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Sample records for intense laser-plasma interactions

  1. Microengineering Laser Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S.; Ji, L. L.; Audesirk, H.; George, K. M.; Snyder, J.; Krygier, A.; Poole, P.; Willis, C.; Daskalova, R.; Chowdhury, E.; Lewis, N. S.; Schumacher, D. W.; Pukhov, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on microscales using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high-contrast short-pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both the total and cutoff energies of the produced electron beam. The self-generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration.

  2. The shaped critical surface in high intensity laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, D. W.; Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D.

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes an investigation of the properties of the relativistic critical surface in a high intensity laser-plasma interaction, specifically the spatial morphology of the surface and its effect upon the divergence of the reflected light. The particle-in-cell code LSP running in two dimensions (2d3v) was used to model the formation of the critical surface and to show that it resides at a varying depth into the material that is dependent on both the intensity radial dependence of the laser focus as well as the shape of the longitudinal vacuum-material interface. The result is a shaped 'mirror' surface that creates a reflected beam with phase and amplitude information informed by the extent of the preplasma present before the intense laser pulse arrived. A robust, highly effective means of experimentally determining the preplasma conditions for any high intensity laser-matter interaction is proposed using this effect. The important physics is elucidated with a simplified model that, within reasonable intensity bounds, recasts the effect of the complex laser-plasma interaction on the reflected beam into a standard Gaussian optics calculation.

  3. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S.; Sheppard, J. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S.

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  4. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bai-Wen; S, Ishiguro; M, Skoric M.

    2006-09-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively. Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  5. Energetic beams of negative and neutral hydrogen from intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Schnürer, M.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Jequier, S.; Revet, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-12-16

    We present observations of intense beams of energetic negative hydrogen ions and fast neutral hydrogen atoms in intense (5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser plasma interaction experiments, which were quantified in numerical calculations. Generation of negative ions and neutral atoms is ascribed to the processes of electron capture and loss by a laser accelerated positive ion in the collisions with a cloud of droplets. A comparison with a numerical model of charge exchange processes provides information on the cross section of the electron capture in the high energy domain.

  6. Ultra-intense, short pulse laser-plasma interactions with applications to the fast ignitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, S.C.; Kruer, W.L.; Young, P.E.; Hammer, J.; Tabak, M.

    1995-04-01

    Due to the advent of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) as an efficient means of creating ultra-high intensity laser light (I > 5{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) in pulses less than a few picoseconds, new ideas for achieving ignition and gain in DT targets with less than 1 megajoule of input energy are currently being pursued. Two types of powerful lasers are employed in this scheme: (1) channeling beams and (2) ignition beams. The current state of laser-plasma interactions relating to this fusion scheme will be discussed. In particular, plasma physics issues in the ultra-intense regime are crucial to the success of this scheme. We compare simulation and experimental results in this highly nonlinear regime.

  7. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-06-15

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly.

  8. Bremsstrahlung Temperature Scaling in Ultra-Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulick, C.; Hou, B.; Nees, J.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2011-10-01

    The absorption of laser energy during ultra-intense (I > 1018 W/cm2) laser-plasma interactions results in the production of a hot electron current, which can subsequently generate energetic protons, ions, and photons. The energetic photons are of particular interest in isomer excitation, positron production, and homeland security applications. Experiments were performed on the high repetition rate (500 Hz) Lambda Cubed laser (I ~ 5 .1018 , duration 30 fs) allowing high resolution (λ/ Δλ = 300) spectroscopy of X-ray and γ-ray bremsstrahlung photons in the 20 keV to 3 MeV energy range. The effective bremsstrahlung temperature was measured over a range of laser energies, target materials, and detection angles. Additionally, simulations (MCNPX and GEANT4) were used to correlate experimental bremsstrahlung temperatures with hot electron temperatures, which were compared to existing electron temperature scaling laws. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the FOCUS Physics Frontier Center PHY-0114336, and by the Department of Homeland Security and NSF through grant EECS-0833499.

  9. Nonlinear theory of intense laser-plasma interactions modified by vacuum polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenbo; Bu, Zhigang; Li, Hehe; Luo, Yuee; Ji, Peiyong

    2013-07-15

    The classical nonlinear theory of laser-plasma interactions is corrected by taking account of the vacuum polarization effects. A set of wave equations are obtained by using the Heisenberg-Euler Lagrangian density and the derivative correction with the first-order quantum electrodynamic effects. A model more suitable to formulate the interactions of ultra-strong lasers and high-energy-density plasmas is developed. In the result, some environments in which the effects of vacuum polarization will be enhanced are discussed.

  10. Quantitative Kα line spectroscopy for energy transport in ultra-intense laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Nakai, M.; Chen, H.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Ozaki, T.; Shiraga, H.; Kojima, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Miyanaga, N.; Kawanaka, J.; Nakata, Y.; Jitsuno, T.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    Absolute Ka line spectroscopy is proposed for studying laser-plasma interactions taking place in the cone-guided fast ignition targets. X-ray spectra ranging from 20 to 100 keV were quantitatively measured with a Laue spectrometer. The absolute sensitivities of the Laue spectrometer system were calibrated using pre-characterized laser-produced x-ray sources and radioisotopes. The integrated reflectivity for the crystal is in good agreement with predictions by an open code for x-ray diffraction. The energy transfer efficiency from incident laser beams to hot electrons, as the energy transfer agency, is derived as a consequence of this work. The absolute yield of Au and Ta Ka lines were measured in the fast ignition experimental campaign performed at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. Applying the hot electron spectrum information from the electron spectrometer, an energy transfer efficiency of the incident LFEX [1], a kJ-class PW laser, to hot electrons was derived for a planar and cone-guided geometry.

  11. Effects of laser-plasma interactions on terahertz radiation from solid targets irradiated by ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chun; Zhou Mulin; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Liu Feng; Li Yutong; Wang Weimin; Ma Jinglong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Lou Zheng; Shi Shengcai

    2011-09-15

    Interactions of 100-fs laser pulses with solid targets at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and resultant terahertz (THz) radiation are studied under different laser contrast ratio conditions. THz emission is measured in the specular reflection direction, which appears to decrease as the laser contrast ratio varies from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -6}. Correspondingly, the frequency spectra of the reflected light are observed changing from second harmonic dominant, three-halves harmonic dominant, to vanishing of both harmonics. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation also suggests that this observation is correlated with the plasma density scale length change. The results demonstrate that the THz emission is closely related to the laser-plasma interaction processes. The emission is strong when resonance absorption is a key feature of the interaction, and becomes much weaker when parametric instabilities dominate.

  12. Fast-electron refluxing effects on anisotropic hard-x-ray emission from intense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    McKeever, K; Makita, M; Nersisyan, G; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Kettle, B; Dromey, B; Zepf, M; Sarri, G; Doria, D; Ahmed, H; Lewis, C L S; Riley, D; Robinson, A P L

    2015-03-01

    Fast-electron generation and dynamics, including electron refluxing, is at the core of understanding high-intensity laser-plasma interactions. This field is itself of strong relevance to fast ignition fusion and the development of new short-pulse, intense, x-ray, γ-ray, and particle sources. In this paper, we describe experiments that explicitly link fast-electron refluxing and anisotropy in hard-x-ray emission. We find the anisotropy in x-ray emission to be strongly correlated to the suppression of refluxing. In contrast to some previous work, the peak of emission is directly along the rear normal to the target rather than along either the incident laser direction or the specular reflection direction. PMID:25871224

  13. Effects of Landau quantization on the equations of state in intense laser plasma interactions with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, Shalom; Norreys, Peter; Mendonca, Jose T.; Lancaster, Kate

    2005-05-15

    Recently, magnetic fields of 0.7({+-}0.1) gigaGauss (GG) have been observed in the laboratory in laser plasma interactions. From scaling arguments, it appears that a few gigaGauss magnetic fields may be within reach of existing petawatt lasers. In this paper, the equations of state (EOS) are calculated in the presence of these very large magnetic fields. The appropriate domain for electron degeneracy and for Landau quantization is calculated for the density-temperature domain relevant to laser plasma interactions. The conditions for a strong Landau quantization, for a magnetic field in the domain of 1-10 GG, are obtained. The role of this paper is to formulate the EOS in terms of those that can potentially be realized in laboratory plasmas. By doing so, it is intended to alert the experimental laser-plasma physics community to the potential of realizing Landau quantization in the laboratory for the first time since the theory was first formulated.

  14. Recent numerical results on double-layer simulation in high-intensity laser--plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Szichman, H.

    1988-06-01

    Numerical studies on dynamic electric fields and double layers created inside of plasmas irradiated at laser intensities of 10/sup 17/ and 10/sup 18/ Wcm/sup 2/ were carried out using a macroscopic two-fluid model including nonlinear forces and the complete intensity dependent optical response for heating and dielectric force effects. This was possible only by longer computation times since the temporal and spatial step sizes had to be reduced accordingly. Electrostatic fields as high as 10/sup 9/ and 10/sup 10/ Vcm were, respectively, measured for both laser intensities and the coupling of irradiated electromagnetic waves to generate Langmuir longitudinal waves is shown to be possible for the first time. The development and production of the well-known density minima (cavitons) because of nonlinear forces is also confirmed, their prominent appearance being in direct relation to the stronger effect of the high irradiances applied.

  15. Parametric instabilities and electron heating in ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, P.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Guérin, S.; Laval, G.; Quesnel, B.

    1998-02-01

    The general dispersion relation for electron parametric instabilities of an ultra-intense circularly polarized laser wave is established for arbitrary plasma density. It corresponds to a generalization of the stimulated Raman scattering instability, the relativistic modulational instability, the relativistic filamentation instability, and the two plasmons decay instability. In the relativistic regime the generalized instability is characterized by a wide extent of the unstable region in the wave vector space, with growth rates reaching a fraction of the laser frequency, and a strong harmonic generation. One-dimensional and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations confirm these results. In particular a systematic study of the propagation of very intense laser pulses through slabs of plasma of several tens of microns are presented. The instability leads to a rapid longitudinal and transverse electron heating, and to filamentary structures which progressively merge in a nonlinear stage. The heating results in highly energetic electrons with energy of several tens of MeV. Correlatively, a strong attenuation rate of the electromagnetic wave is observed.

  16. High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Gourab Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2014-01-15

    A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few μm is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The μm-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  17. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition (FI) approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to FI. Increases in computational and modelling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modelling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modelling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale FI problem.

  18. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  19. Appearance of Density Cavitations in the Laser Wake in Simulations of High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.-L.

    2009-01-22

    Nonlinear interactions of high intensity, ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas produce many interesting features that may appear in computer simulations. One of these features commonly observed in Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations is the spontaneous appearance of long-lived density cavitations in the plasma wake region behind the laser pulse. To study these cavitations, several small 2D PIC simulations are run in which plasma density, density ramps, total simulation time, laser pulsewidth, laser intensity, and laser polarization parameters have been varied. Based on the simulation results, some possible aspects of an experiment designed to directly detect these structures are discussed.

  20. Laser Plasma Interactions at Intensities from 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W L

    2002-11-05

    A tutorial introduction is given to some important physics and current challenges in laser plasma interactions. The topics are chosen to illustrate a few of John Dawson's many pioneering contributions to the physics and modeling of plasmas. In each case, a current frontier is also briefly discussed, including the .53{micro}m option for laser fusion, kinetic inflation of instability levels, and new regimes accessed with ultra-high power lasers.

  1. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  2. Studies on laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheut, Y.; Batani, D.; Nicolai, Ph.; Antonelli, L.; Krousky, E.

    2015-04-01

    We realized a series of experiments to study the physics of laser-plasma interaction in an intensity regime of interest for the novel "Shock Ignition" approach to Inertial Fusion. Experiments were performed at the Prague Asterix Laser System laser in Prague using two laser beams: an "auxiliary" beam, for pre-plasma creation, with intensity around 7 × 1013 W/cm2 (250 ps, 1ω, λ = 1315 nm) and the "main" beam, up to 1016 W/cm (250 ps, 3ω, λ = 438 nm), to launch a shock. The main goal of these experiments is to study the process of the formation of a very strong shock and the influence of hot electrons in the generation of very high pressures. The shock produced by the ablation of the plastic layer is studied by shock breakout chronometry. The generation of hot electrons is analyzed by imaging Kα emission.

  3. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M

    2003-11-11

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3{omega}) with a total intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO{sub 2} producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n{sub e} = 6 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and temperatures of T{sub e} = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last {approx}1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length ({approx}2 mm). increasing to 12% for {approx}7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  4. An MPP hydrocode to study laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S H; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Williams E A

    1998-10-01

    Because of the increased size and power inherent in a laser-AGEX on NIF, laser-plasma interactions (LPI) observed in NOVA AGEX play an increasingly important role. The process by which filamentation and stimulated backscatter grow is complex. Furthermore, there is a competition among the instabilities so that lessening one can increase another. Therefore, simulating them is an integral part to successful experiments on NIF. In this paper, we present a massively parallel hydrocode to simulate laser-plasma interactions in NIF-relevant AGEX regimes.

  5. Nonlinear Laser-Plasma Interaction in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, Thomas James; Bliss, David E.; Campbell, Edward Michael; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Kimmel, Mark W.; et al

    2016-03-04

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. Although magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Ultimately, nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Wemore » determine and discuss key LPI processes and mitigation methods. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.« less

  6. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  7. Negative ion beam generation in laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jequier, Sophie; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2013-10-01

    Detection of a large number of energetic negative ions and neutral atoms have been reported in recent intense laser plasma interaction experiments. These particles were produced from fast positive ions (proton, carbon, oxygen) accelerated from a laser produced plasma when they were passing through a cold spray of water or ethanol. The negative ions formation is strongly related to the fast positive ions, and it is explained by a process of a single electron capture - loss. Double charge exchange, elastic scattering and energy loss phenomena have been neglected since their cross sections are much smaller. Assuming independent atoms approximation, we study populations evolution through the interaction zone analytically and numerically by solving the rate equations using cross sections drawn from literature. Taking into account the energy distribution of the incident ions, the calculations give the final energy distribution for the different species that can be compared to experimental spectra. First results obtained for hydrogen in the water case indicate that this model can explain the main observed features. The results concerning the carbon and oxygen ions will be also presented as well as refinement of the cross sections since some cross sections are missing for these energies.

  8. Subpicosecond KrF{asterisk}-laser plasma interaction at intensities between 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Teubner, U.; Gibbon, P.; Foerster, E.; Fallies, F.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.P.; Gauthier, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    The interaction of high-intensity subpicosecond KrF{asterisk}-laser pulses with aluminium plasmas is investigated at intensities between 10{sup 14} and 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a one-dimensional hydrocode, the laser energy absorption and time evolution of plasma parameters have been studied as a function of laser intensity, incidence angle, and polarization. Complementary particle-in-cell simulations have also been performed to check the collisionless absorption component carried by hot electrons and ions. These simulations are compared to previous experiments on laser pulse absorption and x-ray generation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  10. PIC Simulation of Laser Plasma Interactions with Temporal Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2015-11-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temperal bandwidths under conditions relevant to current and future shock ignition experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth, the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using smoothing techniques such as SSD or ISI). We will show that temporal bandwidth along play an important role in the control of LPI's in these lasers and discuss future directions. This work is conducted under the auspices of NRL.

  11. Improving the Capabilities of a Continuum Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R

    2006-06-15

    The numerical simulation of plasmas is a critical tool for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have been working to improve the predictive capability of a continuum laser plasma interaction code pF3d, which couples a continuum hydrodynamic model of an unmagnetized plasma to paraxial wave equations modeling the laser light. Advanced numerical techniques such as local mesh refinement, multigrid, and multifluid Godunov methods have been adapted and applied to nonlinear heat conduction and to multifluid plasma models. We describe these algorithms and briefly demonstrate their capabilities.

  12. Intermittent laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, R.; Li, J.; Ren, C.

    2014-06-15

    We study laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in the ignition phase of shock ignition through 1D and 2D particle-in-cell simulations in the regime of long density scale length and moderately high laser intensity. These long-term simulations show an intermittent bursting pattern of laser-plasma instabilities, resulting from a coupling of the modes near the quarter-critical-surface and those in the lower density region via plasma waves and laser pump depletion. The majority of the hot electrons are found to be from stimulated Raman scattering and of moderate energies. However, high energy electrons of preheating threat can still be generated from the two-plasmon-decay instability.

  13. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  14. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  15. Energy transport in laser-plasma interactions: a UK perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    A range of experimental and theoretical work has been performed recently to gain a greater insight into energy transport in laser plasma interactions. Experiments have been performed on the VULCAN Petawatt facility in the UK and the LULI2000 facility in France to look at energy transport as a function of a number of different parameters. The parameters studied range from the introduction of controlled pre-pulses, material properties / target geometry through to absorption as a function of density scale length. A wide range of diagnostics were used such as transverse shadowgraphy, rear-side optical emission imaging, X-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and streaked harmonic measurements. To support and stimulate this work, computational tools such as Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (LEDA, K2 (K2 constructed by M. Sherlock)) and radiation hydrodynamic codes. One highlight that will be discussed in detail is the observation of changes to the beam divergence pattern with the addition of a cone-guide. Preliminary results from very recent studies conducted at the VULCAN facility to study the characterization and energy transport in warm dense matter in the context of the HiPER project will be presented. A.P.L Robinson et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 025002 2008 K.L.Lancaster et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett www.hiper-laser.org

  16. New developments in energy transfer and transport studies in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norreys, P. A.; Green, J. S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Scott, R. H. H.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoight, H.-P.; Baton, S.; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Adams, D. J.; Markey, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Zepf, M.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Schreiber, J.; Davies, J. R.; Higginson, D. P.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, C.; Ma, T.; Patel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Two critical issues related to the success of fast ignition inertial fusion have been vigorously investigated in a co-ordinated campaign in the European Union and the United States. These are the divergence of the fast electron beam generated in intense, PW laser-plasma interactions and the fast electron energy transport with the use of high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses. Proof is presented that resistivity gradient-induced magnetic fields can guide fast electrons over significant distances in (initially) cold metallic targets. Comparison of experiments undertaken in both France and the United States suggests that an important factor in obtaining efficient coupling into dense plasma is the irradiation with high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses, rather than the colour of the laser pulse itself.

  17. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  18. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  19. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  20. GPU-Accelerated PIC/MCC Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interaction Using BUMBLEBEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Tao; Chen, Wenlong; Wu, Huidong; Tang, Maowen; Li, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser-plasma interaction in its wide applications relies on the use of advanced numerical simulation tools to achieve high performance operation while reducing computational time and cost. BUMBLEBEE has been developed to be a fast simulation tool used in the research of laser-plasma interactions. BUMBLEBEE uses a 1D3V electromagnetic PIC/MCC algorithm that is accelerated by using high performance Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware. BUMBLEBEE includes a friendly user-interface module and four physics simulators. The user-interface provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational post processing functionality. The solver of BUMBLEBEE has four modules for now, which are used to simulate the field ionization, electron collisional ionization, binary coulomb collision and laser-plasma interaction processes. The ionization characteristics of laser-neutral interaction and the generation of high-energy electrons have been analyzed by using BUMBLEBEE for validation.

  1. On specular reflectivity measurements in high and low-contrast relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Ramis, R.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2015-01-01

    Using both experiment and 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we describe the use of specular reflectivity measurements to study relativistic (Iλ2 > 1018 W/cm2ṡμm2) laser-plasma interactions for both high and low-contrast 527 nm laser pulses on initially solid density aluminum targets. In the context of hot-electron generation, studies typically rely on diagnostics which, more-often-than-not, represent indirect processes driven by fast electrons transiting through solid density materials. Specular reflectivity measurements, however, can provide a direct measure of the interaction that is highly sensitive to how the EM fields and plasma profiles, critical input parameters for modeling of hot-electron generation, evolve near the interaction region. While the fields of interest occur near the relativistic critical electron density, experimental reflectivity measurements are obtained centimeters away from the interaction region, well after diffraction has fully manifested itself. Using a combination of PIC simulations with experimentally inspired conditions and an analytic, non-paraxial, pulse propagation algorithm, we calculate reflected pulse properties, both near and far from the interaction region, and compare with specular reflectivity measurements. The experiment results and PIC simulations demonstrate that specular reflectivity measurements are an extremely sensitive qualitative, and partially quantitative, indicator of initial laser/target conditions, ionization effects, and other details of intense laser-matter interactions. The techniques described can provide strong constraints on many systems of importance in ultra-intense laser interactions with matter.

  2. Specular reflectivity and hot-electron generation in high-contrast relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  3. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Duvillaret, L; Andreoli, P L; Cipriani, M; Cristofari, G; Di Giorgio, G; Ingenito, F; Verona, C

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation. PMID:27301704

  4. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    PubMed Central

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation. PMID:27301704

  5. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  6. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Duvillaret, L; Andreoli, P L; Cipriani, M; Cristofari, G; Di Giorgio, G; Ingenito, F; Verona, C

    2016-06-15

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  7. Dense Monoenergetic Proton Beams from Chirped Laser-Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galow, Benjamin J.; Salamin, Yousef I.; Liseykina, Tatyana V.; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2011-10-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultraintense (107 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 1021W/cm2.

  8. Towards modeling of nonlinear laser-plasma interactions with hydrocodes: The thick-ray approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaïtis, A.; Duchateau, G.; Nicolaï, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with the computation of laser beam intensity in large-scale radiative hydrocodes applied to the modeling of nonlinear laser-plasma interactions (LPIs) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO) is adapted for light waves in an inhomogeneous medium and modified to include the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the ponderomotive force. This thick-ray model is compared to the standard ray-tracing (RT) approach, both in the chic code. The PCGO model leads to different power deposition patterns and better diffraction modeling compared to standard RT codes. The intensity-reconstruction technique used in RT codes to model nonlinear LPI leads to artificial filamentation and fails to reproduce realistic ponderomotive self-focusing distances, intensity amplifications, and density channel depletions, whereas PCGO succeeds. Bundles of Gaussian thick rays can be used to model realistic non-Gaussian ICF beams. The PCGO approach is expected to improve the accuracy of ICF simulations and serve as a basis to implement diverse LPI effects in large-scale hydrocodes.

  9. Towards modeling of nonlinear laser-plasma interactions with hydrocodes: the thick-ray approach.

    PubMed

    Colaïtis, A; Duchateau, G; Nicolaï, P; Tikhonchuk, V

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with the computation of laser beam intensity in large-scale radiative hydrocodes applied to the modeling of nonlinear laser-plasma interactions (LPIs) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO) is adapted for light waves in an inhomogeneous medium and modified to include the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the ponderomotive force. This thick-ray model is compared to the standard ray-tracing (RT) approach, both in the chic code. The PCGO model leads to different power deposition patterns and better diffraction modeling compared to standard RT codes. The intensity-reconstruction technique used in RT codes to model nonlinear LPI leads to artificial filamentation and fails to reproduce realistic ponderomotive self-focusing distances, intensity amplifications, and density channel depletions, whereas PCGO succeeds. Bundles of Gaussian thick rays can be used to model realistic non-Gaussian ICF beams. The PCGO approach is expected to improve the accuracy of ICF simulations and serve as a basis to implement diverse LPI effects in large-scale hydrocodes.

  10. Kinetically driven Raman scattering in short, bi-speckle laser-plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glize, Kevin; Rousseaux, Christophe; Baton, Sophie; Dervieux, Vincent; Lancia, Livia

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate collective speckles behavior in laser-plasma interaction, bi-speckle experiments have been performed using the ELFIE facility (LULI). Two independent laser pulses (1.06 nm, 1.5 ps FWHM) interact with preformed He plasma (0.06 nc, 300 eV). The first beam drives stimulated Raman scattering, while the second, which its intensity is set near SRS threshold, is focused near the first one (typically 90 μm). The interaction, with crossed and parallel polarization, was studied for both variation of the time delay and the lateral distance between the two pulses, featuring a highly resolved Thomson-scattering diagnostic and backward Raman imaging. It is shown that the kinetic perturbations are of primary importance on triggering SRS in the weak speckle, which exhibits SRS instability up to an expectedly long time delay after the interaction of the strong one. The experimental results will be discussed with the help of 2D PIC simulations (CALDER code).

  11. Overview of inertial fusion and high-intensity laser plasma research in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassart, J.

    2004-12-01

    Inertial fusion science is driven by 'the quest for ignition'. For many years, a 'conventional' route towards inertial fusion has been investigated using two different approaches: ignition by an inertial central hot spot could be obtained either through the direct or the indirect drive scheme. Both imply the use of a very large facility to operate the driver, which is a powerful laser in the current projects (LMJ in France as well as NIF in the US). The LMJ construction being on the way, a large amount of experimental and computational work is currently being done to deepen the understanding of ignition requirements. On the other hand, the so-called 'fast ignition' approach has led to an increasingly important amount of scientific work since it was proposed at the beginning of the 1990s. During the last several years (from the previous IFSA held in Kyoto in 2001), several PW-class high-intensity laser facilities have been built in Europe. In the meantime, a large number of interesting results related to fast electron and proton production have been obtained with the existing facilities. Observation of laser-irradiated solid targets has provided the first evidence of electron bunches separated by half the period of light. Nevertheless, target heating remains modest. On the other hand, multi-megaelectronvolt highly collimated electron beams have been produced by table-top lasers interacting with the low-density plasmas. They open the feasibility of a lot of applications: x-ray probe beams in plasma physics, biology, chemistry, injector for conventional accelerators, etc). Laser-produced proton beams is also a growing field, with a lot of promising applications: proton therapy, radio-isotope production, diagnostic for transient phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, etc. Inertial fusion research is fostered by a sustained effort of organization and coordination at the national level (the creation of an Institute for Lasers and Plasmas in France) as well as at the

  12. On specular reflectivity measurements in high and low-contrast relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, G. E.; Link, A.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Ramis, R.

    2015-01-15

    Using both experiment and 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we describe the use of specular reflectivity measurements to study relativistic (Iλ{sup 2 }> 10{sup 18 }W/cm{sup 2}⋅μm{sup 2}) laser-plasma interactions for both high and low-contrast 527 nm laser pulses on initially solid density aluminum targets. In the context of hot-electron generation, studies typically rely on diagnostics which, more-often-than-not, represent indirect processes driven by fast electrons transiting through solid density materials. Specular reflectivity measurements, however, can provide a direct measure of the interaction that is highly sensitive to how the EM fields and plasma profiles, critical input parameters for modeling of hot-electron generation, evolve near the interaction region. While the fields of interest occur near the relativistic critical electron density, experimental reflectivity measurements are obtained centimeters away from the interaction region, well after diffraction has fully manifested itself. Using a combination of PIC simulations with experimentally inspired conditions and an analytic, non-paraxial, pulse propagation algorithm, we calculate reflected pulse properties, both near and far from the interaction region, and compare with specular reflectivity measurements. The experiment results and PIC simulations demonstrate that specular reflectivity measurements are an extremely sensitive qualitative, and partially quantitative, indicator of initial laser/target conditions, ionization effects, and other details of intense laser-matter interactions. The techniques described can provide strong constraints on many systems of importance in ultra-intense laser interactions with matter.

