lifespans of RF-exposure group and the control group were carefully recorded. RNA samples were collected at L4 (35h) and gravid adult (50h) stages for further high-throughput sequencing, focusing on differences between the RF-exposure and the sham control groups. Results The RF-exposed and sham control groups developed at almost the same rate and had similar longevity curves. In L4 stage worms, 94 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated genes were identified, while 186 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated genes were identified in adult stage worms. GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes at 35h were associated with growth, body morphogenesis and collagen and cuticle-based development. Genes that were linked to growth rate and reproductive development were differentially expressed at 50h. Some embryonic and larval development genes in the offspring were also differentially expressed at 50h. Ten genes were differentially expressed at both 35h and 50h, most of which were involved in both embryonic and larval developmental processes. Although prolonged RF fields did not induce significant temperature increase in RF exposure groups, the temperature inside worms during exposure was unknown. Conclusions No harmful effects were observed in prolonged exposure to 1750 MHz RF fields at SAR of 3W/kg on development and longevity of C. elegans. Although some differentially expressed genes were found after prolonged RF exposure, these differences were ascribed to

  8. Orbital Noise of the Earth Causes Intensity Fluctuation in the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Wade, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Orbital noise of Earth's obliquity can provide an insight into the core of the Earth that causes intensity fluctuations in the geomagnetic field. Here we show that noise spectrum of the obliquity frequency have revealed a series of frequency periods centered at 250-, 1OO-, 50-, 41-, 30-, and 26-kyr which are almost identical with the observed spectral peaks from the composite curve of 33 records of relative paleointensity spanning the past 800 kyr (Sint-800 data). A continuous record for the past two million years also reveals the presence of the major 100 kyr periodicity in obliquity noise and geomagnetic intensity fluctuations. These results of correlation suggest that obliquity noise may power the dynamo, located in the liquid outer core of the Earth, which generates the geomagnetic field.

  9. Optimisation extraction of chondroitin sulfate from fish bone by high intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    He, Guidan; Yin, Yongguang; Yan, Xiaoxia; Yu, Qingyu

    2014-12-01

    High intensity pulsed electric fields (PEF) was used to extract chondroitin sulphate (CS) from fish bone. Results show that PEF extraction speed is much faster, and the content of CS is much higher compared with traditional methods. Variation of PEF parameters and the content of CS were determined by single factor experiments. The processing conditions were optimised by quadratic general rotary unitised design experiments. The maximum yield of 6.92 g/L was achieved under the following conditions: material-liquid ratio of 1:15 g/mL, electric field intensity of 16.88 kV/cm, pulse number of 9, and NaOH concentration of 3.24%. The purity of CS was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. CS purity was high, and the extract did not contain any other glycosaminoglycans. PEF can be widely used to extract CS with non-thermal performance, high speed, and low pollution.

  10. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during chronic exposure to multiple field strengths of 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rommereim, D.N.; Rommereim, R.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Buschbom, R.L.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and developmental toxicity. A response model was developed from previous results and tested in groups of rats exposed to electric fields at various field strengths. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. Animals were exposed for 19 hr/day throughout the experiment. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Offspring were born in the field and remained with their dams through the suckling period. Numbers of pups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to higher field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham-exposed animals. At weaning, two F1 females per litter (randomly selected) continued on the same exposure regimen were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and euthanized at 20 days of gestation. Uterine contents were evaluated, and all live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F1 females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m.

  11. A model to assess personal exposure to ELF magnetic fields from common household sources

    SciTech Connect

    Delpizzo, V. )

    1990-01-01

    Emission data are inadequate to characterize the contribution of a source to the total personal extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure. In this paper, a simple model is proposed that takes into consideration the position of the subject with respect to the source and the duration of exposure. The magnetic field is spatially averaged over the whole body of the exposed subject and integrated over time. Exposure is regarded as significant if it approaches or exceeds 400 microT-h/year. By use of this method, the ELF magnetic fields generated by several household sources were compared with the levels of residential external sources, to assess their relative significance. Some common domestic electrical appliances are found to be responsible for an exposure comparable to that from power lines. When the model is used to assess exposure to electric blankets, apparently conflicting findings may be reconciled.

  12. Absorption spectra of two-level atoms interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field and an arbitrarily intense probe field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tai Hyun; Chung, Myung Sai; Lee, Hai-Woong

    1999-09-01

    A numerical method is introduced that solves the optical Bloch equations describing a two-level atom interacting with a strong polychromatic pump field with an equidistant spectrum and an arbitrarily intense monochromatic probe field. The method involves a transformation of the optical Bloch equations into a system of equations with time-independent coefficients at steady state via double harmonic expansion of the density-matrix elements, which is then solved by the method of matrix inversion. The solutions so obtained lead immediately to the determination of the polarization of the atomic medium and of the absorption and dispersion spectra. The method is applied to the case when the pump field is bichromatic and trichromatic, and the physical interpretation of the numerically computed spectra is given.

  13. Heating, ionization and upward discharges in the mesosphere due to intense quasi-electrostatic thundercloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasko, Victor P.; Inan, Umran S.; Taranenko, Yuri N.; Bell, Timothy F.

    1995-01-01

    Quasi-electrostatic (QE) fields that temporarily exist at high altitudes following the sudden removal (e.g., by a lightning discharge) of thundercloud charge at low altitudes are found to significantly heat mesospheric electrons and produce ionization and light. The intensity, spatial extent, duration and spectra of optical emissions produced are consistent with the observed features of the Red Sprite type of upward discharges.

  14. Volt-ampere characteristics and nonlinear properties of indium phosphide Gunn diodes in intense microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. I.; Galanin, A. L.; Liubchenko, V. E.; Rogashkov, A. S.; Telegin, A. A.

    1988-10-01

    Experimental results are presented on InP Gunn diodes in intense microwave fields. Two important features of such devices which distinguish them from GaAs devices were found: (1) microwave oscillation at an active-layer electron density of about 10 to the 17th/cu cm and (2) the substantial heating of the near-cathode region of the active layer, leading to characteristic changes in the I-V characteristics.

  15. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Structural Deformation of CO22+ in Intense Femtosecond Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Xia, Yuan-Qin; Wang, Yu-Quan; Lu, Zhen-Zhong; Chen, De-Ying

    2009-08-01

    The angular distributions of CO+ from the dissociation of CO2+2 and CO+2 in intense femtosecond laser fields (45 fs, about 5 × 1015 W/cm2) are studied at a laser wavelength of 800 nm based on the time-of-flight mass spectra of CO fragment ions. The experimental results show that structural deformation occurs in the charge state of CO2+2 and the CO+2 maintains linear geometrical structure.

  16. Comparison of personal radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure in different urban areas across Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Wout; Thuroczy, Gyoergy; Gajsek, Peter; Trcek, Tomaz; Bolte, John; Vermeeren, Guenter; Juhasz, Peter; Finta, Viktoria

    2010-10-15

    Background: Only limited data are available on personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in everyday life. Several European countries performed measurement studies in this area of research. However, a comparison between countries regarding typical exposure levels is lacking. Objectives: To compare for the first time mean exposure levels and contributions of different sources in specific environments between different European countries. Methods: In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), measurement studies were performed using the same personal exposure meters. The pooled data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method in order to allow for data below the detection limit. Mean exposure levels were compared between different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoor. Results: Exposure levels were of the same order of magnitude in all countries and well below the international exposure limits. In all countries except for the Netherlands, the highest total exposure was measured in transport vehicles (trains, car, and busses), mainly due to radiation from mobile phone handsets (up to 97%). Exposure levels were in general lower in private houses or flats than in offices and outdoors. At home, contributions from various sources were quite different between countries. Conclusions: Highest total personal RF-EMF exposure was measured inside transport vehicles and was well below international exposure limits. This is mainly due to mobile phone handsets. Mobile telecommunication can be considered to be the main contribution to total RF-EMF exposure in all microenvironments.

  17. Dynamics of intense particle beam in axial-symmetric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Yuri K.

    2015-02-01

    Axial-symmetric magnetic field is often used in focusing of particle beams. Most existing ion Low Energy Beam Transport lines are based on solenoid focusing. Modern accelerator projects utilize superconducting solenoids in combination with superconducting accelerating cavities for acceleration of high-intensity particle beams. Present article discusses conditions for matched beam in axial-symmetric magnetic field. Analysis allows us to minimize power consumption of solenoids and beam emittance growth due to nonlinear space charge, lens aberrations, and maximize acceptance of the channel. Expressions for maximum beam current in focusing structure, beam emittance growth due to spherical aberrations and non-linear space charge forces are derived.

  18. Atoms and molecules in intense attosecond fields: beyond the dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Førre, M.; Hansen, J. P.; Kocbach, L.; Selstø, S.; Kjeldsen, T. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2007-11-01

    The exact non-dipole minimal-coupling Hamiltonian for an atomic system interacting with an explicitly time- and space-dependent laser field is transformed into the rest frame of a classical free electron in the laser field, i.e., into the Kramers-Henneberger frame. The new form of the Hamiltonian has been used to study the non-dipole dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense XUV laser pulses. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved without any simplifications.

  19. Electronic and intraband optical properties of single quantum rings under intense laser field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, A.; Kirakosyan, A. A.; Baghramyan, H. M.; Barseghyan, M. G.; Laroze, D.

    2014-09-07

    The influence of an intense laser field on one-electron states and intraband optical absorption coefficients is investigated in two-dimensional GaAs/Ga{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}As quantum rings. An analytical expression of the effective lateral confining potential induced by the laser field is obtained. The one-electron energy spectrum and wave functions are found using the effective mass approximation and exact diagonalization technique. We have shown that changes in the incident light polarization lead to blue- or redshifts in the intraband optical absorption spectrum. Moreover, we found that only blueshift is obtained with increasing outer radius of the quantum ring.

  20. A new resonance based method for the measurement of magnetic field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Park, Jinhyuk; Zhang, Haifeng; Umapathy, Mangalanathan; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-04-01

    A new magnetic field intensity measurement method using resonance principle is proposed in this paper. The proposed magnetic field sensor consists of magneto rheological (MR) fluid placed between two collocated, piezo-bounded, metallic, circular disc mounted face to face in the z-axis. The resonant frequency of the disc is changed by the magnetic field dependent viscosity of the MR fluid. The key enabling concept in this work is stiffening the circular metal disc using the rheological effect of MR fluid i.e. resonant frequency varies with respect to magnetic field strength. The change in resonant frequency is measured using simple closed loop electronics connected between the two piezo crystals. The analytical model of the vibrating circular discs with MR fluid placed at the center is derived and the results are validated with experimentation. The proposed magnetic flux density measurement concept is novel and it is found to have better sensitivity and linearity.

  1. Enhancement of Efficiency of XUV Generation in Atomic Gases Irradiated by Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Y.; Shoutova, O. A.

    We present the results of the theoretical study of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atomic gases. It is shown that the photoemission spectra exhibit unusual behavior when the laser field strength approaches near-atomic values. In subatomic field strength the cut-off frequency increases linearly with laser pulse intensity. However, when the field strength approaches near-atomic region firstly cut-off frequency slows down and then saturates. To interpret such kind of photoemission spectrum behavior we have proposed the light-atom interaction theory based on the use of eigenfunctions of boundary value problem for "an atom in the external field" instead of the traditional basis of the "free atom" eigenfunctions.

  2. Electron nuclear dynamics of LiH and HF in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeckhove, J.; Coutinho-Neto, M. D.; Deumens, E.; Öhrn, Y.

    1997-12-01

    The electron nuclear dynamics theory (END) extended to include a time-dependent external field is briefly described. The dynamical equations, in addition to the full electron nuclear coupling terms, now also contain the interactions of both the nuclei and the electrons with the external field. This extended END theory is applied to the study of vibrational excitations of the simple diatomics HF and LiH. The END results using an intense infrared laser field are compared with those of molecular dynamics as well as those from quantum wave-packet calculations. While the effect of the nonadiabatic electron-nuclear coupling terms on the vibrational dynamics is negligible for the chosen application, the electron-field coupling has a significant impact.

  3. Dalitz plot analysis of Coulomb exploding O{sub 3} in ultrashort intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Akitaka; Takahashi, Eiji J.; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2007-09-21

    The three-body Coulomb explosion of O{sub 3}, O{sub 3}{sup 3+}{yields}O{sup +}+O{sup +}+O{sup +}, in ultrashort intense laser fields (2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) is studied with two different pulse durations (9 and 40 fs) by the coincidence momentum imaging method. In addition to a decrease in the total kinetic energy release, a broadening in the Dalitz plot distribution [Philos. Mag. 44, 1068 (1953)] is observed when the pulse duration is increased from 9 to 40 fs. The analysis based on a simple Coulomb explosion model shows that the geometrical structure of O{sub 3} remains almost unchanged during the interaction with the few-cycle intense laser fields, while a significant structural deformation along all the three vibrational coordinates, including the antisymmetric stretching coordinate, is identified in the 40 fs intense laser fields. The observed nuclear dynamics are discussed in terms of the population transfer to the excited states of O{sub 3}.

  4. Intensity and phase fields behind phase-shifting masks studied with high-resolution interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Kim, Myun Sik; Naqavi, Ali; Herzig, Hans Peter; Weichelt, Tina; Zeitner, Uwe; Vogler, Uwe; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    We try to find out the details of how light fields behind the structures of photomasks develop in order to determine the best conditions and designs for proximity printing. The parameters that we use approach real situations like structure printing at proximity gaps of 20 to 50 μm and structure sizes down to 2 μm. This is the first time that an experimental analysis of light propagation through a mask is presented in detail, which includes information on intensity and phase. We use high-resolution interference microscopy (HRIM) for the measurement. HRIM is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which is capable of recording three-dimensional distributions of intensity and phase with diffraction-limited resolution. Our characterization technique allows plotting the evolution of the desired light field, usually called the aerial image, and therefore gives access to the printable structure until the desired proximity gap. Here, we discuss in detail the evolution of intensity and phase fields of elbow or corner structures at different positions behind a phase mask and interpret the main parameters. Of particular interest are tolerances against proximity gap variation and the theoretical explanation of the resolution in printed structures.

  5. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  6. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  7. The influence of intense electric fields on three-dimensional asymmetric magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2013-06-15

    A three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of magnetic reconnection in an asymmetric configuration without a guide field and with temperature ratio T{sub i}/T{sub e}>1 demonstrates that intense perpendicular electric fields are produced on the low-density side of the current layer where there is a strong gradient in the plasma density. The simulation shows that the 3-D reconnection rate is unaffected by these intense electric fields, that the electron current layer near the X line remains coherent and does not break up, but that localized regions of strong energy dissipation exist along the low-density separatrices. Near the X line the dominant term in the generalized Ohm's law for the reconnection electric field remains the off-diagonal electron pressure gradient ∂P{sub exy}/∂x. On the low-beta separatrix, however, the anomalous drag −<δnδE{sub y}>/ makes an equally important contribution to that of the pressure gradient to the average E{sub y} field.

  8. Coherent manipulation of absorption by intense fields in four level ladder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear optical processes attributed to the dependence of the susceptibility of the medium on the input fluence can be remarkably manipulated by the quantum interference and coherence. One of these processes, the optical bistability (OB), that refers to the possibilities of two stable outputs for the same input fields, can also be modified by quantum coherence. Further, the nonlinear dependence of the absorption on the power of the input light gives rise to interesting processes like saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA). While the SA corresponds to the decrease in the absorption coefficient with the increase of intensity of input light, the RSA corresponds to otherwise, that finds applications in optical limiting. We show, using a four-level Ladder system, how a control field manipulates these processes for an intense probe field applied in the excited state transition. The nonlinear absorption increases whereas the threshold of OB decreases in presence of a control field. We further delineates how the control field and the decay rates modifies SA and RSA. The control of these processes find applications in optical switching, optical limiting and optical communications.

  9. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    PubMed

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices.

  10. The Revised Electromagnetic Fields Directive and Worker Exposure in Environments With High Magnetic Flux Densities

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-01-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers’ exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker’s body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices. PMID:24557933

  11. [Cavitation and boiling of bubbles at the focal region during high intensity focused ultrasound exposure].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mingsong; Ai, Huijian; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a very complex transient process and can cause tissue coagulation necrosis. The cavitation and boiling behaviour of bubbles in the focal region play very important roles throughout an injury process. This paper reviews the research done by domestic and foreign scholars on behaviours of bubbles in HIFU irradiation process and summarizes in the focal region bubble cavitation and boiling generation, related detective means and relationships with hyperecho, temperature rise of the focus and injury shape.

  12. High light intensity protects photosynthetic apparatus of pea plants against exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, E; Wróblewska, B; Drozak, A; Siedlecka, M

    2006-01-01

    The electron transport rates and coupling factor activity in the chloroplasts; adenylate contents, rates of photosynthesis and respiration in the leaves as well as activity of isolated mitochondria were investigated in Pisum sativum L. leaves of plants grown under low or high light intensity and exposed after detachment to 5 mM Pb(NO(3))(2). The presence of Pb(2+) reduced rate of photosynthesis in the leaves from plants grown under the high light (HL) and low light (LL) conditions, whereas the respiration was enhanced in the leaves from HL plants. Mitochondria from Pb(2+) treated HL-leaves oxidized glycine at a higher rate than those isolated from LL leaves. ATP content in the Pb-treated leaves increased to a greater extend in the HL than LL grown plants. Similarly ATP synthase activity increased markedly when chloroplasts isolated from control and Pb-treated leaves of HL and LL grown plants were subjected to high intensity light. The presence of Pb ions was found inhibit ATP synthase activity only in chloroplasts from LL grown plants or those illuminated with low intensity light. Low light intensity during growth also lowered PSI electron transport rates and the Pb(2+) induced changes in photochemical activity of this photosystem were visible only in the chloroplasts isolated from LL grown plants. The activity of PSII was influenced by Pb ions on similar manner in both light conditions. This study demonstrates that leaves from plants grown under HL conditions were more resistant to lead toxicity than those obtained from the LL grown plants. The data indicate that light conditions during growth might play a role in regulation of photosynthetic and respiratory energy conservation in heavy metal stressed plants by increasing the flexibility of the stoichiometry of ATP to ADP production.

  13. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  14. FIELD COLLECTION METHODS USED IN THE EPA NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY HUMAN EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT PROGRAM TO EVALUATE CHILDREN'S AGGREGATE EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES: A TUTORIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tutorial on the field sampling equipment used to collect multimedia samples.

    We conduct observational human exposure measurement studies in order to understand what chemicals people come into contact with, at what levels, what the sources of those chemicals are, and wher...

  15. Effect of electric field exposure on melatonin and enzyme circadian rhythms in the rat pineal

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.; Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of chronic 30-day electric field exposure on pineal serotonin N-acetyl transferase (EC 2.1.15) activity as well as melatonin and 5-methoxy tryptophol (5-MTOL) concentrations in rats, were assessed.

  16. High exposure rates of anticoagulant rodenticides in predatory bird species in intensively managed landscapes in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas Kjær; Lassen, Pia; Elmeros, Morten

    2012-10-01

    The extensive use of anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) for rodent control has led to widespread secondary exposure in nontarget predatory wildlife species. We investigated exposure rates and concentrations of five ARs in liver samples from five raptors and six owls from Denmark. A total of 430 birds were analysed. ARs were detected in 84-100 % of individual birds within each species. Multiple AR exposure was detected in 73 % of all birds. Average number of substances detected in individual birds was 2.2 with no differences between owls and raptors. Difenacoum, bromadiolone, and brodifacoum were the most prevalent substances and occurred in the highest concentrations. Second-generation ARs made up 96 % of the summed AR burden. Among the six core species (sample size >30), summed AR concentrations were lower in rough-legged buzzard (Buteo lagopus) and long-eared owl (Asio otus) than in barn owl (Tyto alba), buzzard (B. buteo), kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), and tawny owl (Strix aluco). There was a strong tendency for seasonal variations in the summed AR concentration with levels being lowest during autumn, which is probably related to an influx of less-exposed migrating birds from northern Scandinavia during autumn. High hepatic AR residue concentrations (>100 ng/g wet weight), which have been associated with symptoms of rodenticide poisoning and increased mortality, were recorded high frequencies (12.9-37.4 %) in five of the six core species. The results suggest that the present use of ARs in Denmark, at least locally, may have adverse effects on reproduction and, ultimately, population status in some raptors and owls. PMID:22588365

  17. Influence of exposure to pesticides on serum components and enzyme activities of cytotoxicity among intensive agriculture farmers.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Amparo Gómez, M; Pérez, Vidal; García-Lario, Jose V; Pena, Gloria; Gil, Fernando; López, Olga; Rodrigo, Lourdes; Pino, Guadalupe; Pla, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    Although the effects of acute pesticide poisoning are well known for the pesticides most currently used, hardly any data exist on health effects after long-term low-dose exposures. Major unresolved issues include the effect of moderate exposure in the absence of poisoning. The increased utilization of pesticides other than organophosphates makes it even more difficult to find associations. In this study a cohort of 106 intensive agriculture workers were assessed twice during the course of a spraying season for changes in serum biochemistry, namely enzymes reflecting cytotoxicity (AST, ALT, LDH, CK, and amino-oxidase) and other biochemical parameters, such as markers of nephrotoxicity (urea, creatinine) and lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides). Several criteria for estimating pesticide exposure were used, the most important one being serum cholinesterase depression greater than 25% from baseline to peak exposure. Our results revealed an association of pesticide exposure with changes in AST (increased activity), LDH, and amino-oxidase (decreased activity) as well as with changes in serum creatinine and phosphorus (lower and higher levels, respectively). These results provide support for a very slight impairment of the liver function, but overall these findings are consistent with no clinically significant hepatotoxicity. Intriguingly, paraoxonase-1 R allele was found to be an independent predictor of higher rates of AST and lower rates of amino-oxidase, so that it may play a supporting role as an individual marker of susceptibility on pesticide-induced health effects. In conclusion, different biomarkers might be used to detect early biochemical effects of pesticides before adverse clinical health effects occur. PMID:16620808

  18. Changes in catecholamine (CA) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in mouse brain induced by prenatal exposure to electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.; Yao, G.D.; Yang, Q.E.; Lu, D.Q. )

    1992-02-26

    A series of 3 experiments were performed to determine the effects of 50 Hz EMF from electric blankets on developing mouse brains. NIH pregnant mice were exposed 5 hours daily throughout the pregnancy to EMF from blankets with different intensities and proportions of electric field (E) to magnetic field (B) components. Quantitative analyses for CA fluorescence and SDH transmittance in hypothalamus and/or hippocampus were carried out with an OPTON MPMOIK microspectrophotometer. The results of the 3 experiments were summarized as follows: (1) When compared with control, a significant decrease in SDH activities was observed in hypothalamus of mice aged 7 exposed prenatally to 50 Hz EMF at the E strength of 1.0-1.5 kV/m and magnetic flux density of 0.2-0.4uT, but the decrease was not found when the offspring were tested at 40 days of age. However, a significant decrease in CA content was observed not only at 7 days of age but at 40 days. (2) For different proportions of E to B, either E exposure or B exposure decreased CA in hypothalamus and hippocampus of mice, but the former was more effective than the latter. There was no difference in CA levels between the E exposure group and the combined exposure group, indicating that the decrease in CA were induced mainly by E exposure. It is concluded that the CA content and SDH activity in mouse brain may be decreased by 50 Hz E and/or B, especially E, exposure from electric blankets.

  19. From the UV to the static-field limit: Rates and scaling laws for intense-field ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Parker, J. S.; Boca, M.; Taylor, K. T.

    2009-11-01

    We present high-accuracy calculations of ionization rates of helium at UV (195 nm) wavelengths. The numerical results are obtained from full-dimensional numerical integration of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Comparison is made between ionization rates at 195 nm with previously obtained data at 390 nm and 780 nm. In addition, we have obtained quantitatively accurate solutions of the full-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation for static-field ionization of helium. We compare our numerically integrated rates with those of time-independent calculations, and obtain good agreement over a wide range of intensities.

  20. [Exposure to VHF and UHF electromagnetic fields among workers employed in radio and TV broadcast centers. I. Assessment of exposure].

    PubMed

    Zmyślony, M; Aniołczyk, H; Bortkiewicz, A

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, radio and television have become one of the areas of the human technical activity that develops most rapidly. Also ultra-short waves of VHF (30-300 MHz) and UHF (0.3-3 GHz) bands have proved to be the most important carriers of radio and TV-programs. In Poland, a network of radio and TV broadcast centers (RTCN) with high (over 200 m) masts was set up in the 1960s and 1970s. These centers concentrate the majority of stations broadcasting national and local programs (for areas within the RTCN range). At present, the RTCN established several decades ago are equally important. The assessment of the exposure to electromagnetic fields among workers of multi-program broadcast stations is complicated and feasible only to a certain degree of approximation because of changing conditions of exposure in individual stations during their long history, resulting from the changing numbers and types of transmitters installed. In this work, the method of retrospective estimation of exposure dose is described, and the results of the assessment carried out at three kinds of typical RTCN are discussed. The results of the analysis indicate that the workers of RTCN are exposed primarily to electromagnetic fields of VHF and UHF bands, but this exposure may be considered as admissible, hence it should not exert an adverse effect on the workers' health. PMID:11828845

  1. Indoor transformer stations and ELF magnetic field exposure: use of transformer structural characteristics to improve exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Okokon, Enembe Oku; Roivainen, Päivi; Kheifets, Leeka; Mezei, Gabor; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that populations of multiapartment buildings with indoor transformer stations may serve as a basis for improved epidemiological studies on the relationship between childhood leukaemia and extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). This study investigated whether classification based on structural characteristics of the transformer stations would improve ELF MF exposure assessment. The data included MF measurements in apartments directly above transformer stations ("exposed" apartments) in 30 buildings in Finland, and reference apartments in the same buildings. Transformer structural characteristics (type and location of low-voltage conductors) were used to classify exposed apartments into high-exposure (HE) and intermediate-exposure (IE) categories. An exposure gradient was observed: both the time-average MF and time above a threshold (0.4 μT) were highest in the HE apartments and lowest in the reference apartments, showing a statistically significant trend. The differences between HE and IE apartments, however, were not statistically significant. A simulation exercise showed that the three-category classification did not perform better than a two-category classification (exposed and reference apartments) in detecting the existence of an increased risk. However, data on the structural characteristics of transformers is potentially useful for evaluating exposure-response relationship.

  2. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz–100 kHz)

    PubMed Central

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure. PMID:27598182

  3. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure. PMID:27598182

  4. Review of Studies Concerning Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposure Assessment in Europe: Low Frequency Fields (50 Hz-100 kHz).

    PubMed

    Gajšek, Peter; Ravazzani, Paolo; Grellier, James; Samaras, Theodoros; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to review the findings of exposure assessment studies done in European countries on the exposure of the general public to low frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of various frequencies. The study shows that outdoor average extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) in public areas in urban environments range between 0.05 and 0.2 µT in terms of flux densities, but stronger values (of the order of a few µT) may occur directly beneath high-voltage power lines, at the walls of transformer buildings, and at the boundary fences of substations. In the indoor environment, high values have been measured close to several domestic appliances (up to the mT range), some of which are held close to the body, e.g., hair dryers, electric shavers. Common sources of exposure to intermediate frequencies (IF) include induction cookers, compact fluorescent lamps, inductive charging systems for electric cars and security or anti-theft devices. No systematic measurement surveys or personal exposimetry data for the IF range have been carried out and only a few reports on measurements of EMFs around such devices are mentioned. According to the available European exposure assessment studies, three population exposure categories were classified by the authors regarding the possible future risk analysis. This classification should be considered a crucial advancement for exposure assessment, which is a mandatory step in any future health risk assessment of EMFs exposure.

  5. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  6. Intensity/frequency indicator for detection in space the high values of the incident solar or laser optical radiation in comparison with the appropriate maximum permissible exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitomeneas, S.; Petropoulos, B.

    2001-08-01

    The solar or laser optical radiation impact to humans in space depends on the intensity, on the exposure type (direct or indirect) & duration and on the matching of radiation wavelength to tissue characteristics. The main protection factor in space is the application of exposure limits. This paper describes the main biological optical interaction parameters, the optical exposure hazards and the development of a small active lightweight indicator, with output beeper rate depended to the ratio of optical irradiance / exposure limit. The indicator may be used as warning element on the side of helmets, goggles, spectacles, etc, with low power consumption. Electronically the indicator is an intensity/frequency converter, based on the value of the ratio of exposure / exposure limits, with audio & light beepers like the indication output of the ionizing (radioactive) radiation monitors.

  7. Intensity/frequency indicator for detection in space: the high values of the incident solar or laser optical radiation in comparison with the appropriate maximum permissible exposure.

    PubMed

    Tsitomeneas, S; Petropoulos, B

    2001-01-01

    The solar or laser optical radiation impact to humans in space depends on the intensity, on the exposure type (direct or indirect) & duration and on the matching of radiation wavelength to tissue characteristics. The main protection factor in space is the application of exposure limits. This paper describes the main biological optical interaction parameters, the optical exposure hazards and the development of a small active lightweight indicator, with output beeper rate depended to the ratio of optical irradiance/exposure limit. The indicator may be used as warning element on the side of helmets, goggles, spectacles, etc, with low power consumption. Electronically the indicator is an intensity/frequency converter, based on the value of the ratio of exposure/exposure limits, with audio & light beepers like the indication output of the ionizing (radioactive) radiation monitors.

  8. Writing Intensive Undergraduate Field Camp and Education: Expanding the Classroom and Preparing Students for the Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, M. T.; McGehee, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    There has always been a strong perception within the geoscience community that a capstone field course was the pinnacle of an undergraduate geoscience degree. Such a course draws from the student's accumulated knowledge base, using information from multiple sub-disciplines to solve "real-world" problems. Since 2006, there has been a 92% increase in students attending field camps (Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014 - AGI). But, the number of field camps has significantly declined. In 1995, 35% of geoscience departments offered a summer field course but by 2006 that number had dropped to 15% (Status Report on Geoscience Summer Field Camps - AGI) and since 2009, the number of field camps listed in the Geology.com directory has dropped from 100 to about 75. This decline is despite the fact that 88% of industry professionals believe fieldwork should "be an integral and required part of undergraduate programs" (Petcovic, et al., 2014). In 2012, in order to meet the growing needs of industry and better prepare our students, Texas A&M University-Kingsville developed an in-house, unique set of field courses that expand the limits of the classroom. We have two required courses. One is similar to a traditional field camp except that it contains a writing intensive component. The six-credit course runs for seven weeks. Prior to camp, students are required to write an introduction (geologic history section) on the study area. We spend two weeks in the field, mapping daily (Big Bend National Park), and then return to Kingsville. Students then have two weeks to finish a fully referenced paper, including their edited introduction, methods, observations, interpretations, discussion and conclusions and once complete, they begin the introduction for the next area. This is another two-week field session, in central Texas. After this, we return the first paper which has been edited for content by geoscience faculty and for grammar by an English instructor. Students spend the next

  9. Computation of instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity field around rotating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yijun; Xu, Chen; Qi, Datong

    2015-02-01

    A vector aeroacoustics method is developed to analyze the acoustic energy flow path from the rotating source. In this method, the instantaneous and time-averaged active acoustic intensity vectors are evaluated from the time-domain and frequency-domain acoustic pressure and acoustic velocity formulations, respectively. With the above method, the acoustic intensity vectors and the acoustic energy streamlines are visualized to investigate the propagation feature of the noise radiated from the monopole and dipole point sources and the rotor in subsonic rotation. The result reveals that a portion of the acoustic energy spirals many circles before moving towards the far field, and another portion of the acoustic energy firstly flows inward along the radial direction and then propagates along the axial direction. Further, an acoustic black hole exists in the plane of source rotation, from which the acoustic energy cannot escape once the acoustic energy flows into it. Moreover, by visualizing the acoustic intensity field around the rotating sources, the acoustic-absorption performance of the acoustic liner built in the casing and centerbody is discussed.

  10. Ligand field and Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters of samarium doped tellurite glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanko, Y. A.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Sahar, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    We report the samarium ions (Sm3+) contents dependent ligand field and Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters (Ω2, Ω4, Ω6) of zinc tellurite glass. The amorphous nature of the melt-quench synthesized glasses is confirmed using XRD. The lower energy region of the absorption spectra is used to calculate JO intensity parameters and the UV edge is exploited to determine the Nephelauxetic ratio, bonding, and Racah parameters. The Nephelauxetic ratio and Racah parameter is reduced and the bonding parameter is enhanced with the increase of Sm3+ concentration. The enhancement in covalency is found to increase the non-bridging oxygen and crystal field strength by delocalizing more d-shell electrons. Furthermore, Nephelauxetic function revealed an increase due to the reduction of localized d-electrons that is aroused from the overlap of d-orbital and ligand orbital. The JO intensity parameters displayed the Ω4>Ω6>Ω2 trend. Increase in Ω2 and decrease in Ω2 and Ω2 with the increase of Sm3+ concentration indicated an increase in the Smsbnd O covalency and coordination in the asymmetry of the prepared glasses. The large vale of spectroscopic quality factor (greater than unity) makes the proposed glass system prospective for various optical devices fabrication.

  11. Tracking electric field exposure levels through radio frequency dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, P.D.; Moore, M.R.; Rochelle, R.W.; Thomas, R.S.; Hess, R.A.; Hoffheins, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    The radio-frequency (rf) dosimeter developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a portable, pocket-sized cumulative-dose recording device designed to detect and record the strengths and durations of electric fields present in the work areas of naval vessels. The device measures an integrated dose and records the electric fields that exceed the permissible levels set by the American National Standards Institute. Features of the rf dosimeter include a frequency range of 30 MHz to 10 GHz and a three-dimensional sensor. Data obtained with the rf dosimeter will be used to determine the ambient field-strength profile for shipboard personnel over an extended time. Readings are acquired and averaged over a 6-min period corresponding to the rise time of the core body temperature. These values are stored for up to 6 months, after which the data are transferred to a computer via the dosimeter's serial port. The rf dosimeter should increase knowledge of the levels of electric fields to which individuals are exposed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  13. Lightning criteria relative to space shuttles: Currents and electric field intensity in Florida lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uman, M. A.; Mclain, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    The measured electric field intensities of 161 lightning strokes in 39 flashes which occurred between 1 and 35 km from an observation point at Kennedy Space Center, Florida during June and July of 1971 have been analyzed to determine the lightning channel currents which produced the fields. In addition, typical channel currents are derived and from these typical electric fields at distances between 0.5 and 100 km are computed and presented. On the basis of the results recommendations are made for changes in the specification of lightning properties relative to space vehicle design as given in NASA TMX-64589 (Daniels, 1971). The small sample of lightning analyzed yielded several peak currents in the 100 kA range. Several current rise-times from zero to peak of 0.5 microsec or faster were found; and the fastest observed current rate-of-rise was near 200 kA/microsec. The various sources of error are discussed.

  14. Optoelectrofluidic field separation based on light-intensity gradients and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinsung; Lee, Sanghyun; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2010-11-01

    Optoelectrofluidic field separation (OEFS) of particles under light-intensity gradient (LIG) is reported, where the LIG illumination on the photoconductive layer converts the short-ranged dielectrophoresis (DEP) force to the long-ranged one. The long-ranged DEP force can compete with the hydrodynamic force by alternating current electro-osmosis (ACEO) over the entire illumination area for realizing effective field separation of particles. Results of the field separation and concentration of diverse particle pairs (0.82--16 μm) are well demonstrated, and conditions determining the critical radius and effective particle manipulation are discussed. In addition, expanding the OEFS to biological applications such as rapid cell manipulation and separation will be discussed. The OEFS with LIG strategy could be a promising manipulation method of particles including biological cells in many applications where a rapid manipulation of particles over the entire working area is of interest.

  15. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W C; Ghafur, O; Khurmi, C; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-07-29

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation. PMID:27517769

  16. Precise and Accurate Measurements of Strong-Field Photoionization and a Transferable Laser Intensity Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, W. C.; Ghafur, O.; Khurmi, C.; Sainadh U, Satya; Calvert, J. E.; Laban, D. E.; Pullen, M. G.; Bartschat, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Wells, D.; Quiney, H. M.; Tong, X. M.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.; Kielpinski, D.

    2016-07-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here, we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percent-level accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much needed benchmark for testing models of ionization in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  17. Investigating short-term exposure to electromagnetic fields on reproductive capacity of invertebrates in the field situation.

    PubMed

    Vijver, Martina G; Bolte, John F B; Evans, Tracy R; Tamis, Wil L M; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Musters, C J M; de Snoo, Geert R

    2014-01-01

    Organisms are exposed to electromagnetic fields from the introduction of wireless networks that send information all over the world. In this study we examined the impact of exposure to the fields from mobile phone base stations (GSM 900 MHz) on the reproductive capacity of small, virgin, invertebrates. A field experiment was performed exposing four different invertebrate species at different distances from a radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) transmitter for a 48-h period. The control groups were isolated from EMF exposure by use of Faraday cages. The response variables as measured in the laboratory were fecundity and number of offspring. Results showed that distance was not an adequate proxy to explain dose-response regressions. No significant impact of the exposure matrices, measures of central tendency and temporal variability of EMF, on reproductive endpoints was found. Finding no impact on reproductive capacity does not fully exclude the existence of EMF impact, since mechanistically models hypothesizing non-thermal-induced biological effects from RF exposure are still to be developed. The exposure to RF EMF is ubiquitous and is still increasing rapidly over large areas. We plea for more attention toward the possible impacts of EMF on biodiversity.

  18. High intensity 5 eV O-atom exposure facility for material degradation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. B.; Spangler, L. H.; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Archuleta, F. A.; Leger, Lubert; Visentine, James; Hunton, Don E.; Cross, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atomic oxygen exposure facility was developed for studies of material degradation. The goal of these studies is to provide design criteria and information for the manufacture of long life (20 to 30 years) construction materials for use in low Earth orbit. The studies that are being undertaken will provide: (1) absolute reaction cross sections for the engineering design problems, (2) formulations of reaction mechanisms for use in the selection of suitable existing materials and the design of new more resistant ones, and (3) the calibration of flight hardware (mass spectrometers, etc.) in order to directly relate experiments performed in low Earth orbit to ground based investigations. The facility consists of a CW laser sustained discharge source of O-atoms, an atomic beam formation and diagnostics system, a spinning rotor viscometer, and provision for using the system for calibration of actual flight instruments.

  19. Influence of electromagnetic field intensity on the metastable zone width of CaCO3 crystallization in circulating water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianguo; Liang, Yandong; Chen, Si

    2016-09-01

    In this study, changes in the metastable zone width of CaCO3 crystallization was determined through conductivity titration by altering electromagnetic field parameters applied to the circulating water system. The critical conductivity value and metastable zone curves of CaCO3 crystallization were determined under different solution concentrations and electromagnetic field intensities. Experimental results indicate that the effect of the electromagnetic field intensity on the critical conductivity value intensifies with the increase of solution concentration. Moreover, the metastable zone width of CaCO3 crystallization increases with the increase of electromagnetic field intensity within 200 Gs, thereby prolonging the induction period of nucleation.

  20. Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. P.

    2006-08-15

    Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of a short duration intense axial magnetic field has been studied. Resonance occurs between the electrons and the laser field for an optimum magnetic field leading to effective energy transfer from laser to electrons. The value of optimum magnetic field is independent of the laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy. The electrons rotate around the axis of the laser pulse with small angle of emittance and small energy spread. Acceleration gradient increases with laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy.

  1. Population exposure to power-frequency fields: concepts, components, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Florig, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    There are many sources of population exposures to power-frequency (50/60 Hz) electric and magnetic fields including household appliances and wiring, neighborhood distribution circuits, and high-voltage transmission lines. Bioeffects studies were unable to demonstrate that exposures to power-frequency fields can affect public health. Researcher have likewise been unable to show that the health effects of such exposures are negligible. State and federal regulatory agencies are, therefore, grappling with questions of whether and how to regulate the sitting or design of new extra high-voltage transmission lines so as to control the ground-level fields to which people are exposed. The purpose of this dissertation is to illuminate some of the exposure-related aspects of these question. A taxonomy of the relationship between field encounter and effect is developed to clarify the meaning of terms such as exposure and dose in the power-frequency context. The major inputs to models of population dose from power-frequency electric fields are identified. The inputs that contribute most to uncertainty in population dose are shown to be the population distribution around overhead lines, the degree to which various objects shield people from overhead line electric fields, and the body currents that are induced by the non-uniform fields associated with appliances and other indoor sources.

  2. Effects of acute electromagnetic fields exposure on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity during resting state.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bin; Shao, Qing; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of acute radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. We designed a controllable LTE-related EMF exposure environment at 2.573 GHz and performed the 30 min real/sham exposure experiments on human brain under the safety limits. The resting state fMRI signals were collected before and after EMF exposure. Then voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity method was utilized to evaluate the acute effects of LTE EMF exposure on the homotopic functional connectivity between two human hemispheres. Based on our previous research, we further demonstrated that the 30 min short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity in resting state around the medial frontal gyrus and the paracentral lobule during the real exposure.

  3. 3D Coincidence Imaging Disentangles Intense Field Double Detachment of SF6(–).

    PubMed

    Kandhasamy, Durai Murugan; Albeck, Yishai; Jagtap, Krishna; Strasser, Daniel

    2015-07-23

    The efficient intense field double detachment of molecular anions observed in SF6(–) is studied by 3D coincidence imaging of the dissociation products. The dissociation anisotropy and kinetic energy release distributions are determined for the energetically lowest double detachment channel by virtue of disentangling the SF5(+) + F fragmentation products. The observed nearly isotropic dissociation with respect to the linear laser polarization and surprisingly high kinetic energy release events suggest that the dissociation occurs on a highly excited state. Rydberg (SF6(+))* states composed of a highly repulsive dication core and a Rydberg electron are proposed to explain the observed kinetic energy release, accounting also for the efficient production of all possible cationic fragments at equivalent laser intensities.

  4. Improved hurricane track and intensity forecast using single field-of-view advanced IR sounding measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Hui

    2009-06-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounders such as the AIRS and IASI provide unprecedented global atmospheric temperature and moisture soundings with high vertical resolution and accuracy. The AIRS and IASI data have been used in global numerical weather prediction models with positive impact on weather forecasts. The high spatial resolution single field-of-view soundings retrieved from AIRS have been applied to hurricane track and intensity assimilations and forecasts. The newly developed NCAR WRF/DART ensemble data assimilation is performed at 36 km resolution. Studies show that the track error for Hurricane Ike (2008) is reduced greatly when AIRS soundings are used compared with the control run which includes other observations such as radiosonde, satellite cloud winds, aircraft data, ship data, and land surface data, etc. The hurricane intensity forecast is also substantially improved when AIRS data are assimilated. This study demonstrates the importance of high spatial and hyperspectral IR sounding data in forecasting hurricanes.

  5. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen

    2014-04-15

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  6. Steering of hydrogen migration in hydrocarbons using intense few-cycle laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Kuebel, Matthias; Burger, Christian; Kling, Nora; Foerg, Benjamin; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Kling, Matthias; Kaziannis, Spyros; Siemering, Robert; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Stierle, Johannes; Kessel, Alexander; Betsch, Kelsie; Bergues, Boris; Trushin, Sergei; Alnaser, Ali; Azzeer, Abdallah; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Structural rearrangements in hydrocarbons, namely acetylene, allene and toluene, are initiated by phase- and intensity-controlled few-cycle laser pulses. The momentum distributions of several ionic fragments are monitored using single-shot VMI and COLTRIMS. The results show that the hydrogen migration in these hydrocarbons can be steered by changing the CEP and the intensity of the few-cycle pulses. Quantum dynamical calculations performed on acetylene and allene show that a superposition of vibrational modes can be created by wave-form controlled few-cycle laser fields, which will result in a directionality of the hydrogen migration. This mechanism, which appears to be of general importance for such complex molecules, should also be able to explain the molecular dynamics observed in toluene.

  7. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen

    2014-04-01

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  8. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions. PMID:18695413

  9. Mechanism of enhanced ionization of linear H+3 in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, I.; Kono, H.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2001-10-01

    We investigate the mechanism of enhanced ionization that occurs at a critical internuclear distance Rc in the two-electron symmetric linear triatomic molecule H+3 subjected to an ultrashort, intense laser pulse by solving exactly the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a one-dimensional model of H+3. Results of the simulations are analyzed by using three essential adiabatic field states \\|1>, \\|2>, and \\|3> that are adiabatically connected with the lowest three electronic states X1Σ+g, B1Σ+u, and E1Σ+g of the field free ion. We give also a simple MO (molecular orbital) picture in terms of these three states to illustrate the important electronic configurations in an intense field. The states \\|1>, \\|2>, and \\|3> are shown to be composed mainly of the configurations HHH+, HH+H, and H+HH, respectively in the presence of the field. We conclude that the overall level dynamics is governed mainly by transitions at the zero-field energy quasicrossings of these three states. The response of H+3 to a laser field can be classified into two regimes. In the adiabatic regime (RRc), internuclear electron transfer is suppressed due to electron repulsion and laser induced localization. In the intermediate (R~=Rc) region, where enhanced ionization occurs, the state \\|3> is most efficiently created by the field-induced nonadiabatic transitions between the states at quasicrossing points. The ``quasistatic'' laser-induced potential barriers are low enough for the electron to tunnel from the ascending (upper) well, thus confirming the quasistatic model at high intensities. Analytic expressions for the critical distance Rc are obtained from this model and collective electron motion is inferred from the detailed time-dependent two-electron distributions.

  10. Tumour cell membrane poration and ablation by pulsed low-intensity electric field with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Dun; Zhou, Ru; Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-03-26

    Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can potentially act like "lighting rods" or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field)/15 V/cm (alignment field) at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz) of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses.

  11. Electric field exposure and evidence of stress in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, L.; De Jager, L. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of stress induced by an electric field on the adrenal gland cortex of mice was examined by means of corticosterone serum assay and evaluation of the lipid profile of the different zones of the cortex. Six generations of experimental mice were exposed to a 10 kV/m electric field from conception and corresponding control groups were sham exposed. Mice were sacrificed at 35 days (n = 10), as adults (n = 20) and at 18 months (old mice) (n = 10). Blinded lipid estimates were performed on histological preparations of the adrenals, serum corticosterone levels were determined, and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean lipid volume in the zona glomerulosa of the exposed adult male group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.004). The median daytime corticosterone level of the exposed male mice was also significantly higher than that in the controls (P = 0.02). The lipid profiles and corticosterone values in the other subgroups did not differ significantly. As chronic stress increases the lipid volume of all the zones of the adrenal cortex and stimulates the zona glomerulosa to corticosterone secretion, the data suggest that the electric field acted as a chronic stressor in the adult male mice. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Dichotomy of the exciton wave function in semiconductors under intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, F. M. S.; Nunes, O. A. C.; Amato, M. A.; Fonseca, A. L. A.; Silva, E. F. Jr. da

    2008-06-01

    We study the behavior of excitons in a semiconductor irradiated by a monochromatic, linearly polarized, intense laser field. By taking the finiteness of the hole effective mass into account and including the radiation field in a semiclassical manner, we solved the two-body quantum problem in the framework of a nonperturbative theory based upon the Kramers-Henneberger translation transformation for the Schroedinger equation. In the Kramers frame, the rapidly oscillating potential is expanded in a Fourier-Floquet series and, for laser frequencies high enough, only the zeroth-order term survives, the so-called 'laser-dressed' potential. By applying the Ehlotzky's approximation, this potential simplifies to a two-center potential that resembles that for the electronic motion in the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecule ion. The binding energy for an exciton in bulk GaAs under a nonresonant laser field is then computed by following a variational scheme we recently adapted from the linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbitals method for the H{sub 2}{sup +} system. Similarly to the binding energy in H{sub 2}{sup +} in the separated-atoms limit, we found that, instead of vanishing, the exciton binding energy tends to a quarter of the excitonic Rydberg energy with the increase of the laser intensity. We also trace a correlation between this residual binding and the dichotomy of the excitonic wave function in the large dressing parameter limit, which indicates the possibility of excitons becoming stable against ionization.

  13. Nanosecond, high-intensity pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J; Fox, Paula M; Rec, Laura J; Willis, E Lauren K; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2003-08-01

    Electroporation by using pulsed electric fields with long durations compared with the charging time of the plasma membrane can induce cell fusion or introduce xenomolecules into cells. Nanosecond pulse power technology generates pulses with high-intensity electric fields, but with such short durations that the charging time of the plasma membrane is not reached, but intracellular membranes are affected. To determine more specifically their effects on cell structure and function, human cells were exposed to high intensity (up to 300 kV/cm) nanosecond (10-300 ns) pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) and were analyzed at the cellular and molecular levels. As the pulse duration decreased, plasma membrane electroporation decreased and appearances of apoptosis markers were delayed. NsPEF induced apoptosis within tens of minutes, depending on the pulse duration. Annexin-V binding, caspase activation, decreased forward light scatter, and cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm were coincident. Apoptosis was caspase- and mitochondria-dependent but independent of plasma membrane electroporation and thermal changes. The results suggest that with decreasing pulse durations, nsPEF modulate cell signaling from the plasma membrane to intracellular structures and functions. NsPEF technology provides a unique, high-power, energy-independent tool to recruit plasma membrane and/or intracellular signaling mechanisms that can delete aberrant cells by apoptosis.