  13. Hot Electron Measurement and Modeling for Short-Pulse Laser Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; McLean, S; Patel, P K; Wilks, S C

    2003-09-08

    We measured the hot electron production from short pulse laser plasma interactions using a fiber-array-based compact electron spectrometer that uses permanent magnets for electron energy dispersion and over 100 scintillating fibers coupled to a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD as the detection system. This spectrometer has electron energy coverage from 10 keV to 60 MeV. The whole spectrometer is compact with dimensions of 8 inch x 7 inch x 4 inch. We performed systematic measurements of electron production on the ultra short pulse laser JanUSP (with pulse width less than 100 fs) at intensity range interest to Fast Ignition scheme from 10{sup 17} Wcm{sup -2} up to 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2} at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. The electron distributions were obtained at various laser energies for different solid target materials and observation angles. We determined characteristic temperature of the escaped hot electrons at various incident laser intensity which is confirmed by theoretical simulations using the ZOHAL Particle-in-cell (PIC) code.

  14. Mono-Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth,Cs.; van Tilborg, J.; Cary, John R.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Nieter, Chet

    2005-05-09

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L'OASIS laser, the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing > 200 pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at< 2pi-mm-mrad were produced. Data and simulations (VORPAL code) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was guided without trapping, potentially providing a platform for controlled injection. The plasma channel technique forms the basis of a new class of accelerators, with high gradients and high beam quality.

  15. Simulation of laser-plasma interactions and fast-electron transport in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I. Kemp, A.J.; Divol, L.

    2010-06-20

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogeneous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  16. Three dimensional modeling of Laser-Plasma interaction: benchmarking our predictive modeling tools vs. experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L; Berger, R; Meezan, N; Froula, D H; Dixit, S; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-08

    We have developed a new target platform to study Laser Plasma Interaction in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester)[1]. By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, we were able to create a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed us to benchmark our hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA[2]. As a result of this effort, we can use with much confidence these simulations as input parameters for our LPI simulation code pF3d[3]. In this paper, we show that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, whole beam three-dimensional linear kinetic modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements(SBS thresholds, reflectivity values and the absence of measurable SRS). This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations. These simulations accurately predicted the strong reduction of SBS measured when polarization smoothing is used.

  17. Three-dimensional modeling of laser-plasma interaction: Benchmarking our predictive modeling tools versus experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Froula, D. H.; Dixit, S.; Michel, P.; London, R.; Strozzi, D.; Ross, J.; Williams, E. A.; Still, B.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    New experimental capabilities [Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 085001 (2007)] have been developed to study laser-plasma interaction (LPI) in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester). By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV was created. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed to benchmark hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056304 (2007)]. As a result of this effort, these simulations can be used with much confidence as input parameters for the LPI simulation code PF3D [Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 4337 (1998)]. In this paper, it is shown that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, whole beam three-dimensional linear kinetic modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements (SBS thresholds, reflectivity values, and the absence of measurable stimulated Raman scattering). This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations. These simulations accurately predicted the strong reduction of SBS measured when polarization smoothing is used.

  18. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  19. Calculating the radiation characteristics of accelerated electrons in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Qu, J. F.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we studied the characteristics of radiation emitted by electrons accelerated in a laser-plasma interaction by using the Lienard-Wiechert field. In the interaction of a laser pulse with a underdense plasma, electrons are accelerated by two mechanisms: direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). At the beginning of the process, the DLA electrons emit most of the radiation, and the DLA electrons emit a much higher peak photon energy than the LWFA electrons. As the laser-plasma interaction progresses, the LWFA electrons become the major radiation emitter; however, even at this stage, the contribution from DLA electrons is significant, especially to the peak photon energy.

  20. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  1. Coupled hydrodynamic model for laser-plasma interaction and hot electron generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaïtis, A.; Duchateau, G.; Ribeyre, X.; Maheut, Y.; Boutoux, G.; Antonelli, L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Batani, D.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of the model of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes, including the creation and propagation of high-energy electrons excited by parametric instabilities and collective effects. This formulation accounts for laser beam refraction and diffraction, energy absorption due to collisional and resonant processes, and hot electron generation due to the stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay, and resonant absorption processes. Hot electron (HE) transport and absorption are described within the multigroup angular scattering approximation, adapted for transversally Gaussian electron beams. This multiscale inline LPI-HE model is used to interpret several shock ignition experiments, highlighting the importance of target preheating by HEs and the shortcomings of standard geometrical optics when modeling the propagation and absorption of intense laser pulses. It is found that HEs from parametric instabilities significantly increase the shock pressure and velocity in the target, while decreasing its strength and the overall ablation pressure.

  2. Accelerating piston action and plasma heating in high-energy density laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Wilks, S. C.; Baring, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    In the field of high-energy density physics (HEDP), lasers in both the nanosecond and picosecond regimes can drive conditions in the laboratory relevant to a broad range of astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray burst afterglows and supernova remnants. In the short-pulse regime, the strong light pressure (>Gbar) associated ultraintense lasers of intensity I > 1018 W/cm2 plays a central role in many HEDP applications. Yet, the behavior of this nonlinear pressure mechanism is not well-understood at late time in the laser-plasma interaction. In this paper, a more realistic treatment of the laser pressure 'hole boring' process is developed through analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. A simple Liouville code capturing the phase space evolution of ponderomotively-driven ions is employed to distill effects related to plasma heating and ion bulk acceleration. Taking into account these effects, our results show that the evolution of the laser-target system encompasses ponderomotive expansion, equipartition, and quasi-isothermal expansion epochs. These results have implications for light piston-driven ion acceleration scenarios, and astrophysical applications where the efficiencies of converting incident Poynting flux into bulk plasma flow and plasma heat are key unknown parameters.

  3. Coupled hydrodynamic model for laser-plasma interaction and hot electron generation.

    PubMed

    Colaïtis, A; Duchateau, G; Ribeyre, X; Maheut, Y; Boutoux, G; Antonelli, L; Nicolaï, Ph; Batani, D; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of the model of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes, including the creation and propagation of high-energy electrons excited by parametric instabilities and collective effects. This formulation accounts for laser beam refraction and diffraction, energy absorption due to collisional and resonant processes, and hot electron generation due to the stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay, and resonant absorption processes. Hot electron (HE) transport and absorption are described within the multigroup angular scattering approximation, adapted for transversally Gaussian electron beams. This multiscale inline LPI-HE model is used to interpret several shock ignition experiments, highlighting the importance of target preheating by HEs and the shortcomings of standard geometrical optics when modeling the propagation and absorption of intense laser pulses. It is found that HEs from parametric instabilities significantly increase the shock pressure and velocity in the target, while decreasing its strength and the overall ablation pressure.

  4. Coupled hydrodynamic model for laser-plasma interaction and hot electron generation.

    PubMed

    Colaïtis, A; Duchateau, G; Ribeyre, X; Maheut, Y; Boutoux, G; Antonelli, L; Nicolaï, Ph; Batani, D; Tikhonchuk, V

    2015-10-01

    We present a formulation of the model of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) at hydrodynamical scales that couples the plasma dynamics with linear and nonlinear LPI processes, including the creation and propagation of high-energy electrons excited by parametric instabilities and collective effects. This formulation accounts for laser beam refraction and diffraction, energy absorption due to collisional and resonant processes, and hot electron generation due to the stimulated Raman scattering, two-plasmon decay, and resonant absorption processes. Hot electron (HE) transport and absorption are described within the multigroup angular scattering approximation, adapted for transversally Gaussian electron beams. This multiscale inline LPI-HE model is used to interpret several shock ignition experiments, highlighting the importance of target preheating by HEs and the shortcomings of standard geometrical optics when modeling the propagation and absorption of intense laser pulses. It is found that HEs from parametric instabilities significantly increase the shock pressure and velocity in the target, while decreasing its strength and the overall ablation pressure. PMID:26565161

  5. Time-Space Position of Warm Dense Matter in Laser Plasma Interaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H

    2006-09-25

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been perform performed using an fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. Electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were cautiously compared with relevant 1D numerical simulation. Finally these results provide a first experience of searching for the time-space position of the so-called warm dense plasma in an ultra fast laser target interaction process. These experiments aim to prepare near solid-density plasmas for Thomson scattering experiments using the short wavelength free-electron laser FLASH, DESY Hamburg.

  6. Space-Time Characterization of Laser Plasma Interactions in the Warm Dense Matter Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, L F; Uschmann, I; Forster, E; Zamponi, F; Kampfer, T; Fuhrmann, A; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Toleikis, S; Tschentsher, T; Glenzer, S H

    2008-04-30

    Laser plasma interaction experiments have been performed using a fs Titanium Sapphire laser. Plasmas have been generated from planar PMMA targets using single laser pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy, 50 fs pulse duration at 800 nm wavelength. The electron density distributions of the plasmas in different delay times have been characterized by means of Nomarski Interferometry. Experimental data were compared with hydrodynamic simulation. First results to characterize the plasma density and temperature as a function of space and time are obtained. This work aims to generate plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime at near solid-density in an ultra-fast laser target interaction process. Plasmas under these conditions can serve as targets to develop x-ray Thomson scattering as a plasma diagnostic tool, e.g., using the VUV free-electron laser (FLASH) at DESY Hamburg.

  7. Dynamics of electron bunches at the laser-plasma interaction in the bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. I.; Svystun, O. M.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Tkachenko, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-bunches self-injection, observed in laser-plasma accelerators in the bubble regime, affects the energy gain of electrons accelerated by laser wakefield. However, understanding of dynamics of the electron bunches formed at laser-plasma interaction may be challenging. We present here the results of fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of laser wakefield acceleration driven by a short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The trapping and acceleration of three witness electron bunches by the bubble-like structures were observed. It has been shown that with time the first two witness bunches turn into drivers and contribute to acceleration of the last witness bunch.

  8. Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N; Alexander, N; Stephens, R B; MacPhee, A G; Hey, D; Pape, S L; Patel, P; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Offermann, D; Link, A; Chowdhury, E; Van-Woerkom, L D; Freeman, R R

    2007-12-18

    The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.

  9. High-Quality Ion Beam Generation in Laser Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Izumiyzma, Takeshi; Barada, Daisuke; Kawata, Shigeo; Gu, Yan Jun; Kong, Qing; Xiao Wang, Ping; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Min

    We focus on a control of generation of high-quality ion beam. In this study, near-critical density plasmas are employed and are illuminated by high intensity short laser pulses; we have successfully generated high-energy ions by multiple-stages acceleration. We performed particle-in-cell simulations in this paper. Near-critical density plasmas are employed at the proton source and also in the post acceleration. A beam bunching method is also proposed to control the ion beam length.

  10. Radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Jaroszynski, D A; Bingham, R; Brunetti, E; Ersfeld, B; Gallacher, J; van der Geer, B; Issac, R; Jamison, S P; Jones, D; de Loos, M; Lyachev, A; Pavlov, V; Reitsma, A; Saveliev, Y; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M

    2006-03-15

    Plasma waves excited by intense laser beams can be harnessed to produce femtosecond duration bunches of electrons with relativistic energies. The very large electrostatic forces of plasma density wakes trailing behind an intense laser pulse provide field potentials capable of accelerating charged particles to high energies over very short distances, as high as 1GeV in a few millimetres. The short length scale of plasma waves provides a means of developing very compact high-energy accelerators, which could form the basis of compact next-generation light sources with unique properties. Tuneable X-ray radiation and particle pulses with durations of the order of or less than 5fs should be possible and would be useful for probing matter on unprecedented time and spatial scales. If developed to fruition this revolutionary technology could reduce the size and cost of light sources by three orders of magnitude and, therefore, provide powerful new tools to a large scientific community. We will discuss how a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator can be used to produce radiation with unique characteristics over a very large spectral range.

  11. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed. PMID:22680581

  12. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  13. Production of ultrahigh ion current densities at skin-layer subrelativistic laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Hora, H.; Krása, J.; Láska, L.; Rohlena, K.

    2004-12-01

    Some applications of fast ions driven by a short (<=1 ps) laser pulse (e.g. fast ignition of ICF targets, x-ray laser pumping, laboratory astrophysics research or some nuclear physics experiments) require ion beams of picosecond (or shorter) time durations and of very high ion current densities (~1010 A cm-2 or higher). A possible way of producing ion beams with such extreme parameters is ballistic focusing of fast ions generated by a target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism at relativistic laser intensities. In this paper we discuss another method, where the production of short-pulse ion beams of ultrahigh current densities is possible in a planar geometry at subrelativistic laser intensities and at a low energy (<=1 J) of the laser pulse. This method—referred to as skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA)—uses strong ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser pulse with a proper preplasma layer in front of a solid target. The basic features of the high-current ion generation by S-LPA were investigated using a simplified theory, numerical hydrodynamic simulations and measurements. The experiments were performed with subjoule 1 ps laser pulses interacting with massive or thin foil targets at intensities of up to 2 × 1017 W cm-2. It was found that both in the backward and forward directions highly collimated high-density ion beams (plasma blocks) with current densities at the ion source (close to the target) approaching 1010 A cm-2 are produced, in accordance with the theory and numerical calculations. These ion current densities were found to be comparable to (or even higher than) those estimated from recent short-pulse TNSA experiments with relativistic laser intensities. Apart from the simpler physics of the laser plasma interaction, the advantage of the considered method is the low energy of the driving laser pulses allowing the production of ultrahigh-current-density ion beams with a high repetition rate. It

  14. Study of laser plasma interactions in the relativistic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, D.

    1997-08-13

    We discuss the first experimental demonstration of electron acceleration by a laser wakefield over instances greater than a Rayleigh range (or the distance a laser normally propagates in vacuum). A self-modulated laser wakefield plasma wave is shown to have a field gradient that exceeds that of an RF linac by four orders of magnitude (E => 200 GV/m) and accelerates electrons with over 1-nC of charge per bunch in a beam with space-charge-limited emittance (1 mm-mrad). Above a laser power threshold, a plasma channel, created by the intense ultrashort laser pulse (I approx. 4 x1018 W/CM2, gamma = 1 micron, r = 400 fs), was found to increase the laser propagation distance, decrease the electron beam divergence, and increase the electron energy. The plasma wave, directly measured with coherent Thomson scattering is shown to damp-due to beam loading-in a duration of 1.5 ps or approx. 100 plasma periods. These results may have important implications for the proposed fast ignitor concept.

  15. Laser plasma interaction physics in the context of fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Depierreux, S.; Baldis, H. A.; Pesme, D.; Myatt, J.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Laval, G.

    2000-08-01

    Of vital importance for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are the understanding and control of the nonlinear processes which can occur during the propagation of the laser pulses through the underdense plasma surrounding the fusion capsule. The control of parametric instabilities has been studied experimentally, using the LULI six-beam laser facility, and also theoretically and numerically. New results based on the direct observation of plasma waves with Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam have revealed the occurence of the Langmuir decay instability. This secondary instability may play an imporant role in the saturation of stimulated Raman scattering. Another mechanism for reducing the growth of the scattering instabilities is the so-called `plasma-induced incoherence'. Namely, recent theoretical studies have shown that the propagation of laser beams through the underdense plasma can increase their spatial and temporal incoherence. This plasma-induced beam smoothing can reduce the levels of parametric instabilities. One signature of this process is a large increase of the spectral width of the laser light after propagation through the plasma. Comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations shows an excellent agreement between the observed and calculated time-resolved spectra of the transmitted laser light at various laser intensities.

  16. Electron acceleration in long scale laser - plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamperidis, Christos; Mangles, Stuart P. D.; Nagel, Sabrina R.; Bellei, Claudio; Krushelnick, Karl; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Bourgeois, Nicola; Marques, Jean Raphael; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2006-10-01

    Broad energy electron bunches are produced through the Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration scheme at the 30J, 300 fsec laser, LULI, France, with long scale underdense plasmas, created in a He filled gas cell and in He gas jet nozzles of various lengths. With c.τlaser>>λplasma, electrons reached Emax ˜ 200MeV. By carefully controlling the dynamics of the interaction and by simultaneous observations of the electron energy spectra and the forward emitted optical spectrum, we found that a plasma density threshold (˜5.10^18 cm-3) exists for quasi-monoenergetic (˜30MeV) features to appear. The overall plasma channel size was inferred from the collected Thomson scattered light. 2D PIC simulations indicate that the main long laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that eventually get compressed and tightly focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a bubble like acceleration of electron bunches.

  17. SiC detector damage and characterization for high intensity laser-plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cannavò, A.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon-Carbide (SiC) detectors are always more extensively employed as diagnostics in laser-generated plasma due to their remarkable properties such as their high band gap, high carrier velocity, high detection efficiency, high radiation resistance and low leakage current at room temperature. SiC detectors, in comparison with Si detectors, have the advantage of being insensitive to visible light, having low reverse current at high temperature and high radiation hardness. A similar energy resolution characterizes the two types of detectors, being 0.8% in Si and 1.0% in SiC, as measured detecting 5.8 MeV alpha particles. Generally, SiC detectors are employed as laser-plasma diagnostics in time-of-flight configuration, permitting the simultaneous detection of photons, electrons and ions based on discrimination of velocity. SiC detectors can be employed in the proportionality regime, because their response is proportional to the radiation energy deposited in the active layer. Using thin absorbers in front of the detectors makes it possible to have further information on the radiation nature, intensity and energy. Surface characterization of SiC before and after prolonged exposure to hot plasma laser generated shows the formation of bulk defects and thin film deposition on the detector surface limiting the device functionality.

  18. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siminos, E.; Skupin, S.; Sävert, A.; Cole, J. M.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Kaluza, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few-cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Finally, we show that time-dependent information from the interaction can be recovered from a single shot by using a broadband, chirped probe pulse and subsequent spectral filtering.

  19. Dependence of laser-plasma interaction physics on laser wavelength and plasma scalelength

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.

    1984-04-09

    We discuss the dependence of many features of laser-plasma interaction physics on both the laser wavelength and plasma dimensions. Experimental results that are presented include absorption, stimulated Brillouin scattering, suprathermal electron production, and optical signatures of the two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman instabilities. While the experiments show beneficial effects of decreasing laser wavelength on the coupling physics, the mix and efficiency of the various interaction processes is shown to be strongly dependent on the size of the underdense plasma. 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Numerical investigation of new regimes in laser-plasma and laser-solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Lancaster, Kate; Norreys, Peter; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo; Hooker, Simon

    2006-10-01

    The steady increase in the capabilities of the world's strongest lasers opens up parameter regimes for laser-plasma and laser- solid interaction experiments that were inaccessible before. This is even more true if one considers projected upgrades, such as the Vulcan 10 PW upgrade or the Astra Gemini system (two 50 fs pulses of 500 TW each). In order to become familiar with the physical processes that dominate laser-matter interactions in these regimes, extensive numerical investigations are needed. In this paper, we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations of laser-plasma interactions for electron acceleration in the blowout regime, using Astra Gemini-style pulses, as well as laser-solid interactions for fast ignition fusion research, using Vulcan Petawatt-style pulses. The simulations have been performed using the Osiris framework. New features of the interaction processes that are a direct consequence of the elevated pulse capabilities will be highlighted, and consequences for future experiments will be discussed.

  1. Development and characterization of very dense submillimetric gas jets for laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sylla, F.; Kahaly, S.; Flacco, A.; Malka, V.; Veltcheva, M.

    2012-03-15

    We report on the characterization of recently developed submillimetric He gas jets with peak density higher than 10{sup 21} atoms/cm{sup 3} from cylindrical and slightly conical nozzles of throat diameter of less than 400 {mu}m. Helium gas at pressure 300-400 bar has been developed for this purpose to compensate the nozzle throat diameter reduction that affects the output mass flow rate. The fast-switching electro-valve enables to operate the jet safely for multi-stage vacuum pump assembly. Such gaseous thin targets are particularly suitable for laser-plasma interaction studies in the unexplored near-critical regime.

  2. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  3. Annual Scientific Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Henry C. Kapteyn

    2005-05-03

    In this project, we use coherent short-wavelength light generated using high-order harmonic generation as a probe of laser-plasma dynamics and phase transitions on femtosecond time-scales. The interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with materials and plasmas is relevant to stockpile stewardship, to understanding the equation of state of matter at high pressures and temperatures, and to plasma concepts such as the fast-ignitor ICF fusion concept and laser-based particle acceleration. Femtosecond laser technology makes it possible to use a small-scale setup to generate 20fs pulses with average power >10W at multiple kHz repetition rates, that can be focused to intensities in excess of 1017W/cm2. These lasers can be used either to rapidly heat materials to initiate phase transitions, or to create laser plasmas over a wide parameter space. These lasers can also be used to generate fully spatially coherent XUV beams with which to probe these materials and plasma systems. We are in process of implementing imaging studies of plasma hydrodynamics and warm, dense matter. The data will be compared with simulation codes of laser-plasma interactions, making it possible to refine and validate these codes.

  4. Filamentation of magnetosonic wave and generation of magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. V.; Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, R. P.; Satsangi, V. R.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction due to the nonlinear coupling of magnetosonic wave with ion acoustic wave in overdense plasma. For this study, dynamical equations of magnetosonic waves and the ion acoustic waves have been developed in the presence of ponderomotive force due to the pump magnetosonic wave. Slowly converging and diverging behavior has been studied semi-analytically, this results in the formation of filaments of the magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has also been carried out to study nonlinear stage. From the results, it has been found that the localized structures become quite complex in nature. Further, power spectrum has been studied. Results show that the spectral index follows (∼k{sup −2.0}) scaling at smaller scale. Relevance of the present investigation has been shown with the experimental observation.

  5. Time dependence of fast electron beam divergence in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Akli, K U; Storm, M J; McMahon, M; Jiang, S; Ovchinnikov, V; Schumacher, D W; Freeman, R R; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2012-08-01

    We report on the measurement and computer simulation of the divergence of fast electrons generated in an ultraintense laser-plasma interaction (LPI) and the subsequent propagation in a nonrefluxing target. We show that, at Iλ(2) of 10(20) Wcm(-2)μm(2), the time-integrated electron beam full divergence angle is (60±5)°. However, our time-resolved 2D particle-in-cell simulations show the initial beam divergence to be much smaller (≤30°). Our simulations show the divergence to monotonically increase with time, reaching a final value of (68±7)° after the passage of the laser pulse, consistent with the experimental time-integrated measurements. By revealing the time-dependent nature of the LPI, we find that a substantial fraction of the laser energy (~7%) is transported up to 100 μm with a divergence of 32°.

  6. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyash, Igor A.; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-03-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods, that are used commonly in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  7. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-03-15

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach.

  8. A two-color terawatt laser system for high-intensity laser-plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, James; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Downer, Michael

    2012-10-01

    In some high-field laser-plasma experiments, it is advantageous to accompany the main high-energy (˜1 J) laser with a second high-energy pulse (˜0.1 J) which has been frequency-shifted by ˜10%. Such a pulse-pair would have a low walk-off velocity while remaining spectrally distinct for use in two-color pump-probe experiments. Moreover, by shifting the second pulse by ˜plasma frequency, it is theoretically possible to enhance or suppress relativistic self-focusing, which is the first (uncontrolled) step in many laser-plasma experiments. We report a hybrid chirped pulse Raman amplifier (CPRA)/Ti-Sapphire amplifier (>200 mJ, 15-20 nm bandwidth (FWHM), >60 fs duration) that is capable of performing such two-color high-field experiments. When amplified and compressed, this beam's power exceeds 1 TW. This two-color capability can be added to any commercial terawatt laser system without compromising the energy, duration or beam quality of the main system. We will report progress with a two-color seeded relativistic self-phase modulation experiment.

  9. Laser-plasma interaction in ignition relevant plasmas: benchmarking our 3D modelling capabilities versus recent experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Divol, L; Froula, D H; Meezan, N; Berger, R; London, R A; Michel, P; Glenzer, S H

    2007-09-27

    We have developed a new target platform to study Laser Plasma Interaction in ignition-relevant condition at the Omega laser facility (LLE/Rochester)[1]. By shooting an interaction beam along the axis of a gas-filled hohlraum heated by up to 17 kJ of heater beam energy, we were able to create a millimeter-scale underdense uniform plasma at electron temperatures above 3 keV. Extensive Thomson scattering measurements allowed us to benchmark our hydrodynamic simulations performed with HYDRA [1]. As a result of this effort, we can use with much confidence these simulations as input parameters for our LPI simulation code pF3d [2]. In this paper, we show that by using accurate hydrodynamic profiles and full three-dimensional simulations including a realistic modeling of the laser intensity pattern generated by various smoothing options, fluid LPI theory reproduces the SBS thresholds and absolute reflectivity values and the absence of measurable SRS. This good agreement was made possible by the recent increase in computing power routinely available for such simulations.

  10. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J.

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  11. Role of Hydrodynamics Simulations in Laser-Plasma Interaction Predictive Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; London, R A; Moody, J D; Marinak, M M; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P B; Prisbrey, S T; Ross, J S; Williams, E A; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J

    2006-11-02

    Efforts to predict and control laser-plasma interactions (LPI) in ignition hohlraum targets for the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Optical Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] are based on plasma conditions provided by radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Recent experiments provide compelling evidence that codes such as hydra [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] can accurately predict the plasma conditions in laser heated targets such as gas-filled balloon (gasbag) and hohlraum platforms for studying LPI. Initially puzzling experimental observations are found to be caused by bulk hydrodynamic phenomena. Features in backscatter spectra and transmitted light spectra are reproduced from the simulated plasma conditions. Simulations also agree well with Thomson scattering measurements of the electron temperature. The calculated plasma conditions are used to explore a linear-gain based phenomenological model of backscatter. For long plasmas at ignition-relevant electron temperatures, the measured backscatter increases monotonically with gain and is consistent with linear growth for low reflectivities. These results suggest a role for linear gain postprocessing as a metric for assessing LPI risk.

  12. Spatio-temporal evolution of magnetosonic wave in the laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P. Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, Swati; Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Modi, K. V.; Satsangi, V. R.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the transient response of nonlinear coupling between magnetosonic wave and ion acoustic wave in the overdense plasma. Filamentation of magnetosonic wave has been considered to be responsible for magnetic turbulence during the laser plasma interaction. The ion acoustic wave gets excited due to the ponderomotive force exerted by magnetosonic wave and this ion acoustic wave in turn generates perturbation in the background density in the form of spatial density harmonics. Numerical simulation has been carried out for dimensionless coupled equations of magnetosonic wave and ion acoustic wave; and the results show quite complex localized structures that grow with time. The power spectrum has also been studied which shows that the spectral index follows an approximate scaling of the order of ∼k{sup −2.4} at smaller scales. The data obtained from numerical simulation are used in semi analytical model to better understand the mechanism of nonlinear evolution of magnetosonic wave. The results indicate considerable randomness in the spatial structure of the magnetic field profile which gives sufficient indication of turbulence.

  13. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaoyan Hao, Liang; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang; Li, Bin Guo, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D) has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS), stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS), non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT) is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  14. Spatial Variation of Two-Plasmon-Decay Laser-Plasma Interactions Found in 3/2 ω Target Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    The Thomson-scattering system (TSS) on OMEGA has recorded images of 3/2 ω light emitted from implosions. The 3/2 ω light results from Thomson scattering of the drive beams off of electron plasma waves (EPW's) driven by the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) laser-plasma interaction at the quarter-critical surface. The images indicate that the 3/2 ω emission is not uniform over the surface. The images show distinct patterns that change as the drive beam profile is varied. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons has been shown to empirically scale with the TPD multibeam common-wave gain (CWG) during implosions on OMEGA. A hydrodynamic post-processor code calculates the CWG, including the effects of cross-beam energy exchange on the laser intensity and k vectors of the EPW's driven at the quarter-critical surface. The 3/2 ω light Thomson scattered off these EPW's and collected is modeled and compared to the observed images. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  16. X-ray optics for laser-plasma sources: Aplications of intense SXR and EUV radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Anna; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Pina, Ladislav

    2012-05-17

    In this work we present a short review of SXR and EUV optics that have been designed and developed for experiments concerning material processing and imaging, using a laser-plasma radiation source based on a gas puff target. Three different kinds of mirrors employed as the EUV collectors are presented: the grazing incidence axisymmetrical ellipsoidal mirror, the grazing incidence multifoil mirror, and the ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating. Experiments concerning characterization of the mirrors were performed using EUV radiation from Kr or Xe plasmas produced in a double stream gas puff target irradiated with Nd:YAG laser pulses (4ns, 0.8 J, 10 Hz). Intensity of the focused radiation was sufficient for micromachining of organic polymers and surface modification of organic and inorganic solids. Different kinds of micro-and nanostructures created in near-surface layers of different kinds polymers were obtained. Significant differences were revealed in XPS spectra acquired for irradiated and not irradiated polymers.

  17. X-ray optics for laser-plasma sources: Aplications of intense SXR and EUV radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Jarocki, Roman; Kostecki, Jerzy; Szczurek, Anna; Szczurek, Mirosław; Wachulak, Przemysław; Pina, Ladislav

    2012-05-01

    In this work we present a short review of SXR and EUV optics that have been designed and developed for experiments concerning material processing and imaging, using a laser-plasma radiation source based on a gas puff target. Three different kinds of mirrors employed as the EUV collectors are presented: the grazing incidence axisymmetrical ellipsoidal mirror, the grazing incidence multifoil mirror, and the ellipsoidal mirror with Mo/Si multilayer coating. Experiments concerning characterization of the mirrors were performed using EUV radiation from Kr or Xe plasmas produced in a double stream gas puff target irradiated with Nd:YAG laser pulses (4ns, 0.8 J, 10 Hz). Intensity of the focused radiation was sufficient for micromachining of organic polymers and surface modification of organic and inorganic solids. Different kinds of micro-and nanostructures created in near-surface layers of different kinds polymers were obtained. Significant differences were revealed in XPS spectra acquired for irradiated and not irradiated polymers.

  18. High-order harmonic generation of picosecond radiation of moderate intensity in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Boltaev, G S; Ganeev, Rashid A; Kulagin, I A; Satlikov, N Kh; Usmanov, T

    2012-10-31

    The results of investigations into the generation of highorder harmonics (up to the 21st order) of picosecond ({tau} = 38 ps) Nd : YAG laser radiation in the plasma produced by laser ablation of metal and carbon-containing material surfaces are presented. We demonstrate the feasibility of generating high-order harmonics in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (with radiation wavelengths shorter than 120 nm) in plasmas with an efficiency of {approx}0.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. In carbon-containing plasma, the 7th harmonic intensity exceeded that of the 5th one by a factor of seven. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. High-order harmonic generation of picosecond radiation of moderate intensity in laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltaev, G. S.; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Kulagin, I. A.; Satlikov, N. Kh; Usmanov, T.

    2012-10-01

    The results of investigations into the generation of highorder harmonics (up to the 21st order) of picosecond (τ = 38 ps) Nd : YAG laser radiation in the plasma produced by laser ablation of metal and carbon-containing material surfaces are presented. We demonstrate the feasibility of generating high-order harmonics in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range (with radiation wavelengths shorter than 120 nm) in plasmas with an efficiency of ~0.7 × 10-4. In carbon-containing plasma, the 7th harmonic intensity exceeded that of the 5th one by a factor of seven.

  20. Integrated kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions, fast-electron generation, and transport in fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A. J.; Cohen, B. I.; Divol, L.

    2010-05-15

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale using a new approach that combines a three-dimensional collisional electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with a magnetohydrodynamic-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at subcritical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast- electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multipicosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  1. Integrated Kinetic Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions, Fast-Electron Generation and Transport in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A; Cohen, B; Divol, L

    2009-11-16

    We present new results on the physics of short-pulse laser-matter interaction of kilojoule-picosecond pulses at full spatial and temporal scale, using a new approach that combines a 3D collisional electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code with an MHD-hybrid model of high-density plasma. In the latter, collisions damp out plasma waves, and an Ohm's law with electron inertia effects neglected determines the electric field. In addition to yielding orders of magnitude in speed-up while avoiding numerical instabilities, this allows us to model the whole problem in a single unified framework: the laser-plasma interaction at sub-critical densities, energy deposition at relativistic critical densities, and fast-electron transport in solid densities. Key questions such as the multi-picosecond temporal evolution of the laser energy conversion into hot electrons, the impact of return currents on the laser-plasma interaction, and the effect of self-generated electric and magnetic fields on electron transport will be addressed. We will report applications to current experiments.

  2. Using time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images to study refluxing and the extent of pre-plasmas in intense laser-plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Schumacher, D. W.; Kemp, G. E.; Krygier, A. G.; Van Woerkom, L. D.; Akli, K. U.; Freeman, R. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Link, A.

    2011-11-15

    We report the results of an experimental and numerical modeling study of the formation of time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images by electrons excited during an intense laser-plasma interaction. We report the use of the spatial structure of time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images to quantitatively characterize the pre-plasma profile near the critical surface and to verify the near elimination of back-surface refluxing from targets when a thick layer of a low-Z material is attached to the back. The time integrated K{sub {alpha}} images are found to be sensitive to the relative separation between the critical surface and the bulk target, permitting a single parameter exponential pre-plasma scale length to be determined by fitting to experimental results. The refluxed electrons affect different parts of the K{sub {alpha}} images in a manner that varies depending on the location of the refluxing. We use these properties to characterize refluxing also by fitting to experimental results. Experiments were performed using the Titan laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the simulations used a customized version of the hybrid-PIC code, LSP. We find good quantitative match between experiment and simulation.

  3. Scaling laws for collisionless laser-plasma interactions of relevance for laboratory astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Rermington, B A

    2006-04-04

    Scaling laws for interaction of ultra-intense laser beams with a collisionless plasmas are discussed. Special attention is paid to the problem of the collective ion acceleration. Symmetry arguments in application to the generation of the poloidal magnetic field are presented. A heuristic model for evaluating the magnetic field strength is proposed.

  4. Enhancement of laser plasma extreme ultraviolet emission by shockwave-laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bruijn, Rene de; Koshelev, Konstantin N.; Zakharov, Serguei V.; Novikov, Vladimir G.; Bijkerk, Fred

    2005-04-15

    A double laser pulse heating scheme has been applied to generate plasmas with enhanced emission in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The plasmas were produced by focusing two laser beams (prepulse and main pulse) with a small spatial separation between the foci on a xenon gas jet target. Prepulses with ps-duration were applied to obtain high shockwave densities, following indications of earlier published results obtained using ns prepulses. EUV intensities around 13.5 nm and in the range 5-20 nm were recorded, and a maximum increase in intensity exceeding 2 was measured at an optimal delay of 140 ns between prepulse and main pulse. The gain in intensity is explained by the interaction of the shockwave produced by the prepulse with the xenon in the beam waist of the main pulse. Extensive simulation was done using the radiative magnetohydrodynamic code Z{sup *}.

  5. Design and characterization of supersonic nozzles for wide focus laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.; Lopes, N.; Dias, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    In this work we optimize the contour of supersonic nozzles to produce long and stable gas jets suitable to be used in loose focus laser-plasma applications. The nozzle design method takes into account the inclusion of a boundary layer that increases the length of the usable gas jet. Two 8 mm supersonic nozzles were characterized, one with a Mach number of 3 and another with a Mach number of 6, using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer performed with a He:Ne 4 cm expanded laser beam. The experimental results confirm that the inclusion of the boundary layer produces an 8 mm constant longitudinal density profile for the nozzle with a Mach number of 6 (NM6) and a 4.5 mm constant longitudinal density profile for the nozzle with a Mach number of 3 (NM3).

  6. Activities of developing high-power KrF lasers and studying laser plasmas interaction physics at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naiyan; Shan, Yusheng; Ma, Weiyi; Yang, Dawei; Kun, Gong; Wang, Xiaojun; Tang, Xiuzhang; Tao, Yezheng; Ma, Jinglong; Jiang, Xingdong

    2002-01-01

    This report reviews the scientific activities on high power laser and laser plasma physics at CIAE. A 6-beam KrF excimer laser system (100 J/23 ns/248 nm/1013 W/cm2, 15 min/shot) has been built, the Raman technologies used to upgrade it to 1014 W/cm2 has been studied. A UV femtosecond Ti:sapphire/KrF hybrid laser (50 mJ/220 fs/248 nm/1017 W/cm2) has been developed also, hot electron generation research has been carried out in the fs laser. In the near future, the fs laser will be amplified in six-beam laser system to produce ultra-high intensity to do fundamental researches on Fast Ignition of ICF.

  7. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Formation of a plasma jet of multiply charged ions in the interaction of a laser plasma with an external pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakin, V. M.; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Wolowski, J.; Karpinski, L.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.

    1994-12-01

    A dense jet of a plasma consisting of multiply charged ions was generated in the interaction of a laser plasma with a strong external axial magnetic field. Images were formed by spectral lines and the soft x-ray spectrum range of the plasma jet was obtained with a large-aperture spectrograph containing a mica crystal bent to form a spherical surface with a radius of R = 10 cm. A tenfold increase in the density of the He-like Mg XI plasma, compared with a freely expanding plasma, was observed at a distance of 5 mm from the target.

  8. LPIC++ a parallel one-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma-interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfund, R. E. W.; Lichters, R.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.

    1998-02-01

    We report on a recently developed electromagnetic relativistic 1D3V (one spatial, three velocity dimensions) Particle-In-Cell code for simulating laser-plasma interaction at normal and oblique incidence. The code is written in C++ and easy to extend. The data structure is characterized by the use of chained lists for the grid cells as well as particles belonging to one cell. The parallel version of the code is based on PVM. It splits the grid into several spatial domains each belonging to one processor. Since particles can cross boundaries of cells as well as domains, the processor loads will generally change in time. This is counteracted by adjusting the domain sizes dynamically, for which the use of chained lists has proven to be very convenient. Moreover, an option for restarting the simulation from intermediate stages of the time evolution has been implemented even in the parallel version. The code will be published and distributed freely.

  9. A scalable high-energy diode-pumped solid state laser for laser-plasma interaction science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vido, M.; Ertel, K.; Mason, P. D.; Banerjee, S.; Phillips, P. J.; Butcher, T. J.; Smith, J. M.; Shaikh, W.; Hernandez-Gomes, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Collier, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Laser systems efficiently generating nanosecond pules at kJ energy levels and at multi-Hz repetition rates are required in order to translate laser-plasma interactions into practical applications. We have developed a scalable, actively-cooled diode-pumped solid state laser amplifier design based on a multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG architecture called DiPOLE (Diode-Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments) capable of meeting such requirements. We demonstrated 10.8 J, 10 Hz operation at 1030 nm using a scaled-down prototype, reaching an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22.5%. Preliminary results from a larger scale version, delivering 100 J pulse energy at 10 Hz, are also presented.

  10. Beaming of High-Order Harmonics Generated from Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, M.; Dromey, B.; Adams, D.; Cousens, S.; Hörlein, R.; Nomura, Y.; Tsakiris, G. D.; Zepf, M.

    2013-04-01

    Beam divergences of high-order extreme ultraviolet harmonics from intense laser interactions with steep plasma density gradients are studied through experiment and Fourier analysis of the harmonic spatial phase. We show that while emission due to the relativistically oscillating mirror mechanism can be explained by ponderomotive surface denting, in agreement with previous results, the divergence of the emission due to the coherent wake emission mechanism requires a combination of the dent phase and an intrinsic emission phase. The temporal dependence of the divergences for both mechanisms is highlighted while it is also shown that the coherent wake emission divergence can be small in circumstances where the phase terms compensate each other.

  11. MHD simulations of magnetized laser-plasma interaction for laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiar, Benjamin; Ciardi, Andrea; Vinci, Tommaso; Revet, Guilhem; Fuchs, Julien; Higginson, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven plasmas coupled with externally applied strong, steady-state, magnetic fields have applications that range from ICF to astrophysical studies of jet collimation, accretion shock dynamics in young stars and streaming instabilities in space plasmas. We have recently included the modelling of laser energy deposition in our three-dimensional, resistive two-temperature MHD code GORGON. The model assumes linear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption and the laser propagation is done in the geometrical optics approximation. We present full scale numerical simulations of actual experiments performed on the ELFIE installation at LULI, including plasma generated from single and multiple laser plasmas embedded in a magnetic field of strength up to 20 T, and experiments and astrophysical simulations that have shown the viability of poloidal magnetic fields to directly result in the collimation of outflows and the formation of jets in astrophysical accreting systems, such as in young stellar objects. The authors acknowledge the support from the Ile-de-France DIM ACAV, from the LABEX Plas@par and from the ANR grant SILAMPA.

  12. Ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort electron bunches generated in relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Gallot, G.; Malka, V.

    2006-05-15

    An experimental study of the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with underdense plasmas in the relativistic regime is presented. A parameter regime of particular interest was found: the so-called bubble regime. In this regime, the laser pulse is focused to relativistic intensities and its pulse duration is comparable to or shorter than the plasma period. A wealth of physical phenomena occurs for such physical parameters. These phenomena have multiple signatures which have been investigated experimentally: (i) the generation of a high quality electron beam (high energy, very collimated, quasimonoenergetic energy distribution); (ii) the laser pulse temporal shortening in nonlinear plasma waves. In addition, experimental results suggest that the electron beam produced in this way has temporal structures shorter than 50 fs.

  13. Shock Waves and Equations of State Related to Laser Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliezer, Shalom

    Equations of state (EOS) of are fundamental to numerous fields of science, such as astrophysics, geophysics, plasma physics, inertial confinement physics and more. Laser induced shock waves techniques enable the study of equations of states and related properties, expanding the thermodynamic range reached by conventional gas gun shock waves and static loading experiments. Two basic techniques are used in laser-induced shock wave research, direct drive and indirect drive. In direct drive, one or more beams irradiate the target. In the indirect drive, thermal x-rays generated in laser heated cavities create the shock wave. Most of the laser induced shock waves experiments in the last decade used the impedance matching. Both direct and indirect drive can be used to accelerate a small foil-flyer and collide it with the studied sample, creating a shock in the sample, similar to gas-gun accelerated plates experiments. These lectures describe the physics of laser induced shock waves and rarefaction waves. The different formulae of the ideal gas EOS are used in connection with shock waves and rarefaction waves. The critical problems in laser induced shock waves are pointed out and the shock wave stability is explained. A general description of the various thermodynamic EOS is given. In particular the Gruneisen EOS is derived fromEinstein and Debye models of the solid state of matter. Furthermore, the very useful phenomenological EOS, namely the linear relation between the shock wave velocity and the particle flow velocity, is analysed. This EOS is used to explain the ≈ 1 Gbar pressures in laser plasma induced shock waves. Last but not least, the shock wave jump conditions are derived in the presence of a magnetic field.

  14. MULTI-fs - A computer code for laser-plasma interaction in the femtosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramis, R.; Eidmann, K.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Hüller, S.

    2012-03-01

    The code MULTI-fs is a numerical tool devoted to the study of the interaction of ultrashort sub-picosecond laser pulses with matter in the intensity range from 10 11 to 10 17 W cm -2. Hydrodynamics is solved in one-dimensional geometry together with laser energy deposition and transport by thermal conduction and radiation. In contrast to long nanosecond pulses, short pulses generate steep gradient plasmas with typical scale lengths in the order of the laser wavelength and smaller. Under these conditions, Maxwell's equations are solved explicitly to obtain the light field. Concerning laser absorption, two different models for the electron-ion collision frequency are implemented to cover the regime of warm dense matter between high-temperature plasma and solid matter and also interaction with short-wave-length (VUV) light. MULTI-fs code is based on the MULTI radiation-hydrodynamic code [R. Ramis, R. Schmalz, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comp. Phys. Comm. 49 (1988) 475] and most of the original features for the treatment of radiation are maintained. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI-fs Catalogue identifier: AEKT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 598 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 443 771 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN Computer: PC (32 bits and 64 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 1.6 MiB Classification: 19.13, 21.2 Subprograms used: Cat Id: AECV_v1_0; Title: MULTI2D; Reference: CPC 180 (2009) 977 Nature of problem: One-dimensional interaction of intense ultrashort (sub-picosecond) and ultraintense (up to 10 17 W cm -2) laser beams with matter. Solution method: The hydrodynamic motion coupled to laser propagation and

  15. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  16. Neutron production by fast protons from ultraintense laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; McKenna, P.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; McCanny, T.; Robson, L.; Shimizu, S.; Singhal, R.P.; Wei, M.S.; Krushelnick, K.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.A.

    2004-12-01

    Tens of MeV proton beams have been generated by interactions of the VULCAN petawatt laser with foil targets and used to induce nuclear reactions in zinc and boron samples. The numbers of {sup 11}C, {sup 66}Ga, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 61}Cu, {sup 62}Zn, {sup 63}Zn, and {sup 69m}Zn nuclei have been measured and used to determine the proton energy spectrum. It is known that (p,n) reactions provide an important method for producing neutron sources and in the present experiment up to {approx}10{sup 9} neutrons sr{sup -1} have been generated via {sup 11}B(p,n){sup 11}C reactions. Using experimentally determined proton energy spectra, the production of neutrons via (p,n) reactions in various targets has been simulated, to quantify neutron pulse intensities and energy spectra. It has been shown that as high as 4x10{sup 9} neutrons sr{sup -1} per laser pulse can be generated via {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}B reactions using the present VULCAN petawatt laser-pulse conditions.

  17. Ultra-relativistic ion acceleration in the laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongsheng; Wang Naiyan; Tang Xiuzhang; Shi Yijin; Xueqing Yan

    2012-09-15

    An analytical relativistic model is proposed to describe the relativistic ion acceleration in the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with thin-foil plasmas. It is found that there is a critical value of the ion momentum to make sure that the ions are trapped by the light sail and accelerated in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) region. If the initial ion momentum is smaller than the critical value, that is in the classical case of RPA, the potential has a deep well and traps the ions to be accelerated, as the same described before by simulation results [Eliasson et al., New J. Phys. 11, 073006 (2009)]. There is a new ion acceleration region different from RPA, called ultra-relativistic acceleration, if the ion momentum exceeds the critical value. In this case, ions will experience a potential downhill. The dependence of the ion momentum and the self-similar variable at the ion front on the acceleration time has been obtained. In the ultra-relativistic limit, the ion momentum at the ion front is proportional to t{sup 4/5}, where t is the acceleration time. In our analytical hydrodynamical model, it is naturally predicted that the ion distribution from RPA is not monoenergetic, although the phase-stable acceleration mechanism is effective. The critical conditions of the laser and plasma parameters which identify the two acceleration modes have been achieved.

  18. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  19. Energy partition, γ-ray emission, and radiation reaction in the near-quantum electrodynamical regime of laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L. L.; Pukhov, A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Shen, B. F.; Akli, K. U.

    2014-02-15

    When extremely intense lasers (I ≥ 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}) interact with plasmas, a significant fraction of the pulse energy is converted into photon emission in the multi-MeV energy range. This emission results in a radiation reaction (RR) force on electrons, which becomes important at ultrahigh intensities. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations which include a quantum electrodynamics model for the γ–photons emission, the corresponding RR force and electron-positron pair creation, the energy partition in the laser-plasma system is investigated. At sufficiently high laser amplitudes, the fraction of laser energy coupled to electrons decreases, while the energy converted to γ-photons increases. The interaction becomes an efficient source of γ-rays when I > 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}, with up to 40% of the laser energy converted to high-energy photons. A systematic study of energy partition and γ-photon emission angle shows the influence of laser intensity and polarization for two plasma conditions: high-density carbon targets and a low-density hydrogen targets. We find that in the opaque region, the laser-to-photon conversion efficiency scales as I{sub 0}{sup 3/2} for linearly polarized and I{sub 0}{sup 2−2.5} for circularly polarized lasers, respectively. In the relativistically transparent regime, the power-laws merge into I{sub 0}{sup 1/2} for both polarizations and photon emission peaks in the forward direction with a relatively small divergence angle (<20°), resulting in a collimated γ-ray beam.

  20. The impact of laser plasma interactions on three-dimensional drive symmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L. Michel, P.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J.

    2014-07-15

    Achieving symmetric hohlraum radiation drive is an important aspect of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, when experimentally delivered laser powers deviate from ideal conditions, the resultant radiation field can become asymmetric. Two situations in which this may arise are random uncorrelated fluctuations, in as-delivered laser power and laser beams that do not participate in the implosion (either intentionally or unintentionally). Furthermore, laser plasma interactions in the hohlraum obfuscate the connection between laser powers and radiation drive. To study the effect of these situations on drive symmetry, we develop a simplified model for crossed-beam energy transfer, laser backscatter, and plasma absorption that can be used in conjunction with view factor calculations to expediently translate laser powers into three-dimensional capsule flux symmetries. We find that crossed-beam energy transfer can alter both the statistical properties of uncorrelated laser fluctuations and the impact of missing laser beams on radiation symmetry. A method is proposed to mitigate the effects of missing laser beams.

  1. Suppression of stochastic pulsation in laser-plasma interaction by smoothing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich; Aydin, Meral

    1992-04-01

    The control of the very complex behavior of a plasma with laser interaction by smoothing with induced spatial incoherence or other methods was related to improving the lateral uniformity of the irradiation. While this is important, it is shown from numerical hydrodynamic studies that the very strong temporal pulsation (stuttering) will mostly be suppressed by these smoothing methods too.

  2. Suppression of stochastic pulsation in laser-plasma interaction by smoothing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hora, H. ); Aydin, M. )

    1992-04-15

    The control of the very complex behavior of a plasma with laser interaction by smoothing with induced spatial incoherence or other methods was related to improving the lateral uniformity of the irradiation. While this is important, it is shown from numerical hydrodynamic studies that the very strong temporal pulsation (stuttering) will mostly be suppressed by these smoothing methods too.

  3. Detection of surface changes of materials caused by intense irradiation with laser-plasma EUV source utilizing scattered or luminescent radiation excited with the EUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M.

    2008-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer of any material. Irradiation of material samples with intense EUV pulses may cause different surface changes. Some of them, especially connected with material desorption, can be clearly visible using an optical or electron microscope. Other changes concerning crystal structure or chemical composition may not be visible under the microscope. They can however be detected using the EUV radiation itself. In this paper a new method of measurement of surface changes by irradiation with a laser-plasma EUV source is presented. The radiation was collected and focused on a material surface using a specially designed multifoil collector. Radiation scattered or excited in the material was detected with the use of a Wolter-type mirror coupled to a back-illuminated CCD camera. Depending on material samples, images with different intensity distributions were registered. For some samples, the intensity distributions of the images obtained before and after irradiation were slightly different. The intensity differences in such cases allowed us to obtain differential images. The appearance of such images was assumed to be evidence of surface changes.

  4. High efficiency proton beam generation through target thickness control in femtosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J. S. Robinson, A. P. L.; Booth, N.; Carroll, D. C.; Rusby, D.; Wilson, L.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.

    2014-05-26

    Bright proton beams with maximum energies of up to 30 MeV have been observed in an experiment investigating ion sheath acceleration driven by a short pulse (<50 fs) laser. The scaling of maximum proton energy and total beam energy content at ultra-high intensities of ∼10{sup 21} W cm{sup −2} was investigated, with the interplay between target thickness and laser pre-pulse found to be a key factor. While the maximum proton energies observed were maximised for μm-thick targets, the total proton energy content was seen to peak for thinner, 500 nm, foils. The total proton beam energy reached up to 440 mJ (a conversion efficiency of 4%), marking a significant step forward for many laser-driven ion applications. The experimental results are supported by hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations.

  5. Optimization of some laser and target features for laser-plasma interaction in the context of fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depierreux, S.; Labaune, C.; Michel, D. T.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Tassin, V.; Stenz, C.; Borisenko, N. G.; Nazarov, W.; Grech, M.; Hüller, S.; Limpouch, J.; Loiseau, P.; Nicolaï, P.; Pesme, D.; Rozmus, W.; Meyer, C.; D-Nicola, P.; Wrobel, R.; Alozy, E.; Romary, P.; Thiell, G.; Soullié, G.; Reverdin, C.; Villette, B.; Rabec-le-Gloahec, M.; Godinho, C.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents experimental results obtained at LULI 2000 and LIL about (i) the compared laser plasma coupling at 526 (2ω) and 351 nm (3ω) and (ii) the early laser imprint suppression using foam targets as plasma smoother of the laser beam. Both experiments are described, part of the experimental results are presented and discussed.

  6. Theoretical foundations of detection of terahertz radiation in laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A. A.

    2013-02-15

    A theory is developed enabling one to calculate the temporal profile and spectrum of a terahertz wave packet from the energy of the second harmonic of optical radiation generated during the nonlinear interaction between terahertz and circularly polarized laser pulses in the skin layer of an overdense plasma. It is shown that the spectral and temporal characteristics of the envelope of the second harmonic of optical radiation coincide with those of the terahertz pulse only at small durations of the detecting laser radiation. For long laser pulses, the temporal profile and spectrum of the second harmonic are mainly determined by the characteristics of optical radiation at the carrier frequency.

  7. Direct spectroscopic observation of ion deceleration accompanying laser plasma-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, O.; Krouský, E.; Liska, R.; Šmíd, M.; Larroche, O.; Dalimier, E.; Rosmej, F. B.

    2010-08-01

    Interactions of plasma jets with solid surfaces are extensively studied in context with development of future fusion devices. In experiments carried out on the iodine laser system PALS, the energetic ions were produced at double-foil Al/Mg targets irradiated by one or two counter-propagating laser beams. The plasma jets from the rear surface of the laser-exploded Al foil streamed towards the Mg target representing the wall preheated by the action of the high-energy photons, particle and/or laser beams. Instead of being trapped by the cold secondary-target material, the forward-accelerated Al ions collided with the counter-propagating matter ejected from the wall. The environmental conditions in near-wall plasmas were analyzed with the high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy and temporally-resolved x-ray imaging. The deceleration of the incident Al ions in the near-wall region was directly observed and quantitatively characterized via Doppler shifts of the J-satellite from the Al Lya spectral group. The interaction scenario was modelled using the 2D arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrocode PALE and the multifluid code MULTIF.