  14. Static and extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: reported effects on the circadian production of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Reiter, R J

    1993-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of melatonin production (high melatonin levels at night and low during the day) in the mammalian pineal gland is modified by visible portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, i.e., light, and reportedly by extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields as well as by static magnetic field exposure. Both light and non-visible electromagnetic field exposure at night depress the conversion of serotonin (5HT) to melatonin within the pineal gland. Several reports over the last decade showed that the chronic exposure of rats to a 60 Hz electric field, over a range of field strengths, severely attenuated the nighttime rise in pineal melatonin production; however, more recent studies have not confirmed this initial observation. Sinusoidal magnetic field exposure also has been shown to interfere with the nocturnal melatonin forming ability of the pineal gland although the number of studies using these field exposures is small. On the other hand, static magnetic fields have been repeatedly shown to perturb the circadian melatonin rhythm. The field strengths in these studies were almost always in the geomagnetic range (0.2 to 0.7 Gauss or 20 to 70 mu tesla) and most often the experimental animals were subjected either to a partial rotation or to a total inversion of the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field. These experiments showed that several parameters in the indole cascade in the pineal gland are modified by these field exposures; thus, pineal cyclic AMP levels, N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity (the rate limiting enzyme in pineal melatonin production), hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) activity (the melatonin forming enzyme), and pineal and blood melatonin concentrations were depressed in various studies. Likewise, increases in pineal levels of 5HT and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also seen in these glands; these increases are consistent with a depressed melatonin synthesis. The mechanisms whereby non

  15. Assessment of physiotherapists' occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from shortwave and microwave diathermy devices: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Farrow, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed studies reporting the strength of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in physiotherapists' occupational environment. Studies from academic journals published from January 1990 to June 2010 were identified in nine online bibliographic databases. EMF strength was compared with occupational exposure limits (OELs) recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the reviewed studies, EMFs were measured at different distances (range 0.2 m to 6 m) from the console of diathermy devices, electrodes, and cables. For continuous shortwave diathermy (CSWD) (27.12 megahertz, MHz), measurements of EMFs at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m reported the maximum E field strength as 8197%, 1639%, 295%, and 69%, respectively, and the maximum H field strength as 6250%, 681%, 213%, and 56%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For pulsed shortwave diathermy (PSWD) (27.12 MHz), EMF measurements at < 1 m, 1 m, and, 1.1-1.5 m showed the maximum E field intensity as 1639%, 175%, and 32%, and the maximum H field strength as 1175%, 968%, and 28%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For microwave diathermy (MWD) (2.45 gigahertz, GHz), the maximum power density measured at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m was 200%, <30%, 0.76%, and 0.82%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limit for occupational exposure. RF EMF emissions measured from continuous and pulsed electrotherapeutic diathermy devices may well be higher than OELs at specific distances, i.e., at 1 m, which is currently designated to be a safe distance for physiotherapists. The minimum safe distance for physiotherapists should be revised to at least 2 m for CSWD and 1.5 m for PSWD. The reviewed studies did not provide evidence of exceeding the ICNIRP's reference levels for occupational exposure at 1 m from MWD devices. PMID:23570423

  16. Measured electric field intensities near electric cloud discharges detected by the Kennedy Space Center's Lightning Detection and Ranging System, LDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    For a summer thunderstorm, for which simultaneous, airborne electric field measurements and Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) System data was available, measurements were coordinated to present a picture of the electric field intensity near cloud electrical discharges detected by the LDAR System. Radar precipitation echos from NOAA's 10 cm weather radar and measured airborne electric field intensities were superimposed on LDAR PPI plots to present a coordinated data picture of thunderstorm activity.

  17. Resonant Auger Decay of Molecules in Intense X-Ray Laser Fields: Light-Induced Strong Nonadiabatic Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-03-25

    The resonant Auger process is studied in intense x-ray laser fields. It is shown that the dressing of the initial and decaying states by the field leads to coupled complex potential surfaces which, even for diatomic molecules, possess intersections at which the nonadiabatic couplings are singular. HCl is studied as an explicit showcase example. The exact results differ qualitatively from those without rotations. A wealth of nonadiabatic phenomena is expected in decay processes in intense x-ray fields.

  18. Effects of different cold-air exposure intensities on the risk of cardiovascular disease in healthy and hypertensive rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bin; Zhang, Shuyu; Ma, Shoucun; Zhou, Ji; Wang, Baojian

    2014-03-01

    Ten-week-old male Wistar rats (systolic blood pressure, 106-116 mmHg; body weight, 300-320 g) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (systolic blood pressure, 160-176 mmHg; body weight, 210.9-244.9 g) were used as healthy and hypertensive subjects to determine the effects of varying degrees of cold-air exposure in a climate chamber box. The three cold-air ranks were cold air I [minimum temperature (TMIN) 6.4 °C, ↓∆T48 8.6 °C], cold air II (TMIN 3.8 °C, ↓∆T48 11.2 °C), and cold air III (TMIN -0.3 °C, ↓∆T48 15.3 °C), as established from the cold-air data of Zhangye City, China. Each cold-air rank consisted of a temperature drop and a temperature increase with the same initial and terminal temperatures (15 °C). After cold-air exposure, the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as systolic blood pressure, whole blood viscosity (10/s and 150/s), plasma fibrinogen, and blood lipids of the rats were determined. The results indicated that the CVD risk factors of the healthy and hypertensive rats increased significantly with cold-air exposure intensities. The increase in systolic blood pressure was greater during temperature drops, whereas the increases in whole blood viscosity and plasma fibrinogen were greater after cold-air exposure. The effects of cold-air exposure on the CVD risk factors of healthy rats, particularly the systolic blood pressure, whole blood viscosity (150/s), and LDL/HDL, were greater than those in hypertensive rats. In conclusion, CVD risk may increase with cold-air ranks. Blood pressure-induced CVD risk may be greater during cold-air temperature drop, whereas atherosclerosis-induced CVD risk may be greater after cold-air exposure. The effect of cold air on the CVD risk factors in healthy subjects may be more significant than those in hypertensive subjects.

  19. Effects of different cold-air exposure intensities on the risk of cardiovascular disease in healthy and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Zhang, Shuyu; Ma, Shoucun; Zhou, Ji; Wang, Baojian

    2014-03-01

    Ten-week-old male Wistar rats (systolic blood pressure, 106-116 mmHg; body weight, 300-320 g) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (systolic blood pressure, 160-176 mmHg; body weight, 210.9-244.9 g) were used as healthy and hypertensive subjects to determine the effects of varying degrees of cold-air exposure in a climate chamber box. The three cold-air ranks were cold air I [minimum temperature (TMIN) 6.4 °C, ↓∆T48 8.6 °C], cold air II (TMIN 3.8 °C, ↓∆T48 11.2 °C), and cold air III (TMIN -0.3 °C, ↓∆T48 15.3 °C), as established from the cold-air data of Zhangye City, China. Each cold-air rank consisted of a temperature drop and a temperature increase with the same initial and terminal temperatures (15 °C). After cold-air exposure, the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as systolic blood pressure, whole blood viscosity (10/s and 150/s), plasma fibrinogen, and blood lipids of the rats were determined. The results indicated that the CVD risk factors of the healthy and hypertensive rats increased significantly with cold-air exposure intensities. The increase in systolic blood pressure was greater during temperature drops, whereas the increases in whole blood viscosity and plasma fibrinogen were greater after cold-air exposure. The effects of cold-air exposure on the CVD risk factors of healthy rats, particularly the systolic blood pressure, whole blood viscosity (150/s), and LDL/HDL, were greater than those in hypertensive rats. In conclusion, CVD risk may increase with cold-air ranks. Blood pressure-induced CVD risk may be greater during cold-air temperature drop, whereas atherosclerosis-induced CVD risk may be greater after cold-air exposure. The effect of cold air on the CVD risk factors in healthy subjects may be more significant than those in hypertensive subjects.

  20. Changes of colour and carotenoids contents during high intensity pulsed electric field treatment in orange juices.

    PubMed

    Cortés, C; Esteve, M J; Rodrigo, D; Torregrosa, F; Frígola, A

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC) was the method chosen to evaluate the effects of high intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF), with different electric field intensities (25, 30, 35 and 40 kV/cm) and different treatment times (30-340 micros), on orange juice cis/trans carotenoid contents. In parallel, a conventional heat treatment (90 degrees C, 20 s) was applied to the orange juice in order to compare the effect on the carotenoid contents. HIPEF processing of orange juice is an alternative to the thermal treatment of pasteurization, provided that it is kept refrigerated, because, when the most extreme conditions of this kind of treatment are applied, the decrease in the concentration of carotenoids with vitamin A activity is very small, and also most of the carotenoids identified have a slightly increased concentration after application of the most intense treatments, although always less than in untreated fresh juice. In any case, pasteurization treatment causes a greater decrease in the concentration of most of the carotenoids identified and the carotenoids with vitamin A activity. The total carotenoid concentration decreased by 12.6% in pasteurized orange juice with respect to untreated fresh orange juice, as opposed to decreases of 9.6%, 6.3% or 7.8% when fields of 25, 30 or 40 kV/cm were applied. Orange juice treated with HIPEF shows a greater tendency towards the colour yellow and a lesser tendency towards red with respect to untreated orange juice, while the luminance of the juice remains practically invariable. This tendency is less than in pasteurized orange juice.

  1. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S. V. L. S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ˜16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ˜20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs.

  2. The regulation of rat activity following exposure to hyperdynamic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Ishihama, Linda M.; Murakami, Dean M.

    1993-01-01

    The microgravity of space flight and the hyperdynamic fields produced via centrifugation have allowed researchers to examine the effect of altered gravitational environments on the regulation of physiological systems. In this study, a high frequency light/dark cycle was provided for 24 hours as an environmental challenge to assess the recovery of homeostatic and circadian components of physiological regulation in rats. For example, the nocturnal rat exhibited a homeostatic increase in body temperature during the dark periods and a decrease during the light periods. In addition, the magnitude of the body temperature response exhibits a time of day variation demonstrating the effect on circadian regulation.

  3. Field evaluation of an engineering control for respirable crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, Scott; Heitbrink, William A

    2007-11-01

    During mortar removal with a right angle grinder, a building renovation process known as "tuck pointing," worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica can be as high as 5 mg/m(3), 100 times the recommended exposure limit developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. To reduce the risk of silicosis among these workers, a vacuum cleaner can be used to exhaust 80 ft(3)/min (2.26 m(3)/min) from a hood mounted on the grinder. Field trials examined the ability of vacuum cleaners to maintain adequate exhaust ventilation rates and measure exposure outcomes when using this engineering control. These field trials involved task-based exposure measurement of respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal. These measurements were compared with published exposure data. Vacuum cleaner airflows were obtained by measuring and digitally logging vacuum cleaner static pressure at the inlet to the vacuum cleaner motor. Static pressures were converted to airflows based on experimentally determined fan curves. In two cases, video exposure monitoring was conducted to study the relationship between worker activities and dust exposure. Worker activities were video taped concurrent with aerosol photometer measurement of dust exposure and vacuum cleaner static pressure as a measure of airflow. During these field trials, respirable crystalline silica exposures for 22 samples had a geometric mean of 0.06 mg/m(3) and a range of less than 0.01 to 0.86 mg/m(3). For three other studies, respirable crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal have a geometric means of 1.1 to 0.35. Although this field study documented noticeably less exposure to crystalline silica, video exposure monitoring found that the local exhaust ventilation provided incomplete dust control due to low exhaust flow rates, certain work practices, and missing mortar. Vacuum cleaner airflow decrease had a range of 3 to 0.4 ft(3)/min (0.08 to 0.01 m(3)/sec(2)) over a range

  4. Ion and electron emission from silver nanoparticles in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Fennel, Th.; Radcliffe, P.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2006-03-15

    By a comparative analysis of the emission of highly charged ions and energetic electrons the interaction dynamics of intense femtosecond laser fields (10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with nanometer-sized silver clusters is investigated. Using dual laser pulses with variable optical delay the time-dependent cluster response is resolved. A dramatic increase both in the atomic charge state of the ions and the maximum electron kinetic energy is observed for a certain delay of the pulses. Corresponding Vlasov calculations on a metal cluster model system indicate that enhanced cluster ionization as well as the generation of fast electrons coincide with resonant plasmon excitation.

  5. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  6. Theoretical analysis of controllability of interference phenomena between partially coherent fields in the intensity matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiki, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the controllability of interference phenomena between partially coherent fields by introducing the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and entropy, which is defined using the intensity matrix [H. Gamo, J. Opt. Soc. Am. 47, 976 (1957)]. The analytical derivation of the WDF and entropy is presented for a partially coherent imaging system consisting of two pinholes illuminated by a circular source. It is shown that the WDF, defined in the 4D space–spatial frequency region, and entropy can be useful tools to understand how one can freely and quantitatively control the interference when any optical components in the partially coherent imaging system are changed.

  7. Development of a proposed international standard for certification of aircraft to High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel B.

    1993-01-01

    Avionic systems performing critical functions in modern aircraft are potentially susceptible to the hazards of electromagnetic radiation from ground and airborne transmitters. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested that the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) coordinate the development of procedures and guidance material which can be used during the aircraft certification process to ensure adequate protection against high intensity radiated fields (HIRF). This paper addresses both the technical challenge of drafting a certification procedure and guidance standard as well as the management process used by the SAE subcommittee AE4R to converge a diverse range of opinions by its international membership in the shortest possible time.

  8. Steering Proton Migration in Hydrocarbons Using Intense Few-Cycle Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kübel, M.; Siemering, R.; Burger, C.; Kling, Nora G.; Li, H.; Alnaser, A. S.; Bergues, B.; Zherebtsov, S.; Azzeer, A. M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Moshammer, R.; de Vivie-Riedle, R.; Kling, M. F.

    2016-05-01

    Proton migration is a ubiquitous process in chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis. Thus, the ability to manipulate the movement of nuclei with tailored light within a hydrocarbon molecule holds promise for far-reaching applications. Here, we demonstrate the steering of hydrogen migration in simple hydrocarbons, namely, acetylene and allene, using waveform-controlled, few-cycle laser pulses. The rearrangement dynamics is monitored using coincident 3D momentum imaging spectroscopy and described with a widely applicable quantum-dynamical model. Our observations reveal that the underlying control mechanism is due to the manipulation of the phases in a vibrational wave packet by the intense off-resonant laser field.

  9. From Recollisions to the Knee: A Road Map for Double Ionization in Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, F.; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.

    2010-01-29

    We examine the nature and statistical properties of electron-electron collisions in the recollision process in a strong laser field. The separation of the double ionization yield into sequential and nonsequential components leads to a bell-shaped curve for the nonsequential probability and a monotonically rising one for the sequential process. We identify key features of the nonsequential process and connect our findings in a simplified model which reproduces the knee shape for the probability of double ionization with laser intensity and associated trends.

  10. Childhood leukemia and residential exposure to weak extremely low frequency magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Feychting, M.; Ahlbom, A.

    1995-03-01

    There is no known mechanism by which magnetic fields of the type generated by high voltage power lines can play a role in cancer development. Nevertheless, epidemiologic research has rather consistently found associations between residential magnetic field exposure and cancer. This is most evident for leukemia in children. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  11. No effect of exposure to static and sinusoidal magnetic fields on nitric oxide production by macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Mnaimneh, S. |; Bizri, M. |; Veyret, B.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of exposure to static (1--100 mT) or sinusoidal (1 Hz, 1.6 mT) magnetic fields on the production of nitric oxide (NO) by murine BCG-activated macrophages were investigated. In these cells, the inducible isoform of NO synthase is present. No significant differences were observed in nitrite levels among exposed, sham-exposed, or control macrophages after exposure for 14 h to static fields of 1, 10, 50, and 100 mT and to sinusoidal 1.6 mT, 1 Hz magnetic fields.

  12. Safety of Exposure From Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields During Prenatal Ultrasound Examinations in Clinicians and Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jee Soo; Kim, Deok Won; Chung, Jai Won; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong Won; Cho, Hee Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Investigations into the safety of ultrasonography in pregnancy have focused on the potential harm of ultrasound itself. However, no data have been published regarding the electromagnetic fields that ultrasound devices might produce. This study is the first to measure extremely low-frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) exposure of clinicians and pregnant women during prenatal ultrasound examinations in the examination room from 2 different ultrasound devices and compare them with ELF-MFs during patient consultation in the consulting room. The ELF-MF intensities that clinicians and pregnant women were exposed to were measured every 10 seconds for 40 prenatal ultrasound examinations using Philips iU22 or Accuvix V20 Prestige machines and 20 patient consultations in a consulting room using portable ELF-MF measurement devices. The mean ELF-MF exposure of both clinicians and pregnant women was 0.18 ± 0.06 mG during prenatal ultrasound examination. During patient consultation, the mean ELF-MF exposures of clinicians and pregnant women were 0.10 ± 0.01 and 0.11 ± 0.01 mG, respectively. Mean ELF-MF exposures during prenatal ultrasound examination were significantly higher than those during patient consultations (P < 0.001 by Mann–Whitney U test). Our results provide basic reference data on the ELF-MF exposure of both clinicians and pregnant women during prenatal ultrasound monitoring from 2 different ultrasound devices and patient consultation, all of which were below 2 mG, the most stringent level considered safe in many studies, thus relieving any anxiety of clinicians and pregnant women regarding potential risks of ELF-MFs. PMID:26200630

  13. Investigation of the effects of magnetic field exposure on human melatonin. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Cohen, H.D.

    1994-08-01

    Several rodent studies have suggested that magnetic field exposure may alter the daily pattern of melatonin secretion. This study investigated melatonin levels in mean exposed overnight to magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG. The study also assessed the potential effects of exposure on a number of performance and self-reported endpoints in the subjects. Investigation of this area is important, as altered diurnal melatonin cycles have been linked to a variety of endpoints, including reproductive outcome, neurobehavioral function, and carcinogenesis. The results of this investigation did not support the a priori hypothesis that exposure to 60-Hz magnetic fields of 10 mG and 200 mG alters nighttime melatonin levels in a population of adult males. However, the data suggested the possibility of differential sensitivity to magnetic fields based on an individual`s baseline melatonin level.

  14. A comparison of a laboratory and field study of annoyance and acceptability of aircraft noise exposures. [human reactions and tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1977-01-01

    Residents living in close, middle and distant areas from JFK Airport were included in a field interview and laboratory study. Judgments were made of simulated aircraft noise exposures of comparable community indoor noise levels and mixes of aircraft. Each group of subjects judged the levels of noise typical for its distance area. Four different numbers of flyovers were tested: less than average for each area, the approximate average, the peak number, or worst day, and above peak number. The major findings are: (1) the reported integrated field annoyance is best related to the annoyance reported for the simulated approximate worst day exposure in the laboratory; (2) annoyance is generally less when there are fewer aircraft flyovers, and the subject has less fear of crashes and more favorable attitudes toward airplanes; (3) beliefs in harmful health effects and misfeasance by operators of aircraft are also highly correlated with fear and noise annoyance; (4) in direct retrospective comparisons of number of flights, noise levels and annoyance, subjects more often said the worst day laboratory exposured more like their usual home environments; and (5) subjects do not expect an annoyance-free environment. Half of the subjects can accept an annoyance level of 5 to 6 from a possible annoyance range of 0 to 9, 28% can live with an annoyance intensity of 7, and only 5% can accept the top scores of 8 to 9.

  15. Efficient injection of an intense positron beam into a dipole magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Stanja, J.; Stenson, E. V.; Hergenhahn, U.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Stoneking, M. R.; Piochacz, C.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-10-01

    We have demonstrated efficient injection and trapping of a cold positron beam in a dipole magnetic field configuration. The intense 5 eV positron beam was provided by the NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh facility at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum, and transported into the confinement region of the dipole field trap generated by a supported, permanent magnet with 0.6 T strength at the pole faces. We achieved transport into the region of field lines that do not intersect the outer wall using the {E}× {B} drift of the positron beam between a pair of tailored plates that created the electric field. We present evidence that up to 38% of the beam particles are able to reach the intended confinement region and make at least a 180° rotation around the magnet where they annihilate on an insertable target. When the target is removed and the {E}× {B} plate voltages are switched off, confinement of a small population persists for on the order of 1 ms. These results lend optimism to our larger aims to apply a magnetic dipole field configuration for trapping of both positrons and electrons in order to test predictions of the unique properties of a pair plasma.

  16. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields generated from a transmitter with a large aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tao; Fan, Tingbo; Zhang, Wei; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Tu, Juan E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2014-03-21

    Prediction and measurement of the acoustic field emitted from a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is essential for the accurate ultrasonic treatment. In this study, the acoustic field generated from a strongly focused HIFU transmitter was characterized by a combined experiment and simulation method. The spheroidal beam equation (SBE) was utilized to describe the nonlinear sound propagation. The curve of the source pressure amplitude versus voltage excitation was determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component of the focal waveform to the simulation result; finally, the acoustic pressure field generated by the strongly focused HIFU transmitter was predicted by using the SBE model. A commercial fiber optic probe hydrophone was utilized to measure the acoustic pressure field generated from a 1.1 MHz HIFU transmitter with a large half aperture angle of 30°. The maximum measured peak-to-peak pressure was up to 72 MPa. The validity of this combined approach was confirmed by the comparison between the measured results and the calculated ones. The results indicate that the current approach might be useful to describe the HIFU field. The results also suggest that this method is not valid for low excitations owing to low sensitivity of the second harmonic.

  17. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  18. Application of Helical Characteristics of the Velocity Field to Evaluate the Intensity of Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, G.; Glebova, E.; Naumov, A.; Trosnikov, I.

    The paper presents results of numerical analysis for helical features of velocity field to investigate the process of tropical cyclone formation, namely, the downward helicity flux through the upper boundary of the viscous atmospheric turbulent boundary layer has been calculated. The simulation was carried out by use of the regional atmospheric ETA model and NCEP reanalysis global data. Calculations were performed for two tropical cyclones - Wilma (Atlantic basin, 2005) and Man-Yi (North-West Pacific, 2007). It has been found, that the chosen helical characteristic reveals an adequate response to basic trends in variation of such important meteorological fields as pressure and wind velocity during the hurricane vortex evolution. The analysis carried out in the paper shows that the helicity flux can be used as an illustrative characteristic to describe the intensity and destructive power of tropical cyclones.

  19. Building Exposure Maps Of Urban Infrastructure And Crop Fields In The Mekong River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, E.; Weichselbaum, J.; Gangkofner, U.; Miltzer, J.; Wali, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the frame of the Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) initiative for the Mekong river basin World Bank is collaborating with the Mekong River Commission and governmental organizations in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Vietnam to build national and regional capacities for managing the risks associated with natural disasters, such as floods, flash floods and droughts. Within ‘eoworld', a joint initiative set up by ESA and World Bank to foster the use of Earth Observation (EO) for sustainable development work, a comprehensive database of elements at risk in the Lower Mekong river basin has been established by GeoVille, including urban infrastructure and crops (primarily rice paddies). In the long term, this exposure information shall be fed into an open-source multi- hazard modeling tool for risk assessment along the Mekong River, which then shall be used by national stakeholders as well as insurance and financial institutions for planning, disaster preparedness and emergency management. Earth Observation techniques can provide objective, synoptic and repetitive observations of elements at risk including buildings, infrastructure and crops. Through the fusion of satellite-based with in-situ data from field surveys and local knowledge (e.g. on building materials) features at risk can be characterised and mapped with high accuracy. Earth Observation data utilised comprise bi-weekly Envisat ASAR imagery programmed for a period of 9 months in 2011 to map the development of the rice cultivation area, identify predominant cropping systems (wet-season vs. dry season cultivation), crop cycles (single /double / triple crop per year), date of emergence/harvest and the distinction between rice planted under intensive (SRI) vs. regular rice cultivation techniques. Very High Resolution (VHR) optical data from SPOT, KOMPSAT and QuickBird were used for mapping of buildings and infrastructure, such as building footprints, residential / commercial areas, industrial

  20. Intense transient electric field sensor based on the electro-optic effect of LiNbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing Sun, Shangpeng; Han, Rui; Sima, Wenxia; Liu, Tong

    2015-10-15

    Intense transient electric field measurements are widely applied in various research areas. An optical intense E-field sensor for time-domain measurements, based on the electro-optic effect of lithium niobate, has been studied in detail. Principles and key issues in the design of the sensor are presented. The sensor is insulated, small in size (65 mm × 15 mm × 15 mm), and suitable for high-intensity (<801 kV/m) electric field measurements over a wide frequency band (10 Hz–10 MHz). The input/output characteristics of the sensor were obtained and the sensor calibrated. Finally, an application using this sensor in testing laboratory lightning impulses and in measuring transient electric fields during switch-on of a disconnector confirmed that the sensor is expected to find widespread use in transient intense electric field measurement applications.

  1. Utilization of the Wavefront Sensor and Short-exposure Images for Simultaneous Estimation of Quasi-static Aberration and Exoplanet Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2013-04-01

    Heretofore, the literature on exoplanet detection with coronagraphic telescope systems has paid little attention to the information content of short exposures and methods of utilizing the measurements of adaptive optics wavefront sensors. This paper provides a framework for the incorporation of the wavefront sensor measurements in the context of observing modes in which the science camera takes millisecond exposures. In this formulation, the wavefront sensor measurements provide a means to jointly estimate the static speckle and the planetary signal. The ability to estimate planetary intensities in as little as a few seconds has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of exoplanet search surveys. For simplicity, the mathematical development assumes a simple optical system with an idealized Lyot coronagraph. Unlike currently used methods, in which increasing the observation time beyond a certain threshold is useless, this method produces estimates whose error covariances decrease more quickly than inversely proportional to the observation time. This is due to the fact that the estimates of the quasi-static aberrations are informed by a new random (but approximately known) wavefront every millisecond. The method can be extended to include angular (due to diurnal field rotation) and spectral diversity. Numerical experiments are performed with wavefront data from the AEOS Adaptive Optics System sensing at 850 nm. These experiments assume a science camera wavelength λ of 1.1 μ, that the measured wavefronts are exact, and a Gaussian approximation of shot-noise. The effects of detector read-out noise and other issues are left to future investigations. A number of static aberrations are introduced, including one with a spatial frequency exactly corresponding the planet location, which was at a distance of ≈3λ/D from the star. Using only 4 s of simulated observation time, a planetary intensity, of ≈1 photon ms-1, and a stellar intensity of ≈105 photons ms-1

  2. Occupational Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Breast Cancer Among Women Textile Workers in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Thomas, David B.; Yost, Michael; Davis, Scott; Breslow, Norman; Gao, Dao Li; Fitzgibbons, E. Dawn; Camp, Janice E.; Wong, Eva; Wernli, Karen J.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields (MFs) is hypothesized to increase the risk of breast cancer by reducing production of melatonin by the pineal gland. A nested case-cohort study was conducted to investigate the association between occupational exposure to MFs and the risk of breast cancer within a cohort of 267,400 female textile workers in Shanghai, China. The study included 1,687 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1989 to 2000 and 4,702 noncases selected from the cohort. Subjects’ complete work histories were linked to a job–exposure matrix developed specifically for the present study to estimate cumulative MF exposure. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards modeling that was adapted for the case-cohort design. Hazard ratios were estimated in relation to cumulative exposure during a woman's entire working years. No association was observed between cumulative exposure to MFs and overall risk of breast cancer. The hazard ratio for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of cumulative exposure was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.87, 1.21). Similar null findings were observed when exposures were lagged and stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis. The findings do not support the hypothesis that MF exposure increases the risk of breast cancer. PMID:24043439

  3. Occupational exposure to magnetic fields and breast cancer among women textile workers in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M; Thomas, David B; Yost, Michael; Davis, Scott; Breslow, Norman; Gao, Dao Li; Fitzgibbons, E Dawn; Camp, Janice E; Wong, Eva; Wernli, Karen J; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields (MFs) is hypothesized to increase the risk of breast cancer by reducing production of melatonin by the pineal gland. A nested case-cohort study was conducted to investigate the association between occupational exposure to MFs and the risk of breast cancer within a cohort of 267,400 female textile workers in Shanghai, China. The study included 1,687 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1989 to 2000 and 4,702 noncases selected from the cohort. Subjects' complete work histories were linked to a job-exposure matrix developed specifically for the present study to estimate cumulative MF exposure. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards modeling that was adapted for the case-cohort design. Hazard ratios were estimated in relation to cumulative exposure during a woman's entire working years. No association was observed between cumulative exposure to MFs and overall risk of breast cancer. The hazard ratio for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of cumulative exposure was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.87, 1.21). Similar null findings were observed when exposures were lagged and stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis. The findings do not support the hypothesis that MF exposure increases the risk of breast cancer. PMID:24043439

  4. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C. )

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child's sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children's electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  5. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child`s sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children`s electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  6. The influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Ding, J.; Duan, W.; Zhu, Y. M.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of present work was to investigate the influence of magnetic fields exposure on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The neurite number per cell, length of neurites and directions of neurite growth with respect to the direction of the magnetic field were analyzed after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for 96 h. A promotion was observed under a weak field (0.23 mT), as the average number of neurites per cell increased to 2.38±0.06 compared to 1.91±0.07 neurites/cell of the control dishes, while inhibition and directional outgrowth was evident under a relatively stronger field (1.32 mT). Our work shows that biological systems can be very sensitive to the strength of electromagnetic field.

  7. Illumination of Conjugated Polymer in Solution Alters its Conformation and Thermodynamics: The Role of Incident Light Intensity, Wavelength and Exposure Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Brian; Dadmun, Mark

    The importance of chain structure in conjugated polymer-based material active layers and its relation to device efficiencies in OPVs, organic field transistors, and OLEDs, has been well established. However the influence of light absorption on the conjugated polymer structure is not well understood. We have employed small angle neutron scattering to investigate structural changes occurring in solutions of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) with exposure to white light. Our previous results indicate significant change in the structure of the polymer upon illumination, an effect we attribute to an alteration in the thermodynamic interactions of the polymer with the surrounding solvent. In order to further our understanding of this phenomenon, we have studied the modulation of these light/dark structural changes as a function of solvent choice, incident light intensity, illumination wavelength, and light exposure duration. Analysis of this data allows refinement and increased control of these light-initiated effects, moving our efforts closer to the development of a powerful, non-destructive, and tunable method for controlling polymer conformation in solution and novel light-responsive materials.

  8. Moderate-intensity rotating magnetic fields do not affect bone quality and bone remodeling in hindlimb suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  9. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae-kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones, conducted as part of the MOBI-KIDS epidemiological study. The main challenge is to identify a small number of generic phone models that can be used to classify the ELF exposure for the different phones reported in the study. Two-dimensional magnetic flux density measurements were performed on 47 GSM mobile phones at a distance of 25 mm. Maximum resultant magnetic flux density values at 217 Hz had a geometric mean of 221 (+198/-104) nT. Taking into account harmonic data, measurements suggest that mobile phones could make a substantial contribution to ELF exposure in the general population. The maximum values and easily available variables were poorly correlated. However, three groups could be defined on the basis of field pattern indicating that manufacturers and shapes of mobile phones may be the important parameters linked to the spatial characteristics of the magnetic field, and the categorization of ELF magnetic field exposure for GSM phones in the MOBI-KIDS study may be achievable on the basis of a small number of representative phones. Such categorization would result in a twofold exposure gradient between high and low exposure based on type of phone used, although there was overlap in the grouping.

  10. First archaeomagnetic field intensity data from Ethiopia, Africa (1615 ± 12 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, María Luisa; Catanzariti, Gianluca; Chauvin, Annick; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Roperch, Pierrick; Fernández, Víctor M.

    2015-05-01

    First archaeointensity determinations have been obtained from Ethiopia. Seven bricks (34 specimens) from the Däbsan archaeological remains were subjected to archaeointensity determination by means of classical Thellier-Thellier experiment including tests for magnetic anisotropy and magnetic cooling rate dependency. The age of the Däbsan Palace is well controlled by historical information: between 1603, when land grants were conceded to the Jesuits and the Catholicism was established as the official religion in Ethiopia, and the age of the Palace foundation in 1626-27. Successful archaeointensity determinations were obtained in 27 specimens from five individual bricks revealing an average field value of 33.5 ± 1.1 μT, which is 11-26% lower than expected values from global geomagnetic models based on historical and archaeomagnetic data. Global models for 1615 AD predict a low in central-southern Africa related to past location of the present Southern Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Our results suggest that the field intensity in central Africa may have been slightly lower than global model predictions. This would indicate that the low could be probably more extended towards central-eastern Africa (or more intense) than previously considered. Further data from this region are especially welcome to delineate the evolution of the SAA.

  11. Space-time contours to treat intense field-dressed molecular states

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amit K.; Adhikari, Satrajit; Baer, Michael

    2010-01-21

    In this article we consider a molecular system exposed to an intense short-pulsed external field. It is a continuation of a previous publication [A. K. Paul, S. Adhikari, D. Mukhopadhyay et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 7331 (2009)] in which a theory is presented that treats quantum effects due to nonclassical photon states (known also as Fock states). Since these states became recently a subject of intense experimental efforts we thought that they can be treated properly within the existing quantum formulation of dynamical processes. This was achieved by incorporating them in the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) treatment with time-dependent coefficients. The extension of the BO treatment to include the Fock states results in a formidable enhancement in numerical efforts expressed, in particular, in a significant increase in CPU time. In the present article we discuss an approach that yields an efficient and reliable approximation with only negligible losses in accuracy. The approximation is tested in detail for the dissociation process of H{sub 2}{sup +} as caused by a laser field.

  12. Refinements in magnetic field exposure assignment for a case-cohort study of electrical utility workers.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, E; Savitz, D A; Kleckner, R C; Mihlan, G; Nylander-French, L A; Dufort, V; Cai, J; Loomis, D; Kromhout, H

    1999-10-01

    This study examined the effect of refinements in exposure assignment on annual and career exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields, using all deaths from brain cancer (145) and leukemia (164) and a random sample of 800 workers from a cohort of 138,905 men. Reassessment of 1060 job titles in the measurement database generated 20 subcategories in addition to 28 occupational categories used in the original cohort mortality study. Furthermore, previously misclassified jobs were corrected. The complete work history of each sub-cohort member was re-examined. Original and refined average annual exposures were 0.086 and 0.088 microT, respectively. The average career cumulative exposures were 1.40 and 1.44 microT-years, respectively. Spearman correlation coefficients between the original and refined methods across the companies were 0.81 for annual exposure and 0.93 for career cumulative exposure. 23% of the workers were assigned to another exposure ranking after refinement, but 85% of these moved to an adjacent group, suggesting that the differences in exposure ranking are small. The results of this study indicate that refinements have modest influence on the average annual and career exposures. However, the refinements may only change a very rough exposure assessment into one that is slightly less crude. The proportion of workers assigned to another exposure ranking indicated that nondifferential exposure misclassification in the original cohort mortality study may have occurred. Implications of these changes for the risk estimates of brain cancer and leukemia cases will to be examined.

  13. Inhibitory effect of intensity and interstimulus interval of conditioning stimuli on somatosensory evoked magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideaki; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Shirozu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-08-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings were performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of conditioning stimuli with various types of interstimulus intervals (ISIs) or intensities on somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) using a 306-ch whole-head MEG system. Twenty-three healthy volunteers participated in this study. Electrical stimuli were applied to the right median nerve at the wrist. Six pulse trains with ISIs of 500 ms were presented in Experiment 1. A paired-pulse paradigm with three kinds of conditioning stimulus (CON) intensities, 500 ms before the test stimulus (TS), was applied in Experiment 2. Finally, three CONs 500 or 1000 ms before TS were presented in Experiment 3. Three main SEF deflections (N20m, P35m, and P60m) were observed, and the source activities of P35m and P60m significantly decreased after the 2nd pulse of a six pulse trains. These source activities also significantly decreased with increasing intensity of CON. In addition, these attenuations of source activities were affected by CON-CON or CON-TS intervals. These results indicated that the source activities were modulated by the intensity and ISIs of CONs. Furthermore, P35m after the stimulation were very sensitive to CONs; however, the attenuation of P60m after the stimulation lasted for a longer period than that of P35m. Our findings suggest that the conditioning stimulation had inhibitory effects on subsequent evoked cortical responses for more than 500 ms. Our results also provide important clues about the nature of short-latency somatosensory responses in human studies. PMID:27319980

  14. Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Reports the results of a field trip to measure the intensity of electromagnetic fields generated by electronic devices in the home, in cars, at work, outside, and in places people visit during the day. Found that a person gets more intense exposure while working at a computer than by living next to an electrical substation. (MDH)

  15. Considerable exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemicals phthalates and bisphenol-A in intensive care unit (ICU) patients.

    PubMed

    Huygh, Johan; Clotman, Katrien; Malarvannan, Govindan; Covaci, Adrian; Schepens, Tom; Verbrugghe, Walter; Dirinck, Eveline; Van Gaal, Luc; Jorens, Philippe G

    2015-08-01

    Critical care medicine has largely benefited from plastic-containing medical devices. However, bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates present in the plastics can leach from such devices. We hypothesized that intensive care unit (ICU) patients are exposed to BPA and phthalates through (plastic) medical devices. Serum (n = 118) and urine (n= 102) samples of adult ICU patients (n = 35) were analyzed for total BPA and phthalate metabolites (PMs). Our results showed that adult ICU patients are continuously exposed to phthalates, such as di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), as well as to BPA, albeit to a lesser extent. This exposure resulted in detectable high serum and urinary levels in almost every patient and at every studied time point. Moreover, these levels were significantly higher than in controls or compared to referenced literature. The chronology of exposure was demonstrated: pre-operative urinary and serum levels of the DEHP metabolites were often below the detection limit. Plastic-containing medical devices were the main source of DEHP exposure: post-operative patients on hemofiltration, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or both showed serum levels 100-or 1000-fold higher than the levels in the general population reported in the literature. The serum and some of the urinary levels of the DEHP metabolites are the highest ever reported in humans; some at biologically highly relevant concentrations of ≥ 10-50 μM. Despite the continuously tightening regulations, BPA and DEHP appear to be still present in (some) medical devices. Because patient safety is a concern in the ICU, further research into the (possibly toxic and clinical) effects of these chemicals released from medical devices is imperiously necessary. PMID:25955314

  16. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Li; Deng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) at our institution in the past seven years. Methods and Materials A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated. Results The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2%) with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance. Conclusions Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin’s disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26630566

  17. Considerable exposure to the endocrine disrupting chemicals phthalates and bisphenol-A in intensive care unit (ICU) patients.

    PubMed

    Huygh, Johan; Clotman, Katrien; Malarvannan, Govindan; Covaci, Adrian; Schepens, Tom; Verbrugghe, Walter; Dirinck, Eveline; Van Gaal, Luc; Jorens, Philippe G

    2015-08-01

    Critical care medicine has largely benefited from plastic-containing medical devices. However, bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates present in the plastics can leach from such devices. We hypothesized that intensive care unit (ICU) patients are exposed to BPA and phthalates through (plastic) medical devices. Serum (n = 118) and urine (n= 102) samples of adult ICU patients (n = 35) were analyzed for total BPA and phthalate metabolites (PMs). Our results showed that adult ICU patients are continuously exposed to phthalates, such as di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), as well as to BPA, albeit to a lesser extent. This exposure resulted in detectable high serum and urinary levels in almost every patient and at every studied time point. Moreover, these levels were significantly higher than in controls or compared to referenced literature. The chronology of exposure was demonstrated: pre-operative urinary and serum levels of the DEHP metabolites were often below the detection limit. Plastic-containing medical devices were the main source of DEHP exposure: post-operative patients on hemofiltration, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or both showed serum levels 100-or 1000-fold higher than the levels in the general population reported in the literature. The serum and some of the urinary levels of the DEHP metabolites are the highest ever reported in humans; some at biologically highly relevant concentrations of ≥ 10-50 μM. Despite the continuously tightening regulations, BPA and DEHP appear to be still present in (some) medical devices. Because patient safety is a concern in the ICU, further research into the (possibly toxic and clinical) effects of these chemicals released from medical devices is imperiously necessary.

  18. A comparative sonochemical reaction that is independent of the intensity of ultrasound and the geometry of the exposure apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sostaric, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    Sonolysis of aqueous solutions of n-alkyl anionic surfactants results in the formation of secondary carbon-centered radicals (-*CH-). The yield of -*CH- depends on the bulk surfactant concentration up to a maximum attainable radical yield (the 'plateau yield') where an increasing surfactant concentration (below the critical micelle concentration) no longer affects the -*CH- yield. In an earlier study it was found that the ratio of -*CH- detected following sonolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium pentane sulfonate (SPSo) to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (i.e. CH(SPSo)/CH(SDS)) depended on the frequency of sonolysis, but was independent of the ultrasound intensity, at the plateau concentrations [J.Z. Sostaric, P. Riesz, Adsorption of surfactants at the gas/solution interface of cavitation bubbles: an ultrasound intensity-independent frequency effect in sonochemistry, J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 12537-12548]. In the current study, it was found that the CH(SPSo)/CH(SDS) ratio depended only on the ultrasound frequency and did not depend on the geometry of the ultrasound exposure apparatus considered. PMID:18472292

  19. Occupational exposure to magnetic fields and breast cancer among Canadian men.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Harris, Shelley A; Demers, Paul A; Johnson, Kenneth C; Agnew, David A; Villeneuve, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Occupational magnetic field (MF) exposure has been suggested as a risk factor for breast cancer in both men and women. Due to the rarity of this disease in men, most epidemiologic studies investigating this relationship have been limited by small sample sizes. Herein, associations of several measures of occupational MF exposure with breast cancer in men were investigated using data from the population-based case-control component of the Canadian National Enhanced Cancer Surveillance System. Lifetime job histories were provided by 115 cases and 570 controls. Average MF exposure of individual jobs was classified into three categories (<0.3, 0.3 to <0.6, or ≥0.6 μT) through expert blinded review of participant's lifetime occupational histories. The impact of highest average and cumulative MF exposure, as well as exposure duration and specific exposure-time windows, on cancer risk was examined using logistic regression. The proportion of cases (25%) with a highest average exposure of ≥0.3 μT was higher than among controls (22%). We found an elevated risk of breast cancer in men who were exposed to ≥0.6 μT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.80, 95% CI = 0.82-3.95) when compared to those with exposures <0.3 μT. Those exposed to occupational MF fields for at least 30 years had a nearly threefold increase in risk of breast cancer (OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 0.98-7.82) when compared to those with background levels of exposure. Findings for the other time-related MF variables were inconsistent. Our analysis, in one of the largest case-control studies of breast cancer in men conducted to date, provides limited support for the hypothesis that exposure to MF increases the risk breast cancer in men.

  20. Does apartment's distance to an in-built transformer room predict magnetic field exposure levels?

    PubMed

    Huss, Anke; Goris, Kelly; Vermeulen, Roel; Kromhout, Hans

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that magnetic field exposure in apartments located directly on top or adjacent to transformer rooms is higher compared with exposure in apartments located further away from the transformer rooms. It is unclear whether this also translates into exposure contrast among individuals living in these apartments. We performed spot measurements of magnetic fields in 35 apartments in 14 apartment buildings with an in-built transformer and additionally performed 24-h personal measurements in a subsample of 24 individuals. Apartments placed directly on top of or adjacent to a transformer room had on average exposures of 0.42 μT, apartments on the second floor on top of a transformer room, or sharing a corner or edge with the transformer room had 0.11 μT, and apartments located further away from the transformer room had levels of 0.06 μT. Personal exposure levels were approximately a factor 2 lower compared with apartment averages, but still showed exposure contrasts, but only for those individuals who live in the apartments directly on top or adjacent to a transformer room compared with those living further away, with 0.23 versus 0.06 μT for personal exposure when indoors, respectively. A classification of individuals into 'high' and 'low' exposed based on the location of their apartment within a building with an in-built transformer is possible and could be applied in future epidemiological studies.

  1. A 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure facility for nonhuman primates: Design and operational data during experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Lucas, J.H.; Cory, W.E.; Orr, J.L.; Smith, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    A unique exposure facility was designed and constructed to generate large-scale vertical electric fields (EF) of up to 65 kV/m and horizontal magnetic fields (MF) of up to 100 {micro}T (1G), so that the behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of 60 Hz EF or combined electric and magnetic field (E/MF) exposure could be examined using nonhuman primates as subjects. Facility design and operational problems and their solutions are presented, and representative operational data from four sets of experiments are provided. A specially designed, optically isolated, 4 cm spherical-dipole EF probe and a commercially available MF probe were used to map the EF and MF within the fiberglass animal cages. In addition, amplifiers, signal conditioners, and A/D converters provided EF, MF, and transformer signals to a microcomputer at 15 min intervals. The apparatus produced homogeneous, stable E/MF at the desired intensities, and the fiberglass cages did not produce appreciable distortion or attenuation. Levels of recognized EF artifacts such as corona and ozone were negligible. The facility worked as intended, providing a well-characterized and artifact-controlled environment for experiments with baboons (Papio cynocephalus).

  2. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields of uninterruptible power supply industry workers.

    PubMed

    Teşneli, N Berna; Teşneli, Ahmet Y

    2014-12-01

    There is an increasing concern that exposure to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) may cause or contribute to adverse health effects. To assess exposure to ELF EMFs, electric and magnetic field spot measurements were performed extensively at the workplace of a worldwide uninterruptible power supply (UPS) factory. The measurements were carried out in order to get the electric and magnetic field exposure results in real working situations in test areas, production lines and power substations. The electric and magnetic fields reached up to 992.0 V m(-1) and 215.6 μT in the test areas, respectively. The fields existed up to 26.7 V m(-1) and 7.6 μT in the production lines. The field levels in the vicinity of the power substations did not exceed 165.5 V m(-1) and 65 μT. The data presented are useful in determining the occupational exposure levels of UPS industry workers. The measurements are below the reference levels recommended by the guideline published in 2010 by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and action levels of the directive adopted in 2013 by European Parliament and Council.

  3. Exposure to magnetic fields of railway engine drivers: a case study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Contessa, G M; Falsaperla, R; Brugaletta, V; Rossi, P

    2010-12-01

    A case study of exposure assessment of railway workers to static and extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields is presented. A measurement campaign was conducted in aboard Italian main line trains. All measurements were performed on board during regular service (two engine drivers were simultaneously present), in all places potentially accessible to personnel, considering routes ranging from a few tens of kilometres to hundreds of kilometres. The measurement protocol was mostly based on broadband metres and personal metres were employed to assess individual exposure. Surveys on static and ELF magnetic fields were performed for seven different models of engine or electrified train. Traction motors were fed by alternating current (AC) current, except for two engines, where AC current fed only auxiliary services. The final result is that the average exposure to static magnetic field was a little higher than the background geomagnetic field; occasionally in few areas it could reach levels of the order of millitesla. The average exposure to ELF magnetic fields was in the order of 1-2 μT, with higher levels (few microtesla) only for one engine; occasionally in hot spots, close to wiring or specific equipment, the field values could reach several tens of microtesla.

  4. Geomagnetic field intensity and quantitative paleorainfall reconstruction from Chinese loess using 10Be and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, W.; zhou, W.; Li, C.; Wu, Z.; White, L.; Xian, F.

    2011-12-01

    7Be is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols, usually encapsulated in rain or snow. Numerous studies have shown that its flux to the ground is proportional to rainfall amount. Unfortunately, with a half life of only a few weeks, this observation has little relevance for reconstruction past rainfall amounts in paleosoils. Fortunately, 7Be has a long-lived sister isotope (10Be) with a half life of ~1.5 Ma which can be used for such purposes. There are a number of complications, however. First, 10Be atmospheric production rate changes when the geomagnetic field intensity changes. Secondly, 10Be half life is long enough that 10Be which fell to the ground attached to dust some time in the past can become resuspended, meaning that there are two sources of 10Be, one meteoric, and the other recycled aeolian dust. Fortunately, we have found a method to deconvolute this knotty situation and have applied it to soils of the Chinese Loess Plateau, allowing us to reconstruct records of both geomagnetic field intensity and paleorainfall. To do so, we use the additional parameters magnetic susceptibility and coercivity to help define the inherited amount of each component, and to define what fraction of the variations in 10Be are associated with magnetic field fluctuations, versus that linked to rainfall variations. We also use a sediment age/depth model to convert 10Be concentration to 10Be flux, and finally, we use the modern 7Be vs. rainfall relationship and 10Be/7Be atmospheric production rate ratio to calculate quantitative paleorainfall rates. We have used these techniques to generate several such records ranging from the Holocene to MIS13 (Circa 525 ka BP), and will compare some of these to U-series dated speleothem records of δ18O.