  8. Relativistic mirrors in laser plasmas (analytical methods)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Kando, M.; Koga, J.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role. We present an overview of theoretical methods used to describe relativistic flying, accelerating, oscillating mirrors emerging in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  9. Four-color laser irradiation system for laser-plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Wilcox, R.B.

    1996-06-01

    Since 1986, optical smoothing of the laser irradiance on targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has gained increasing attention. Optical smoothing can significantly reduce wavefront aberrations that produce nonuniformities in the energy distribution of the focal spot. Hot spots in the laser irradiance can induce local self focusing of the light, producing filamentation of the plasma. Filamentation can have detrimental consequences on the hydrodynamics of an ICF plasma, and can affect the growth of parametric instabilities, as well as add to the complexity of the study of such instabilities as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). As experiments approach and exceed breakeven (i.e., where driver energy = fusion yield), the likelihood of significant excitation of these processes increases. As a result, the authors are including a scheme for implementing optical-beam smoothing for target experiments in the baseline design for the proposed next-generation ICF facility--the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To verify the efficacy of this design for the suppression of parametric instabilites in NIF-like indirect-drive targets, the authors successfully modified a Nova beamline to simulate the proposed NIF conditions. In this article, they discuss the laser science associated with a four-color target campaign on Nova to test the effect of f-number (ratio of focal length to beam diameter) and temporal smoothing on the scaling of SBS with a four-segment interaction beam using NIF-like parameters. The results of the target series associated with the four-color configuration are discussed elsewhere.

  10. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  11. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  12. Flash imaging of fine structures of cellular organelles by contact x-ray microscopy with a high intensity laser plasma x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Kishimoto, Maki; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-09-01

    X-ray flash imaging by contact microscopy with a highly intense laser-plasma x-ray source was achieved for the observation of wet biological cells. The exposure time to obtain a single x-ray image was about 600 ps as determined by the pulse duration of the driving laser pulse. The x-ray flash imaging makes it possible to capture an x-ray image of living biological cells without any artificial treatment such as staining, fixation, freezing, and so on. The biological cells were cultivated directly on the surface of the silicon nitride membranes, which are used for the x-ray microscope. Before exposing the cells to x-rays they were observed by a conventional fluorescent microscope as reference, since the fluorescent microscopes can visualize specific organelles stained with fluorescent dye. Comparing the x-ray images with the fluorescent images of the exact same cells, each cellular organelle observed in the x-ray images was identified one by one and actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the x-ray images.

  13. Hydrogen atom in a laser-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde J.; Sun, Guo-Hua; Liman, Muhammed S.; Oyewumi, K. J.; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-11-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of the eigenvalues of a hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma as it interacts with an electric field directed along θ  =  π and is exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. We refer to the interaction of the plasma with the laser light as laser-plasma. Using the Kramers–Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is the semiclassical counterpart of the Block–Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in the KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series, and using Ehlotzky’s approximation we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate an intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to O≤ft({{r}4},α 09\\right) , we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of the hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by an electric field, within the framework of perturbation theory formalism. Our numerical results show that for a weak external electric field and a very large Debye screening parameter length, the system is strongly repulsive, in contrast with the case for a strong external electric field and a small Debye screening parameter length, when the system is very attractive. This work has potential applications in the areas of atomic and molecular processes in external fields, including interactions with strong fields and short pulses.

  14. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  15. Laser-driven proton sources and their applications: femtosecond intense laser plasma driven simultaneous proton and x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Mori, M.; Ma, J.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimoura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Akutsu, A.; Nagashima, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Iwashita, Y.; Shirai, T.; Nakamura, S.; Choi, I. W.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, H. T.; Jeong, T. M.; Hong, K.-H.; Noh, Y.-C.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J.

    2008-05-01

    We have performed simultaneous proton and X-ray imaging with an ultra-short and high-intensity Ti: Sap laser system. More than 1010 protons, whose maximum energy reaches 2.5 MeV, were delivered within a ~ps bunch. At the same time, keV X-ray is generated at almost the same place where protons are emitted. We have performed the simultaneous imaging of the copper mesh by using proton and x-ray beams, in practical use of the characteristics of the laser produced plasma that it can provide those beams simultaneously without any serious problems on synchronization.

  16. Effect of the electronic structure of target atoms on the emission continuum of laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, Nikolai E; Michurin, Sergei V; Fedorov, Gennadii M

    2004-06-30

    The low-temperature laser plasma at the surface of metal targets is experimentally investigated. Continuous spectra emitted from a laser plume are found to be similar for targets consisting of the elements of the same subgroup of the Mendeleev periodic table. The similarity manifests itself both in the dependence of the emission intensity on the external pressure and in the structure of absorption bands related to a fine-dispersed phase existing in the peripheral regions of the plume. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  17. Initiation of nuclear reactions in femtosecond laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Golovinski, P. A.; Mikhin, E. A.

    2013-01-15

    Mechanisms of electron interaction with a nucleus via a direct electron-nucleus collision and via bremsstrahlung generated in electron scattering on a nucleus in a femtosecond laser plasma are considered. The description of this interaction is simplified substantially by using the instantaneous-impact and equivalent-photon approximations. The yields of photons, electron-positron pairs, and products of nuclear reactions initiated by a laser pulse for some nuclei are calculated. In particular, this is done for {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 232}Th fission in a laser field of intensity 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  19. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Christine

    2013-11-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a thermonuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-term program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  20. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a the1monuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-te1m program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  1. Laser-Plasma Interaction in Presence of an Obliquely External Magnetic Field: Application to Laser Fusion without Radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobaraki, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear interaction of ultra-high power laser beam with fusion plasma at relativistic regime in the presence of obliquely external magnetic Geld has been studied. Imposing an external magnetic Geld on plasma can modify the density profile of the plasma so that the thermal conductivity of electrons reduces which is considered to be the decrease of the threshold energy for ignition. To achieve the fusion of Hydrogen-Boron (HB) fuel, the block acceleration model of plasma is employed. Energy production by HB isotopes can be of interest, since its reaction does not generate radioactive tritium. By using the inhibit factor in the block model acceleration of plasma and Maxwell's as well as the momentum transfer equations, the electron density distribution and dielectric permittivity of the plasma medium are obtained. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the intensity of the external magnetic field, the oscillation of the laser magnetic field decreases, while the dielectric permittivity increases. Moreover, the amplitude of the electron density becomes highly peaked and the plasma electrons are strongly bunched with increasing the intensity of external magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetized plasma can act as a positive focusing lens to enhance the fusion process. Besides, we find that with increasing θ-angle (from oblique external magnetic field) between 0 and 90°, the dielectric permittivity increases, while for θ between 90° and 180°, the dielectric permittivity decreases with increasing θ.

  2. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipchak, A. I.; Solomonov, V. I.; Tel'nov, V. A.; Osipov, V. V.

    1995-04-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the spectral and temporal characteristics of a laser plasma formed by the interaction of a CO2 laser pulse with a target in atmospheric air. The results obtained indicate that the main role in the process of filling the excited states in a laser plasma is played by a recombination cascade and that both atoms and molecules of the atmospheric gases are excited. The result also show that a laser plasma can be used in spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent samples. The solution of the thermophysical problem of heating of a target by laser radiation supports the existing ideas on the process of formation of a plasma near the target surface in air.

  3. Characteristics of volume expansion of laser plasma for efficient propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Shigeaki; Hashimoto, Kazuhisa; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Niino, Masayuki; Ashizuka, Takashi; Kawashima, Nobuki

    2002-09-01

    Laser propulsion has many advantages over other conventional methods of producing thrust in space applications. For example, laser energy can be delivered to a remote objects such as space debris which otherwise is impossible to make thrust on its surfaces to remove from the orbits. However, essential advantage of laser propulsion lies in the fact that the characteristics of laser propulsion can be controlled over wide range of parameters by changing laser irradiation conditions. This advantage is based on the capability of controlling specific energy carried by propellant. The specific energy is a key parameter of thrust performance since it determines the propellant temperature or expanding velocity and thus propulsion efficiency. A number of researches so far conducted have treated laser plasma interactions created on solid surfaces with laser parameters such as wavelength, pulse width, intensity, as well as ambient gas pressure. The present study will give a new insight to laser plasma interactions and/or new mechanism of laser thrust generation. Laser energy is deposited inside solid target and, as an initial condition, confined by solid material. Since the confinement time is an order of milli-second, both shock waves and thermal conduction can tale part in the energy transfer process and therefore, give more controllable parameters over the thrust characteristics. In this manner, specific energy carried by target material or propellant can be controlled by changing the depth of energy deposition region. This will give a new dimension of controlling laser plasma characteristics for laser propulsion. In this paper, experimental results and physical insights will be presented as to propelled mass and velocity dependence on laser energy and temporal behavior of impulse generation, as well as enhancement of impact generation over the conventional ablation scheme.

  4. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. Interaction of Intense Lasers with Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Gennady

    1995-01-01

    This thesis addresses two important topics in nonlinear laser plasma physics: the interaction of intense lasers with a non thermal homogeneous plasma, the excitation of laser wakefields in hollow plasma channels, and the stability of channel guided propagation of laser pulses. In the first half of this thesis a new theoretical approach to the nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with underdense plasmas is developed. Unlike previous treatments, this theory is three-dimensional, relativistically covariant, and does not assume that a<<1, where a=eA/mc^2 is a dimensionless vector potential. This formalism borrows the diagrammatic techniques from quantum field theory, yet remains classical. This classical field theory, which treats cold plasma as a relativistic field interacting with the electromagnetic fields, introduces an artificial length scale which is smaller than any physically relevant spatial scale. By adopting a special (Arnowitt -Fickler) gauge, electromagnetic waves in a cold relativistic plasma are separated into "photons" and "plasmons" which are the relativistic extensions of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves in a cold stationary plasma. The field-theoretical formalism is applied to a variety of nonlinear problems including harmonic generation, parametric instabilities, and nonlinear corrections to the index of refraction. For the first time the rate of the second harmonic emission from a homogeneous plasma is calculated and its dependence on the polarization of the incident radiation is studied. An experimental check of this calculation is suggested, based on the predicted non-linear polarization rotation (the second harmonic is emitted polarized perpendicularly to polarization of the incident signal). The concept of renormalization is applied to the plasma and electromagnetic radiation (photons and plasmons). To the lowest order, this corresponds to relativistically correcting the electron mass for its oscillation in an intense EM field

  6. Review of upconverted Nd-glass laser plasma experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.

    1982-05-01

    Systematic scaling experiments aimed at deducing the dependence of laser-plasma interaction phenomena on target plasma material and target irradiation history have been underway in laboratories all over the world in recent years. During 1980 and 1981 the Livermore program undertook to measure the laser light absorption of high and low Z plasmas and the partition of the absorbed energy amongst the thermal and suprathermal electron populations as a function of both laser intensity and wavelength. Simulations suggested that short wavelength laser light would couple more efficiently than longer wavelengths to target plasmas. Shorter wavelength heating of higher electron plasma densities would, it was felt, lead to laser-plasma interactions freer of anomalous absorption processes. The following sections review LLNL experiments designed to test these hypotheses.

  7. Note: Study of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission of metal targets produced by laser-plasma-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, I.; Bidu, T.; Malzer, W.; Kanngiesser, B.; Jung, R.; Tuemmler, J.; Legall, H.; Stiel, H.; Sandner, W.

    2011-06-15

    Different metal targets were investigated as possible source material for tailored laser-produced plasma-sources. In the wavelength range from 1 to 20 nm, x-ray spectra were collected with a calibrated spectrometer with a resolution of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}= 150 at 1 nm up to {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}= 1100 at 15 nm. Intense line emission features of highly ionized species as well as continuum-like spectra from unresolved transitions are presented. With this knowledge, the optimal target material can be identified for the envisioned application of the source in x-ray spectrometry on the high energy side of the spectra at about 1 keV. This energy is aimed for because 1 keV-radiation is ideally suited for L-shell x-ray spectroscopy with nm-depth resolution.

  8. The generation of Biermann battery fields in laser-plasma interactions and the interplay with the Weibel instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeffler, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with intense lasers are probing the dynamics of self-generated large scale magnetic fields with unprecedented detail. In these scenarios the Biermann battery effect is critical to understand the field dynamics but a multi-dimensional detailed study of this mechanism was not present yet in the literature. Moreover, the interplay between the Biermann battery effect and plasma micro instabilities and the evolution of plasma turbulence is still unknown. In this work, particle-in-cell simulations are used to investigate the formation of magnetic fields, B, in plasmas with perpendicular electron density and temperature gradients. For system sizes, L, comparable to the ion skin depth, di, it is shown that β ~di / L , consistent with the Biermann battery effect. However, for large L /di , it is found that the Weibel instability (due to electron temperature anisotropy) supersedes the Biermann battery as the main producer of B. The Weibel-produced fields saturate at a finite amplitude (plasma β ~ 1), independent of L. The magnetic energy spectra below the electron Larmor radius scale are well fitted by power law with slope - 16 / 3 , as predicted in.The relevance of these results for several ongoing experiments is also discussed.

  9. Role of cavitons in laser-plasma interactions: Final report for the period August 15, 1984-August 14, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y.; Tanikawa, T.

    1986-09-01

    We have observed three new phenomena associated with cavitons generated at the critical layer in an inhomogeneous plasma. Half-harmonic ((1/2)..omega../sub 0/, (3/2)..omega../sub 0/, etc.) electromagnetic (em) radiation, accompanying the resonant absorption of the high-power microwave at ..omega../sub 0/ by an inhomogeneous plasma, appears to originate from the cavitons. Double layers have been found to develop near the locations of cavitons. Acceleration of ions by these double layers has also been observed. The evolution of resonantly excited electron plasma waves and density profile modification at the critical layer has been studied in detail. Conditions under which the role of cavitons becomes significant in em wave-plasma interactions are discussed.

  10. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  11. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets

    2008-10-03

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.

  12. On the origin of super-hot electrons from intense laser interactions with solid targets having moderate scale length preformed plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Krygier, A. G.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.

    2014-02-15

    We use particle-in-cell modeling to identify the acceleration mechanism responsible for the observed generation of super-hot electrons in ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions with solid targets with pre-formed plasma. We identify several features of direct laser acceleration that drive the generation of super-hot electrons. We find that, in this regime, electrons that become super-hot are primarily injected by a looping mechanism that we call loop-injected direct acceleration.

  13. Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I; Khodakovskii, N G; Mikheev, P M

    2013-08-31

    The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  14. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  15. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1% per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/ps/mm{sup 2}, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within {+-}10%.

  16. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Influence of corundum structure on the characteristics of multiply charged ions in a laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedilov, M. R.; Beisembaeva, Kh B.; Sabitov, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was made of the interaction of intense laser radiation (λ = 1.06 μm) with previously irradiated corundum. The studies were performed in the collecting mode by employing time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Electron and ion currents were considered simultaneously with charge-state and energy characteristics of multiply charged ions of the plasmas produced at the source and previously irradiated targets. The combined consideration allows the conclusion that the prior neutron irradiation of a sample by a fluence of 1015 — 1019 neutron cm-2 makes for production of a higher-temperature plasma.

  17. WE-E-18A-05: Bremsstrahlung of Laser-Plasma Interaction at KeV Temperature: Forward Dose and Attenuation Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Saez-Beltran, M; Fernandez Gonzalez, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain an analytical empirical formula for the photon dose source term in forward direction from bremsstrahlung generated from laser-plasma accelerated electron beams in aluminum solid targets, with electron-plasma temperatures in the 10–100 keV energy range, and to calculate transmission factors for iron, aluminum, methacrylate, lead and concrete and air, materials most commonly found in vacuum chamber labs. Methods: Bremsstrahlung fluence is calculated from the convolution of thin-target bremsstrahlung spectrum for monoenergetic electrons and the relativistic Maxwell-Juettner energy distribution for the electron-plasma. Unattenuatted dose in tissue is calculated by integrating the photon spectrum with the mass-energy absorption coefficient. For the attenuated dose, energy dependent absorption coefficient, build-up factors and finite shielding correction factors were also taken into account. For the source term we use a modified formula from Hayashi et al., and we fitted the proportionality constant from experiments with the aid of the previously calculated transmission factors. Results: The forward dose has a quadratic dependence on electron-plasma temperature: 1 joule of effective laser energy transferred to the electrons at 1 m in vacuum yields 0,72 Sv per MeV squared of electron-plasma temperature. Air strongly filters the softer part of the photon spectrum and reduce the dose to one tenth in the first centimeter. Exponential higher energy tail of maxwellian spectrum contributes mainly to the transmitted dose. Conclusion: A simple formula for forward photon dose from keV range temperature plasma is obtained, similar to those found in kilovoltage x-rays but with higher dose per dissipated electron energy, due to thin target and absence of filtration.

  18. Imitation, Interaction and Dialogue Using Intensive Interaction: Tea Party Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Intensive Interaction has become widely used when building up communication with children with profound learning difficulties. Often practitioners understand Intensive Interaction to be primarily about imitation and Mark Barber shows how this can be a "mis"understanding that limits the kinds of interactions that can be enjoyed by conversation…

  19. Study of laser-plasma interaction using a physics-based model for understanding the physical mechanism of double-pulse effect in nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Benxin; Zhou Yun; Forsman, Andrew

    2009-12-21

    This paper studies the double-pulse effect in high-intensity ({>=}{approx}GW/cm{sup 2}) nanosecond (ns) laser ablation, which refers to the significant material removal rate enhancement for ablation by two ns laser pulses (often separated by a delay time of {approx}10 to 100 ns). The early-stage interaction of the second laser pulse with the plasma plume created by the first pulse is very important for understanding the physical mechanism of the double pulse effect. However, the plasma properties in the early stage (during a laser pulse or within 20 to 30 ns after the completion of the pulse) are very difficult to measure experimentally. In this letter, a physics-based predictive model is used as the investigation tool, which was previously verified based on experiments on plasma properties in the late stage, which are relatively easy to measure. The study shows that the second laser pulse does not directly strike the target condensed phase. Instead, it mainly interacts with the plasma plume created by the first laser pulse, heats and accelerates the ablated material in the plume lingering above the target surface.

  20. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  1. Light-curing polymers for laser plasma generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Protasov, Y. S.; Protasov, Y. Y.; Telekh, V. D.

    2015-07-01

    Solid rather than liquid media are used in pulsed laser plasma generators despite sophisticated transportation and dosing system need for a long-term operation. Liquid media could be more preferable due to transfer and dosing (down to 10-14 L) being well developed, but plasma generation of those results in intense droplet formation and kinetic energy losses. Combination of liquids transportation advantages and solids plasma generation efficiency might resolve this trade-off. Liquid-to-solid transition can be induced by cooling down to sublimation temperature, thermo-, photo- or electron induced polymerization (curing). Light cured polymers seem to be very useful as active media for plasma generators, since they can be solidified very fast (ca. 30 ms) just before impact. We considered experimentally several UV- curing polymer and mixtures ablation regimes and supply schemes for laser plasma generation. The best results were obtained for liquid polymer at high-power pulsed irradiation matching curing optimum wavelength.

  2. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  3. Parametric instabilities in large nonuniform laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Estabrook, K.G.; Berger, R.L.; Kruer, W.L.; Labaune, C.; Batha, S.H.

    1992-09-01

    The study of parametric instabilities in laser plasmas is of vital importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The long scale-length plasma encountered in the corona of an ICF target provides ideal conditions for the growth of instabilities such as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and filamentation. These instabilities can have detrimental effects in ICF and their characterization and understanding is of importance. Scattering instabilities are driven through a feedback loop by which the beating between the electromagnetic EM fields of the laser and the scattered light matches the frequency of a local longitudinal mode of the plasma. Any process which interferes with the coherence of this mechanism can substantially alter the behavior of the instability. Of particular interest is the study of laser beam smoothing techniques on parametric instabilities. These techniques are used to improve irradiation uniformity which can suppress hydrodynamic instabilities. Laser beam smoothing techniques have the potential to control the scattering level from parametric instabilities since they provide not only a smoother laser intensity distribution, but also reduced coherence. Beam smoothing techniques that affect the growth of parametric instabilities include spatial smoothing and temporal smoothing by laser bandwidth. Spatial smoothing modifies the phase fronts and temporal distribution of intensities in the focal volume. The transverse intensity spectrum is shifted towards higher spatial wavenumber and can significantly limit the growth of filamentation. Temporal smoothing reduces the coherence time and consequently limits the growth time. Laser bandwidth is required for most smoothing techniques, and can have an independent effect on the instabilities as well.

  4. Interactions of intense laser radiation with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, M. H.

    1981-04-01

    The dominant physical processes involved in the interaction of intense laser radiation with plasma are discussed with emphasis on their dependence on the wavelength of the laser radiation. Hydrodynamic pressure resulting from these interactions, acceleration of spherical shell targets, and fluid instability associated with the acceleration are discussed with reference to compression of plasma in laser driven implosions. Experimental data are presented to illustrate the various phenomena.

  5. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Low-threshold generation of harmonics and hard x radiation in a laser plasma. 1. Single-peak generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Derzhavin, S. I.; Kazakov, K. Kh

    1993-02-01

    A source of hard x radiation based on a laser plasma has been studied under conditions such that parametric instabilities are driven in the plasma at low intensities of the pump radiation (below 10 GW/cm2). A qualitative interpretation of the observed effects is offered.

  6. Comparative study of amplified spontaneous emission and short pre-pulse impacts onto fast electron generation at sub-relativistic femtosecond laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. A.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Ksenofontov, P. A.; Tsymbalov, I. N.; Volkov, R. V.; Savel'ev, A. B.; Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Turinge, A. A.; Lapik, A. M.; Rusakov, A. V.; Djilkibaev, R. M.; Nedorezov, V. G.

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes the study of hot electron generation under the action of intense (˜1018 W/cm2) femtosecond pulses onto the surface of a solid target, in the presence of a long pre-plasma, which varied with different spatial extents and densities. The corona was formed by pre-pulses with varied intensities and temporal profiles (amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and short pre-pulses). The most efficient fast electron acceleration, to energies well beyond the ponderomotive potential, was observed if the ASE was able to form to the extent of ˜100 μm a slightly undercritical plasma. Energy of accelerated electrons underwent further growth if the laser pulse duration increased from ˜45 to ˜350 fs at constant energy fluence. The experimental results were supported by numerical simulations using 3D3V Mandor PIC code.

  7. Development of laser-plasma diagnostics using ultrafast atomic-scale dynamics. 96-ERD-046 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; Kulander, K.C.; Boreham, B.W.

    1997-03-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse systems allow examination of intense, ultrafast laser-plasma interactions. More specifically, intense laser irradiation can induce short xuv/x-ray bursts from the surface of condensed phase targets. Ultrafast xuv/x-ray detection is needed to understand laser-plasma interactions in this dynamic regime. Support of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program requires this critical understanding. Our effort here has been to extend understanding of atomic-scale dynamics in such environments with the goal of developing next generation ultrafast xuv/x-ray diagnostics where the sensors will be the atoms and ions themselves and the time resolution will approach that of the induced atomic transitions ({approx} a few femtoseconds). Pivotal contributions to the rapidly developing field of highly nonperturbative interactions of ultrashort pulse lasers with atoms/ions have been made at this laboratory. In the visible/infrared wavelength regions the temporal and spectral content of ultrashort laser pulses are now reliably monitored within a single pulse using frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) which is based on rapid nonlinear optical processes such as the Kerr effect. New applications of this basic concept are still being developed. Corresponding detection for the xuv/x-ray wavelengths does not exist and is urgently needed in many laboratory programs. The FROG technique cannot be applied in the xuv/x-ray region. Current x-ray streak camera technology is limited to {approx}0.5 picosecond resolution.

  8. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Spatial-temporal distribution of a mechanical load resulting from interaction of laser radiation with a barrier (analytic model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyushin, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    The concepts developed earlier are used to propose a simple analytic model describing the spatial-temporal distribution of a mechanical load (pressure, impulse) resulting from interaction of laser radiation with a planar barrier surrounded by air. The correctness of the model is supported by a comparison with experimental results.

  9. Modeling the Backscatter and Transmitted Light of High Power Smoothed Beams with pF3D, a Massively Parallel Laser Plasma Interaction Code

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Langdon, A.B.; Moody, J.D.; Still, C.H.; Suter, L.; Williams, E.A.; Young, P.E.

    2000-06-01

    Using the three-dimensional wave propagation code, F3D[Berger et al., Phys. Fluids B 5,2243 (1993), Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,4337(1998)], and the massively parallel version pF3D, [Still et al. Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000)], we have computed the transmitted and reflected light for laser and plasma conditions in experiments that simulated ignition hohlraum conditions. The frequency spectrum and the wavenumber spectrum of the transmitted light are calculated and used to identify the relative contributions of stimulated forward Brillouin and self-focusing in hydrocarbon-filled balloons, commonly called gasbags. The effect of beam smoothing, smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS), on the stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from Scale-1 NOVA hohlraums was simulated with the use nonlinear saturation models that limit the amplitude of the driven acoustic waves. Other experiments on CO{sub 2} gasbags simultaneously measure at a range of intensities the SBS reflectivity and the Thomson scatter from the SBS-driven acoustic waves that provide a more detailed test of the modeling. These calculations also predict that the backscattered light will be very nonuniform in the nearfield (the focusing system optics) which is important for specifying the backscatter intensities be tolerated by the National Ignition Facility laser system.

  10. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.

    2013-06-15

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  11. High-energy 4{omega} probe laser for laser-plasma experiments at nova

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    For the characterization of inertial confinement fusion plasmas we implemented a high-energy 4{omega} probe laser at the Nova laser facility. A total energy of > 50 Joules at 4{omega}, a focal spot size of order 100 {micro}m, and a pointing accuracy of 100 {micro}m was demonstrated for target shots. This laser provides intensities of up to 3 x 10{sup 14}W cm{sup -2} and therefore fulfills high-power requirements for laser-plasma interaction experiments. The 4{omega} probe laser is now routinely used for Thomson scattering. Successful experiments were performed in gas-filled hohlraums at electron densities of n{sub e} > 2 X 10{sup 21}cm{sup -3} which represents the highest density plasma so far being diagnosed with Thomson scattering.

  12. Modelling of non-LTE atomic physics processes in hot dense plasmas during the interaction with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G. M.

    2014-05-01

    The implicit 2D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) code developed to study the interaction of intense lasers with matter (Petrov and Davis 2008 Comput. Phys. Commun. 179 868-80 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 073102) has been extended to include atomic physics under extreme energy density conditions. The atomic physics model is applied to aluminium. Each ionization stage contains two levels: one ground and one lumped excited state, for which various atomic physics processes such as optical field ionization, collisional ionization, excitation, de-excitation and radiative decay describe the population density. Two-dimensional PIC simulations have been carried out for laser pulses with peak intensity 1 × 1020 W cm-2, pulse duration 60 fs, spot size 3 µm and energy 0.75 J interacting with ultrathin (0.2 µm) Al foil. Radiation emitted during the laser-target interaction is computed by accounting for both bound-bound transitions and bremsstrahlung radiation. We demonstrate that the radiation signature of laser-produced plasma can be used as a complementary tool to other diagnostic techniques used in laser-plasma interactions. Finally, results from the PIC model are compared to equilibrium calculations (Maxwell-Boltzmann and Saha). In the early stages of laser-plasma interactions (<100 fs) the plasma is far from equilibrium and equilibrium models can not be applied with confidence to model the plasma.