  5. Complex magnetic field exposure system for in vitro experiments at intermediate frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Rossella; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Mancini, Sergio; Lopresto, Vanni; Lovisolo, Giorgio A

    2013-04-01

    In occupational environments, an increasing number of electromagnetic sources emitting complex magnetic field waveforms in the range of intermediate frequencies is present, requiring an accurate exposure risk assessment with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this article, an in vitro exposure system able to generate complex magnetic flux density B-fields, reproducing signals from actual intermediate frequency sources such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, for instance, is developed and validated. The system consists of a magnetic field generation system and an exposure apparatus realized with a couple of square coils. A wide homogeneity (99.9%) volume of 210 × 210 × 110 mm(3) was obtained within the coils, with the possibility of simultaneous exposure of a large number of standard Petri dishes. The system is able to process any numerical input sequence through a filtering technique aimed at compensating the coils' impedance effect. The B-field, measured in proximity to a 1.5 T MRI bore during a typical examination, was excellently reproduced (cross-correlation index of 0.99). Thus, it confirms the ability of the proposed setup to accurately simulate complex waveforms in the intermediate frequency band. Suitable field levels were also attained. Moreover, a dosimetry index based on the weighted-peak method was evaluated considering the induced E-field on a Petri dish exposed to the reproduced complex B-field. The weighted-peak index was equal to 0.028 for the induced E-field, indicating an exposure level compliant with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics 34:211-219, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23060274

  6. Complex magnetic field exposure system for in vitro experiments at intermediate frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Rossella; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Mancini, Sergio; Lopresto, Vanni; Lovisolo, Giorgio A

    2013-04-01

    In occupational environments, an increasing number of electromagnetic sources emitting complex magnetic field waveforms in the range of intermediate frequencies is present, requiring an accurate exposure risk assessment with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this article, an in vitro exposure system able to generate complex magnetic flux density B-fields, reproducing signals from actual intermediate frequency sources such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, for instance, is developed and validated. The system consists of a magnetic field generation system and an exposure apparatus realized with a couple of square coils. A wide homogeneity (99.9%) volume of 210 × 210 × 110 mm(3) was obtained within the coils, with the possibility of simultaneous exposure of a large number of standard Petri dishes. The system is able to process any numerical input sequence through a filtering technique aimed at compensating the coils' impedance effect. The B-field, measured in proximity to a 1.5 T MRI bore during a typical examination, was excellently reproduced (cross-correlation index of 0.99). Thus, it confirms the ability of the proposed setup to accurately simulate complex waveforms in the intermediate frequency band. Suitable field levels were also attained. Moreover, a dosimetry index based on the weighted-peak method was evaluated considering the induced E-field on a Petri dish exposed to the reproduced complex B-field. The weighted-peak index was equal to 0.028 for the induced E-field, indicating an exposure level compliant with the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics 34:211-219, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Instruments to assess and measure personal and environmental radiofrequency-electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Redmayne, Mary; Abramson, Michael J; Benke, Geza

    2016-03-01

    Radiofrequency-electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure of human populations is increasing due to the widespread use of mobile phones and other telecommunication and broadcasting technologies. There are ongoing concerns about potential short- and long-term public health consequences from RF-EMF exposures. To elucidate the RF-EMF exposure-effect relationships, an objective evaluation of the exposures with robust assessment tools is necessary. This review discusses and compares currently available RF-EMF exposure assessment instruments, which can be used in human epidemiological studies. Quantitative assessment instruments are either mobile phone-based (apps/software-modified and hardware-modified) or exposimeters. Each of these tool has its usefulness and limitations. Our review suggests that assessment of RF-EMF exposures can be improved by using these tools compared to the proxy measures of exposure (e.g. questionnaires and billing records). This in turn, could be used to help increase knowledge about RF-EMF exposure induced health effects in human populations. PMID:26684750

  8. A field evaluation of the impact of transfer efficiency on worker exposure during spray painting.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu-Mei; Flynn, Michael R; Buller, Thomas S

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to predict breathing-zone overspray concentrations produced during spray painting as a function of the overspray generation rate, ventilation and work practices. The overspray generation rate required an estimate of the spray gun transfer efficiency, which was provided by a previously developed mathematical model. These models were evaluated in the field under two different scenarios: first in a controlled environment that approximated the assumptions of models, and then under actual spray painting conditions. Results from the first test showed the model overestimated transfer efficiency, but the measured exposures and predicted exposures were not significantly different. During actual spray painting operations, all task exposures were within a factor of three of the model predictions, and there was no statistical difference between the measured and predicted values. The predicted average exposure of each worker was within the 95% confidence interval. The overall mean exposure was within one standard error of the model prediction. The current study expands on the original exposure model by including a transfer efficiency model to provide a better estimate of the overspray generation rate. The theoretical foundation between exposure and its primary determinants is established, and this knowledge can be applied to design and can evaluate optimal control interventions. Also, the general methodology presented here for developing an exposure model is applicable to operations other than spray painting. PMID:12005123

  9. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  10. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M.; Mermelstein, Claudia S.; Costa, Manoel L.; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  11. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  12. Energy levels and far-infrared optical absorption of impurity doped semiconductor nanorings: Intense laser and electric fields effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of electron-impurity interaction on energy levels and far-infrared absorption in semiconductor nanoring under the action of intense laser and lateral electric fields have been investigated. Numerical calculations are performed using exact diagonalization technique. It is found that the electron-impurity interaction and external fields change the energy spectrum dramatically, and also have significant influence on the absorption spectrum. Strong dependence on laser field intensity and electric field of lowest energy levels, also supported by the Coulomb interaction with impurity, is clearly revealed.

  13. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during exposure to electric fields at multiple strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E. )

    1991-11-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and development toxicity. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed, or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Numbers ofpups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to high field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham exposed animals. At weaning, two F{sub 1} females per litter continued on the same exposure regimen, were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and sacrificed at 20 days of gestation. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F{sub 1} females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m. Incidence of chromodacryorrhea was not significantly different between sham-exposed rats and those exposed at 10 kV/m. 29 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Nonlinear radiation response of n-doped indium antimonide and indium arsenide in intense terahertz field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiao-Li; Liu, Jin-Song; Chu, Zheng; Yang, Zhen-Gang; Wang, Ke-Jia; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear radiation responses of two different n-doped bulk semiconductors: indium antimonide (InSb) and indium arsenide (InAs) in an intense terahertz (THz) field are studied by using the method of ensemble Monte Carlo (EMC) at room temperature. The results show that the radiations of two materials generate about 2-THz periodic regular spectrum distributions under a high field of 100 kV/cm at 1-THz center frequency. The center frequencies are enhanced to about 7 THz in InSb, and only 5 THz in InAs, respectively. The electron valley occupancy and the percentage of new electrons excited by impact ionization are also calculated. We find that the band nonparabolicity and impact ionization promote the generation of nonlinear high frequency radiation, while intervalley scattering has the opposite effect. Moreover, the impact ionization dominates in InSb, while impact ionization and intervalley scattering work together in InAs. These characteristics have potential applications in up-convension of THz wave and THz nonlinear frequency multiplication field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574105 and 61177095), the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province, China (Grant Nos. 2012FFA074 and 2013BAA002), the Wuhan Municipal Applied Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 20140101010009), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2013KXYQ004 and 2014ZZGH021).

  15. Multiphoton and tunneling ionization probability of atoms and molecules in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Liu, Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically studied ionization of atoms exposed to an intense laser field by using three different methods, i.e., the numerical solution of the single-active-electron approximation based time-dependent Schrödinger equation (SAE-TDSE), the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (PPT) model, and the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) model. The ionization of several linear molecules in a strong laser field is also investigated with the molecular ADK (MO-ADK) and the molecular PPT (MO-PPT) model. We show that the ionization probability from the PPT and the MO-PPT model agrees well with the corresponding SAE-TDSE result in both the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes. By considering the volume effect of the laser field, the ionization signal obtained from the PPT and the MO-PPT model fits well the experimental data in the whole range of the multiphoton and tunneling ionization regimes. However, both the ADK and MO-ADK models seriously underestimate the ionization probabilities (or signals) in the multiphoton regime.

  16. Developmental effects of perinatal exposure to extremely weak 7 Hz magnetic fields and nitric oxide modulation in the Wistar albino rat.

    PubMed

    Whissell, P D; Persinger, M A

    2007-11-01

    Prenatal exposure of pregnant dams to oscillating magnetic fields can cause behavioural deficits in their offspring which persist into adulthood. These changes are waveform-specific and may involve nitric oxide. To investigate the interaction between nitric oxide modulation and perinatal magnetic fields, dams were exposed from 2 days before to 14 days after birth to one of six magnetic field conditions (1, 5, 10, 50 or 500 nT or sham) and given either water, 1g/L nitric oxide precursor l-arginine or 0.5 g/L nitric oxide synthase inhibitor n-methylarginine. At weaning (22d), their offspring were placed in the open field for observation. Rats given 50 nT field or 500 nT field+water were hyperactive and showed increased rearing and bodyweight. These strong effects were attenuated or absent in groups given 50 or 500 nT field+n-methylarginine. Groups given sham field+l-arginine were behaviourally similar to animals given 50 or 500 nT field+water. Higher intensity fields showed robust behavioural and physiological effects. In general, these effects were counteracted by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor n-methylarginine, which had little effect on its own. Shams given NO precursor l-arginine were highly similar to those given any higher intensity magnetic field. Results support a critical developmental role of NO and the involvement of NO in magnetic field effects.

  17. Occupational exposure to low frequency magnetic fields and dementia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Geller, Petra; Nienhaus, Albert; Bernhardt, Tanja; Ruppe, Ingeburg; Eggert, Siegfried; Hietanen, Maila; Kauppinen, Timo; Frölich, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Background Several studies point to a potential aetiological relevance to dementia of exposure to low‐frequency magnetic fields, but the evidence is inconclusive. Objective To further examine the relationship between low frequency magnetic fields and dementia. Methods From 23 general practices, 195 patients with dementia were recruited. Of these, 108 had possible Alzheimer's disease, 59 had possible vascular dementia and 28 had secondary or unclassified dementia. A total of 229 controls were recruited: 122 population controls and 107 ambulatory patients free from dementia. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview; in cases, the interview was administered to the next of kin. Exposure to low‐frequency electromagnetic fields was assessed by expert rating. To identify occupations suspected to be associated with dementia, major occupations were a priori formed. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression, to control for age, region, sex, dementia in parents and smoking. Results Exposure to magnetic fields was not significantly associated with dementia; restriction of the analysis to cases with possible Alzheimer's disease or possible vascular dementia did not lead to statistically significant results. We found an increased risk of dementia in blue‐collar occupations (electrical and electronics workers, metal workers, construction workers, food and beverage processors and labourers). Conclusions Our study does not support a strong association between occupational exposure to low‐frequency magnetic fields and dementia. Further studies should consider the relationship between blue‐collar work and the late development of dementia. PMID:17043077

  18. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times). PMID:17495654

  19. Electromagnetic absorption in a multilayered slab model of tissue under near-field exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, I; Hagmann, M J; Gandhi, O P

    1980-01-01

    The electromagnetic energy deposited in a semi-infinite slab model consisting of skin, fat, and muscle layers is calculated for both plane-wave and near-field exposures. The plane-wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to calculate the energy deposited in the model by fields present due to leakage from equipment using electromagnetic energy. This analysis applies to near-field exposures where coupling of the target to the leakage source can be neglected. Calculations were made for 2,450 MHz, at which frequency the layered slab adequately models flat regions of the human body. Resonant absorption due to layering is examined as a function of the skin and fat thicknesses for plane-wave exposure and as a function of the physical extent of the near-field distribution. Calculations show that for fields that are nearly constant over at least a free-space wavelength, the energy deposition (for skin, fat, and muscle combination that gives resonant absorption) is equal to or less than that resulting from plane-wave exposure, but is appreciably greater than that obtained for a homogeneous muscle slab model.

  20. Electromagnetic absorption in a multilayered slab model of tissue under near-field exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Hagmann, M.J.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1980-01-01

    The electromagnetic energy deposited in a semi-infinite slab model consisting of skin, fat, and muscle layers is calculated for both plane-wave and near-field exposures. The plane-wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to calculate the energy deposited in the model by fields present due to leakage from equipment using electromagnetic energy. This analysis applies to near-field exposures where coupling of the target to the leakage source can be neglected. Calculations were made for 2,450 MHz, at which frequency the layered slab adequately models flat regions of the human body. Resonant absorption due to layering is examined as a function of the skin and fat thicknesses for plane-wave exposure and as a function of the physical extent of the near-field distribution. Calculations show that for fields that are nearly constant over at least a free-space wavelength, the energy deposition (for skin, fat, and muscle combination that gives resonant absorption) is equal to or less than that resulting from plane-wave exposure, but is appreciably greater than that obtained for a homogeneous muscle slab model.

  1. Assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Hannah

    2007-06-01

    The correct assessment of non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields already is a key issue in the occupational environment while becoming more and more important in the domain of the general public. The method presented provides a simple and safe solution for the assessment of arbitrary field types--including sinusoidal and continuous-wave signals--with frequencies up to several 100 kHz and has already proven its practicability and usefulness for more than 5 years. The concept is based on fundamental laws of physics and electrostimulation and well-established physiological data. It allows for a seamless and easy integration in any standard or guideline dealing with human safety in electric, magnetic, and electromagnetic fields. A very simple-to-use graphical version allows an easy and fast assessment of the exposure to non-sinusoidal, pulsed, or intermittent low-frequency magnetic fields without introducing a large overestimation of the exposure situation. A computer-based version makes a much more detailed signal analysis possible and can provide useful information for exposure reduction using modifications of the magnetic field's time parameters (e.g., rise/fall times).

  2. Evolution of dark state of an open atomic system in constant intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Krmpot, A. J.; Radonjic, M.; Cuk, S. M.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2011-10-15

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the evolution of open atomic systems in the constant intensity laser field. The study is performed by analyzing the line shapes of Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) obtained in different segments of a laser beam cross section of constant intensity, i.e., a {Pi}-shaped laser beam. Such Hanle EIT resonances were measured using a small movable aperture placed just in front of the photodetector, i.e., after the entire laser beam had passed through the vacuum Rb cell. The laser was locked to the open transition F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=1 at the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with laser intensities between 0.5 and 4 mW/cm{sup 2}. This study shows that the profile of the laser beam determines the processes governing the development of atomic states during the interaction. The resonances obtained near the beam center are narrower than those obtained near the beam edge, but the significant changes of the linewidths occur only near the beam edge, i.e., right after the atom enters the beam. The Hanle EIT resonances obtained near the beam center exhibit two pronounced minima next to the central maximum. The theoretical model reveals that the occurrence of these transmission minima is a joint effect of the preparation of atoms into the dark state and the optical pumping into the uncoupled ground level F{sub g}=1. The appearance of the transmission minima, although similar to that observed in the wings of a Gaussian beam [A. J. Krmpot et al., Opt. Express 17, 22491 (2009)], is of an entirely different nature for the {Pi}-shaped laser beam.

  3. Automatic white matter lesion segmentation using contrast enhanced FLAIR intensity and Markov Random Field.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pallab Kanti; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Janke, Andrew; Desmond, Patricia M; Wong, Tien Yin; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Storey, Elsdon; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri

    2015-10-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are small groups of dead cells that clump together in the white matter of brain. In this paper, we propose a reliable method to automatically segment WMLs. Our method uses a novel filter to enhance the intensity of WMLs. Then a feature set containing enhanced intensity, anatomical and spatial information is used to train a random forest classifier for the initial segmentation of WMLs. Following that a reliable and robust edge potential function based Markov Random Field (MRF) is proposed to obtain the final segmentation by removing false positive WMLs. Quantitative evaluation of the proposed method is performed on 24 subjects of ENVISion study. The segmentation results are validated against the manual segmentation, performed under the supervision of an expert neuroradiologist. The results show a dice similarity index of 0.76 for severe lesion load, 0.73 for moderate lesion load and 0.61 for mild lesion load. In addition to that we have compared our method with three state of the art methods on 20 subjects of Medical Image Computing and Computer Aided Intervention Society's (MICCAI's) MS lesion challenge dataset, where our method shows better segmentation accuracy compare to the state of the art methods. These results indicate that the proposed method can assist the neuroradiologists in assessing the WMLs in clinical practice.

  4. Ventricular myocyte injury by high-intensity electric field: Effect of pulse duration.

    PubMed

    Prado, Luiza Ns; Goulart, Jair T; Zoccoler, Marcelo; Oliveira, Pedro X

    2016-04-01

    Although high-intensity electric fields (HEF) application is currently the only effective therapy available to terminate ventricular fibrillation, it may cause injury to cardiac cells. In this study we determined the relation between HEF pulse length and cardiomyocyte lethal injury. We obtained lethality curves by survival analysis, which were used to determine the value of HEF necessary to kill 50% of cells (E50) and plotted a strength-duration (SxD) curve for lethality with 10 different durations: 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 35 and 70 ms. For the same durations we also obtained an SxD curve for excitation and established an indicator for stimulatory safeness (stimulation safety factor - SSF) as the ratio between the SxD curve for lethality and one for excitation. We found that the lower the pulse duration, the higher the HEF intensity required to cell death. Contrary to expectations, the highest SSF value does not correspond to the lowest pulse duration but to the one of 0.5 ms. As defibrillation threshold has been described as duration-dependent, our results imply that the use of shorter stimulus duration - instead of the one typically used in the clinic (10 ms) - might increase defibrillation safeness. PMID:26830130

  5. Automatic white matter lesion segmentation using contrast enhanced FLAIR intensity and Markov Random Field.

    PubMed

    Roy, Pallab Kanti; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Janke, Andrew; Desmond, Patricia M; Wong, Tien Yin; Abhayaratna, Walter P; Storey, Elsdon; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri

    2015-10-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are small groups of dead cells that clump together in the white matter of brain. In this paper, we propose a reliable method to automatically segment WMLs. Our method uses a novel filter to enhance the intensity of WMLs. Then a feature set containing enhanced intensity, anatomical and spatial information is used to train a random forest classifier for the initial segmentation of WMLs. Following that a reliable and robust edge potential function based Markov Random Field (MRF) is proposed to obtain the final segmentation by removing false positive WMLs. Quantitative evaluation of the proposed method is performed on 24 subjects of ENVISion study. The segmentation results are validated against the manual segmentation, performed under the supervision of an expert neuroradiologist. The results show a dice similarity index of 0.76 for severe lesion load, 0.73 for moderate lesion load and 0.61 for mild lesion load. In addition to that we have compared our method with three state of the art methods on 20 subjects of Medical Image Computing and Computer Aided Intervention Society's (MICCAI's) MS lesion challenge dataset, where our method shows better segmentation accuracy compare to the state of the art methods. These results indicate that the proposed method can assist the neuroradiologists in assessing the WMLs in clinical practice. PMID:26398564

  6. First-order torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Rudnick, I.

    1977-01-01

    The letter reports an observation of first-order nonzero time-averaged torques and solid-body spinning velocities in intense acoustic fields. The experimental apparatus consisted of a vertical cylindrical rod supported on an air bearing and passing through a box with two loudspeakers centered on adjoining vertical sides. The rim velocity of the cylinder and the torque on the cylinder are measured as functions of air-particle velocity and the phase difference between the x and y components of the particle velocity. It is found that both rim velocity and torque are linear functions of particle velocity. Difficulties in constructing a proper theoretical description of the observed effects are discussed.

  7. Classical and quantum mechanical studies of HF in an intense laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Dardi, P.S.; Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    The behavior of an HF molecule in an intense laser field is investigated with both classical trajectories and quantum dynamics. Vibration-rotation transition probabilities and energy absorption as a function of laser pulse time are calculated for the diatomic initially in its ground state. For comparison, results are also reported for a model nonrotating HF molecule. It is found that classical mechanics does not predict the correct time behavior of the system, nor does it predict the correct rotational state distributions. Classical mechanics does, however, predict pulse time averaged quantities to be the correct order of magnitude. There is also a correct general trend of increased multiphoton excitation for laser frequencies red-shifted from the one-photon resonance, although multiphoton resonance peaks are not observed in the classical results and far too little multiphoton excitation is predicted. The effect of laser phase has also been investigated and shown to be relatively unimportant in both the classical and quantum dynamics.

  8. Battlefield ethics training: integrating ethical scenarios in high-intensity military field exercises

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Megan M.; Jetly, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that modern missions have added stresses and ethical complexities not seen in previous military operations and that there are links between battlefield stressors and ethical lapses. Military ethicists have concluded that the ethical challenges of modern missions are not well addressed by current military ethics educational programs. Integrating the extant research in the area, we propose that scenario-based operational ethics training in high-intensity military field training settings may be an important adjunct to traditional military ethics education and training. We make the case as to why this approach will enhance ethical operational preparation for soldiers, supporting their psychological well-being as well as mission effectiveness. PMID:25206947

  9. Semi-analytical fluid study of the laser wake field excitation in the strong intensity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, D.; Fedele, R.; Belić, M.; De Nicola, S.

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma. The study has been performed in the ultrarelativistic regime of electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The calculations are applied to a laser wake field acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse.

  10. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  11. Steering Proton Migration in Hydrocarbons Using Intense Few-Cycle Laser Fields.

    PubMed

    Kübel, M; Siemering, R; Burger, C; Kling, Nora G; Li, H; Alnaser, A S; Bergues, B; Zherebtsov, S; Azzeer, A M; Ben-Itzhak, I; Moshammer, R; de Vivie-Riedle, R; Kling, M F

    2016-05-13

    Proton migration is a ubiquitous process in chemical reactions related to biology, combustion, and catalysis. Thus, the ability to manipulate the movement of nuclei with tailored light within a hydrocarbon molecule holds promise for far-reaching applications. Here, we demonstrate the steering of hydrogen migration in simple hydrocarbons, namely, acetylene and allene, using waveform-controlled, few-cycle laser pulses. The rearrangement dynamics is monitored using coincident 3D momentum imaging spectroscopy and described with a widely applicable quantum-dynamical model. Our observations reveal that the underlying control mechanism is due to the manipulation of the phases in a vibrational wave packet by the intense off-resonant laser field. PMID:27232019

  12. Instability in an amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O field effect transistor upon water exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Bhupendra K.; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    The instability of an amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) field effect transistor is investigated upon water treatment. Electrical characteristics are measured before, immediately after and a few days after water treatment in ambient as well as in vacuum conditions. It is observed that after a few days of water exposure an IGZO field effect transistor (FET) shows relatively more stable behaviour as compared to before exposure. Transfer characteristics are found to shift negatively after immediate water exposure and in vacuum. More interestingly, after water exposure the off current is found to decrease by 1-2 orders of magnitude and remains stable even after 15 d of water exposure in ambient as well as in vacuum, whereas the on current more or less remains the same. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study is carried out to investigate the qualitative and quantitative analysis of IGZO upon water exposure. The changes in the FET parameters are evaluated and attributed to the formation of excess oxygen vacancies and changes in the electronic structure of the IGZO bulk channel and at the IGZO/SiO2 interface, which can further lead to the formation of subgap states. An attempt is made to distinguish which parameters of the FET are affected by the changes in the electronic structure of the IGZO bulk channel and at the IGZO/SiO2 interface separately.

  13. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36–2.07, p < 0.0001 linear trend), and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.23, 95% CI 0.97–1.57, p = 0.02 linear trend). Conclusions Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. Impact Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  14. Ntp technical report on toxicity, reproductive, and developmental studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields, administered by whole body exposure to F344/N rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    SciTech Connect

    Boorman, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Electric and magnetic fields are associated with the production, transmission, and use of electricity; thus the potential for human exposure is high. These electric and magnetic fields are predominantly of low frequency (60 Hz) and generally of low intensity. The prevailing view among physicists is that exposure to these low-frequency, low-intensity fields does not pose a health hazard. However, this view has been challenged by reports linking magnetic field exposure to the development of leukemia and other cancers. Because multiple epidemiologic studies suggested a potential for increased cancer rates with increasing exposure, and because of public concern, the effects of 60-Hz magnetic field exposure were examined in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in 8-week full-body-exposure studies. Animals were evaluated for hematology and clinical chemistry (rats only) parameters, pineal gland hormone concentrations, and histopathology. Additional studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats to examine teratologic and reproductive effects of magnetic field exposure.

  15. Behavioral effects of long-term exposure to magnetic fields in rats.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, H I; Grzesik, J; Bortel, M; Kuśka, R; Duda, D; Michnik, J; Małecki, A

    1993-01-01

    Male rats and pregnant and nonpregnant female rats of the Wistar strain were sham-exposed or exposed to static (0.49 T) or to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) magnetic fields (0.018 T) 2 h per day for 20 consecutive days. Measures of irritability, exploratory activity, and locomotion were made in that order before and after the 4th, 10th, and 17th 2-h exposures. A reliable decrease in the irritability of rats after repeated exposure to a static or undulating field was found. No significant effects of treatment conditions on open-field behavior and locomotor activity were observed. Pregnancy had no influence on the behavioral end points. These results indicate that irritability of rats may be used as a simple behavioral indicant of mammalian sensitivity to magnetic fields. PMID:8216385

  16. Automatic exposure control for a slot scanning full field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakri, Idris A.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.; Tesic, Mike M.