  13. Multistage coupling of independent laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; van Tilborg, J; Benedetti, C; Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C B; Daniels, J; Swanson, K K; Gonsalves, A J; Nakamura, K; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2016-02-11

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) are capable of accelerating charged particles to very high energies in very compact structures. In theory, therefore, they offer advantages over conventional, large-scale particle accelerators. However, the energy gain in a single-stage LPA can be limited by laser diffraction, dephasing, electron-beam loading and laser-energy depletion. The problem of laser diffraction can be addressed by using laser-pulse guiding and preformed plasma waveguides to maintain the required laser intensity over distances of many Rayleigh lengths; dephasing can be mitigated by longitudinal tailoring of the plasma density; and beam loading can be controlled by proper shaping of the electron beam. To increase the beam energy further, it is necessary to tackle the problem of the depletion of laser energy, by sequencing the accelerator into stages, each powered by a separate laser pulse. Here, we present results from an experiment that demonstrates such staging. Two LPA stages were coupled over a short distance (as is needed to preserve the average acceleration gradient) by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from a first LPA were focused to a twenty-micrometre radius--by a discharge capillary-based active plasma lens--into a second LPA, such that the beams interacted with the wakefield excited by a separate laser. Staged acceleration by the wakefield of the second stage is detected via an energy gain of 100 megaelectronvolts for a subset of the electron beam. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second-stage laser pulse allowed us to reconstruct the temporal wakefield structure and to determine the plasma density. Our results indicate that the fundamental limitation to energy gain presented by laser depletion can be overcome by using staged acceleration, suggesting a way of reaching the electron energies required for collider applications.

  14. Multistage coupling of independent laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; van Tilborg, J; Benedetti, C; Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C B; Daniels, J; Swanson, K K; Gonsalves, A J; Nakamura, K; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2016-02-11

    Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) are capable of accelerating charged particles to very high energies in very compact structures. In theory, therefore, they offer advantages over conventional, large-scale particle accelerators. However, the energy gain in a single-stage LPA can be limited by laser diffraction, dephasing, electron-beam loading and laser-energy depletion. The problem of laser diffraction can be addressed by using laser-pulse guiding and preformed plasma waveguides to maintain the required laser intensity over distances of many Rayleigh lengths; dephasing can be mitigated by longitudinal tailoring of the plasma density; and beam loading can be controlled by proper shaping of the electron beam. To increase the beam energy further, it is necessary to tackle the problem of the depletion of laser energy, by sequencing the accelerator into stages, each powered by a separate laser pulse. Here, we present results from an experiment that demonstrates such staging. Two LPA stages were coupled over a short distance (as is needed to preserve the average acceleration gradient) by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from a first LPA were focused to a twenty-micrometre radius--by a discharge capillary-based active plasma lens--into a second LPA, such that the beams interacted with the wakefield excited by a separate laser. Staged acceleration by the wakefield of the second stage is detected via an energy gain of 100 megaelectronvolts for a subset of the electron beam. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second-stage laser pulse allowed us to reconstruct the temporal wakefield structure and to determine the plasma density. Our results indicate that the fundamental limitation to energy gain presented by laser depletion can be overcome by using staged acceleration, suggesting a way of reaching the electron energies required for collider applications. PMID:26829223

  15. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  16. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  17. Control of laser plasma instabilities in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1996-12-01

    Laser plasma instabilities are an important constraint on the operating regime for inertial fusion. Many techniques have been developed to control the various laser-driven instabilities. Experiments with long scale length plasmas are testing these instability levels, the nonlinear regimes, and the control mechanisms.

  18. Electron Diffraction Experiments using Laser Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fill, E E; Trushin, S; Tommasini, R; Bruch, R

    2005-09-07

    We demonstrate that electrons emitted from a laser plasma can be used to generate diffraction patterns in reflection and transmission. The electrons are emitted in the direction of laser polarization with energies up to 100 keV. The broad electron energy spectrum makes possible the generation of a ''streaked'' diffraction pattern which allows recording fast processes in a single run.

  19. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  20. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-08-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm‑2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies.

  1. Large-scale magnetic field generation by asymmetric laser-pulse interactions with a plasma in low-intensity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, K.; Gupta, D. N.; Kim, Y. K.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a way to enhance the strength of self-generated magnetic field from laser-plasma interactions by incorporating the combined role of pulse asymmetricity and plasma inhomogeneity. The pulse asymmetry combined with the plasma inhomogeneity contributes for strong nonlinear current within the pulse body; consequently, a stronger magnetic field can be produced. The nature of self-generated magnetic field is "Quasistatic" that means the self-generated magnetic field varies on the time scale of the period of laser radiation. Our results show that the magnetic-field generated by a temporally asymmetric laser pulse is many-folds higher than the magnetic-field generated by a symmetric laser pulse in plasmas. The present study predicts the generation of magnetic field of the order of 15 T for the laser intensity of ˜ 10 14 cm-2. Our study might be applicable to improve the accelerated bunch quality in laser wakefield acceleration mechanism.

  2. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm−2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies. PMID:27531755

  3. Ablation of carbon-doped liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Liang, T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Z. L.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-doped liquid glycerol ablated by nanosecond pulse laser is investigated in laser plasma propulsion. It is found that the propulsion is much more correlated with the carbon content. The doped carbon can change the laser intensity and laser focal position so as to reduce the splashing quantity of the glycerol. Less consumption of the liquid volume results in a high specific impulse.

  4. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  5. Laser plasma interactions in fused silica cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Yoo, Jong H.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-06-24

    The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was investigated. The temperature and electron number density of laser-induced plasmas in a fused silica cavity were determined using spectroscopic methods, and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. Plasma temperature and electron number density during laser ablation in a cavity with aspect ratio of 4 increased faster with irradiance after the laser irradiance reached a threshold of 5 GW/cm{sup 2}. The threshold irradiance of particulate ejection was lower for laser ablation in a cavity compared with on a flat surface; the greater the cavity aspect ratio, the lower the threshold irradiance. The ionization of silicon becomes saturated and the crater depths were increased approximately by an order of magnitude after the irradiance reached the threshold. Phase explosion was discussed to explain the large change of both plasma characteristics and mass removal when irradiance increased beyond a threshold value. Self-focusing of the laser beam was discussed to be responsible for the decrease of the threshold in cavities.

  6. High-intensity laser-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachain, Charles J.

    2014-11-01

    Following a historical introduction on the nature of light and its interaction with matter, a survey is given of the development of lasers capable of delivering short pulses of very intense radiation. The peak intensities of these laser pulses are so high that the corresponding laser fields can compete with, or even dominate, the Coulomb field in governing the dynamics of atomic systems. As a result, new phenomena, known as multiphoton processes, can occur. An outline is given of the basic properties found in the study of three important multiphoton processes. Firstly, the multiphoton ionization of atoms and the phenomenon of “above-threshold ionization”. Secondly, the emission by atoms of high-order harmonics of the frequency of the driving laser and their use to generate laser pulses having durations in the attosecond range. Thirdly, laser-assisted electron-atom collisions. A review is then given of the main non-perturbative methods which have been used to perform theoretical studies of multiphoton processes.

  7. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  8. Current new applications of laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Forslund, D.W.; McKinstrie, C.J.; Wark, J.S.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Hamil, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes several new applications of laser-produced plasmas that have arisen in the last few years. Most of the applications have been an outgrowth of the active research in laser/matter interaction inspired by the pursuit of laser fusion. Unusual characteristics of high-intensity laser/matter interaction, such as intense x-ray and particle emission, were noticed early in the field and are now being employed in a significant variety of applications outside the fusion filed. Applications range from biology to materials science to pulsed-power control and particle accelerators. 92 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Efficient fast electron generation in an interaction of Intense, ultrashort laser with metal nanoparticle coated dielectric target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deep; Tata, Sheroy; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Adak, Amitava; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Ayyub, Pushan; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2016-05-01

    Hot electron generation in intense laser-matter interaction studies is a topic of great interest due in significant part to its applications in fast ignitor scheme in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). We measure the hot electron energy spectrum from Ag nanoparticle coated fused silica target (100 μm thick) interacting with an intense (I∼1018W/cm2), short pulse (τ∼ 30× 10-15s) laser and compare the results with those of an uncoated fused silica. Enhancement in hot electron energy and hard x-ray yield is measured as a function of thickness of Ag nano-coating, varied from tens of nm to hundreds of nm. The hot electron temperatures and integrated x-ray yield are observed to be greater for subwavelength film thicknesses for the case of a p-polarized laser. Such results indicate that metal nanoparticle layers have an important role to play in the enhancement of laser-plasma coupling efficiency for short scale-length plasmas created in femtosecond laser interactions.

  10. Dielectronic satellites of the He{sub {beta}} line of the Si XIII ion in a dense laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya; Bartnik, A; Kostecki, J; Fiedorowicz, H; Szczurek, M; Jarocki, R; Behar, E; Doron, R; Mandelbaum, P; Schwob, J L; Dyakin, V M

    1998-08-31

    The first precision measurements of the wavelengths and identifications were made of the satellites of the Heb line of the Si XIII ion in the emission spectrum of a laser plasma. These satellites were the result of radiation decay of the 1s3l{sub 1}2l{sub 2} levels of the Si XII ion. The wavelengths were determined more accurately for the 1s3l{sub 1}3l{sub 2} configurations. The experimental results obtained were compared with calculations carried out by various methods. The structure of the relative intensities of the 1s3l{sub 1}3l{sub 2} satellites indicated that their emission occurred mainly in a thin overdense plasma region with N{sub e}>N{sub e}{sup cr}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  11. Plasma Diagnostics of a Forward Laser Plasma Accelerated Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, Masaya; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Takeda, Akihito; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-02

    Fundamental investigations on plasma diagnostics of a forward laser plasma acceleration employing laser-foil interactions were conducted for an Al-foil target irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser of 1J/pulse with pulse-width of 10nsec. A time-of-flight measurement was also conducted to evaluate ion speeds. In addition, temporal evolutions of electron temperatures and densities were evaluated with electrostatic probes and spectroscopic diagnostics. Moreover, a preliminary one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation was conducted to elucidate acceleration mechanisms. From the results, it was shown that a speed of ions in a forward direction were about 135 km/sec, respectively. Also it was shown that the plasma temperature and density were about 2.5{approx}3 eV and 1010 cm-3.

  12. Optical spectroscopy of laser plasma in a deep crater

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, Taras V; Konov, Vitalii I; Walter, D; Dausinger, F

    2009-04-30

    The time dynamics of plasma-emission spectra is studied experimentally at different stages of the drilling of a steel plate by 100-fs and 5-ps laser pulses: from a shallow crater to a hole. The change in the time dependence of the plasma temperature caused by variations in the irradiated surface geometry is analysed. It is found that the time interval needed to reach a particular temperature (about 8000 K) drastically increases from 40-50 to 150-200 ns when a specific crater depth is achieved. The opposite tendency is observed as the crater depth grows further and a hole is produced. Strong self-absorption in a plasma plume inside a deep crater is experimentally confirmed which results in the appearance of line absorption against a continuous emission spectrum. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  13. Ultra Intense Laser Pulse Interactions with Planer and Spherical Plasmas for Fast Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuo A.

    1999-11-01

    The fast ignitor concept requires the guiding or penetration of an ultra-intense laser close to a highly compressed (1000 times solid density) core and the generation of energetic electrons (MeV). Ultra-intense laser plasma interactions have been intensively studied using the Peta Watt Module (PWM) laser system synchronized with the GEKKO XII laser system. The ultra-intense laser pulse of 50J energy, 0.5-1 psec pulse width and 1053 nm laser wavelength could be focused onto a preformed plasma created on a solid target at an intensity of 1e19 W/cm2. The preformed plasma had a cut-off density surface at around 100 micron from the surface. Changing the focus position of this 100 TW laser pulse relative to the preformed plasma, we found an anomalous mode. Side view of x-ray pinhole camera showed that there was a local tiny spot almost at the surface of the solid target which indicates the propagation of the pulse in the long scale-length plasma into an over-dense region for over 100 micorn distance. The erergy spectrum and angular distribution of more than MeV electrons were measured. Its energy transport was studied with K-a spectroscopy. The backscattered light of the ultra-intense laser light was spectrally and spatially resolved. The backscattered light image showed several hot spots within the focused region. The spatilally resolved spectra of the backscattered light were totally different at the hot spots and surrounding regions. The details of neutron spectra were measured using ``MANDALA" neutron spectormeters with a total of 841 channel photo-multiplier detectors. The data indicates that deuterium ions were accelerated by the hot electrons up to 100 keV and created beam fusion reactions within solid CD targets. Guiding channels were created utilizing a ponderomotive self-focusing in preformed plasmas created on a solid target. The self-focus channel was measured by both UV and x-ray laser probes. The details of the experiment as well as the theoretical

  14. Relativistic effects in the interaction of high intensity ultra-short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Samira; Dorranian, Davoud; Abari, Mehdi Etehadi; Shokri, Babak

    2011-09-15

    In this paper, the effect of weakly relativistic ponderomotive force in the interaction of intense laser pulse with nonisothermal, underdense, collisional plasma is studied. Ponderomotive force modifies the electron density and temperature distribution. By considering the weakly relativistic effect and ohmic heating of plasma electrons, the nonlinear dielectric permittivity of plasma medium is obtained and the equation of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma is solved. It is shown that with considering the ohmic heating of electrons and collisions, the effect of ponderomotive force in weakly relativistic regime leads to steepening the electron density profile and increases the temperature of plasma electrons noticeably. Bunches of electrons in plasma become narrower. By increasing the laser pulse strength, the wavelength of density oscillations decreases. In this regime of laser-plasma interaction, electron temperature increases sharply by increasing the intensity of laser pulse. The amplitude of electric and magnetic fields increases by increasing the laser pulse energy while their wavelength decreases and they lost their sinusoidal form.

  15. A Dual Aspect Process Model of Intensive Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Intensive Interaction is an empirically researched approach to developing fundamental communication and sociability for people with severe and profound learning disabilities and/or autism. However, it is the author's contention that certain aspects of Intensive Interaction are not universally conceptualised in a uniform manner, and that there are…

  16. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Daniels, J.; Swanson, K. K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  17. Optical shaping of gas targets for laser-plasma ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Ettlinger, O.; Maharjan, C.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.; Najmudin, Z.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a technique to generate steep density gradients in gas-jet targets of interest to laser-plasma ion acceleration. By using an intentional low-energy prepulse, we generated a hydrodynamic blast wave in the gas to shape the target prior to the arrival of an intense CO2 λ≈ 10m drive pulse. This technique has been recently shown to facilitate the generation of ion beams by shockwave acceleration (Tresca et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 115 (9), 2015, 094802). Here, we discuss and introduce a model to understand the generation of these blast waves and discuss in depth the experimental realisation of the technique, supported by hydrodynamics simulations. With appropriate prepulse energy and timing, this blast wave can generate steepened density gradients as short as &ap 20μm (1/e), opening up new possibilities for laser-plasma studies with near-critical gaseous targets.

  18. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  19. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  20. Backscatter Reduction Using Combined Spatial, Temporal, and Polarization Beam Smoothing in a Long-Scale-length Laser Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Berger, R. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Williams, E. A.; Young, P. E.

    2001-03-26

    Spatial, temporal, and polarization smoothing schemes are combined for the first time to reduce to a few percent the total stimulated backscatter of a NIF-like probe laser beam (2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, 351 nm, f/8) in a long-scale-length laser plasma. Combining temporal and polarization smoothing reduces simulated Brillouin scattering and simulated Raman scattering (SRS) up to an order of magnitude although neither smoothing scheme by itself is uniformly effective. The results agree with trends observed in simulations performed with the laser-plasma interaction code F3D simulations [R.L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasma 6, 1043 (1999)].

  1. Revisiting trough interactions and tropical cyclone intensity change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirano, C. M.; Corbosiero, K. L.; Tang, B. H.

    2016-05-01

    An updated climatology of Atlantic basin tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change in the presence of upper tropospheric trough forcing is presented. To control for changes in the background thermodynamic environment, a methodology that normalizes intensity change by the potential intensity of the TC is used to more narrowly focus on the effect of troughs compared to previous studies. Relative to the full sample of Atlantic TCs, troughs are a negative influence on intensification: trough interaction cases are 4% less likely to intensify and 5% more likely to weaken. Troughs are especially detrimental compared to TCs without trough forcing: trough interaction cases are 14% less likely to intensify and 13% more likely to weaken. Additionally, eddy flux convergence of angular momentum, previously shown to positively affect TC intensity change, is shown to be a weak predictor of intensity change compared to vertical wind shear, which is enhanced during a trough interaction.

  2. Evidence of high-n hollow-ion emission from Si ions pumped by ultraintense x-rays from relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, S. A.; Tubman, E.; Butler, N. M. H.; Abdallah, J., Jr.; Dance, R. J.; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Alkhimova, M. A.; Booth, N.; Green, J.; Gregory, C.; Andreev, A.; Lötzsch, R.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A.; Kodama, R.; McKenna, P.; Woolsey, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first observation of high-n hollow ions (ions having no electrons in the K or L shells) produced in Si targets via pumping by ultra-intense x-ray radiation produced in intense laser-plasma interactions reaching the radiation dominant kinetics regime (RDKR). The existence of these new types of hollow ions in high-energy density plasma has been found via observation of highly resolved x-ray emission spectra of silicon plasma. This has been confirmed by plasma kinetics calculations, underscoring the ability of powerful radiation sources to fully strip electrons from the innermost shells of light atoms. Hollow-ions spectral diagnostics provide a unique opportunity to characterize powerful x-ray radiation of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. With the use of this technique we provide evidence for the existence of the RDKR via observation of asymmetry in the observed radiation of hollow ions from the front and rear sides of the target.

  3. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670.

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Dale Robert; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-11-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting).

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dynamics of a plasma formed by a surface optical-discharge in a metal vapour interacting with a cw CO2 laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, A. E.; Levin, A. V.; Petrov, A. L.

    1995-02-01

    A surface optical-discharge plasma was formed in a metal vapour under normal conditions by steady-state irradiation with a cw CO2 laser delivering radiation of moderate (2-4.5 MW cm-2) intensity. This plasma strongly screened the irradiated surface. Under the selected experimental conditions the optical discharge was not a continuous (steady-state) process. The plasma cloud was displaced along the beam out of the waist to a region where the laser radiation intensity was almost an order of magnitude less than the threshold for excitation of the optical-discharge plasma in the vapour. A strong screening of the metal surface, which could even completely stop evaporation of the metal, was observed. Self-oscillations of the optical-discharge plasma were observed for the first time in a vapour interacting with cw CO2 radiation: this was attributed to screening of the target surface. Within one period of the self-oscillations there were additional hf plasma pulsations which led to stratification of the plasma cloud. The results obtained were interpreted.

  5. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  6. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  7. Intense ion beams accelerated by relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, Thomas E.; Gauthier, Jean-Claude J.; Allen, Matthew; Audebert, Patrick; Blazevic, Abel; Fuchs, Julien; Geissel, Matthias; Hegelich, Manuel; Karsch, S.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen; Pukhov, Alexander; Schlegel, Theodor

    2001-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the target properties on laser-accelerated proton and ion beams generated by the LULI multi-terawatt laser. A strong dependence of the ion emission on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and material of the thin foil targets were observed. We have performed a full characterization of the ion beam using magnetic spectrometers, Thompson parabolas, radiochromic film and nuclear activation techniques. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was found in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Proton kinetic energies up to 25 MeV have been observed.

  8. Intense high repetition rate Mo Kα x-ray source generated from laser solid interaction for imaging application

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Li, M. H.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, L. M.; Guo, X.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-15

    We report an efficient Mo Kα x-ray source produced by interaction of femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser pulses with a solid Molybdenum target working at 1 kHz repetition rate. The generated Mo Kα x-ray intensity reaches to 4.7 × 10{sup 10} photons sr{sup −1} s{sup −1}, corresponding to an average power of 0.8 mW into 2π solid angle. The spatial resolution of this x-ray source is measured to be 26 lp/mm. With the high flux and high spatial resolution characteristics, high resolving in-line x-ray radiography was realized on test objects and large size biological samples within merely half a minute. This experiment shows the possibility of laser plasma hard x-ray source as a new low cost and high resolution system for radiography and its ability of ultrafast x-ray pump-probe study of matter.

  9. Biotic interaction strength and the intensity of selection.

    PubMed

    Benkman, Craig W

    2013-08-01

    Although the ecological and evolutionary impacts of species interactions have been the foci of much research, the relationship between the strength of species interactions and the intensity of selection has been investigated only rarely. I develop a simple model demonstrating how the opportunity for selection varies with interaction strength, and then use the relationship between the maximum value of the selection differential and the opportunity for selection (Arnold & Wade 1984) to evaluate how selection differentials vary in relation to species interaction strength. This model predicts an initial deceleration and then an accelerating increase in the intensity of selection with increasing strength of antagonistic interactions and with decreasing strength of mutualistic interactions. Empirical data from several studies provide support for this model. These results further support an evolutionary mechanism for some striking patterns of evolutionary diversification including the latitudinal species gradient, and should be relevant to studies of eco-evolutionary dynamics.

  10. Development and Application of a Predictive Computational Tool for Short-Pulse, High-Intensity Target Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Chung, H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S M; McCandless, B C; Still, C H; Tabak, M

    2007-01-26

    The widely differing spatial, temporal, and density scales needed to accurately model the fast ignition process and other short-pulse laser-plasma interactions leads to a computationally challenging project that is difficult to solve using a single code. This report summarizes the work performed on a three year LDRD to couple together three independent codes using PYTHON to build a new integrated computational tool. An example calculation using this new model is described.

  11. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  12. Kilohertz sources of hard x rays and fast ions with femtosecond laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoss, A.; Richardson, M.; Korn, G.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Vogt, U.; Elsaesser, T.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new, stable, kilohertz femtosecond laser plasma source of hard-x-ray continuum and Kα emission that uses a microscopic liquid jet target that is continuous and debris free. Plasmas produced by ultrashort (50-fs) intense laser pulses from a fine (10-30-μm diameter) liquid Ga jet emit bright 9.3- and 10.3-keV Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multikilovolt bremmstrahlung continuum. Kilohertz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high-intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot to shot and debris free. Our target provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We show the hard-x-ray spectrum described above. The source was generated by a 50-fs-duration, 1-kHz, 2-W, high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser. Using the same technology, we also generate forward-going sub-mega-electron-volt (sub-MeV) protons from a 10-μm liquid water target at 1-kHz repetition rates. Kilohertz sources of high-energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies and will lead to efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors in both the forward and the backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high-repetition-rate lasers sources increases, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency, and directionality to occur. The effect of these developments is discussed. As compact, high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser technology reaches focused intensities of ~1019 W/cm2, many new applications of high-repetition-rate hard-x-ray and MeV ion sources will become practical.

  13. Effects of front-surface target structures on properties of relativistic laser-plasma electrons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Krygier, A G; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Freeman, R R

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the role of prescribed geometrical structures on the front of a target in determining the energy and spatial distribution of relativistic laser-plasma electrons. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation studies apply to short-pulse, high-intensity laser pulses, and indicate that a judicious choice of target front-surface geometry provides the realistic possibility of greatly enhancing the yield of high-energy electrons while simultaneously confining the emission to narrow (<5°) angular cones.

  14. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S. Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  15. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  16. High repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Relativistic electron beams have wide-ranging applications in medicine, materials science, and homeland security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high flux sources of relativistic electrons - which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma by focusing a 5 × 1018 W/cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser pulse onto a fused silica target, we have measured electrons ejected from the target surface having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons, as well as the spatial divergence of the resulting beam, was also measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing and focusing conditions. The experimental results are compared to particle in cell simulations.

  17. Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."

  18. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  19. The Effectiveness of Intensive Interaction, A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Nick; Bodicoat, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach used for communicating with people with profound and multiple intellectual disabilities [PMID] or autism. It has gained increased recognition as a helpful technique, but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. Method: Computerized and hand searches of the literature were conducted using…

  20. High-power, high-intensity laser propagation and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman

    2014-05-15

    This paper presents overviews of a number of processes and applications associated with high-power, high-intensity lasers, and their interactions. These processes and applications include: free electron lasers, backward Raman amplification, atmospheric propagation of laser pulses, laser driven acceleration, atmospheric lasing, and remote detection of radioactivity. The interrelated physical mechanisms in the various processes are discussed.

  1. Changing intensity of interaction can resolve prisoner's dilemmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaqi; Zhang, Chunyan; Sun, Qinglin; Chen, Zengqiang; Zhang, Jianlei

    2016-03-01

    We put forward a computational model which mainly focuses on the effect of changing the intensity of interaction between individuals to study the evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game in social networks. In this model, an individual will unilaterally increase the intensity of interaction from it to some of its neighbors in case it is satisfied with the current income which it obtains from the neighbor; conversely, the individual will unilaterally reduce the intensity of interaction from it to its neighbor. We show that this simple evolutionary rule can effectively shift the survival barrier of cooperators and drastically facilitate the emergence of cooperation. Interestingly, for a fixed temptation to defect, there exists the smallest increment of intensity of interaction, resulting in a plateau of high cooperation level due to the positive feedback mechanism. Furthermore, we find good agreement between simulation results and theoretical predictions obtained from an extended pair-approximation method. Meanwhile, we illustrate the dynamical evolution of cooperators on the network, and investigate the impact of noise during the strategy updates.

  2. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  3. Angular characteristics of the stimulated-Brillouin-scattering spectrum from a laser plasma with strong acoustic-wave damping

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.

    1981-07-01

    The spectrum of stimulated Brillouin scattering from an inhomogeneous moving laser plasma is analyzed. The damping of acoustic waves and scattered electromagnetic waves is taken into account. Spectra are derived for various scattering angles and for various radii of the laser beam. For all observation angles the center of the spectral line is at an unshifted frequency. As the observation angle increases, the width of the red wing in the spectrum increases. The intensity of the scattered light is very anisotropic.

  4. Acoustic intensity in the interaction region of a parametric source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauchle, G. C.; Gabrielson, T. B.; van Tol, D. J.; Kottke, N. F.; McConnell, J. A.

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this project was to measure acoustic intensity in the strong interaction region of a parametric source in order to obtain a clear definition of the source-generation region and to separate the local generation (the reactive field) from propagation (the real or active field). The acoustic intensity vector was mapped in the interaction region of a parametric projector at Lake Seneca. The source was driven with primary signals at 22 kHz and 27 kHz. Receiving sensors were located 8.5 meters from the projector. At that range, the secondary at 5 kHz was between 40 and 45 dB below either primary. For the primary levels used, the plane-wave shock inception distance would have been at least 14 meters. Furthermore, the Rayleigh distance for the projector was about 4 meters so the measurements at 8.5 meters were in the strong interaction region but not in saturation. Absorption was negligible over these ranges. The intensity measurements were made at fixed range but varying azimuth angle and varying depth thus developing a two-dimensional cross-section of the secondary beam. Measurements of both the active and reactive intensity vectors will be presented along with a discussion of measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code 321SS.

  5. LDRD Final Report: Adaptive Methods for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M R; Garaizar, F X; Hittinger, J A

    2003-01-29

    The goal of this project was to investigate the utility of parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) in the simulation of laser plasma interaction (LPI). The scope of work included the development of new numerical methods and parallel implementation strategies. The primary deliverables were (1) parallel adaptive algorithms to solve a system of equations combining plasma fluid and light propagation models, (2) a research code implementing these algorithms, and (3) an analysis of the performance of parallel AMR on LPI problems. The project accomplished these objectives. New algorithms were developed for the solution of a system of equations describing LPI. These algorithms were implemented in a new research code named ALPS (Adaptive Laser Plasma Simulator) that was used to test the effectiveness of the AMR algorithms on the Laboratory's large-scale computer platforms. The details of the algorithm and the results of the numerical tests were documented in an article published in the Journal of Computational Physics [2]. A principal conclusion of this investigation is that AMR is most effective for LPI systems that are ''hydrodynamically large'', i.e., problems requiring the simulation of a large plasma volume relative to the volume occupied by the laser light. Since the plasma-only regions require less resolution than the laser light, AMR enables the use of efficient meshes for such problems. In contrast, AMR is less effective for, say, a single highly filamented beam propagating through a phase plate, since the resulting speckle pattern may be too dense to adequately separate scales with a locally refined mesh. Ultimately, the gain to be expected from the use of AMR is highly problem-dependent. One class of problems investigated in this project involved a pair of laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. Under certain conditions, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other via a resonant interaction with an ion acoustic wave in the crossing region. AMR provides an

  6. High Intensity Femtosecond XUV Pulse Interactions with Atomic Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, K.; Murphy, B.; Keto, J.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-09-10

    The interactions of large xenon clusters irradiated by intense, femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at a wavelength of 38 nm have been studied. Using high harmonic generation from a 35 fs near-infrared terawatt laser, clusters have been irradiated by XUV pulses of 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} intensity. Charge states up to Xe{sup 8+} are observed, states well above that produced by single atom illumination, indicating that plasma continuum lowering is important. Furthermore the kinetic energy distribution of the exploding ions is consistent with a quasineutral hydrodynamic expansion, rather than a Coulomb explosion.

  7. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  8. Magnetic Cavitation and the Reemergence of Nonlocal Transport in Laser Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgers, C. P.; Kingham, R. J.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2008-02-22

    We present the first fully kinetic Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of nanosecond laser-plasma interactions including self-consistent magnetic fields and hydrodynamic plasma expansion. For the largest magnetic fields externally applied to long-pulse laser-gas-jet experiments (12 T) a significant degree of cavitation of the B field (>40%) will be shown to occur from the laser-heated region in under half a nanosecond. This is due to the Nernst effect and leads to the reemergence of nonlocality even if the initial value of the magnetic field strength is sufficient to localize the transport.

  9. Application of imaging plate to x-ray imaging and spectroscopy in laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Snavely, R; Gregori, G; Koch, J A; Park, H; Remington, B A

    2006-04-25

    We report recent progress of x-ray diagnostic techniques in laser plasma experiment with using imaging plates. Imaging plate is a photo-stimulable phosphor screen (BaF(Br0.85,10.15):Eu{sup 2+}) deposited on flexible metal or plastic substrate. We applied the imaging plate to x-ray microscopy in laser fusion experiment experiments. Self-emission x-ray images of imploded core were obtained successfully with using imaging plate and high magnification target mounted pinhole arrays. The imaging plates were applied also in ultra-intense laser experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Small samarium foil was irradiated by high intensity laser pulse from the Vulcan laser system. The k shell x-rays from the foil ({approx}40keV) was used as a line x-ray source for microscopic radiography. Performance of imaging plate on high-energy x-ray backlit radiography was demonstrated by imaging sinusoidal grooves of 6um amplitude on a Au foil. Detailed spectrum of k shell x-ray from Cu embedded foil target was successfully observed by fully coupling imaging plate with a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer. The performances of the imaging plates evaluated in actual laser plasma experiments will be presented.

  10. Extracting ion emission lines from femtosecond-laser plasma x-ray spectra heavily contaminated by spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasilov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Stagira, S.; Calegari, F.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.

    2007-09-01

    Nowadays charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors are widely used for the registration of multicharged ions x-ray spectra. These spectra are generated in a plasma during interaction of ultrashort, ultraintense laser pulses with solid targets. Strong parasitic radiation from the plasma affects CCD detectors and contaminates resulting spectra, so that spectral features can be completely covered by noise even during measurements with a very short accumulation time. In this work we propose a "mean to median" (M2M) algorithm for noise suppression in femtosecond laser plasma x-ray spectra. Series of spectra is necessary for the identification of corrupted data points by the developed method. The algorithm was tested with model spectra which reflect main features of experimental data. In practice we used it for extracting information about spectral lines of Ne-like Fe ions and He-like Al ions which allowed us to calculate plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that M2M method is able to clean spectra with more than 10% of corrupted pixels. Fluctuations in intensity of spectral lines induced by laser instability do not affect validity of the proposed method.

  11. Extracting ion emission lines from femtosecond-laser plasma x-ray spectra heavily contaminated by spikes

    SciTech Connect

    Gasilov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Stagira, S.; Calegari, F.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.

    2007-09-15

    Nowadays charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors are widely used for the registration of multicharged ions x-ray spectra. These spectra are generated in a plasma during interaction of ultrashort, ultraintense laser pulses with solid targets. Strong parasitic radiation from the plasma affects CCD detectors and contaminates resulting spectra, so that spectral features can be completely covered by noise even during measurements with a very short accumulation time. In this work we propose a ''mean to median'' (M2M) algorithm for noise suppression in femtosecond laser plasma x-ray spectra. Series of spectra is necessary for the identification of corrupted data points by the developed method. The algorithm was tested with model spectra which reflect main features of experimental data. In practice we used it for extracting information about spectral lines of Ne-like Fe ions and He-like Al ions which allowed us to calculate plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that M2M method is able to clean spectra with more than 10% of corrupted pixels. Fluctuations in intensity of spectral lines induced by laser instability do not affect validity of the proposed method.

  12. X-ray microscopy and imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans nematode using a laser-plasma-pulsed x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Giulio; Orsini, Franceasco; Ullschmied, Jiri; Skala, Jiri; Kralikova, Bozena; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kadlec, Christelle; Mocek, Tomas; Prag, A. R.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia, C.; Batani, Dimitri; Bernardinello, A.; Desai, Tara; Zullini, A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on Soft X-ray Contact Microscopy (SXCM) performed on Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes is discussed. This sample has been selected since it is a well studied case used as model in many biological contexts. The experiment has been performed using the iodine PALS laser source to generate pulsed soft X-rays from laser-plasma interaction, using molybdenum and gold as targets. Typical intensities on the targets exceeded 1014 W/cm2. The SXCM imprints have been recorded on Polymethilmetacrylate (PMMA) photo resists which have been chemically developed and analyzed with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) operating in constant force mode. The use of error signal AFM images together with topography AFM images, did allow an easier recognition of biological patterns, and the identification of observed structures with internal organs. Several organs were identified in the SXCM images, including cuticle annuli, alae, pharynx, and three different types of cell nuclei. These are the first SXCM images of multi-cellular complex organisms.

  13. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Generation of currents and propagation of plasma fronts in the case of two-pulse interaction with a target in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhudarov, É. M.; Gelashvili, G. V.; Gumberidze, G. G.; Taktakishvili, M. I.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation was made of the enhancement in the efficiency of generation of currents when a target in air was subjected to two consecutive CO2 laser radiation pulses. Preliminary interaction with a low-energy (1.5-5 J) pulse increased by more than one order of magnitude the currents generated by the second pulse and this was true in a wide range of energies of the latter pulse. The energy conversion efficiency was practically unaffected. The results were in qualitative agreement with the proposed pattern of plasma formation and propagation of shock waves near a target.

  14. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  15. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  16. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdessus, Remi; d'Humières, Emmanuel; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  17. Diversity-disturbance relationships: frequency and intensity interact.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex R; Miller, Adam D; Leggett, Helen C; Roxburgh, Stephen H; Buckling, Angus; Shea, Katriona

    2012-10-23

    An influential ecological theory, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH), predicts that intermediate levels of disturbance will maximize species diversity. Empirical studies, however, have described a wide variety of diversity-disturbance relationships (DDRs). Using experimental populations of microbes, we show that the form of the DDR depends on an interaction between disturbance frequency and intensity. We find that diversity shows a monotonically increasing, unimodal or flat relationship with disturbance, depending on the values of the disturbance aspects considered. These results confirm recent theoretical predictions, and potentially reconcile the conflicting body of empirical evidence on DDRs.

  18. Laser Plasma instability reduction by coherence disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W l; Amendt, P A; Meezan, N; Suter, L J

    2006-04-19

    The saturation levels of stimulated scattering of intense laser light in plasmas and techniques to reduce these levels are of great interest. A simple model is used to highlight the dependence of the reflectivity on the coherence length for the density fluctuations producing the scattering. Sometimes the coherence lengths can be determined nonlinearly. For NIF hohlraum plasmas, a reduction in the coherence lengths might be engineered in several ways. Finally, electron trapping in ion sound waves is briefly examined as a potentially important effect for the saturation of stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  19. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-C.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Ruhl, H.; Sheng, Z.-M.

    2011-03-15

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect.

  20. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  1. Component Technology for Laser Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W J; Smith, S G; Dahlgren, T; Epperley, T; Kohn, S; Kumfert, G

    2002-06-17

    This paper will discuss the application of high performance component software technology developed for a complex physics simulation development effort. The primary tool used to build software components is called Babel and is used to create language-independent libraries for high performance computers. Components were constructed from legacy code and wrapped with a thin Python layer to enable run-time scripting. Low-level components in Fortran, C++, and Python were composed directly as Babel components and invoked interactively from a parallel Python script.

  2. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  3. Hybrid Ray/Wave Optics for Laser-Plasma Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Kallman, J.S.; Afeyan, B.B.; Feit, M.D.

    1999-02-18

    This aim of this FY 1998 LDRD project was to create a computational tool which bridges the gap between wave and ray optical regimes, important for application areas such as laser propagation in plasma and multimode photonics. We used phase space methods, where a set of rays distributed in a particular way in position and angle retain many essential features of wave optics. To characterize and enhance our understanding of the method, we developed a GUI-based photonics tool which can analyze light propagation in systems with a variety of axial and transverse refractive index distributions.

  4. Laminar shocks in high power laser plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P.; Trines, R.

    2014-02-15

    We propose a theory to describe laminar ion sound structures in a collisionless plasma. Reflection of a small fraction of the upstream ions converts the well known ion acoustic soliton into a structure with a steep potential gradient upstream and with downstream oscillations. The theory provides a simple interpretation of results dating back more than forty years but, more importantly, is shown to provide an explanation for recent observations on laser produced plasmas relevant to inertial fusion and to ion acceleration.

  5. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  6. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., ``sub-Larmor scales''. Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  7. Ultlra-intense laser-matter interactions at extreme parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hegellich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    thinnest of these at less than 3nm, i.e. 1/300 of the laser wavelength, are even thinner than the plasma skin depth. This drastically changes the laser-matter interaction physics leading to the emergence of new particle acceleration mechanisms, like Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) Acceleration, driven by a relativistic, kinetic plasma instability or Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA), driven by stabilized charge separation. Furthermore, these interactions also produce relativistic high harmonics in forward direction as well as mono-en,ergetic electron pulses which might lend itself as a source for fully coherent Thomson scattering in the mulit-keV regime. In this talk I will present an overview over the laser developments leading to this paradigm change as well as over the theoretical and experimental results following from it. Specifically we were able for the first time to demonstrate BOA acceleration of Carbon ions to up to 0.5 GeV using a laser pulse with {approx}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2} intensity and showing the scalability of this mechanism into regimes relevant for Hadron Therapy. We were further able to demonstrate mono-energetic electron break-out from ultrathin targets, as a first step towards a flying mirror.

  8. Gigagauss Magnetic Field Generation from High Intensity Laser Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcik, J.; Perry, M. D.; Lasinski, B. F.; Langdon, A. B.; Cowan, T.; Hammer, J.; Hatchett, S.; Hunt, A.; Key, M. H.; Moran, M.; Pennington, D.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.; Wilks, S. C.

    2004-11-01

    Intense laser (>1021 W/cm2) sources using pulse compression techniques in the sub-picosecond time frame have been used to create dynamic electric field strengths in excess of 100 Megavolts/micron with associated magnetic field strengths in the gigagauss regime. We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for a variety of applications. Hot electron spectra from laser-target interactions in Au have been measured with energies up to 100 MeV. Hot x-ray production has been measured using filtered thermoluminescent dosimeters and threshold nuclear activation (γ,n) from giant resonance interactions. High-resolution radiographs through ρr ≥ 165 gm/cm2 have been obtained. Dose levels in the x-ray band from 2-8 MeV have been measured at the level of several rads at one meter from the target for a single pulse. The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide high magnetic fields are discussed. Results of preliminary magnetic field calculations are presented along with potential applications of this technology and estimates of the fundamental scaling limits for future development.

  9. High-repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams have applications spanning materials science, medicine, and home- land security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high ux sources of relativistic electrons- which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma with the lambda cubed laser system at the University of Michigan (a 5 × 1018W=cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser), we have measured electrons ejected from the surface of fused silica nd Cu targets having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons was measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing, and focusing conditions. While taken at a high repetition rate, the pulse energy of the lambda cubed system was consistently on the order of 10 mJ. In order to predict scaling of the electron energy with laser pulse energy, simulations are underway which compare the spectrum generated with the lambda cubed system to the predicted spectrum generated on the petawatt scale HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan.

  10. Nonlinear interaction of intense hypergeometric Gaussian subfamily laser beams in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, H.; Vaziri (Khamedi), M.; Rooholamininejad, H.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of Hypergeometric-Gaussian laser beam in a nonlinear plasma medium is investigated by considering the Source Dependent Expansion method. A subfamily of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams with a non-negative, even and integer radial index, can be expressed as the linear superposition of finite number of Laguerre-Gaussian functions. Propagation of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams in a nonlinear plasma medium depends on the value of radial index. The bright rings' number of these beams is changed during the propagation in plasma medium. The effect of beam vortex charge number l and initial (input) beam intensity on the self-focusing of Hypergeometric-Gaussian beams is explored. Also, by choosing the suitable initial conditions, Hypergeometric-Gaussian subfamily beams can be converted to one or more mode components that a typical of mode conversion may be occurred. The self-focusing of these winding beams can be used to control the focusing force and improve the electron bunch quality in laser plasma accelerators.

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2010-11-04

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  12. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g. diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g. shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  13. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  14. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  15. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K; Veisz, L

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  16. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  17. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vesztergombi, G.

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  18. Fast Ignitor Research with Use of Ultra-Intense Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuo A.; Kodama, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Fujita, Hisanori; Kanabe, Tadashi; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Kato, Yoshiaki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Sonomoto, Tatsuya; Matusita, Tomohiro; Habara, Hideaki; Yosida, Eiji; Matuo, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Tetsuji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Kimura, Yasuko; Takabe, Hideaki; Mima, Kunioki

    Several years ago a new concept called “fast ignition” was introduced for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The concept proposes to use an ultra-intense (Peta watt) short (psec) laser pulse to ignite a highly compressed fuel core within the core disassembly time. Since then, Japan, England, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Russia, Spain and USA started intensive studies on ultrahigh intensity laser plasma interactions. We report on our most recent experimental and theoretical studies on fast ignitor related research at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University.

  19. Micromachining of polydimethylsiloxane induced by laser plasma EUV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Makimura, T.; Okazaki, K.; Nakamura, D.; Takahashi, A.; Okada, T.; Niino, H.; Murakami, K.

    2011-06-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is fundamental materials in the field of biotechnology. Because of its biocompatibility, microfabricated PDMS sheets are applied to micro-reactors and microchips for cell culture. Conventionally, the microstructures were fabricated by means of cast or imprint using molds, however it is difficult to fabricate the structures at high aspect ratios such as through-holes/vertical channels. The fabrication of the high-aspect structures would enable us to stack sheets to realize 3D fluidic circuits. In order to achieve the micromachining, direct photo-ablation by short wavelength light is promising. In the previous works, we investigated ablation of transparent materials such as silica glass and poly(methyl methacrylate) induced by irradiation with laser plasma EUV light. We achieved smooth and fine nanomachining. In this work, we applied our technique to PDMS micromachining. We condensed the EUV light onto PDMS surfaces at high power density up to 108 W/cm2 using a Au coated ellipsoidal mirror. We found that PDMS sheet was ablated at a rate up to 440 nm/shot. It should be emphasized that through hole with a diameter of 1 μm was fabricated in a PDMS sheet with a thickness of 4 μm. Thus we demonstrated the micromachining of PDMS sheets using laser plasma EUV light.

  20. Radiation from laser-microplasma-waveguide interactions in the ultra-intense regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-07-01

    When a high-contrast ultra-relativistic (>1020 W/cm2) laser beam enters a micro-sized plasma waveguide, the pulse energy is coupled into waveguide modes, which significantly modifies the interaction between the electrons and electromagnetic wave. Electrons pulled out from the walls of the waveguide form a dense helical bunch inside the channel and are efficiently accelerated by the transverse magnetic modes to hundreds of MeV. The asymmetry in the transverse electric and magnetic fields drives strong oscillations, which lead to the emission of bright, well-collimated, hard X-rays. In this paper, we present our study on the underlying physics in the aforementioned process using 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The mechanism of electron acceleration and the dependence of radiation properties on different laser plasma parameters are addressed. An analytic model and basic scalings for X-ray emission are also presented by considering the lowest optical modes in the waveguide, which is adequate to describe the basic phenomenon. In addition, the effects of high-order modes as well as laser polarization are also qualitatively discussed. The considered X-ray source has promising features, potentially making it a competitive candidate for a future tabletop synchrotron source.

  1. X-Ray Radiation Measurements With Photodiodes In Plasmas Generated By 1017 W/Cm2 Intensity Krf Excimer Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, E.; Földes, I. B.; Ryć, L.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out using a prepulse-free hybrid KrF excimer-dye laser system (700fs pulse duration, 248nm wavelength, 15mJ pulse energy). The intensity of the p-polarized, focused laser beam was 1.5ṡ1017 W/cm2. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-rays from solid state laser plasmas were generated in the laser-plasma interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses of nonrelativistic laser intensities. An x-ray sensitive FLM photodiode (ITE, Warsaw) was used to detect x-rays between 1-19 keV in front of the targets. The diode was filtered by a 4μm Al foil. The dependence of the x-ray flux on laser intensity and the angular distribution of x-rays for aluminum and copper targets in the half space of the front side of the targets were investigated.

  2. Nonstationary stimulated Brillouin scattering in a laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chirokikh, A.V.; Kozochkin, S.M.; Streltsov, A.P. ); Ochirov, B.D.; Rubenchik, A.M. )

    1993-08-02

    The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of intense laser light is considered. We present experimental data demonstrating SBS nonstationarity of radiation directed at thick targets. The results are explained in terms of the interaction of light scattered and reflected from the critical surface. Numerical simulations supporting this interpretation are presented. It is demonstrated that the SBS evolution is neither sensitive to plasma density, size of plasma slab, or beam intensity variations. But it is sensitive enough to changes in the reflection coefficient and variations of the critical surface velocity.

  3. Laser ablation and ionisation by laser plasma radiation in the atmospheric-pressure mass spectrometry of organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pento, A V; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Grechnikov, A A; Alimpiev, S S

    2013-01-31

    A new method was developed for the mass spectrometric analysis of organic and bioorganic compounds, which involves laser ablation with the ionisation of its products by laser-plasma radiation and enables analysing gaseous, liquid, and solid substances at atmospheric pressure without sample preparation. The capabilities of this method were demonstrated by the examples of fast pharmaceutical composition screening, real-time atmosphere composition analysis, and construction of the mass spectrometric images of organic compound distributions in biological materials. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Performance of capillary discharge guided laser plasma wakefieldaccelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Gonsalves,Anthony J.; Leemans, Wim P.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Hooker, S.M.

    2007-06-25

    A GeV-class laser-driven plasma-based wakefield acceleratorhas been realized at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).The device consists of the 40TW high repetition rate Ti:sapphire LOASISlaser system at LBNL and a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguidedeveloped at Oxford University. The operation of the capillary dischargeguided laser plasma wakefield accelerator with a capillaryof 225 mu mdiameter and 33 mm in length was analyzed in detail. The input intensitydependence suggests that excessive self-injection causes increased beamloading leading to broadband lower energy electron beam generation. Thetrigger versus laser arrival timing dependence suggests that the plasmachannel parameters can be tuned to reduce beam divergence.

  6. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  7. Reshaping of intense laser pulse with a capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Lihua; Yu Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Wang Xin; Gu Yuqiu; He, X. T.

    2009-09-15

    The reshaping of intense laser pulse by vacuum capillary is studied by particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that as an intense laser pulse propagates from free space into a capillary, its profile is reshaped due to laser-plasma interaction near the entrance of capillary. As a result, the free-space mode is self-consistently converted into a capillary mode. Only the relatively low-intensity periphery of the reshaped pulse interacts with the capillary-wall plasma, so that the high-intensity center of the pulse can propagate in the narrow vacuum channel over a distance much larger than the Rayleigh length. The mechanism is then applied to reshape a radially imperfect laser pulse having two wings around the center spot. Most of the output light energy is concentrated in the center spot, and the wings are almost completely removed. That is, the quality of the laser pulse can be greatly improved by a capillary.

  8. Experimental approach to interaction physics challenges of the shock ignition scheme using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Goyon, C; Depierreux, S; Yahia, V; Loisel, G; Baccou, C; Courvoisier, C; Borisenko, N G; Orekhov, A; Rosmej, O; Labaune, C

    2013-12-01

    An experimental program was designed to study the most important issues of laser-plasma interaction physics in the context of the shock ignition scheme. In the new experiments presented in this Letter, a combination of kilojoule and short laser pulses was used to study the laser-plasma coupling at high laser intensities for a large range of electron densities and plasma profiles. We find that the backscatter is dominated by stimulated Brillouin scattering with stimulated Raman scattering staying at a limited level. This is in agreement with past experiments using long pulses but laser intensities limited to 2×10(15)  W/cm2, or short pulses with intensities up to 5×10(16)  W/cm2 as well as with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:24476284

  9. Generation of high pressure shocks relevant to the shock-ignition intensity regime

    SciTech Connect

    Batani, D.; Folpini, G.; Giuffrida, L.; Maheut, Y.; Malka, G.; Nicolai, Ph.; Ribeyre, X.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.; Schiavi, A.; Badziak, J.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Pisarczyk, T.; Rosinski, M.; Baffigi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; and others

    2014-03-15

    An experiment was performed using the PALS laser to study laser-target coupling and laser-plasma interaction in an intensity regime ≤10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, relevant for the “shock ignition” approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion. A first beam at low intensity was used to create an extended preformed plasma, and a second one to create a strong shock. Pressures up to 90 Megabars were inferred. Our results show the importance of the details of energy transport in the overdense region.

  10. Protons acceleration in thin CH foils by ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, I. N.

    2015-03-15

    Interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with the intensities 10{sup 21}, 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2} with CH plastic foils is studied in the framework of kinetic theory of laser plasma based on the construction of propagators (in classical limit) for electron and ion distribution functions in plasmas. The calculations have been performed for real densities and charges of plasma ions. Protons are accelerated both in the direction of laser pulse (up to 1 GeV) and in the opposite direction (more than 5 GeV). The mechanisms of forward acceleration are different for various intensities.

  11. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey; Daughton, W; Yin, L

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  12. Characterization of a laser-plasma extreme-ultraviolet source using a rotating cryogenic Xe target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, S.; Masuda, K.; Shimoura, A.; Miyamoto, S.; Mochizuki, T.

    2010-10-01

    A laser-plasma source for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) light that uses a rotating cryogenic solid-state Xe target has been characterized. We focused on parameters at the wavelength of 13.5 nm with 2% bandwidth required for an EUV lithography source and investigated improvements of the conversion efficiency (CE). With the drum rotating, there was an increase in CE and less fast ions compared with the case for the drum at rest. It is considered that the Xe gas on the target surface can produce optimal-scale plasma, and satellite emission lines in Xe plasma effectively increase the EUV intensity, and the ion number is decreased by the gas curtain effect. The dependence of CE on the laser wavelength, laser energy and intensity also studied. As a result, the maximum CE was 0.9% at 13.5 nm with 2% bandwidth under the optimal condition. By continuous irradiation of a Nd:YAG slab laser at a repetition rate of 320 Hz and an average power of 110 W, the target continuously generated EUV light with an average power of 1 W at 13.5 nm with 2% bandwidth. The achieved performances provide valuable information for the design of a future EUV lithography source.

  13. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  14. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Chen, M; Zeng, M; Vieira, J; Yu, L L; Weng, S M; Silva, L O; Jaroszynski, D A; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because of their extremely high accelerating gradients. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks tunability, especially of the intensity and polarization distributions. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source based on a helical plasma undulator in a plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of 2 × 10(19) photons/s/mm(2)/mrad(2)/0.1% bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with third generation synchrotron radiation facilities running at similar photon energies, suggesting that laser plasma based radiation sources are promising for advanced applications. PMID:27377126

  15. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J.; Chen, M.; Zeng, M.; Vieira, J.; Yu, L. L.; Weng, S. M.; Silva, L. O.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because of their extremely high accelerating gradients. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks tunability, especially of the intensity and polarization distributions. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source based on a helical plasma undulator in a plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of 2 × 1019 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with third generation synchrotron radiation facilities running at similar photon energies, suggesting that laser plasma based radiation sources are promising for advanced applications. PMID:27377126

  16. Frequency-Domain Tomography for Single-shot, Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Downer, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Intense laser pulses propagating through plasma create plasma wakefields that often evolve significantly, e.g. by expanding and contracting. However, such dynamics are known in detail only through intensive simulations. Laboratory visualization of evolving plasma wakes in the ``bubble'' regime is important for optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Recently snap-shots of quasi-static wakes were recorded using frequency-domain holography (FDH). To visualize the wake's evolution, we have generalized FDH to frequency-domain tomography (FDT), which uses multiple probes propagating at different angles with respect to the pump pulse. Each probe records a phase streak, imprinting a partial record of the evolution of pump-created structures. We then topographically reconstruct the full evolution from all phase streaks. To prove the concept, a prototype experiment visualizing nonlinear index evolution in glass is demonstrated. Four probes propagating at 0, 0.6, 2, 14 degrees to the index ``bubble'' are angularly and temporally multiplexed to a single spectrometer to achieve cost-effective FDT. From these four phase streaks, an FDT algorithm analogous to conventional CT yields a single-shot movie of the pump's self-focusing dynamics.