    2005-09-15

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) is an important feature in mammography. It enables consistently optimal image exposure despite variations in tissue density and thickness, and user skill level. Full field digital mammography systems cannot employ conventional AEC methods because digital receptors fully absorb the x-ray beam. In this paper we describe an AEC procedure for slot scanning mammography. With slot scanning detectors, our approach uses a fast low-resolution and low-exposure prescan to acquire an image of the breast. Tube potential depends on breast thickness, and the prescan histogram provides the necessary information to calculate the required tube current. We validate our approach with simulated prescan images and phantom measurements. We achieve accurate exposure tracking with thickness and density, and expect this method of AEC to reduce retakes and improve workflow.

  17. Whole brain EEG synchronization likelihood modulated by long term evolution electromagnetic fields exposure.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bin; Su, Chang; Yang, Lei; Xie, Yi; Wu, Tongning

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible interactions between human brain and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) with electroencephalogram (EEG) technique. Unlike the previous studies which mainly focused on EMF effect on local brain activities, we attempted to evaluate whether the EMF emitted from Long Term Evolution (LTE) devices can modulate the functional connectivity of brain electrical activities. Ten subjects were recruited to participate in a crossover, double-blind exposure experiment which included two sessions (real and sham exposure). In each session, LTE EMF exposure (power on or off) lasted for 30 min and the EEG signals were collected with 32 channels throughout the experiment. Then we applied the synchronization likelihood method to quantify the neural synchronization over the whole brain in different frequency bands and in different EEG record periods. Our results illustrated that the short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the synchronization patterns of EEG activation across the whole brain.

  18. Intense-field ionization of atoms and molecules: Spatially resolved ion detection and ultrashort optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, James

    The interaction of light and matter has for many years provided a venue in which scientists have been able to increase their understanding of fundamental quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. The advent of the laser in the early sixties significantly changed the way in which experiments were performed. These coherent sources of radiation played a pivotal role in the investigations of new phenomenon such as multiphoton ionization. As time progressed many significant advances have been made in laser technology. For instance, the development of mode-locking techniques such as Q-switching and the nonlinear Kerr effect have made pulsed lasers possible (now down to ˜ 5 fs), the discovery of Chirped-Pulse-Amplification allowed for these ultrashort pulses to be amplified up to Joules in energy per pulse. As a result of these new advances in laser technology, new and exciting physics have been illuminated. When ultrashort intense laser fields interact with matter, one possible outcome is the ionization of the target into its constituents (atoms, molecules, electrons or photons). Because the constituents are usually ions which may have different masses and charges, time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are often employed in the analysis of the ionization yields. In these experiments, the usual quantity of physical interest is the ionization probability as a function of a well known intensity. However, in reality the impinging laser radiation possesses a distribution of intensities. To further add to this annoyance, it is difficult for a TOF spectrometer to distinguish between ions created at different intensities and the usual course of action is to integrate ions from over the entire focal volume. The inevitable result of this so-called spatial averaging is to limit information about the underlying physical process. Additionally, coherent sources of radiation have captured the attention of researchers whose main interests are in spatially modulating the phase and amplitude of

  19. Geomagnetic field intensity and inclination records from the Hawaiian long basaltic cores: geomagnetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laj, C. E.; Kissel, C.; Davies, C.; Gubbins, D.

    2009-12-01

    In the long basaltic cores drilled in the Big Island of Hawaii, the sub-horizontal orientation of the flows and their regular accumulation with time, which makes the continuity in time almost comparable with sediments, provides an excellent opportunity to obtain a detailed record of the absolute intensity and inclination of the geomagnetic field from a sequence of lava flows. Here, we report new paleointensity (Thellier and Thellier) and inclination determinations obtained from the analysis of 370 samples from 130 flows in the subaerial part of HSDP2. These new results are combined with previous results obtained from the other long basaltic cores in Hawaii (HSDP1, SOH4 and SOH1) all selected using a set of stringent paleointensity selection criteria (PICRIT-03). In a first step the Sharp and Renne age model was used for correlation of the records. In a second step correlation was refined using some characteristic features of the paleomagnetic records themselves (HSDP 1 and HSDP 2 in particular), which led to a slight modification of the Sharp and Renne age model. The age model was further improved by correlation with the sedimentary SINT-800 record. The results are consistent between these independent records, over the different time intervals where they overlap. This allows construction of the first accurate lava record of absolute intensity and inclination at Hawaii which overlap for almost 75% of this time interval these different records overlap, the results are very consistent and allow to construct an accurate lava record of absolute geomagnetic field intensity and inclination at Hawaii for the last 420 kyr based on at least two independent records over almost. The VADM undergoes large oscillations between about 3 and 16 10^22 A.m*2 with an average values of about 8 10^22 A m^2. When the values corresponding to recognized excursional periods are omitted, the inclination is on the average 29.6°, i.e. about 6° shallower than the GAD value. These results will

  20. Power frequency magnetic field exposure and gap junctional communication in Clone 9 cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G D; Khalaf, W; Hayden, K E; Miller, E J; Dowray, V R; Creekmore, A L; Carruthers, C W; Williams, M W; Gailey, P C

    2000-06-01

    Exposure to a power-frequency magnetic field has been reported to produce a statistically significant inhibition of gap junctional communication (GJC) in Clone 9 cells that have been pre-stressed by treatment with low concentrations of chloral hydrate (CH) [C.F. Blackman, J.P. Blanchard, S.G. Benane, D.E. House, J.A. Elder, Double blind test of magnetic field effects on neurite outgrowth, Bioelectromagnetics, 19 (1998) 204-209]. This observation might provide mechanistic insight into the possible role of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the carcinogenic process, since cancer cells frequently show decreased or absent GJC, and tumor promoting chemicals have been observed to inhibit GJC. Magnetic field exposure conditions were 45 Hz, 23.8 microT rms + parallel DC 36.6 microT, for 30 min of exposure. The responses of Clone 9 cells to the GJC-inhibiting effects of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and the chemical CH were evaluated and compared to reported results [S.G. Benane, C.F. Blackman, D.E. House, Effects of perchloroethylene and its metabolites on intercellular communication in Clone 9 rat liver cells, J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, 48 (1996) 427-437]. Before magnetic field exposure, cells were exposed for 24 h to either 3 (nine experiments) or 5 mM (11 experiments) CH to produce GJC of 67% or 50%, respectively, relative to unexposed controls. GJC was assessed microscopically using the scrape-loading technique and a blinded protocol. No statistically significant effect was observed due to magnetic field exposure with either CH concentration.

  1. 916 MHz electromagnetic field exposure affects rat behavior and hippocampal neuronal discharge☆

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Dongmei; Yang, Lei; Chen, Su; Tian, Yonghao; Wu, Shuicai

    2012-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to a 916 MHz, 10 W/m2 mobile phone electromagnetic field for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. Average completion times in an eight-arm radial maze were longer in the exposed rats than control rats after 4–5 weeks of exposure. Error rates in the exposed rats were greater than the control rats at 6 weeks. Hippocampal neurons from the exposed rats showed irregular firing patterns during the experiment, and they exhibited decreased spiking activity 6–9 weeks compared with that after 2–5 weeks of exposure. These results indicate that 916 MHz electromagnetic fields influence learning and memory in rats during exposure, but long-term effects are not obvious. PMID:25657684

  2. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Kohn, Gabriel; Hicho, George; Swartzendruber, Lydon

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  3. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  4. Application of an induced field sensor for assessment of electromagnetic exposure from compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Jagadish; Douglas, Mark; Capstick, Myles; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2012-02-01

    The development of scientifically sound instrumentation, methods, and procedures for the electromagnetic exposure assessment of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is investigated. The incident and induced fields from 11 CFLs have been measured in the 10 kHz-1 MHz range, and they are compared with the levels for incandescent and light emitting diode (LED) bulbs. Commercially available equipment was used to measure the incident fields, while a novel sensor was built to assess the induced fields in humans. Incident electric field levels significantly exceed the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) reference levels at close distances for some sources, while the induced fields are within the ICNIRP basic restrictions. This demonstrates the importance of assessing the induced fields rather than the incident fields for these sources. Maximum current densities for CFLs are comparable to the limits (in the range of 9% to 56%), demonstrating the need for measurements to establish compliance. For the frequency range investigated, the induced fields were found to be considerably higher for CFLs than for incandescent light bulbs, while the exposure from the two LED bulbs was low. The proposed instrumentation and methods offer several advantages over an existing measurement standard, and the measurement uncertainty is significantly better than the assessment of electric and magnetic fields at close distances.

  5. Residential exposure to electromagnetic fields and childhood leukaemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo, I. F.; Villari, P.

    1999-01-01

    Although individual epidemiological investigations have suggested associations between residential exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukaemia, overall the findings have been inconclusive. Several of these studies do, however, lend themselves to application of the meta-analysis technique. For this purpose we carried out searches using MEDLINE and other sources, and 14 case-control studies and one cohort study were identified and evaluated for epidemiological quality and included in the meta-analysis. Relative risk estimates were extracted from each of the studies and pooled. Separate meta-analyses were performed on the basis of the assessed EMF exposure (wiring configuration codes, distance to power distribution equipment, spot and 24-h measures of magnetic field strength (magnetic flux density) and calculated magnetic field). The meta-analysis based on wiring configuration codes yielded a pooled relative risk estimate of 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.04, P = 0.024) and for that for exposure to 24-h measurements of magnetic fields, 1.59 (95% CI = 1.14-2.22, P = 0.006), indicating a potential effect of residential EMF exposure on childhood leukaemia. In most cases, lower risk estimates were obtained by pooling high-quality studies than pooling low-quality studies. There appears to be a clear trend for more recent studies to be of higher quality. Enough evidence exists to conclude that dismissing concerns about residential EMFs and childhood leukaemia is unwarranted. Additional high-quality epidemiological studies incorporating comparable measures for both exposure and outcomes are, however, needed to confirm these findings and, should they prove to be true, the case options for minimizing exposure should be thoroughly investigated to provide definitive answers for policy-makers. PMID:10612886

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Field Campaigns or Intensive Operational Periods (IOP)

    DOE Data Explorer

    ARM Climate Research Facility users regularly conduct field campaigns to augment routine data acquisitions and to test and validate new instruments. Any field campaign which is proposed, planned, and implemented at one or more research sites is referred to as an intensive operational period (IOP). IOPs are held using the fixed and mobile sites; Southern Great Plains, North Slope of Alaska, Tropical Western Pacific, ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), and Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP). [Taken from http://www.arm.gov/science/fc.stm] Users may search with the specialized interface or browse campaigns/IOPs in table format. Browsing allows users to see the start date of the IOP, the status (Past, In Progress, etc.), the duration, the Principal Investigator, and the research site, along with the title of the campaign/IOP. Clicking on the title leads to a descriptive summary of the campaign, names of co-investigators, contact information, links to related websites, and a link to available data in the ARM Archive. Users will be requested to create a password, but the data files are free for viewing and downloading. The URL to go directly to the ARM Archive, bypassing the information pages, is http://www.archive.arm.gov/. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kännälä, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Alanko, Tommi; Jokela, Kari

    2009-04-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s-1 for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s-1 for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s-1) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  8. Dynamical studies of model membrane and cellular response to nanosecond, high-intensity pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qin

    The dynamics of electroporation of biological cells subjected to nanosecond, high intensity pulses are studied based on a coupled scheme involving the current continuity and Smoluchowski equations. The improved pore formation energy model includes a dependence on pore population and density. It also allows for variable surface tension and incorporates the effects of finite conductivity on the electrostatic correction term, which was not considered by the simple energy models in the literature. It is shown that E(r) becomes self-adjusting with variations in its magnitude and profile. The whole scheme is self-consistent and dynamic. An electromechanical analysis based on thin-shell theory is presented to analyze cell shape changes in response to external electric fields. The calculations demonstrate that at large fields, the spherical cell geometry can be modified, and even ellipsoidal forms may not be appropriate to account for the resulting shape. It is shown that, in keeping with reports in the literature, the final shape depends on membrane thickness. This has direct implications for tissues in which significant molecular restructuring can occur. This study is also focused on obtaining qualitative predictions of pulse width dependence to apoptotic cell irreversibility that has been observed experimentally. The analysis couples a distributed electrical model for current flow with the Smoluchowski equation to provide self-consistent, time-dependent transmembrane voltages. The model captures the essence of the experimentally observed pulse-width dependence, and provides a possible physical picture that depends only on the electrical trigger. Different cell responses of normal and malignant (Farage) tonsillar B-cell are also compared and discussed. It is shown that subjecting a cell to an ultrashort, high-intensity electric pulse is the optimum way for reversible intracellular manipulation. Finally, a simple but physical atomistic model is presented for molecular

  9. Effect of near-earth thunderstorms electric field on the intensity of ground cosmic ray positrons/electrons in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. X.; Wang, X. J.; Huang, D. H.; Jia, H. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the correlation between the ground cosmic ray intensity and near-earth thunderstorms electric field at YBJ (located at YangBaJing, Tibet, China, 4300 m a. s. l.). The variations of the secondary cosmic ray intensity are found to be highly dependent on the strength and polarity of the electric field. In negative fields and in positive fields greater than 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons increases with increasing electric field strength. And these values increase more obviously when involving a shower with lower primary energy or a higher zenith angle. While in positive fields ranging from 0 to 600 V/cm, the total number of ground comic ray positrons and electrons declines and the amplitude is up to 3.1% for vertical showers. A decrease of intensity occurs in inclined showers within the range of 0-500 V/cm, which is accompanied by smaller amplitudes. In this paper, the intensity changes are analyzed, especially concerning those decreasing phenomena in positive electric fields. Our simulation results could be helpful in understanding the decreases observed in some ground-based experiments (such as the Carpet air shower array and ARGO-YBJ), and also be useful in understanding the acceleration mechanisms of secondary charged particles caused by an atmospheric electric field.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of the nematic liquid crystal phase in the presence of an intense magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2006-04-01

    The influence of an intense external field on the dynamics of the nematic liquid crystal phase is investigated using a molecular dynamics simulation for the Gay-Berne nematogen under isobaric-isothermal conditions. The molecular dynamics as a function of the second-rank orientational order parameter ⟨P2⟩ for a system consisting of a nematic liquid crystal in the presence of an intense magnetic field is compared with that of a similar system without the field. The translational motion of molecules is determined as a function of the translational diffusion coefficient tensor and the anisotropy and compared with the values predicted theoretically. The rotational dynamics of molecules is analyzed using the first- and the second-rank orientational time correlation functions. The translational diffusion coefficient parallel with respect to the director is constrained by the intense field, although the perpendicular one is decreased as the ⟨P2⟩ is increased, just as it is in the system without the field. However, no essential effect of the strong magnetic field is observed in the rotational molecular dynamics. Further, the rotational diffusion coefficient parallel with respect to the director obtained from the first-rank orientational time correlation function in the simulation is qualitatively in agreement with that in the real nematic liquid crystalline molecules. The ⟨P2⟩ dependence of the rotational diffusion coefficient for the system with the intense magnetic field shows a tendency similar to that for the system without the field.

  11. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    PubMed

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children.

  12. International policy and advisory response regarding children's exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF).

    PubMed

    Redmayne, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure regulations/guidelines generally only consider acute effects, and not chronic, low exposures. Concerns for children's exposure are warranted due to the amazingly rapid uptake of many wireless devices by increasingly younger children. This review of policy and advice regarding children's RF-EMF exposure draws material from a wide variety of sources focusing on the current situation. This is not a systematic review, but aims to provide a representative cross-section of policy and advisory responses within set boundaries. There are a wide variety of approaches which I have categorized and tabulated ranging from ICNIRP/IEEE guidelines and "no extra precautions needed" to precautionary or scientific much lower maxima and extensive advice to minimize RF-EMF exposure, ban advertising/sale to children, and add exposure information to packaging. Precautionary standards use what I term an exclusion principle. The wide range of policy approaches can be confusing for parents/carers of children. Some consensus among advisory organizations would be helpful acknowledging that, despite extensive research, the highly complex nature of both RF-EMF and the human body, and frequent technological updates, means simple assurance of long-term safety cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, minimum exposure of children to RF-EMF is recommended. This does not indicate need for alarm, but mirrors routine health-and-safety precautions. Simple steps are suggested. ICNIRP guidelines need to urgently publish how the head, torso, and limbs' exposure limits were calculated and what safety margin was applied since this exposure, especially to the abdomen, is now dominant in many children. PMID:26091083

  13. No effects of power line frequency extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure on selected neurobehavior tests of workers inspecting transformers and distribution line stations versus controls.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xiong, De-fu; Liu, Jia-wen; Li, Zi-xin; Zeng, Guang-cheng; Li, Hua-liang

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the interference of 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) occupational exposure on the neurobehavior tests of workers performing tour-inspection close to transformers and distribution power lines. Occupational short-term "spot" measurements were carried out. 310 inspection workers and 300 logistics staff were selected as exposure and control. The neurobehavior tests were performed through computer-based neurobehavior evaluation system, including mental arithmetic, curve coincide, simple visual reaction time, visual retention, auditory digit span and pursuit aiming. In 500 kV areas electric field intensity at 71.98% of total measured 590 spots were above 5 kV/m (national occupational standard), while in 220 kV areas electric field intensity at 15.69% of total 701 spots were above 5 kV/m. Magnetic field flux density at all the spots was below 1,000 μT (ICNIRP occupational standard). The neurobehavior score changes showed no statistical significance. Results of neurobehavior tests among different age, seniority groups showed no significant changes. Neurobehavior changes caused by daily repeated ELF-EMF exposure were not observed in the current study. PMID:24379132

  14. Focus formation of C3H/10T1/2 cells and exposure to a 836.55 MHz modulated radiofrequency field

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, C.D.; Thomas, D.L.; Adey, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    Disruption of communication between transformed cells and normal cells is involved in tumor promotion. The authors have tested the hypothesis that exposures to radiofrequency (RF) fields using a form of digital modulation (TDMA) and a chemical tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), are copromoters that enhance focus formation of transformed cells in coculture with parental C3H/10T1/2 murine fibroblasts. RF field exposures did not influence TPA`s dose-dependent promotion of focus formation in coculture. Cell cultures were exposed to an 836.55 MHz TDMA-modulated field in TEM transmission line chambers, with incident energies that simulated field intensities at a user`s head. Specific absorption rates (SARs) of 0.15, 1.5, and 15 {micro}W/g were used during each digital packet, and the packet frequency was 50/s. The TEM chambers were placed in a commercial incubator at 37 C and 95% humidity/5% CO{sub 2}. The RF field exposures were in a repeating cycle, 20 min on, 20 min off, 24 h/day for 28 days. At 1.5 {micro}W/g, TPA-induced focus formation was not significantly different in RF-exposed cultures compared to parallel sham-exposed cultures in ten independent experiments in terms of the number, density, and area of foci. Similarly, at 0.15 and 15.0 {micro}W/g, in two and four experiments, respectively, RF exposure did not alter TPA-induced focus formation. The findings support a conclusion that repeated exposures to this RF field do not influence tumor promotion in vitro, based on the RF field`s inability to enhance TPA-induced focus formation.

  15. Assessment of extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure from GSM mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carolina; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Findlay, Richard; Maslanyj, Myron; Conil, Emmanuelle; Kromhout, Hans; Lee, Ae-kyoung; Sim, Malcolm R; Taki, Masao; Varsier, Nadège; Wiart, Joe; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    Although radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones have received much attention, relatively little is known about the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by phones. This paper summarises ELF magnetic flux density measurements on global system for mobile communications (GSM) mobile phones, conducted as part of the MOBI-KIDS epidemiological study. The main challenge is to identify a small number of generic phone models that can be used to classify the ELF exposure for the different phones reported in the study. Two-dimensional magnetic flux density measurements were performed on 47 GSM mobile phones at a distance of 25 mm. Maximum resultant magnetic flux density values at 217 Hz had a geometric mean of 221 (+198/-104) nT. Taking into account harmonic data, measurements suggest that mobile phones could make a substantial contribution to ELF exposure in the general population. The maximum values and easily available variables were poorly correlated. However, three groups could be defined on the basis of field pattern indicating that manufacturers and shapes of mobile phones may be the important parameters linked to the spatial characteristics of the magnetic field, and the categorization of ELF magnetic field exposure for GSM phones in the MOBI-KIDS study may be achievable on the basis of a small number of representative phones. Such categorization would result in a twofold exposure gradient between high and low exposure based on type of phone used, although there was overlap in the grouping. PMID:24203762

  16. A comparative sonochemical reaction that is independent of the intensity of ultrasound and the geometry of the exposure apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Sostaric, Joe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Sonolysis of aqueous solutions of n-alkyl anionic surfactants results in the formation of secondary carbon-centered radicals (—•CH—). The yield of —•CH— depends on the bulk surfactant concentration up to a maximum attainable radical yield (the ‘plateau yield’) where an increasing surfactant concentration (below the critical micelle concentration) no longer affects the —•CH— yield. In an earlier study it was found that the ratio of —•CH— detected following sonolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium pentane sulfonate (SPSo) to that of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (i.e., CHSPSo/CHSDS) depended on the frequency of sonolysis, but was independent of the ultrasound intensity, at the plateau concentrations (J. Phys. Chem. B 106 (2002) 12537-12548). In the current study, it was found that the CHSPSo/CHSDS ratio depended only on the ultrasound frequency and did not depend on the geometry of the ultrasound exposure apparatus considered. PMID:18472292

  17. Detection of magnetic field intensity gradient by homing pigeons (Columba livia) in a novel "virtual magnetic map" conditioning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Mora, Cordula V; Bingman, Verner P

    2013-01-01

    It has long been thought that birds may use the Earth's magnetic field not only as a compass for direction finding, but that it could also provide spatial information for position determination analogous to a map during navigation. Since magnetic field intensity varies systematically with latitude and theoretically could also provide longitudinal information during position determination, birds using a magnetic map should be able to discriminate magnetic field intensity cues in the laboratory. Here we demonstrate a novel behavioural paradigm requiring homing pigeons to identify the direction of a magnetic field intensity gradient in a "virtual magnetic map" during a spatial conditioning task. Not only were the pigeons able to detect the direction of the intensity gradient, but they were even able to discriminate upward versus downward movement on the gradient by differentiating between increasing and decreasing intensity values. Furthermore, the pigeons typically spent more than half of the 15 second sampling period in front of the feeder associated with the rewarded gradient direction indicating that they required only several seconds to make the correct choice. Our results therefore demonstrate for the first time that pigeons not only can detect the presence and absence of magnetic anomalies, as previous studies had shown, but are even able to detect and respond to changes in magnetic field intensity alone, including the directionality of such changes, in the context of spatial orientation within an experimental arena. This opens up the possibility for systematic and detailed studies of how pigeons could use magnetic intensity cues during position determination as well as how intensity is perceived and where it is processed in the brain. PMID:24039812

  18. Exposure history of the Mocs (L6) chondrite: A study of strewn field samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferko, T. E.; Schultz, L.; Franke, L.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Hutchison, R.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    2000-11-01

    We measured cosmogenic radionuclides (10Be, 26Al, 36Cl) and noble gases (He, Ne and Ar) in 10 specimens of the L6 chondrite Mocs to determine the exposure history and pre-atmospheric relationship among fragments from known locations in the strewn field. Cosmogenic noble gas contents alone are consistent with a simple irradiation exposure of 15.2 Ma. However, Mocs has very low 22Ne/21Ne ratios indicative of deep burial in a large meteoroid, but radionuclide levels at saturation values typical for much smaller meteoroids: this paradox suggests a possible complex exposure. For the latter case, we propose a two-stage exposure history in which Mocs initially was buried deeply in a large object for 110 Ma followed by exposure in a 65 cm object for 10.5 Ma. Relative shielding was inferred from the measured 22Ne/21Ne ratios assuming constant 22Ne/21Ne production for all samples during the first stage. These shielding levels, which are supported by estimates based on 36Cl production by neutron capture, indicate a possible relationship between depth of samples in the Mocs meteoroid and fall location in the strewn field.

  19. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  20. Effects of long-term electromagnetic field exposure on spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Dongmei; Yang, Lei; Chen, Su; Tong, Jun; Tian, Yonghao; Su, Benhang; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-02-01

    With the development of communications industry, mobile phone plays an important role in daily life. Whether or not the electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phone causes any adverse effects on brain function has become of a great concern. This paper investigated the effect of electromagnetic field on spatial learning and memory in rats. 32 trained Wistar rats were divided into two groups: exposure group and control group. The exposure group was exposed to 916 MHz, 10w/m2 mobile phone electromagnetic field (EMF) 6 h a day, 5 days a week, 10 weeks. The completion time, number of total errors and the neuron discharge signals were recorded while the rats were searching for food in an eight-arm radial maze at every weekend. The neuron signals of one exposed rat and one control rat in the maze were obtained by the implanted microelectrode arrays in their hippocampal regions. It can be seen that during the weeks 4-5 of the experiment, the average completion time and error rate of the exposure group were longer and larger than that of control group (p < 0.05). During the weeks 1-3 and 6-9, they were close to each other. The hippocampal neurons showed irregular firing patterns and more spikes with shorter interspike interval during the whole experiment period. It indicates that the 916 MHz EMF influence learning and memory in rats to some extent in a period during exposure, and the rats can adapt to long-term EMF exposure.