  17. Development of a Multi-GeV spectrometer for laser-plasma experiment at FLAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benocci, R.; Benedetti, C.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fioravanti, S.; Gallo, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Londrillo, P.; Martellotti, S.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Tani, F.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2011-10-01

    The advance in laser-plasma acceleration techniques pushes the regime of the resulting accelerated particles to higher energies and intensities. In particular, the upcoming experiments with the 250 TW laser at the FLAME facility of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, will enter the GeV regime with more than 100 pC of electrons. At the current status of understanding of the acceleration mechanism, relatively large angular and energy spreads are expected. There is therefore the need for developing a device capable to measure the energy of electrons over three orders of magnitude (few MeV to few GeV), with still unknown angular divergences. Within the PlasmonX experiment at FLAME, a spectrometer is being constructed to perform these measurements. It is made of an electro-magnet and a screen made of scintillating fibers for the measurement of the trajectories of the particles. The large range of operation, the huge number of particles and the need to focus the divergence, present challenges in the design and construction of such a device. We present the design considerations for this spectrometer that lead to the use of scintillating fibers, multichannel photo-multipliers and a multiplexing electronics, a combination which is innovative in the field. We also present the experimental results obtained with a high intensity electron beam performed on a prototype at the LNF beam test facility.

  18. [Effects of Intensity of Acting Agents on the Manifestation of Synergistic Interaction].

    PubMed

    Petin, V G; Zhurakovskaya, G P

    2015-01-01

    The universal dependence of the synergistic interaction on the intensity of the acting agents was demonstrated. This dependence is not associated with the biological object, as well as the nature of the physical or chemical agents used in the combined exposures. In all cases, with a decrease in the intensity of one of the agents the intensity of the other factor should be also decreased to ensure the greatest synergistic effect. Such relationship of synergy and the intensity of the acting agents is of interest for radiation safety. This regularity indicates the principal possibility of synergistic interaction of harmful environmental factors actually occurring in the biosphere at their low intensities. PMID:26964345

  19. Explosion of relativistic electron vortices in laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezhnin, K. V.; Kamenets, F. F.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Gu, Y. J.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with an underdense plasma may lead to the formation of electron vortices. Though being quasistationary on the electron timescales, these structures tend to expand on a proton timescale due to Coulomb repulsion of ions. Using a simple analytical model of a stationary vortex as an initial condition, 2D PIC simulations are performed. A number of effects are observed such as vortex boundary field intensification, multistream instabilities at the vortex boundary, and bending of the vortex boundary with the subsequent transformation into smaller electron vortices.

  20. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-11-15

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t<100 ns) resulted in enhanced continuum and line emission, shockwave formation and plasma plume rebound. Later phase, long duration plasma-surface interactions (t>160 ns) resulted in sustained 'decay', i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (N{sub e}) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  1. Design Requirements for Communication-Intensive Interactive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolchini, Davide; Garzotto, Franca; Paolini, Paolo

    Online interactive applications call for new requirements paradigms to capture the growing complexity of computer-mediated communication. Crafting successful interactive applications (such as websites and multimedia) involves modeling the requirements for the user experience, including those leading to content design, usable information architecture and interaction, in profound coordination with the communication goals of all stakeholders involved, ranging from persuasion to social engagement, to call for action. To face this grand challenge, we propose a methodology for modeling communication requirements and provide a set of operational conceptual tools to be used in complex projects with multiple stakeholders. Through examples from real-life projects and lessons-learned from direct experience, we draw on the concepts of brand, value, communication goals, information and persuasion requirements to systematically guide analysts to master the multifaceted connections of these elements as drivers to inform successful communication designs.

  2. Short-pulse high intensity laser thin foil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, Patrick

    2003-10-01

    The technology of ultrashort pulse laser generation has progressed to the point that optical pulses larger than 10 J, 300 fs duration or shorter are routinely produced. Such pulses can be focused to intensities exceeding 10^18 W/cm^2. With high contrast pulses, these focused intensities can be used to heat solid matter to high temperatures with minimal hydrodynamic expansion, producing an extremely high energy-density state of matter for a short period of time. This high density, high temperature plasma can be studied by x-ray spectroscopy. We have performed experiments on thin foils of different elements under well controlled conditions at the 100 Terawatt laser at LULI to study the characteristics X-ray emission of laser heated solids. To suppress the ASE effect, the laser was frequency doubled. S-polarized light with a peak intensity of 10^19W/cm^2 was used to minimize resonance absorption. To decrease the effect of longitudinal temperature gradients very thin (800 μ) aluminum foil targets were used. We have also studied the effect of radial gradient by limiting the measured x-ray emission zone using 50μ or 100μ pinhole on target. The spectra, in the range 7-8Å, were recorded using a conical crystal spectrometer coupled to a 800 fs resolution streak camera. A Fourier Domain Interferometry (FDI) of the back of the foil was also performed providing a measurement of the hydrodynamic expansion as function of time for each shot. To simulate the experiment, we used the 1D hydrodynamic code FILM with a given set of plasma parameter (ρ, Te) as initial conditions. The X-ray emission was calculated by post processing hydrodynamic results with a collisional-radiative model which uses super-configuration average atomic data. The simulation reproduces the main features of the experimental time resolved spectrum.

  3. Relativistic intensity laser interactions with low-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingale, L.; Nilson, P. M.; Zulick, C.; Chen, H.; Craxton, R. S.; Cobble, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Norreys, P. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Scott, R. H. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-03-01

    We perform relativistic-intensity laser experiments using the Omega EP laser to investigate channeling phenomena and particle acceleration in underdense plasmas. A fundamental understanding of these processes is of importance to the hole-boring fast ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion. Proton probing was used to image the electromagnetic fields formed as the Omega EP laser pulse generated a channel through underdense plasma. Filamentation of the channel was observed, followed by self-correction into a single channel. The channel radius as a function of time was found to be in reasonable agreement with momentum- conserving snowplough models.

  4. Multiphoton Microscopy and Interaction of Intense Light Pulses with Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Jean-Michel

    2011-07-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of soft-matter, such as biological tissues, in its native environment has promising applications in medicine to correct for defects (eg. eye cataracts) or to destroy malignant regions (eg. cancerous tumours). To achieve this we need the ability to first image and then do precise ablation with sub-micron resolution with the same setup. For this purpose, we designed and built a multiphoton microscope and tested it on goldfish gills and bovine cells. We then studied light-matter interaction on a hard polymer (PMMA) because the nature of ablation of soft-matter in its native environment is complex and not well understood. Ablation and modification thresholds for successive laser shots were obtained. The ablation craters revealed 3D nanostructures and polarization dependent orientation. The interaction also induced localized porosity in PMMA that can be controlled.

  5. Target dependent femtosecond laser plasma implantation dynamics in enabling silica for high density erbium doping

    PubMed Central

    Chandrappan, Jayakrishnan; Murray, Matthew; Kakkar, Tarun; Petrik, Peter; Agocs, Emil; Zolnai, Zsolt; Steenson, D.P.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin

    2015-01-01

    Chemical dissimilarity of tellurium oxide with silica glass increases phase separation and crystallization tendency when mixed and melted for making a glass. We report a novel technique for incorporating an Er3+-doped tellurite glass composition into silica substrates through a femtosecond (fs) laser generated plasma assisted process. The engineered material consequently exhibits the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-ions, which are unachievable in pure silica and implies this as an ideal material for integrated photonics platforms. Formation of a well-defined metastable and homogeneous glass structure with Er3+-ions in a silica network, modified with tellurite has been characterized using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and structural analyses using HRTEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and laser excitation techniques, confirm that such fs-laser plasma implanted glasses may be engineered for significantly higher concentration of Er3+-ions without clustering, validated by the record high lifetime-density product 0.96 × 1019 s.cm−3. Characterization of planar optical layers and photoluminescence emission spectra were undertaken to determine their thickness, refractive indices and photoluminescence properties, as a function of Er3+ concentration via different target glasses. The increased Er3+ content in the target glass enhance the refractive index and photoluminescence intensity of the modified silica layer whilst the lifetime and thickness decrease. PMID:26370060

  6. Compact quasi-monoenergetic photon sources from laser-plasma accelerators for nuclear detection and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Rykovanov, Sergey; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Steinke, Sven; Vay, Jean-Luc; Esarey, Eric H.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Nakamura, Kei; Quiter, Brian J.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-05-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources at MeV energies offer improved sensitivity at greatly reduced dose for active interrogation, and new capabilities in treaty verification, nondestructive assay of spent nuclear fuel and emergency response. Thomson (also referred to as Compton) scattering sources are an established method to produce appropriate photon beams. Applications are however restricted by the size of the required high-energy electron linac, scattering (photon production) system, and shielding for disposal of the high energy electron beam. Laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) produce GeV electron beams in centimeters, using the plasma wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser. Recent LPA experiments are presented which have greatly improved beam quality and efficiency, rendering them appropriate for compact high-quality photon sources based on Thomson scattering. Designs for MeV photon sources utilizing the unique properties of LPAs are presented. It is shown that control of the scattering laser, including plasma guiding, can increase photon production efficiency. This reduces scattering laser size and/or electron beam current requirements to scale compatible with the LPA. Lastly, the plasma structure can decelerate the electron beam after photon production, reducing the size of shielding required for beam disposal. Together, these techniques provide a path to a compact photon source system.

  7. X-ray Spectral Measurements of the JMAR High-Power Laser-plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Gaeta, Celestino J.; Cassidy, Kelly L.; Powers, Michael F.; Kleindolph, Thomas; Morris, James H.; Forber, Richard A.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray spectra of Cu plasmas at the focus of a four-beam, solid-state diode-pumped laser have been recorded. This laser-plasma X-ray source is being developed for JMAR's lithography systems aimed at high- performance semiconductor integrated circuits. The unique simultaneous overlay of the four sub-nanosecond laser beams at 300 Hertz produces a bright, point-plasma X-ray source. PIN diode measurements of the X-ray output indicate that the conversion efficiency (ratio of X-ray emission energy into 2π steradians to incident laser energy) was approximately 9 percent with average X-ray power yields of greater than 10 Watts. Spectra were recorded on calibrated Kodak DEF film in a curved-crystal spectrograph. A KAP crystal (2d = 26.6 Angstroms) was used to disperse the 900 eV to 3000 eV spectral energies onto the film. Preliminary examination of the films indicated the existence of Cu and Cu XX ionization states. Additional spectra as a function of laser input power were also recorded to investigate potential changes in X-ray yields. These films are currently being analyzed. The analysis of the spectra provide absolute line and continuum intensities, and total X-ray output in the measured spectral range.

  8. Laser-plasma-accelerators—A novel, versatile tool for space radiation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, Bernhard; Königstein, Thomas; Willi, Oswald; Rosenzweig, James B.; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Pretzler, Georg

    2011-04-01

    The potential of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology for future advanced space radiation studies is investigated. Laser-plasma accelerators have been shown to be capable of robust generation of particle beams such as electrons, protons, neutrons and ions, as well as photons, having a wide range of accessible parameters. Further, instead of maximum accelerating fields of the order of MV/m as in state-of-the-art accelerators, laser-plasma acceleration operates with fields up to TV/m and can thus be used to reach as yet inaccessible parameter regimes, but which are very relevant to space radiation studies. Due to their versatility and compactness, the same laser-plasma-accelerator can be used in university-scale labs to generate different kinds of particle and photon beams, each yielding up to kGy doses per shot, and allowing combinations of different kinds of radiation production simultaneously. Laser-plasma-accelerators provide the advantage of cost-effective radiation generation, thus ameliorating the current shortage of beam time for testing of radiation resistivity of electronic components. Beyond this, laser-plasma-accelerators can be used to reproduce certain aspects of space radiation, e.g. broad, decreasing multi-MeV-scale spectra, with substantially improved level of fidelity, as compared to state-of-the-art technology. This can increase the significance of electronic components testing, and in turn yield increased reliability and safety of future manned or unmanned space missions, high-altitude flights, as well as the electronic components used in harsh radiation environments in general. Laser-plasma-accelerators may therefore become indispensable tools for next-generation space radiation studies.

  9. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  10. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium-tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  11. Novel method for characterizing relativistic electron beams in a harsh laser-plasma environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hidding, B.; Pretzler, G.; Clever, M.; Brandl, F.; Zamponi, F.; Luebcke, A.; Kaempfer, T.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Kroupp, E.; Veisz, L.; Schmid, K.; Benavides, S.; Karsch, S.

    2007-08-15

    Particle pulses generated by laser-plasma interaction are characterized by ultrashort duration, high particle density, and sometimes a very strong accompanying electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Therefore, beam diagnostics different from those known from classical particle accelerators such as synchrotrons or linacs are required. Easy to use single-shot techniques are favored, which must be insensitive towards the EMP and associated stray light of all frequencies, taking into account the comparably low repetition rates and which, at the same time, allow for usage in very space-limited environments. Various measurement techniques are discussed here, and a space-saving method to determine several important properties of laser-generated electron bunches simultaneously is presented. The method is based on experimental results of electron-sensitive imaging plate stacks and combines these with Monte Carlo-type ray-tracing calculations, yielding a comprehensive picture of the properties of particle beams. The total charge, the energy spectrum, and the divergence can be derived simultaneously for a single bunch.

  12. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett D.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., "sub-Larmor scales." Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  13. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, Brett D. Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2015-11-15

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., “sub-Larmor scales.” Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  14. On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, E A

    2005-10-21

    In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

  15. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.

    2015-02-15

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a{sub 0} ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10{sup −12}) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  16. A Laboratory-Intensive Course on the Experimental Study of Protein-Protein Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Sue

    2011-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions is important to scientists in a wide range of disciplines. We present here the assessment of a lab-intensive course that teaches students techniques used to identify and further study protein-protein interactions. One of the unique elements of the course is that students perform a yeast two-hybrid screen…

  17. Deflection of a Reflected Intense Vortex Laser Beam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Huang, Shan; Shi, Yin; Liu, Chen; Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jiancai; Pei, Zhikun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-01

    An interesting deflection effect deviating the optical reflection law is revealed in the relativistic regime of intense vortex laser plasma interaction. When an intense vortex laser obliquely impinges onto an overdense plasma target, the reflected beam deflects out of the plane of incidence with an experimentally observable deflection angle. The mechanism is demonstrated by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical modeling using the Maxwell stress tensor. The deflection results from the rotational symmetry breaking of the foil driven by the unsymmetrical shear stress of the vortex beam. The l-dependent shear stress, where l is the topological charge, as an intrinsic characteristic to the vortex beam, plays an important role as the ponderomotive force in relativistic vortex laser matter interaction. PMID:27661689

  18. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  19. Laser plasma influence on the space-time structure of powerful laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyin, O. B.; Bogdanov, G. S.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Gerasimov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. P.; Melekhov, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence of laser plasma on the structure of the radiation field of a powerful Nd-glass laser with pulse energy up to 30 J and with the diameter of the output beam 45 mm. Laser plasma is generated by focusing the laser radiation on a low-density target such as nylon mesh and teflon or mylar films. Temporal profile of the laser pulse with a total duration of 25 ns consists of a several short pulse train. Duration of each pulse is about 2 ns. Notable smoothing of spatially non-uniform radiation structure was observed in the middle of the laser pulse.

  20. Investigation of the foreplasma parameters of a laser-plasma diode

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, Yu V; Lebo, A I; Lebo, I G

    2010-11-13

    The results of computing experiments are presented, which allow estimating the parameters of the laser foreplasma used to initiate a discharge in a laser-plasma diode. The resultant plasma is a material medium which carries a high-power discharge current. This opens a possibility to make a compact source of hard X-ray radiation and fast-ion streams. Proceeding from our numerical simulations we derive similarity relations, which enable determining the fluxes of plasma mass and charge as functions of laser pulse parameters. (effects of laser radiation on matter. laser plasma)

  1. High-average-power water window soft X-rays from an Ar laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Sho

    2016-07-01

    A high average power of 140 mW and high conversion efficiency of 14% were demonstrated in “water window” soft X-rays generated using a laser plasma source developed in-house, when a solid Ar target was irradiated by a commercial Nd:YAG Q-switched laser with an energy of 1 J at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. This soft X-ray power compared favorably with that produced using a synchrotron radiation source, and the developed laser plasma source can be used in various applications, such as soft X-ray microscopy, in place of synchrotron facilities.

  2. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  3. Temporal Characterization of Femtosecond Laser-Plasma-AcceleratedElectron Bunches using THz Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Filip, C.V.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes,C.G.R.; Fubiani, G.; Huber, R.; Kaindl, R.A.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2005-07-12

    The temporal pro le of relativistic laser-plasma-acceleratedelectron bunches has been characterized. Coherent transition radiation atTHz frequencies, emitted at the plasma-vacuum boundary, is measuredthrough electro-optic sampling. The data indicates that THz radiation isemitted by a skewed bunch with a sub-50 fs rise time and a ~; 600 fs tail(half-width-at-half-maximum), consistent with ballistic debunching of 100percent-energy-spread beams. The measurement demonstrates bothshot-to-shot stability of the laser-plasma accelerator and femtosecondsynchronization between bunch and probe beam.

  4. Interaction diversity within quantified insect food webs in restored and adjacent intensively managed meadows.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Matthias; Duelli, Peter; Schmid, Bernhard; Müller, Christine B

    2007-09-01

    1. We studied the community and food-web structure of trap-nesting insects in restored meadows and at increasing distances within intensively managed grassland at 13 sites in Switzerland to test if declining species diversity correlates with declining interaction diversity and changes in food-web structure. 2. We analysed 49 quantitative food webs consisting of a total of 1382 trophic interactions involving 39 host/prey insect species and 14 parasitoid/predator insect species. Species richness and abundance of three functional groups, bees and wasps as the lower trophic level and natural enemies as the higher trophic level, were significantly higher in restored than in adjacent intensively managed meadows. Diversity and abundance of specific trophic interactions also declined from restored to intensively managed meadows. 3. The proportion of attacked brood cells and the mortality of bees and wasps due to natural enemies were significantly higher in restored than in intensively managed meadows. Bee abundance and the rate of attacked brood cells of bees declined with increasing distance from restored meadows. These findings indicate that interaction diversity declines more rapidly than species diversity in our study system. 4. Quantitative measures of food-web structure (linkage density, interaction diversity, interaction evenness and compartment diversity) were higher in restored than in intensively managed meadows. This was reflected in a higher mean number of host/prey species per consumer species (degree of generalism) in restored than in intensively managed meadows. 5. The higher insect species and interaction diversity was related to higher plant species richness in restored than in intensively managed meadows. In particular, bees and natural enemies reacted positively to increased plant diversity. 6. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the theoretical prediction that decreasing species richness at lower trophic levels should reduce species richness at

  5. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Formation of amplified spontaneous radiation in an expanding laser plasma allowing for refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulov, A. V.; Derzhiev, V. I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Terskikh, A. O.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    1990-06-01

    Calculations are made of the divergence of amplified spontaneous radiation in a laser plasma allowing for refraction by free electrons. An analysis is made of the divergence of the radiation generated due to a 3p→3s' transition in neon-like ions. Calculations are made of the divergence of the radiation due to the 4→3 transition in the O VIII ion allowing for refraction during expansion of a Formvar plasma.

  6. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W L; Moon, S; Patel, N; Patel, P K; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R

    2005-12-08

    We present experimental data of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser. These measurements were made using a CCD-based magnetic spectrometer. We present details on the distinct effective temperatures that were obtained for a wide variety of targets as a function of laser intensity. It is found that as the intensity increases from 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, a 0.4 dependence on the laser intensity is found. Between 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} and 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, a gradual rolling off of temperature with intensity is observed.

  7. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by excited ions in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. M.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.; Rychev, M. V.; Fedotov, Andrei B.

    1989-07-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) method was used in observation of excited Al II, Al III, In II and N II in an optical breakdown plasma. The feasibility of CARS spectroscopy of multiply charged ions in a laser plasma was established.

  8. Patterns of Non-Verbal Social Interactions within Intensive Mathematics Intervention Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jonathan Norris; Harkness, Shelly Sheats

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the non-verbal patterns of interaction within an intensive mathematics intervention context. Specifically, the authors draw on social constructivist worldview to examine a teacher's use of gesture in this setting. The teacher conducted a series of longitudinal teaching experiments with a small number of young, school-age…

  9. On the mechanisms of interaction of low-intensity millimeter waves with biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betskii, O. V.

    1994-01-01

    The interaction of low-intensity millimeter-band electromagnetic waves with biological objects is examined. These waves are widely used in medical practice as a means of physiotherapy for the treatment of various human disorders. Principal attention is given to the mechanisms through which millimeter waves act on the human organism.

  10. Teaching Intensive Interaction to Paid Carers: Using the "Communities of Practice" Model to Inform Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, Kelly; Bradley, Samantha; Johnson, Gemma; Mrozik, Jennifer H.; Appiah, Afua; Nagra, Maninder K.

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of people with learning disabilities in social communication is crucial to the development of relationships with others, a sense of social inclusion and self-worth. Intensive Interaction is an approach that can help carers develop their skills to engage people with severe and profound learning disabilities in personally relevant…

  11. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-08-03

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented.

  12. Interactive effects of ammonia and light intensity on hematochemical variables in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the influence of atmospheric ammonia exposure, light intensity, and their interaction on blood gases, electrolytes, and acid-base balance in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions. The experiment consisted of a 3 × 3 factorial arranged in a randomized comple...

  13. PREFACE: XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, V. E.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Karamurzov, B. S.; Efremov, V. P.; Sultanov, V. G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is a preface to the proceedings of the XXX International Conference on Interaction of Intense Energy Fluxes with Matter, which was held in Elbrus settlement, in the Kabardino-Balkar Republic of the Russian Federation, from March 1-6, 2015.

  14. Optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions from laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Gaul, E.; Rougk, J.; Aymond, F.; Donovan, M. E.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-09-15

    We measured, using Petawatt-level pulses, the average ion energy and neutron yield in high-intensity laser interactions with molecular clusters as a function of laser intensity. The interaction volume over which fusion occurred (1–10 mm{sup 3}) was larger than previous investigations, owing to the high laser power. Possible effects of prepulses were examined by implementing a pair of plasma mirrors. Our results show an optimum laser intensity for the production of energetic deuterium ions both with and without the use of the plasma mirrors. We measured deuterium plasmas with 14 keV average ion energies, which produced 7.2 × 10{sup 6} and 1.6 × 10{sup 7} neutrons in a single shot with and without plasma mirrors, respectively. The measured neutron yields qualitatively matched the expected yields calculated using a cylindrical plasma model.

  15. Study of the plasma expansion produced on ultra-thin foil targets with a high intensity and ultrashort laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedyuk, Semen; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Buffechoux, Sebastien; Albertazzi, Bruno; Martin, Francois; Kieffer, Jean Claude

    2011-10-01

    INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2, Québec, Canada LULI, UMR 7605, CNRS - CEA - Université Paris 6 - Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France Abstract: A high intensity ultrashort laser pulse, with an intensity of the order of 1019 W/cm2, focused onto a thin foil target generates a plasma and highly energetic ion (including proton) beams from its front and rear sides which propagate along the target normal. Another interest of laser plasma interaction with ultra-thin foil is the possibility to deposit energy in the entire laser absorption depth before any expansion thus enabling target isochoric heating. With a target thickness of 30 or 15 nm the laser pulse should interact in volume and enable to reach very high temperature while the target is still at solid density. The resulting cooling of the target will then be ultra-fast and potential X-ray emission should be ultrashort. The 100 TW class laser system at the Advanced Laser Light Source facility enables laser plasma interaction study with femtosecond laser pulses, ultra thin foil targets and high contrast laser pulse intensity ratio. We used a shadowgraph diagnostic with a femtosecond laser probe to characterize the plasma expansion.

  16. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  17. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael; Shvets, G.

    2014-07-31

    In the 1870s, English photographer Eadweard Muybridge captured motion pictures within one cycle of a horse’s gallop, which settled a hotly debated question of his time by showing that the horse became temporarily airborne. In the 1940s, Manhattan project photographer Berlin Brixner captured a nuclear blast at a million frames per second, and resolved a dispute about the explosion’s shape and speed. In this project, we developed methods to capture detailed motion pictures of evolving, light-velocity objects created by a laser pulse propagating through matter. These objects include electron density waves used to accelerate charged particles, laser-induced refractive index changes used for micromachining, and ionization tracks used for atmospheric chemical analysis, guide star creation and ranging. Our “movies”, like Muybridge’s and Brixner’s, are obtained in one shot, since the laser-created objects of interest are insufficiently repeatable for accurate stroboscopic imaging. Our high-speed photographs have begun to resolve controversies about how laser-created objects form and evolve, questions that previously could be addressed only by intensive computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions. Resolving such questions helps develop better tabletop particle accelerators, atmospheric ranging devices and many other applications of laser-matter interactions. Our photographic methods all begin by splitting one or more “probe” pulses from the laser pulse that creates the light-speed object. A probe illuminates the object and obtains information about its structure without altering it. We developed three single-shot visualization methods that differ in how the probes interact with the object of interest or are recorded. (1) Frequency-Domain Holography (FDH). In FDH, there are 2 probes, like “object” and “reference” beams in conventional holography. Our “object” probe surrounds the light-speed object, like a fleas swarming around a

  18. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.

    2009-04-03

    Energy depletion of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The evolution of a resonant laser pulse proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, the pulse steepens, compresses, and frequency red-shifts as energy is deposited in the plasma. The second phase of evolution occurs after the pulse reaches a minimum length at which point the pulse rapidly lengthens, losing resonance with the plasma. Expressions for the rate of laser energy loss and rate of laser red-shifting are derived and are found to be in excellent agreement with the direct numerical solution of the laser field evolution coupled to the plasma response. Both processes are shown to have the same characteristic length-scale. In the high intensity limit, for nearly-resonant Gaussian laser pulses, this scale length is shown to be independent of laser intensity.

  19. Self-focusing of an intense laser pulse interacting with a periodic lattice of metallic nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehri Javan, N.

    2015-09-15

    The motivation for the present work is the study of self-focusing of an intense laser beam propagating through a periodic array of metallic nanoparticle. Using a perturbative method, a wave equation describing the nonlinear interaction of a laser beam with nanoparticles is derived. Evolution of laser spot size with the Gaussian profile for the circular and linear polarizations is considered. It is found that, in the same intensity, the linear polarization in a special interval of frequency resonantly acts better than the circular one.

  20. Analytical model for interaction of short intense laser pulse with solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Ma, G. J.; Yu, Wei; Yu, M. Y.; Zhang, Q. J.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.

    2011-04-15

    A simple but comprehensive two-dimensional analytical model for the interaction of a normally incident short intense laser pulse with a solid-density plasma is proposed. Electron cavitation near the target surface by the laser ponderomotive force induces a strong local electrostatic charge-separation field. The cavitation makes possible mode conversion of the laser light into longitudinal electron oscillation at laser frequency, even for initial normal incidence of laser pulse. The intense charge-separation field in the cavity can significantly enhance the laser induced uxB electron oscillation at twice laser frequency to density levels even higher than that of the initial target.

  1. Interactive retinal vessel centreline extraction and boundary delineation using anisotropic fast marching and intensities consistency.