  1. Intense laser effects on the optical properties of asymmetric GaAs double quantum dots under applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, Doina; Niculescu, Ecaterina Cornelia

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the combined effects of a non-resonant intense laser field and a static electric field on the electronic structure and the nonlinear optical properties (absorption, optical rectification) of a GaAs asymmetric double quantum dot under a strong probe field excitation. The calculations were performed within the compact density-matrix formalism under steady state conditions using the effective mass approximation. Our results show that: (i) the electronic structure and optical properties are sensitive to the dressed potential; (ii) under applied electric fields, an increase of the laser intensity induces a redshift of the optical absorption and rectification spectra; (iii) the augment of the electric field strength leads to a blueshift of the spectra; (iv) for high electric fields the optical spectra show a shoulder-like feature, related with the occurrence of an anti-crossing between the two first excited levels.

  2. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice. PMID:25552555

  3. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice.

  4. Electric Field Distribution Excited by Indoor Radio Source for Exposure Compliance Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Junji; Tarusawa, Yoshiaki

    Correction factors are presented for estimating the RF electromagnetic field strength in the compliance assessment of human exposure from an indoor RF radio source in the frequency range from 800MHz to 3.5GHz. The correction factors are derived from the increase in the spatial average electric field strength distribution, which is dependent on the building materials. The spatial average electric field strength is calculated using relative complex dielectric constants of building materials. The relative complex dielectric constant is obtained through measurement of the transmission and reflection losses for eleven kinds of building materials used in business office buildings and single family dwellings.

  5. Association between Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from High Voltage Transmission Lines and Neurobehavioral Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiongli; Tang, Tiantong; Hu, Guocheng; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Yuyu; Wang, Qiang; Su, Jing; Zou, Yunfeng; Peng, Xiaowu

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence for a possible causal relationship between exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by high voltage transmission (HVT) lines and neurobehavioral dysfunction in children is insufficient. The present study aims to investigate the association between EMF exposure from HVT lines and neurobehavioral function in children. Methods Two primary schools were chosen based on monitoring data of ambient electromagnetic radiation. A cross-sectional study with 437 children (9 to 13 years old) was conducted. Exposure to EMF from HVT lines was monitored at each school. Information was collected on possible confounders and relevant exposure predictors using standardized questionnaires. Neurobehavioral function in children was evaluated using established computerized neurobehavioral tests. Data was analyzed using multivariable regression models adjusted for relevant confounders. Results After controlling for potential confounding factors, multivariable regression revealed that children attending a school near 500 kV HVT lines had poorer performance on the computerized neurobehavioral tests for Visual Retention and Pursuit Aiming compared to children attending a school that was not in close proximity to HVT lines. Conclusions The results suggest long-term low-level exposure to EMF from HVT lines might have a negative impact on neurobehavioral function in children. However, because of differences in results only for two of four tests achieved statistical significance and potential limitations, more studies are needed to explore the effects of exposure to extremely low frequency EMF on neurobehavioral function and development in children. PMID:23843999

  6. Evaluation of an Intensive Intervention Programme to Protect Children Aged 1-5 Years from Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure at Home in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücel, U.; Öcek, Z. A.; Çiçeklioglu, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this randomized-controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive intervention to reduce children's environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure at their home compared with a minimal intervention. The target population of the study was the mothers of children aged 1-5 who lived in the Cengizhan district of Izmir in…

  7. Evaluating exposure cutpoint bias in epidemiologic studies of electric and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wartenberg, D.; Savitz, D.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiologists who study the association between exposure to electric or magnetic fields and adverse health outcomes often classify their subjects as exposed and unexposed, and they report results based on an odds ratio. The exposure classification rule--or dichotomy rule--is typically based on a priori assumptions or arbitrary considerations. We show that results may vary substantially with selection of different cutpoints by which to dichotomize exposure. Further, interpretation and comparison of studies is dependent on the choice of cutpoint. We suggest the use of probability plots as a more informative method of data representation. To demonstrate the utility of probability plots, we re-analyze data reported by Savitz et al. [1988, Am J Epidemiol 128:21-38]. Using a higher exposure cutpoint than that of the original analysis, we obtained larger odds ratios, two of which achieved statistical significance. More important, probability plots of these data showed (1) consistency of results with measures of magnetic fields in both low- and high-power-use situations, and (2) discordance with results based on measures of electric fields. Given these observations, we recommend further study, especially that focused on the most highly exposed individuals.

  8. Human adverse reproductive outcomes and electromagnetic field exposures: review of epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, G M; Croen, L A

    1993-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding a relation between residential and occupational electromagnetic (EM) field exposures and adverse reproductive effects. This paper reviews the epidemiologic evidence for this possible relation, including some pertinent methodologic issues, notes relevant findings from the experimental literature, and discusses areas for future research. Evidence is lacking for a strong association between a woman's use of a video display terminal (VDT) during pregnancy and spontaneous abortion. The evidence for a strong association between a women's use of a VDT and other adverse reproductive endpoints is also lacking, with some suggestive findings for congenital malformations and too few data to reach a conclusion about other endpoints. With respect to low-level EM field exposures other than VDTs, the paucity of data prevents one from determining whether there are reproductive health risks associated with such exposures. Therefore, this is an area that needs further investigation. Given that altered growth may be an underlying biologic effect of EM field exposures, endpoints that might be pursued in future studies include congenital malformations not associated with chromosomal anomalies, intrauterine growth retardation, and chromosomally normal spontaneous abortions. PMID:8206019

  9. CHILDREN'S RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS: APPLICATION OF CPPAES FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND TCPY WITHIN MENTOR/SHEDS PESTICIDES MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The comprehensive individual field-measurements on non-dietary exposure collected in the Children's-Post-Pesticide-Application-Exposure-Study (CPPAES) were used within MENTOR/SHEDS-Pesticides, a physically based stochastic human exposure and dose model. In this application, howev...

  10. Electromagnetic exposure in a phantom in the near and far fields of wire and planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazady, Md. Anas Boksh

    Due to the wide availability and usage of wireless devices and systems there have been and are concerns regarding their effects on the human body. Respective regulatory agencies have developed safety standards based on scientific research on electromagnetic (EM) exposure from wireless devices and antennas. The metric that quantifies the exposure level is called the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). Wireless devices must satisfy the regulatory standards before being marketed. In the past, researchers have primarily focused on investigating the EM exposure from wireless devices that are used very near to the user's head or body (less than 25 mm). But as time progressed many more wireless devices have become ubiquitous (vehicular wireless devices, laptop PCMCIA cards, Bluetooth dongles, wireless LAN routers, cordless phone base stations, and pico base stations are to name a few) and are operated at distances greater than 25 mm yet smaller than 200 mm. Given the variations in operating frequency, distance, and antenna size and type it is challenging to develop an approach using which EM exposure from a wide variety of wireless devices can be evaluated. The problem becomes more involved owing to the difficulties in identifying the antenna zone boundaries, e.g. reactive near-field, radiating near-field, far-field etc. The focus of this thesis is to investigate a large class of low and highly directive antennas and evaluate the EM exposure from them into a large elliptical phantom. The objective is to be able to predict threshold power levels that meet the SAR limits imposed by the regulatory agencies. It was observed that among the low directivity antennas at close near-field distances, electrically small antennas induced distinguishably higher SAR than electrically larger antennas. But differences in SAR were small as the phantom moved into the far-fields of the antennas. SAR induced by highly directive antennas were higher when the phantom was in the far-field of the

  11. Seasonal exposure of fish to neurotoxic pesticides in an intensive agricultural catchment, Uma-oya, Sri Lanka: linking contamination and acetylcholinesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sumith, Jayakody A; Hansani, P L Chamila; Weeraratne, Thilini C; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2012-07-01

    The annual cultivation pattern in the Uma-oya catchment in Sri Lanka is characterized by Yala and Maha rainfall periods and associated cropping. Two cultivation seasons were compared for pesticide residues: base flow, field drainage, and the runoff and supplementary sediment data for three sites in the catchment. Organophosphate and N-methyl carbamate pesticide analysis confirmed a higher concentration in the Yala season with low-flow conditions. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was measured by standard spectrometry in the brain, muscle, and eye tissues of three freshwater cyprinid fishes, Garra ceylonensis, Devario malabaricus, and Rasbora daniconius from three study sites during months overlapping two seasons in 2010 (December) and 2011 (July). Baseline AChE data were measured from fish samples from a forested reserve in the Knuckles. A 73% inhibition in muscle AChE activity in G. ceylonensis was associated with intense pesticide exposure months in the Yala season. The AChE inhibition more than 70% in G. ceylonensis eyes in both Yala (76%) and Maha (72.5%) seasons indicates particular sensitivity of eye tissue to inhibitors. The less dramatic AChE inhibition in the eye tissues in D. malabaricus and R. daniconius in both seasons indicates exemplary protective capacity of muscle AChE in fish. The highest inhibition of AChE (up to 60% in brain and up to 56% in muscle AChE activity in R. daniconius and up to 47.8% in brain and up to 64.6% in muscle AChE activity in D. malabaricus) occurred during the Yala season. Tissue AChE activity and physiological activity in fish were correlated. The results collectively indicate that AChE is a consistent biomarker for diffused contaminant exposure in agricultural catchments.

  12. Whole-Field Simultaneous Integrated-Boost Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Frank C.S.; Ng, Alice W.Y.; Lee, Victor H.F.; Lui, Collin M.M.; Yuen, K.-K.; Sze, W.-K.; Leung, T.-W.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the outcomes of our patients with newly diagnosed nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a whole-field simultaneous integrated-boost technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 175 patients treated with WF-SIB between mid-2004 and 2005 were eligible for study inclusion. The distribution of disease by stage was Stage IA in 10.9%, Stage IIA in 2.3%, Stage IIB in 21.7%, Stage III in 41.1%, Stage IVA in 14.9%, and Stage IVB in 9.1%. Of the 175 patients, 2 (1.2%), 10 (5.7%), and 163 (93.1%) had World Health Organization type I, II, and III histologic features, respectively. We prescribed 70 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy delivered in 33 fractions within 6.5 weeks at the periphery of three planning target volumes (PTV; PTV70, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively). Of the 175 patients, 46 with early T-stage disease received a brachytherapy boost, and 127 with advanced local or regional disease received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 34 months. The overall 3-year local failure-free survival, regional failure-free survival, distant failure-free survival, and overall survival rate was 93.6%, 93.3%, 86.6%, and 87.2%, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed Stage N2-N3 disease (p = .029) and PTV (p = .024) to be independent factors predicting a greater risk of distant failure and poor overall survival, respectively. Grade 3 acute mucositis/pharyngitis occurred in 23.4% of patients, and Stage T4 disease was the only significant predictor of mucositis/pharyngitis (p = .021). Conclusion: Whole-field simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a dose >70 Gy achieved excellent locoregional control, without an excess incidence of severe, acute mucositis/pharyngitis, in the present study. Strategies for using such highly conformal treatment for patients with a large tumor and late N-stage disease are potential areas of investigation for future studies.

  13. Cancer incidence and magnetic field exposure in industries using resistance welding in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, N; Floderus, B; Gustavsson, P; Johansen, C; Olsen, J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To investigate cancer incidence in workers exposed to high levels of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). Methods: A cohort based on the engineering industry was established. Industries assumed to use resistance welding in production were chosen in order to increase the prevalence of high exposed subjects and to reduce the influence of confounding factors. All men and women employed in these branches during 1985–94 were selected, 537 692 men and 180 529 women. Occupation, based on census information from 1980, 1985, and 1990, was linked to a job exposure matrix on ELF-MF. Four exposure groups were used by stratifying on mean workday ELF-MF exposure, using the lowest exposure group as reference. Cancer incidence was obtained by linkage to the Swedish Cancer Registry. Results: Men in the very high exposure group showed an increased incidence of tumours of the kidney, pituitary gland, and biliary passages and liver; for these cancer sites an exposure–response relation was indicated. Women in the very high exposure group showed an increased incidence of astrocytoma I–IV, with a clear exposure–response pattern. An association was suggested in the high exposure group only, for cancer of the corpus uteri and multiple myeloma. Decreased risks in the very high exposure group among men were found for cancer of the colon and connective tissue/muscle. Conclusions: The results on cancer of the liver, kidney, and pituitary gland among men are in accordance with previous observations. Regarding brain tumours and leukaemia, the outcome for women provided further support of an association. The hypothesis of a biological mechanism involving the endocrine system was partly supported. PMID:12107298

  14. Acute exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields increases interleukin-6 in young healthy men.

    PubMed

    Selmaoui, Brahim; Lambrozo, Jacques; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda; Haus, Erhard; Touitou, Yvan

    2011-12-01

    Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that extremely low frequency magnetic fields might affect human health and, in particular, that the incidence of certain types of cancer might increase among individuals living or working in environments exposed to such fields. This study is part of a broad study we conducted in humans. The study presented here was designed to look for possible effects of acute exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields (10 μT) on the interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) production. Thirty-two young men (20-30 years old) were divided into two groups (sham-exposed or control group and exposed group) of 16 subjects each. All subjects participated in two 24-h experiments to evaluate the effects of both continuous and intermittent (1 h "off" and 1 h "on" with the field switched "on" and "off" every 15 s) exposure to linearly polarized magnetic fields. The subjects were exposed to the magnetic field from 2300 to 0800 while recumbent. Blood samples were collected during each session at 11:00, 17:00, 22:00, 01:00, 04:00, 06:00, and 08:00. Results showed that exposure to 50-Hz magnetic fields (10 μT) significantly increases IL-6 when subjects were exposed to an intermittent magnetic field. However, no effect has been observed on interleukin IL-1β, IL-2, IL-1RA, and IL-2R.

  15. The non-ionizing electromagnetic field: Derivation of valid biological exposure metrics from Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2003-03-01

    Standards for protecting health from exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation treat the power density (magnitude of Poynting vector) as the biological exposure metric. For a static electric or magnetic field, the presumed metric is field strength. Scientifically valid expressions for such exposure metrics have been derived theoretically [1]. Three regimes exist for which different expressions are obtained: high frequencies (where electric and magnetic fields are tightly coupled), low frequencies (where these fields are separable), and static fields (where time derivatives are zero). Unexpected results are obtained: * There are two exposure metrics: one for thermal, another for athermal effects. * In general, these two metrics are different. Only for a plane wave is the same metric (power density) valid for both effects. * Exposure metrics used today for static fields are invalid! These findings also apply in the ionizing portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. [1] Wireless Phones and Health II: State of the Science. G. Carlo, ed. NY: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000; Chapter 4.

  16. Linear and nonlinear optical properties in an asymmetric double quantum well under intense laser field: Effects of applied electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilgul, U.; Al, E. B.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Restrepo, R. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.; Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and relative change of the refractive index in asymmetric GaAs/GaAlAs double quantum wells under intense laser fields are theoretically investigated. The electric field is oriented along the growth direction of the heterostructure while the magnetic field is taken in-plane. The intense laser field is linear polarization along the growth direction. Our calculations are made using the effective-mass approximation and the compact density-matrix approach. Intense laser effects on the system are investigated with the use of the Floquet method with the consequent change in the confinement potential of heterostructures. Our results show that the increase of the electric and magnetic fields blue-shifts the peak positions of the total absorption coefficient and of the total refractive index while the increase of the intense laser field firstly blue-shifts the peak positions and later results in their red-shifting.

  17. Exposure to GSM RF fields does not affect calcium homeostasis in human endothelial cells, rat pheocromocytoma cells or rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rodney P; Madison, Steve D; Leveque, Philippe; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Bootman, Martin D

    2010-07-27

    In the course of modern daily life, individuals are exposed to numerous sources of electromagnetic radiation that are not present in the natural environment. The strength of the electromagnetic fields from sources such as hairdryers, computer display units and other electrical devices is modest. However, in many home and office environments, individuals can experience perpetual exposure to an "electromagnetic smog", with occasional peaks of relatively high electromagnetic field intensity. This has led to concerns that such radiation can affect health. In particular, emissions from mobile phones or mobile phone masts have been invoked as a potential source of pathological electromagnetic radiation. Previous reports have suggested that cellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis is affected by the types of radiofrequency fields emitted by mobile phones. In the present study, we used a high-throughput imaging platform to monitor putative changes in cellular Ca2+ during exposure of cells to 900 MHz GSM fields of differing power (specific absorption rate 0.012-2 W/Kg), thus mimicking the type of radiation emitted by current mobile phone handsets. Data from cells experiencing the 900 Mhz GSM fields were compared with data obtained from paired experiments using continuous wave fields or no field. We employed three cell types (human endothelial cells, PC-12 neuroblastoma and primary hippocampal neurons) that have previously been suggested to be sensitive to radiofrequency fields. Experiments were designed to examine putative effects of radiofrequency fields on resting Ca2+, in addition to Ca2+ signals evoked by an InsP(3)-generating agonist. Furthermore, we examined putative effects of radiofrequency field exposure on Ca2+ store emptying and store-operated Ca2+ entry following application of the Ca2+ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. Multiple parameters (e.g., peak amplitude, integrated Ca2+ signal, recovery rates) were analysed to explore potential impact of radiofrequency field

  18. Exposure to GSM RF fields does not affect calcium homeostasis in human endothelial cells, rat pheocromocytoma cells or rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Rodney P; Madison, Steve D; Leveque, Philippe; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Bootman, Martin D

    2010-01-01

    In the course of modern daily life, individuals are exposed to numerous sources of electromagnetic radiation that are not present in the natural environment. The strength of the electromagnetic fields from sources such as hairdryers, computer display units and other electrical devices is modest. However, in many home and office environments, individuals can experience perpetual exposure to an "electromagnetic smog", with occasional peaks of relatively high electromagnetic field intensity. This has led to concerns that such radiation can affect health. In particular, emissions from mobile phones or mobile phone masts have been invoked as a potential source of pathological electromagnetic radiation. Previous reports have suggested that cellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis is affected by the types of radiofrequency fields emitted by mobile phones. In the present study, we used a high-throughput imaging platform to monitor putative changes in cellular Ca2+ during exposure of cells to 900 MHz GSM fields of differing power (specific absorption rate 0.012-2 W/Kg), thus mimicking the type of radiation emitted by current mobile phone handsets. Data from cells experiencing the 900 Mhz GSM fields were compared with data obtained from paired experiments using continuous wave fields or no field. We employed three cell types (human endothelial cells, PC-12 neuroblastoma and primary hippocampal neurons) that have previously been suggested to be sensitive to radiofrequency fields. Experiments were designed to examine putative effects of radiofrequency fields on resting Ca2+, in addition to Ca2+ signals evoked by an InsP(3)-generating agonist. Furthermore, we examined putative effects of radiofrequency field exposure on Ca2+ store emptying and store-operated Ca2+ entry following application of the Ca2+ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. Multiple parameters (e.g., peak amplitude, integrated Ca2+ signal, recovery rates) were analysed to explore potential impact of radiofrequency field

  19. Occupational and residential 60-Hz electromagnetic fields and high-frequency electric transients: exposure assessment using a new dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Deadman, J E; Camus, M; Armstrong, B G; Héroux, P; Cyr, D; Plante, M; Thériault, G

    1988-08-01

    One problem that has limited past epidemiologic studies of cancer and exposure to extremely low-frequency (0-100 Hz) electric and magnetic fields has been the lack of adequate methods for assessing personal exposure to these fields. A new 60-Hz electromagnetic field dosimeter was tested to assess occupational and residential exposures of a group of electrical utility workers and a comparison background group over a 7-day period. Comparing work periods only, utility workers' exposures were significantly higher than background levels by a factor of about 10 for electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields and by a factor of 171 for high-frequency transient electric (HFTE) fields. When overall weekly time-weighted averages combining work and nonwork exposures were compared, ratios of the exposed to background groups were lower. B and HFTE exposure ratios remained statistically significant, with values of 3.5 and 58, respectively, whereas the electric field exposure ratio was no longer significant, with a value of 1.7. E-field exposures of the background group were the highest during the nonwork period, probably reflecting the use of electrical appliances at home. Residential E- and B-field exposures were in the same range as published results from other surveys, whereas occupational E-field exposures tended to be lower than exposures reported in other studies. The high variability associated with occupational exposures probably accounts for the latter discrepancy. Worker acceptance of wearing the dosimeter was good: 95% of participants found it to be of little or no inconvenience while at work. At home, 37% found the device to be inconvenient in its present form but would not object to wearing a slightly smaller and lighter dosimeter.

  20. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  1. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields

    PubMed Central

    Toral, Gregorio M.; Baouab, Riad E.; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S.; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife. PMID:25970170

  2. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    PubMed

    Toral, Gregorio M; Baouab, Riad E; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Broggi, Juli; Martínez-de la Puente, Josue; Viana, Duarte; Mateo, Rafael; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a) 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b) 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain) and (c) in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco). Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife.

  3. Mean-field thalamocortical modeling of longitudinal EEG acquired during intensive meditation training.

    PubMed

    Saggar, Manish; Zanesco, Anthony P; King, Brandon G; Bridwell, David A; MacLean, Katherine A; Aichele, Stephen R; Jacobs, Tonya L; Wallace, B Alan; Saron, Clifford D; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-07-01

    Meditation training has been shown to enhance attention and improve emotion regulation. However, the brain processes associated with such training are poorly understood and a computational modeling framework is lacking. Modeling approaches that can realistically simulate neurophysiological data while conforming to basic anatomical and physiological constraints can provide a unique opportunity to generate concrete and testable hypotheses about the mechanisms supporting complex cognitive tasks such as meditation. Here we applied the mean-field computational modeling approach using the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) collected at three assessment points from meditating participants during two separate 3-month-long shamatha meditation retreats. We modeled cortical, corticothalamic, and intrathalamic interactions to generate a simulation of EEG signals recorded across the scalp. We also present two novel extensions to the mean-field approach that allow for: (a) non-parametric analysis of changes in model parameter values across all channels and assessments; and (b) examination of variation in modeled thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) connectivity over the retreat period. After successfully fitting whole-brain EEG data across three assessment points within each retreat, two model parameters were found to replicably change across both meditation retreats. First, after training, we observed an increased temporal delay between modeled cortical and thalamic cells. This increase provides a putative neural mechanism for a previously observed reduction in individual alpha frequency in these same participants. Second, we found decreased inhibitory connection strength between the TRN and secondary relay nuclei (SRN) of the modeled thalamus after training. This reduction in inhibitory strength was found to be associated with increased dynamical stability of the model. Altogether, this paper presents the first computational approach, taking core aspects of physiology and

  4. Decadal-scale variations in geomagnetic field intensity from ancient Cypriot slag mounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa; Ben-Yosef, Erez; Kassianidou, Vasiliki; Lorentzen, Brita; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Levy, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    models based on direct observations since the 1830s show that the averaged relative change in field intensity on Earth's surface over the past 170 years is less than 4.8% per decade. It is unknown if these rates represent the typical behavior of secular variations due to insufficient temporal resolution of archaeomagnetic records from earlier periods. To address this question, we investigate two ancient slag mounds in Cyprus—Skouriotissa Vouppes (SU1, fourth to fifth centuries CE, 21 m in height), and Mitsero Kokkinoyia (MK1, seventh to fifth centuries BCE, 8 m in height). The mounds are multilayered sequences of slag and charcoals that accumulated near ancient copper production sites. We modeled the age-height relation of the mounds using radiocarbon dates, and estimated paleointensities using Thellier-type IZZI experiments with additional anisotropy, cooling rate, and nonlinear TRM assessments. To screen out ambiguous paleointensity interpretations, we applied strict selection criteria at the specimen/sample levels. To ensure objectivity, consistency, and robust error estimation, we employed an automatic interpretation technique and put the data available in the MagIC database. The analyses yielded two independent subcentury-scale paleointensity time series. The MK1 data indicate relatively stable field at the time the mound accumulated. In contrast, the SU1 data demonstrate changes that are comparable in magnitude to the fastest changes inferred from geomagnetic models. We suggest that fast changes observed in the published archaeomagnetic data from the Levant are driven by two longitudinally paired regions, the Middle East and South Africa, that show unusual activity in geomagnetic models.

  5. Measurements of electric field intensity under 750 kV over head lines in an orchard zone

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, G.N.; Kashina, V.A.; Lisochkina, T.V.; Podporkin, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    The maximum electric field intensity was found to take place in the middle of the space between the rows of apple trees and did not exceed 3 kV/m. The orchard layout and the intensity both through the orchard and under the lines where no trees grew (max intensity 10 kV/m) are given. Unpleasant sensations were experienced in the place where no trees grew due to discharges on contact with plants; the discharge currents in the orchard were too low to feel. Determining the suitability of using trees to ensure ecological safety of extrahigh and ultrahigh voltage overhead lines passing near cities is discussed.

  6. Calibration of exposure dose for nanoscale plasmonic lithography with microsized far-field spot patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dandan; Park, Changhoon; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the reliability of a plasmonic lithography system for nanoscale device fabrication, a rapid calibration process is essentially required. The calibration needs a time-consuming process using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to measure a number of nano-sized spot pattern widths recorded for the variation of the exposure dose. On the basis of the underlying mechanisms of a propagating field through a bowtie aperture, we conducted a theoretical study to derive a fitting equation to predict the widths of spot patterns in a near-field region compared with those in the far-field region. We obtained a calibration curve of the exposure dose to fit the width of spot pattern in the far-field region that is measureable using an optical microscope (OM). The validity of the rapid calibration process using an OM was verified by comparison between the calibration curves determined using AFM and OM, and the uncertainty between them was found to be 3.4%. The drift of the calibration curve was further explored to calculate the system stability of the plasmonic lithography technique, which was estimated to be  >93%. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the calibration curve is effective in the prediction of the exposure dose for nanoscale line patterning.

  7. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dettmar, Christopher M.; Newman, Justin A.; Toth, Scott J.; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron–hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field–induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray–induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray–induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray–induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice. PMID:25552555

  8. The Intensity of the Geomagnetic Field During the Last 6 Millennia as Recorded by Slag Deposits From Archaeological Sites in the Southern Levant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yosef, E.; Tauxe, L.; Hagai, R.; Agnon, A.; Levy, T.; Avner, U.; Kessel, R.; Najjar, M.; Holtzer, A.; Steindorf, J.

    2005-12-01

    Copper-slag material from archaeological sites is a novel and highly promising medium to be used in paleointensity experiments. Its magnetization is carried by ultra fine grained magnetite and was acquired during fast cooling, often behaving nearly ideally during the paleointensity experiment. One of the richest archaeometallurgical regions in the eastern Mediterranean is located in the southern Levant, straddling the `Arava valley, the natural border between the modern states of Israel and Jordan. Metalworking activities cover a time span of more than six thousands years, beginning in the 5th millennium B.C., a date that coincides with innovations in metallurgy in many parts of the Old World. Here we will present results from 77 copper-slag samples from 28 archaeometallurgical sites from the `Arava valley plus several from other locations in Israel. We employed the alternating Infield-Zero field/Zero-field infield (IZZI) cooling method of Yu et al. 2004 on up to 10 specimens from each sample. We also performed anisotropy of anhysteretic remenance experiments. Using strict data selection criteria, 35 samples yielded acceptable results for about a 45% success rate. Moreover, we re-melted slag material and cooled it by exposure to laboratory air in a known field. The intensity results of this re-melted slag recovered the applied field lending confidence to the archaeointensity results. The data gained hitherto shows a fluctuating field behavior, with relatively low field intensity during the 6th millennium B.P. and a conspicuous peak around 3,000 B.P. These trends agree with the global world-model of Korte and Constable (2004), and are in excellent agreement with data from northern Syria (Genevey et al. 2003). Finally, we obtained results from archaeological sites with poor or disputed dating. These results suggest that certain localities were used over a long period of time, potentially reconciling the age disputes amongst archaeologists. Genevey, A.; Gallet, Y

  9. Ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mies, F.H.; Giusti-Suzor, A.; Kulander, K.C.; Schafer, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation for the present ionization calculations is to test the reliability of a recent study of H{sub 2}{sup +} photodissociation which employed such a two electronic state model and neglected any competition with ionization. The photodissociation calculations indicate that in intense short pulsed laser fields appreciable populations of stable vibrational states can survive the pulse. This survival effect can be attributed to the trapping of portions of the initial vibrational wavepacket in transient laser-induced potential wells at intermediate R{approx}3--4au distances. Since the calculated ionization rates exhibit a marked decrease at short R, they already lend some credence to the vibrational trapping effect. Having accurate R-dependent rates enables us to estimate the competitive influence of the ionization on the stabilized population, and may ultimately allow us to predict the contribution of the Coulomb ``explosion`` channel to observed proton kinetic energy distributions. In this paper we will demonstrate the effectiveness of the two-state length gauge model in interpreting the ionization rates that we extract from the numerically exact solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger Equation. A more elaborate presentation of the theory and the results for the full range of distances and wavelengths will be presented elsewhere.

  10. Femtosecond quantum fluid dynamics of helium atom under an intense laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.K.; Deb, B.M. |

    1998-10-05

    A comprehensive, nonperturbative, time-dependent quantum mechanical (TDQM) approach is proposed for studying the dynamics of a helium atom under an intense, ultrashort (femtoseconds) laser pulse. The method combines quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and density functional theory. It solves a single generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation of motion (EOM), involving time and three space variables, which is obtained from two QFD equations, namely, a continuity equation and an Euler-type equation. A highly accurate finite difference scheme along with a stability analysis is presented for numerically solving the EOM. Starting from the ground-state Hartree-Fock density for He at t = 0, the EOM yields the time-dependent (TD) electron density, effective potential surface, difference density, difference effective potential, ground-state probability, {l_angle}r{r_angle}, magnetic susceptibility, polarizability, flux, etc. By a Fourier transformation of the TD dipole moment along the linearly polarized-field direction, the power and rate spectra for photoemission are calculated. eleven mechanistic routes for photoemission are identified, which include high harmonic generation as well as many other spectral transitions involving ionized, singly excited, doubly excited (autoionizing), and continuum He states, based on the evolution of the system up to a particular time. Intimate connections between photoionization and photoemission are clearly observed through computer visualizations. Apart from being consistent with current experimental and theoretical results, the present results offer certain predictions on spectral transitions which are open to experimental verification.

  11. RNA Extraction from a Mycobacterium under Ultrahigh Electric Field Intensity in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sai; Bryson, Bryan D; Sun, Chen; Fortune, Sarah M; Lu, Chang

    2016-05-17

    Studies of transcriptomes are critical for understanding gene expression. Release of RNA molecules from cells is typically the first step for transcriptomic analysis. Effective cell lysis approaches that completely release intracellular materials are in high demand especially for cells that are structurally robust. In this report, we demonstrate a microfluidic electric lysis device that is effective for mRNA extraction from mycobacteria that have hydrophobic and waxy cell walls. We used a packed bed of microscale silica beads to filter M. smegmatis out of the suspension. 4000-8000 V/cm field intensity was used to lyse M. smegmatis with long pulses (i.e., up to 30 pulses that were 5 s long each). Our quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR results showed that our method yielded a factor of 10-20 higher extraction efficiency than the current state-of-the-art method (bead beating). We conclude that our electric lysis technique is an effective approach for mRNA release from hard-to-lyse cells and highly compatible with microfluidic molecular assays. PMID:27081872

  12. Coulomb explosion of CS2 molecule under an intense femtosecond laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wang; Jian, Zhang; Shi-An, Zhang; Zhen-Rong, Sun

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the Coulomb explosion process of CS2 molecule under a near-infrared (800 nm) intense femtosecond laser field by a DC-sliced ion imaging technique. We obtain the DC-sliced images of these fragment ions S+, S2+, CS+, and CS2+ by breaking one C–S bond, and assign their Coulomb explosion channels by considering their kinetic energy release and angular distribution. We also numerically simulate the dissociation dynamics of parent ions by a Coulomb potential approximation, and obtain the time evolution of Coulomb energy and kinetic energy release, which indicates that the dissociation time of parent ions decreases with the increase of the charge number k. These experimental and theoretical results can serve as a useful benchmark for those researchers who work in the related area. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51132004 and 11474096), and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 14JC1401500). We acknowledge the support of the NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai, China.

  13. Hydrogen scrambling in ethane induced by intense laser fields: statistical analysis of coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Kanya, Reika; Kudou, Tatsuya; Schirmel, Nora; Miura, Shun; Weitzel, Karl-Michael; Hoshina, Kennosuke; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2012-05-28

    Two-body Coulomb explosion processes of ethane (CH(3)CH(3)) and its isotopomers (CD(3)CD(3) and CH(3)CD(3)) induced by an intense laser field (800 nm, 1.0 × 10(14) W/cm(2)) with three different pulse durations (40 fs, 80 fs, and 120 fs) are investigated by a coincidence momentum imaging method. On the basis of statistical treatment of the coincidence data, the contributions from false coincidence events are estimated and the relative yields of the decomposition pathways are determined with sufficiently small uncertainties. The branching ratios of the two body decomposition pathways of CH(3)CD(3) from which triatomic hydrogen molecular ions (H(3)(+), H(2)D(+), HD(2)(+), D(3)(+)) are ejected show that protons and deuterons within CH(3)CD(3) are scrambled almost statistically prior to the ejection of a triatomic hydrogen molecular ion. The branching ratios were estimated by statistical Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations by assuming a transition state with a hindered-rotation of a diatomic hydrogen moiety. The hydrogen scrambling dynamics followed by the two body decomposition processes are discussed also by using the anisotropies in the ejection directions of the fragment ions and the kinetic energy distribution of the two body decomposition pathways.

  14. The molecular structure, vibrational force field, spectral frequencies, and infrared intensities of CH 3POF 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Carlowitz, Sunhild; Zeil, Werner; Pulay, Pðer; Boggs, James E.

    The molecular structure of CH 3POF 2 has been determined by MO-LCAO-SCF single determinant calculations using split valence shell basis sets with polarization functions on phosphorus. Interpretation of the results was aided by similar structural calculations on CH 3POH 2, CH 3PF 2, CH 3PH 2 and POF 3. In all cases, geometry optimization was performed by the gradient method using the TEXAS program. Comparison with experimental microwave results for CH 3POF 2 reveals an apparent error of interpretation in the experimental study leading to a radically incorrect angular distribution of bonds around the phosphorus atom. The vibrational force field of CH 3POF 2 has been determined by numerical differentiation of analytically determined energy gradients and used to compute the molecular vibrational spectrum and to provide approximate mode descriptions of the vibrational transitions. Agreement between the calculated and observed frequencies is reasonable and can be made very satisfactory by evaluation of a small number of scale factors to remove the systematic error common to vibrational frequencies calculated at this level of approximation. Dipole moment derivatives are also calculated and used to predict IR intensities.

  15. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and the occurrence of brain tumors. An analysis of possible associations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.S.; Dischinger, P.C.; Conde, J.; Farrell, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    To explore the association between occupation and the occurrence of brain tumor, an epidemiologic study was conducted using data from the death certificates of 951 adult white male Maryland residents who died of brain tumor during the period 1969 through 1982. Compared with the controls, men employed in electricity-related occupations, such as electrician, electric or electronic engineer, and utility company serviceman, were found to experience a significantly higher proportion of primary brain tumors. An increase in the odds ratio for brain tumor was found to be positively related to electromagnetic (EM) field exposure levels. Furthermore, the mean age at death was found to be significantly younger among cases in the presumed high EM-exposure group. These findings suggest that EM exposure may be associated with the pathogenesis of brain tumors, particularly in the promoting stage.

  16. Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas; Windl, Wolfgang; Dickerson, Bryan

    2013-01-03

    The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica's optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the

  17. Coronary heart diseases: assessment of risk associated with work exposure to ultralow-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyna, N G; Villoresi, G; Kopytenko, Y A; Kudrin, V A; Tyasto, M I; Kopytenko, E A; Iucci, N; Voronov, P M; Zaitsev, D B

    1996-01-01

    The present analysis was stimulated by previous findings on the possible influence of natural ultralow-frequency (ULF; 0.001-10 Hz) geomagnetic field variations on the cardiovascular system and indications of an effect of man-made ULF magnetic fields on the rate of myocardial infarction. In the present study, we considered the occupational health hazards of the strongest ULF magnetic fields in densely populated urban areas. Measurements of ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by trains powered by DC electricity were performed by means of a computer-based, highly sensitive, three-component magnetometer. We found that the magnitude of magnetic field pulses inside the driver's cab of electric locomotives (ELs) could be > or = 280 microT in the horizontal component perpendicular to the rails and up to approximately 130 microT in the vertical component, and, in the driver's compartment of electric motor unit (EMU) trains, they were approximately 50 and 35 microT, respectively. We have investigated the relationships between the occupational exposure to ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by electric trains and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among railroad workers in the former Soviet Union. We have analyzed medical statistical data for a period of 3 years for approximately 45,000 railroad workers and 4,000 engine drivers. We have also analyzed 3 years of morbidity data for three subgroups of engine drivers (approximately 4,000 in each group) operating different types of trains. We find that EL drivers have a twofold increase in risk (2.00 +/- 0.27) of coronary heart diseases (CHDs) compared with EMU drivers. Because our analysis of major CVDs shows that the examined subpopulations of drivers can be considered to have had equal exposure to all known risk factors, the elevated CHD risk among EL drivers could be attributed to the increased occupational exposure to ULF magnetic fields.

  18. Field: a new meta-authoring platform for data-intensive scientific visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, M.; Ameres, E.; Fox, P. A.; Goebel, J.; Graves, A.; Hendler, J.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will demonstrate a new platform for data-intensive scientific visualization, called Field, that rethinks the problem of visual data exploration. Several new opportunities for scientific visualization present themselves here at this moment in time. We believe that when taken together they may catalyze a transformation of the practice of science and to begin to seed a technical culture within science that fuses data analysis, programming and myriad visual strategies. It is at integrative levels that the principle challenges exist, for many fundamental technical components of our field are now well understood and widely available. File formats from CSV through HDF all have broad library support; low-level high-performance graphics APIs (OpenGL) are in a period of stable growth; and a dizzying ecosystem of analysis and machine learning libraries abound. The hardware of computer graphics offers unprecedented computing power within commodity components; programming languages and platforms are coalescing around a core set of umbrella runtimes. Each of these trends are each set to continue — computer graphics hardware is developing at a super-Moore-law rate, and trends in publication and dissemination point only towards an increasing amount of access to code and data. The critical opportunity here for scientific visualization is, we maintain, not a in developing a new statistical library, nor a new tool centered on a particular technique, but rather new visual, "live" programming environment that is promiscuous in its scope. We can identify the necessarily methodological practice and traditions required here not in science or engineering but in the "live-coding" practices prevalent in the fields of digital art and design. We can define this practice as an approach to programming that is live, iterative, integrative, speculative and exploratory. "Live" because it is exclusively practiced in real-time (often during performance); "iterative", because

  19. Imaging the evanescent intensity gradients of an optical waveguide using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi W.; Tsai, Din Ping; Jackson, Howard E.

    1999-11-01

    Imaging the local evanescent intensity gradients by using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope is developed. Two different optical structures, one a well- characterized BK-7 glass prism in the total internal reflection configuration, and the other a side-polished optical fiber waveguide with a step index of refraction, were studied. Results show distinct imaging contrast of the intensity gradients, the reveal the variations of the local index of refraction of waveguide. This is a novel near-field optical method, and can be used in the imaging of local index of refraction of a variety of optical waveguide structures.

  20. Analytic variational calculation of the ground-state binding energy of hydrogen in intermediate and intense magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The present work investigates analytically the effect of an intermediate or intense magnetic field, such as probably exist in white dwarfs and near pulsars, on the binding energy of the hydrogen ground state. A wave-function 'prescription' is given for an analytic variational calculation of the binding energy. The calculation still gives a smooth transition between intermediate and intense fields. An explicit calculation of the ground-state binding energy as B goes to infinity is provided for the Yafet et al. (1956) trial function.

  1. The effects of repeated exposure to graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages: A field experiment.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Arie; Bos, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarette packages. In this field-experiment, 118 smokers were assigned to 1 of 2 conditions with either graphic fear appeals or textual warnings on their cigarette packages. During 3 weeks, fear and disgust were assessed 6 times. The intention to quit smoking after 3 weeks and quitting activity during the 3 weeks were the dependent measures. The effects of 3 pretest individual difference moderators were tested: disengagement beliefs, number of cigarettes smoked a day, and readiness to quit. Three weeks of exposure to the graphic fear appeals led to a stronger intention to quit, but only when smokers scored low on disengagement beliefs, or were heavier smokers. In addition, smokers low in disengagement more often reported to have cut down on smoking in the graphic condition. There were no indications of habituation of fear and disgust over the 3 weeks. The effects of graphic fear appeals depended on smokers' characteristics: The moderators may explain the mixed findings in the literature. The lack of habituation may be caused by the renewal of the graphics every few days. The used field-experimental design with natural repeated exposure to graphics is promising. PMID:25621418

  2. Exposure of human cells to electromagnetic fields. Final report, 1 January 1988-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1990-02-27

    This study addressed the following basic question: How does extremely low-level non-ionizing radiation affect human cells, and if there are cellular responses that can be directly related to signal parameters such as frequency, amplitude and time of exposure. The focus of these studies was to identify transcriptional changes in human cultured cells, HL60, which result from exposure of these cells to defined extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (elf EMFS). Our experiments show a pronounced measurable response observed as transcript increase, with associated changes in protein synthesis. The major findings relative to transcriptional changes are fourfold: (1) transcript changes in human cells correlate with previous findings of transcriptional and translational changes in Drosophila salivary gland cells; (2) the frequency of the signal in the amplitude (with resulting changes in E- and B-fields) in log increments from 0.5 to 500 uV at 60 Hz gives both amplitude and time-dependent windows, and (4) genes not usually expressed in HL-60 are unaffected by exposure to elf EMFs. Changes in the overall protein synthetic pattern have also been observed following exposure of HL60 cells to 60 Hz signals.

  3. The effects of repeated exposure to graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages: A field experiment.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Arie; Bos, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Experimental studies on the effects of graphic fear appeals on cigarette packages typically expose smokers in a single session to a fear appeal, although in practice the exposure is always repeated. The present study applied an improved study design with repeated exposure to fear appeals on cigarette packages. In this field-experiment, 118 smokers were assigned to 1 of 2 conditions with either graphic fear appeals or textual warnings on their cigarette packages. During 3 weeks, fear and disgust were assessed 6 times. The intention to quit smoking after 3 weeks and quitting activity during the 3 weeks were the dependent measures. The effects of 3 pretest individual difference moderators were tested: disengagement beliefs, number of cigarettes smoked a day, and readiness to quit. Three weeks of exposure to the graphic fear appeals led to a stronger intention to quit, but only when smokers scored low on disengagement beliefs, or were heavier smokers. In addition, smokers low in disengagement more often reported to have cut down on smoking in the graphic condition. There were no indications of habituation of fear and disgust over the 3 weeks. The effects of graphic fear appeals depended on smokers' characteristics: The moderators may explain the mixed findings in the literature. The lack of habituation may be caused by the renewal of the graphics every few days. The used field-experimental design with natural repeated exposure to graphics is promising.

  4. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E.; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F.

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m−1 lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m−1 in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:24647908

  5. Exposure to inhomogeneous static magnetic field beneficially affects allergic inflammation in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Csillag, Anikó; Kumar, Brahma V; Szabó, Krisztina; Szilasi, Mária; Papp, Zsuzsa; Szilasi, Magdolna E; Pázmándi, Kitti; Boldogh, István; Rajnavölgyi, Éva; Bácsi, Attila; László, János F

    2014-06-01

    Previous observations suggest that static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure acts on living organisms partly through reactive oxygen species (ROS) reactions. In this study, we aimed to define the impact of SMF-exposure on ragweed pollen extract (RWPE)-induced allergic inflammation closely associated with oxidative stress. Inhomogeneous SMF was generated with an apparatus validated previously providing a peak-to-peak magnetic induction of the dominant SMF component 389 mT by 39 T m(-1) lateral gradient in the in vivo and in vitro experiments, and 192 mT by 19 T m(-1) in the human study at the 3 mm target distance. Effects of SMF-exposure were studied in a murine model of allergic inflammation and also in human provoked skin allergy. We found that even a single 30-min exposure of mice to SMF immediately following intranasal RWPE challenge significantly lowered the increase in the total antioxidant capacity of the airways and decreased allergic inflammation. Repeated (on 3 consecutive days) or prolonged (60 min) exposure to SMF after RWPE challenge decreased the severity of allergic responses more efficiently than a single 30-min treatment. SMF-exposure did not alter ROS production by RWPE under cell-free conditions, while diminished RWPE-induced increase in the ROS levels in A549 epithelial cells. Results of the human skin prick tests indicated that SMF-exposure had no significant direct effect on provoked mast cell degranulation. The observed beneficial effects of SMF are likely owing to the mobilization of cellular ROS-eliminating mechanisms rather than direct modulation of ROS production by pollen NAD(P)H oxidases.

  6. Effects of chronic exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on energy balance in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; Décima, Pauline; Thuroczy, Gyorgy; de Seze, René; Cerri, Matteo; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on the control of body energy balance in developing organisms have not been studied, despite the involvement of energy status in vital physiological functions. We examined the effects of chronic RF-EMF exposure (900 MHz, 1 V m(-1)) on the main functions involved in body energy homeostasis (feeding behaviour, sleep and thermoregulatory processes). Thirteen juvenile male Wistar rats were exposed to continuous RF-EMF for 5 weeks at 24 °C of air temperature (T a) and compared with 11 non-exposed animals. Hence, at the beginning of the 6th week of exposure, the functions were recorded at T a of 24 °C and then at 31 °C. We showed that the frequency of rapid eye movement sleep episodes was greater in the RF-EMF-exposed group, independently of T a (+42.1 % at 24 °C and +31.6 % at 31 °C). The other effects of RF-EMF exposure on several sleep parameters were dependent on T a. At 31 °C, RF-EMF-exposed animals had a significantly lower subcutaneous tail temperature (-1.21 °C) than controls at all sleep stages; this suggested peripheral vasoconstriction, which was confirmed in an experiment with the vasodilatator prazosin. Exposure to RF-EMF also increased daytime food intake (+0.22 g h(-1)). Most of the observed effects of RF-EMF exposure were dependent on T a. Exposure to RF-EMF appears to modify the functioning of vasomotor tone by acting peripherally through α-adrenoceptors. The elicited vasoconstriction may restrict body cooling, whereas energy intake increases. Our results show that RF-EMF exposure can induce energy-saving processes without strongly disturbing the overall sleep pattern. PMID:23143821

  7. Activation of autophagy in response to nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Roth, Caleb C; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-03-01

    Previous work demonstrated significant changes in cellular membranes following exposure of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), including nanoporation and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. While it is known that nsPEF exposure can cause cell death, how cells repair and survive nsPEF-induced cellular damage is not well understood. In this paper, we investigated whether autophagy is stimulated following nsPEF exposure to repair damaged membranes, proteins, and/or organelles in a pro-survival response. We hypothesized that autophagy is activated to repair nsPEF-induced plasma membrane damage and overwhelming this compensatory mechanism results in cell death. Activation of autophagy and subsequent cell death pathways were assessed measuring toxicity, gene and protein expression of autophagy markers, and by monitoring autophagosome formation and maturation using fluorescent microscopy. Results show that autophagy is activated at subtoxic nsPEF doses, as a compensatory mechanism to repair membrane damage. However, prolonged exposure results in increased cell death and a concomitant decrease in autophagic markers. These results suggest that cells take an active role in membrane repair, through autophagy, following exposure to nsPEF. PMID:25660455

  8. Subtle consequences of exposure to weak microwave fields: Are there non-thermal effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovely, R. H.; Mizumori, S. J. Y.; Johnson, R. B.; Guy, A. W.

    When we speak of subtle consequences of exposure we mean only that the effects were observed in the absence of changes in core temperature due to microwave exposure. When we measure + delta T degree C in core temperature consequent to microwave exposure, we are witnessing a breakdown of thermoregulatory mechanisms. Short of this event, the exposed subject makes a number of thermoregulatory and metabolic accommodations to maintain a constant body temperature and to deal effectively with the energy being deposited in its tissues. These latter changes should interest us for they are the subtle consequences exposure to weak microwave fields. The long-term accommodations, which accompany subchronic exposure, can lead to a number of interesting effects some of which are described below. Two fundamentally different types of experimental protocol were employed. In Experiment 1A, independent groups of male rats were either exposed or sham-exposed to 915 MHz microwaves for 10 hr/night for up to 4 mo. In Experiment 1B, independent groups of rats were similarly exposed, or sham-exposed, to 2450 MHz microwaves for 10 hr/night for 4 mo. In Experiment 2, using a different type of protocol, pregnant female rats were exposed for 20 hr/day for 19 days of gestation. Control groups were either sham-exposed or served as caged controls. The main focus of the study attended to assessment of various functions and the developmental status of the gravid rats' progeny.

  9. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening ex