    PubMed

    Da Chen; Cohen, Laurent D

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interactive retinal vessels extraction method with anisotropic fast marching (AFM) based on the observation that one vessel may have the property of local intensities consistency. Our goal is to extract both the centrelines and boundaries between two given points. The proposed method consists of two stages: the first stage aims to finding the vessel centrelines using AFM and local intensities consistency roughly, while the second stage is to refine the centrelines from the previous stage using constrained Riemannian metric based AFM, and get the boundaries of the vessels simultaneously. Experiments show that results of our method outperform the classical minimal path method [1]. PMID:26737257

  2. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Pattern of the expansion of laser plasmas of various elements in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryunetkin, B. A.; Begimkulov, U. Sh; Dyakin, V. M.; Koldashov, G. A.; Repin, A. Yu; Stupitskiĭ, E. L.; Faenov, A. Ya

    1993-02-01

    The expansion of laser plasmas of the elements Be, Al, Cu, and Pb in a static transverse magnetic field B<=2.7 T has been studied experimentally. The plasma was produced by a ruby laser at a power density no greater than 1012 W/cm2. For all the elements, a characteristic "two-petal" expansion pattern is observed. At a certain distance from the target, the two petals coalesce into a narrow jet. The radius of curvature of the petals and the position of the coalescence point depend on the field strength and the atomic weight of the element.

  3. Observing and estimating of intensive triad interaction occurrence in very shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudof, Seyed Masoud; Badiei, Peyman; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa; Chegini, Vahid

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a series of field measurements were carried out to investigate triad interactions of spectral peak in near shore. The water level fluctuations were recorded at 5 stations with depths varying from 0.8 to 5 m along a shore-perpendicular transect at sandy coasts of Nowshahr, located in the southern Caspian Sea coast. Two storms with significant wave height of approximately 1.4 m were observed during the measurement period. Using bispectral analysis, a new quantitative index is proposed to investigate temporal and spatial intensity of nonlinear interaction between spectral peak and other harmonics. The proposed index was evaluated for time series of water level data and compared with the bicoherence value of self-spectral peak triad interaction (SSPT); b2 (fp ,fp) . Comparing to SSPT, the proposed new index includes all positive and negative triad interactions with spectral peak. The relative depth, kp d , of non-breaking waves varied from 0.25 to 2.00 along the transect during the study period, where kp is the wave-number and d is the water depth. In general, SSPT increased by decreasing kp d ; however, the results showed that in two shallow stations the maximum SSPT did not correspond to the lowest values of kp d . A considerable time lag was observed between occurrence of the most intensive triad interactions and termination of wave breaking in post storm condition. Furthermore, the intensive triad interactions happened several hours after the largest Ursell numbers of non-breaking waves.

  4. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  5. Higher order terms of radiative damping in extreme intense laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Rishi R.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2012-07-15

    The higher order terms of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation have been derived, and their effects are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation. The dominant group of terms up to the fourth order of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation is identified for ultra-intense laser-matter interactions. The second order terms are found to be the damping terms of the Lorentz force while the first order terms represent friction in the equation of motion. Because the second order terms restrict electron acceleration during the laser interaction, electrons/ions are prevented from over-accelerating. Radiative damping becomes highly significant when I{>=} 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} while Bremsstrahlung will be saturated, thus radiative damping will be a dominant source of hard x-rays in regimes at extreme intensities.

  6. A diagnostic for micrometer sensitive positioning of solid targets in intense laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Kakolee, K. F.; Jeong, T. W.; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis

    2016-09-01

    A target position monitoring diagnostic, relevant to intense laser-solid interaction, is presented. The alignment system, having a sensitivity of few micrometers, consist of an infinity corrected long working distance objective, a broadband illuminating source and a CCD camera. The imaging system, placed along the axis of incident laser pulse, serves the dual purpose of laser focus diagnosis and precise positioning of the target in three dimension axis. By employing this technique, solid targets with thickness varying from opaque micrometer thick foils to few nanometer thin transparent foils can be aligned precisely. The effectiveness of the entire alignment system is demonstrated in enhanced acceleration of ions in intense laser-matter interaction, with very high reproducibility.

  7. Furry picture transition rates in the intense fields at a lepton collider interaction point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect on particle physics processes by intense electromagnetic fields in the charge bunch collisions at future lepton colliders is considered. Since the charge bunch fields are tied to massive sources (the e+e- charges), a reference frame is chosen in which the fields appear to be co-propagating. Solutions of the Dirac equation minimally coupled to the electromagnetic fields reasonably associated with two intense overlapping charge bunches are obtained and found to be a Volkov solution with respect to a null 4-vector whose 3-vector part lies in the common propagation direction. These solutions are used within the Furry interaction picture to calculate the beamstrahlung transition rate for electron radiation due to interaction with the electromagnetic fields of two colliding charge bunches. New analytic expressions are obtained and compared numerically with the beamstrahlung in the electromagnetic field of one charge bunch. The techniques developed will be applied to other collider physics processes in due course.

  8. Angularly separated harmonic generation from intense laser interaction with blazed diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M; Zepf, M; Geissler, M; Dromey, B

    2011-06-15

    We made numerical simulations of the generation of narrowband beams of extreme ultraviolet radiation from intense laser interaction with a blazed grating surface. Strong fifth harmonic emission into its blazed diffraction order was observed as well as heavy suppression of the fundamental frequency with comparison to a typical harmonic spectrum from a flat target. The results demonstrate a new highly efficient method of generating near-monochromatic harmonics from the fundamental with minimal effect on the pulse duration.

  9. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  10. Demonstration of relativistic electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens

    PubMed Central

    Thaury, C.; Guillaume, E.; Döpp, A.; Lehe, R.; Lifschitz, A.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Gautier, J.; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A.; Flacco, A.; Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Rousse, A.; Malka, V.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high-energy electron accelerators. It could make free-electron lasers available to a broad scientific community and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high-energy physics. Furthermore, the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line. PMID:25880791

  11. Demonstration of relativistic electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Ta Phuoc, K; Gautier, J; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Flacco, A; Tissandier, F; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2015-04-16

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high-energy electron accelerators. It could make free-electron lasers available to a broad scientific community and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high-energy physics. Furthermore, the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  12. Demonstration of relativistic electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens.

    PubMed

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Ta Phuoc, K; Gautier, J; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Flacco, A; Tissandier, F; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high-energy electron accelerators. It could make free-electron lasers available to a broad scientific community and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high-energy physics. Furthermore, the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line. PMID:25880791

  13. Ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the blowout regime of laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Popov, K I; Rozmus, W; Bychenkov, V Yu; Naseri, N; Capjack, C E; Brantov, A V

    2010-11-01

    The ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the so called bubble or blowout regime of a laser-plasma accelerator is discussed. In response to the strong fields of the accelerated electrons the ions form a central filament along the laser axis that can be compressed to densities 2 orders of magnitude higher than the initial particle density. A theory of the filament formation and a model of ion self-compression are proposed. It is also shown that in the case of a sharp rear plasma-vacuum interface the ions can be accelerated by a combination of three basic mechanisms. The long time ion evolution that results from the strong electrostatic fields of an electron bunch provides a unique diagnostic of laser-plasma accelerators.

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  15. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  16. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic domain pattern produced by intense femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Jaivarhan; Mohan, Shyam; Banerjee, S. S.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2009-03-01

    An important and intriguing area of research is laser plasma generated giant magnetic field pulses. Interaction of ultrashort high intensity laser pulses with matter involves several mechanisms for generating ultrastrong magnetic fields. By irradiating a magnetic recordable tape constituting of γ-Fe2O3 particles with an intense p-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (˜ 10^16 W cm-2, 100fs), we have found complex magnetic field patterns stored in the tape. We image the local magnetic field distribution around the irradiated region [1] using the high sensitivity magneto-optical imaging technique. We understand the complex magnetic domains patterns recoded on the tape in terms of interesting instabilities [1] generated in the plasma produced during the irradiation of the tape with intense laser pulses. [0pt] [1] Jaivardhan Sinha, Shyam Mohan, S. S Banerjee, S. Kahaly, G. Ravindra Kumar, Phys. Rev. E 77, 046118(2008). *satyajit@iitk.ac.in

  17. Diffraction-limited soft-x-ray projection imaging using a laser plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Brown, L.A. ); Freeman, R.R.; Mansfield, W.M.; Wood, O.R. II; Tennant, D.M.; Bjorkholm, J.E.; MacDowell, A.A. ); Bokor, J.; Jewell, T.E.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L.; Waskiewicz, W.K. )

    1991-10-15

    Projection imaging of 0.1-{mu}m lines and spaces is demonstrated with a Mo/Si multilayer coated Schwarzschild objective and 14-nm illumination from a laser plasma source. This structure has been etched into a silicon wafer by using a trilevel resist and reactive ion etching. Low-contrast modulation at 0.05-{mu}m lines and spaces is observed in polymethylmethacrylate.

  18. Study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas at future ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Lamia, L.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Negoita, F.; Odorici, F.; Petrascu, H.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution we will present the future activities that our collaboration will carry out at ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics), the new multi peta-watt Laser facility, currently under construction at Bucharest (Romania). The activities concerns the study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas. In this framework we proposed the construction of a new, general-purpose experimental set-up able to detect and identify neutrons and charged particles.

  19. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-12-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines or fullerenes are studied here. An increase in XUV yield due to the optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to produce an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to the theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique permits us to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne approximately equals 1018 cm-3 and Te approximately equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne intensities of spectral lines, belonging to the ions having a different degree of ionization. Preliminary experiments show that conversion efficiency for molecular coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  20. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-10-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines are studied here. An increase in EUV yield due to optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to product an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique makes it possible to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne equals 2.0 (+/- 0.5)1018 cm-3 and Te equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne intensities of spectral lines, belonging to the ions having a different degree of ionization. Preliminary experiments show that conversion efficiency for molecular coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  1. Large-solid-angle illuminators for extreme ultraviolet lithography with laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser Plasma Sources (LPSS) of extreme ultraviolet radiation are an attractive alternative to synchrotron radiation sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) due to their modularity, brightness, and modest size and cost. To fully exploit the extreme ultraviolet power emitted by such sources, it is necessary to capture the largest possible fraction of the source emission half-sphere while simultaneously optimizing the illumination stationarity and uniformity on the object mask. In this LDRD project, laser plasma source illumination systems for EUVL have been designed and then theoretically and experimentally characterized. Ellipsoidal condensers have been found to be simple yet extremely efficient condensers for small-field EUVL imaging systems. The effects of aberrations in such condensers on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging have been studied with physical optics modeling. Lastly, the design of an efficient large-solid-angle condenser has been completed. It collects 50% of the available laser plasma source power at 14 nm and delivers it properly to the object mask in a wide-arc-field camera.

  2. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    PubMed

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  3. Broadband Single-Shot Electron Spectrometer for GeV-Class Laser Plasma Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Wan, W.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Laser-plasma-based accelerators can provide electrons over a broad energy range and/or with large momentum spread. The electron beam energy distribution can be controlled via accurate control of laser and plasma properties, and beams with energies ranging from'0.5 to 1000 MeV have been observed. Measuring these energy distributions in a single shot requires the use of a diagnostic with large momentum acceptance and, ideally, sufficient resolution to accurately measure energy spread in the case of narrow energy spread. Such a broadband single-shot electron magnetic spectrometer for GeV-class laser-plasma-based accelerators has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A detailed description of the hardware and the design concept is presented, as well as a performance evaluation of the spectrometer. The spectrometer covered electron beam energies raging from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, and enabled the simultaneous measurement of the laser properties at the exit of the accelerator through the use of a sufficiently large pole gap. Based on measured field maps and 3rd-order transport analysis, a few percent-level resolution and determination of the absolute energy were achieved over the entire energy range. Laser-plasma-based accelerator experiments demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic and its suitability for such a broadband electron source.

  4. Effects of Laser-Plasma Instabilities on Hydro Evolution in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Hu, S. X.; Ren, C.

    2015-11-01

    Laser-plasma instabilities and hydro evolution of coronal plasmas in an OMEGA EP long-scale-length experiment with planar targets are studied with particle-in-cell (PIC) and hydrodynamics simulations. Plasma and laser conditions are first obtained in a DRACO simulation with only inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption. Using these conditions, an OSIRIS simulation is performed to study laser absorption and hot-electron generation caused by laser-plasma instabilities near the quarter-critical region. The obtained PIC information has subsequently been coupled to another DRACO simulation to examine how the laser-plasma instabilities affect the overall hydrodynamics. The results show that the more-realistic laser absorption can increase the electron temperature but only slightly changes the density scale length in the corona. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center), and DE-SC0012316.

  5. Patterns of non-verbal social interactions within intensive mathematics intervention contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jonathan Norris; Harkness, Shelly Sheats

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the non-verbal patterns of interaction within an intensive mathematics intervention context. Specifically, the authors draw on social constructivist worldview to examine a teacher's use of gesture in this setting. The teacher conducted a series of longitudinal teaching experiments with a small number of young, school-age children in the context of early arithmetic development. From these experiments, the authors gathered extensive video records of teaching practice and, from an inductive analysis of these records, identified three distinct patterns of teacher gesture: behavior eliciting, behavior suggesting, and behavior replicating. Awareness of their potential to influence students via gesture may prompt teachers to more closely attend to their own interactions with mathematical tools and take these teacher interactions into consideration when forming interpretations of students' cognition.

  6. Cometary particulate analyzer. [mass spectrometry of laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Miller, D. J.; Utterback, N. G.

    1979-01-01

    A concept for determining the relative abundance of elements contained in cometary particulates was evaluated. The technique utilizes a short, high intensity burst of laser radiation to vaporize and ionize collected particulate material. Ions extracted from this laser produced plasma are analyzed in a time of flight mass spectrometer to yield an atomic mass spectrum representative of the relative abundance of elements in the particulates. Critical aspects of the development of this system are determining the ionization efficiencies for various atomic species and achieving adequate mass resolution. A technique called energy-time focus, which utilizes static electric fields to alter the length of the ion flight path in proportion to the ion initial energy, was used which results in a corresponding compression to the range of ion flight times which effectively improves the inherent resolution. Sufficient data were acquired to develop preliminary specifications for a flight experiment.

  7. Measurement of acceleration in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haessner, R.; Theobald, W.; Niedermeier, S.; Michelmann, K.; Feurer, T.; Schillinger, H.; Sauerbrey, R.

    1998-02-20

    Accelerations up to 4x10{sup 19} m/s{sup 2} are measured in femtosecond laser-produced plasmas at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using the Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) technique. A high density plasma is formed by focusing an ultrashort unchirped laser pulse on a plane carbon target and part of the reflected pulse is eventually detected by a FROG autocorrelator. Radiation pressure and thermal pressure accelerate the plasma which causes a chirp in the reflected laser pulse. The retrieved phase and amplitude information reveal that the plasma motion is dominated by the large light pressure which pushes the plasma into the target. This is supported by theoretical estimates and by the results of independently measured time integrated spectra of the reflected pulse.

  8. Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mahbub; Boyle, Diane K.; Crosser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs) of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs. Despite differences in unit characteristics and interaction-related behaviors, the study finds that when nurses and physicians “interact while sitting” they prefer spaces that help maintain a high level of environmental awareness; that when nurses “walk” and “interact while walking” they avoid spaces with better global access and visibility; and that everyone in ICUs “walk” more in spaces with higher control over neighboring spaces. It is argued that such consistent behavioral patterns occur due to the structural similarities of spatial networks over and above the more general functional similarities of ICUs. PMID:25469838

  9. Impacts of Air-Sea Interaction on Tropical Cyclone Track and Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liguang; Wang, Bin; Braun, Scott A.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of hurricane-ocean coupling on intensity and track of tropical cyclones (TCs) is investigated through idealized numerical experiments using a coupled hurricane-ocean model. The focus is placed on how air-sea interaction affects TC tracks and intensity. It is found that the symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) cooling is primarily responsible for the TC weakening in the coupled experiments because the induced asymmetric circulation associated with the asymmetric SST anomalies is weak and shallow. The track difference between the coupled and fixed SST experiments is generally small because of the competing processes. One is associated with the modified TC asymmetries. The asymmetric SST anomalies - weaken the surface fluxes in the rear and enhance the fluxes in the front. As a result, the enhanced diabatic heating is located on the southern side for a westward-moving TC, tending to shift the TC southward. The symmetric SST anomalies weakens the TC intensity and thus the dymmetrization process, leading to more prominent TC asymmetries. The other is associated with the weakening of the beta drift resulting from the weakening of the TC outer strength. In the coupled experiment, the weakening of the beta drift leads to a more northward shift. By adjusting the vortex outer strength of the initial vortices, the beta drift can vary while the effect of air-sea interaction changes little. Two types of track differences simulated in the previous numerical studies are obtained.

  10. Survey of Collective Instabilities and Beam-Plasma Interactions in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Qin, Hong; Startsev, Edward A.; Rose, David V.; Lund, Steven M.; Welch, Dale R.; Sefkow, Adam

    2008-06-19

    This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding based on advanced analytical and numerical studies of collective processes and beam-plasma interactions in intense heavy ion beams for applications to ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion. The topics include: discussion of the conditions for quiescent beam propagation over long distances; and the electrostatic Harris instability and the transverse electromagnetic Weibel instability in highly anisotropic, intense one-component ion beams. In the longitudinal drift compression and transverse compression regions, collective processes associated with the interaction of the intense ion beam with a charge-neutralizing background plasma are described, including the electrostatic electron-ion two-stream instability, the multispecies electromagnetic Weibel instability, and collective excitations in the presence of a solenoidal magnetic field. The effects of a velocity tilt on reducing two-stream instability growth rates are also discussed. Operating regimes are identified where the possible deleterious effects of collective processes on beam quality are minimized.

  11. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators. PMID:27713541

  12. Femtosecond dynamics of energetic electrons in high intensity laser-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompili, R.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2016-10-01

    Highly energetic electrons are generated at the early phases of the interaction of short-pulse high-intensity lasers with solid targets. These escaping particles are identified as the essential core of picosecond-scale phenomena such as laser-based acceleration, surface manipulation, generation of intense magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses. Increasing the number of the escaping electrons facilitate the late time processes in all cases. Up to now only indirect evidences of these important forerunners have been recorded, thus no detailed study of the governing mechanisms was possible. Here we report, for the first time, direct time-dependent measurements of energetic electrons ejected from solid targets by the interaction with a short-pulse high-intensity laser. We measured electron bunches up to 7 nanocoulombs charge, picosecond duration and 12 megaelectronvolts energy. Our ’snapshots’ capture their evolution with an unprecedented temporal resolution, demonstrat- ing a significant boost in charge and energy of escaping electrons when increasing the geometrical target curvature. These results pave the way toward significant improvement in laser acceleration of ions using shaped targets allowing the future development of small scale laser-ion accelerators.

  13. Hands help hearing: Facilitatory audiotactile interaction at low sound-intensity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Martin; Caetano, Gina; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2004-02-01

    Auditory and vibrotactile stimuli share similar temporal patterns. A psychophysical experiment was performed to test whether this similarity would lead into an intermodal bias in perception of sound intensity. Nine normal-hearing subjects performed a loudness-matching task of faint tones, adjusting the probe tone to sound equally loud as a reference tone. The task was performed both when the subjects were touching and when they were not touching a tube that vibrated simultaneously with the probe tone. The subjects chose on average 12% lower intensities (p<0.01) for the probe tone when they touched the tube, suggesting facilitatory interaction between auditory and tactile senses in normal-hearing subjects.

  14. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Taiee

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  15. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

    2008-10-08

    Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, R.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Woods, M.; Xia, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-03-21

    Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

  17. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  18. Intensity interactions in cascades of a two-stage Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, S. A.; Churkin, D. V.; Podivilov, E. V.

    2003-10-01

    Effects of intensity interactions (pump power depletion and sequential saturation of cascade generation) have been studied in a two-stage phosphosilicate Raman fiber laser in experiment and modeling. An analytical model of the laser which takes into account power variation along the fiber and spectral broadening of the first Stokes wave has been developed that describes experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. Good agreement between calculated and experimental values of the thresholds, differential efficiency for the first and the second Stokes waves and saturation levels for the residual pump and the first Stokes wave powers is demonstrated.

  19. MeV negative ion generation from ultra-intense laser interaction with a water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Borghesi, M.; Doria, D.; Zepf, M.; Sarri, G.; Ehrentraut, L.; Steinke, S.; Sandner, W.; Schnuerer, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2011-08-01

    MeV negative oxygen ions are obtained from a water spray target irradiated by high intensity (5 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) and ultrashort (50 fs) laser pulses. Generation of negative ions is ascribed to electron-capture processes that the laser-accelerated high-energy positive ion experiences when it interacts with atoms in the spray. This mechanism implies the existence of a large number of MeV neutral oxygen atoms, which is consistent with indirect experimental evidence.

  20. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L. Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B.; Yu, J. Q.

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  1. The calculation of the dynamics of interaction between intense electron beams and dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Milyavskii, V.V.; Skvortsov, V.A.

    1995-09-01

    A mathematical model is constructed and a numerical investigation performed of the interaction between an intense relativistic electron beam and a solid high-molecular dielectric. The model is based on the equations of mechanics of continuum, electrodynamics, and kinetics, describing the accumulation and relaxation of space charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. A semiempirical procedure is proposed for the calculation of energy deposition by an electron beam in a target in the presence of a nonuniform electric field.

  2. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  3. The Training of a Child with Autism in a Greek Preschool Inclusive Class through Intensive Interaction: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argyropoulou, Zoe; Papoudi, Despina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of intensive interaction during interactive play between a preschool boy with autism and his teacher and, as a consequence, improve the social interaction between the boy and a non-autistic girl in an inclusive class in Greece. A single subject ABA design was applied. Observed variables…

  4. James Clerk Maxwell Prize Address: High Intensity Laser Propagation and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprangle, Phillip

    2013-10-01

    High intensity laser radiation sources cover a wide range of parameters, e.g., peak powers from tera to peta watts, pulse lengths from pico to femto seconds, repetition rates ranging from kilo to mega hertz and average powers of many tens of watts. This talk will cover, among other things, some of the unique physical processes which result when high intensity laser radiation interacts with gases and plasmas. One of the interesting topics to be discussed is the propagation of these laser pulses in a turbulent atmosphere which results in a multitude of coupled linear and nonlinear processes including filamentation and scintillation. Phase conjugation techniques to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence (scintillation) will be described. This talk will also discuss a range of potential applications of these high intensity lasers, including: electron acceleration in spatially periodic and tapered plasma channels, detection of radioactive material using electromagnetic signatures, atmospheric lasing of N2 molecules, as well as incoherent and coherent x-ray generation mechanisms. Research supported by NRL, ONR and UMD.

  5. Manifestation of anharmonic resonance in the interaction of intense ultrashort laser pulses with microstructured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2016-10-01

    Identification of the basic processes responsible for an efficient heating of intense laser produced plasmas is one of the important features of high intensity laser matter interaction studies. Collisionless absorption due to the anharmonicity in the self-consistent electrostatic potential of the plasma, known as anharmonic resonance (AHR), has been proposed to be a basic mechanism but a clear experimental demonstration is needed. Here, we show that microstructured targets enhance X-ray emission and the polarization dependence ascribes the enhancement to anharmonic resonance heating. It is found that p-polarized pulses of 5 ×1017 W/cm2 intensity bring in a 16-fold enhancement in the X-ray emission in the energy range 20-350 keV compared to s-polarized pulses with microstructured targets. This ratio is 2 for the case of polished targets under otherwise identical conditions. Particle-in-cell simulations clearly show that AHR is the key absorption mechanism responsible for this effect.

  6. Cosmic ray interactions in the ground: Temporal variations in cosmic ray intensities and geophysical studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, D.

    1986-01-01

    Temporal variations in cosmic ray intensity have been deduced from observations of products of interactions of cosmic ray particles in the Moon, meteorites, and the Earth. Of particular interest is a comparison between the information based on Earth and that based on other samples. Differences are expected at least due to: (1) differences in the extent of cosmic ray modulation, and (2) changes in the geomagnetic dipole field. Any information on the global changes in the terrestrial cosmic ray intensity is therefore of importance. In this paper a possible technique for detecting changes in cosmic ray intensity is presented. The method involves human intervention and is applicable for the past 10,000 yrs. Studies of changes over longer periods of time are possible if supplementary data on age and history of the sample are available using other methods. Also discussed are the possibilities of studying certain geophysical processes, e.g., erosion, weathering, tectonic events based on studies of certain cosmic ray-produced isotopes for the past several million years.

  7. The scaling of electron and positron generation in intense laser-solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Link, A.; Fiuza, F.; Hazi, A.; Heeter, R. F.; Kemp, A. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Sentoku, Y.; Audebert, P.; Hill, M.; Hobbs, L.; Kerr, S.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents experimental scalings of the electrons and positrons produced by intense laser-target interactions at relativistic laser intensities (10{sup 18}–10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}). The data were acquired from three short-pulse laser facilities with laser energies ranging from 80 to 1500 J. We found a non-linear (≈E{sub L}{sup 2}) scaling of positron yield [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 215001 (2015)] and a linear scaling of electron yield with the laser energy. These scalings are explained by theoretical and numerical analyses. Positron acceleration by the target sheath field is confirmed by the positron energy spectrum, which has a pronounced peak at energies near the sheath potential, as determined by the observed maximum energies of accelerated protons. The parameters of laser-produced electron-positron jets are summarized together with the theoretical energy scaling. The measured energy-squared scaling of relativistic electron-positron jets indicates the possibility to create an astrophysically relevant experimental platform with such jets using multi-kilojoule high intensity lasers currently under construction.

  8. Clinical relevancy and risks of potential drug–drug interactions in intensive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Aline Teotonio; Stahlschmidt, Rebeca; Granja, Silvia; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Moriel, Patricia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the potential Drug–Drug Interactions (pDDI) found in prescription orders of adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Brazilian public health system hospital; quantify and qualify the pDDI regarding their severity and risks to the critical patient, using the database from Micromedex®. Methods Prospective study (January–December of 2011) collecting and evaluating 369 prescription orders (convenient sampling), one per patient. Results During the study 1844 pDDIs were identified and distributed in 405 pairs (medication A × medication B combination). There was an average of 5.00 ± 5.06 pDDIs per prescription order, the most prevalent being moderate and important interactions, present in 74% and 67% of prescription orders, respectively. In total, there were 9 contraindicated, 129 important and 204 moderate pDDIs. Among them 52 had as management recommendation to “avoid concomitant use” or “suspension of medication”, while 306 had as recommendation “continuous and adequate monitoring”. Conclusion The high number of pDDIs found in the study combined with the evaluation of the clinical relevancy of the most frequent pDDIs in the ICU shows that moderate and important interactions are highly incident. As the majority of them demand monitoring and adequate management, being aware of these interactions is major information for the safe and individualized risk management. PMID:27134536

  9. Situational motivation and perceived intensity: their interaction in predicting changes in positive affect from physical activity.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P < .05) but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed.

  10. Situational Motivation and Perceived Intensity: Their Interaction in Predicting Changes in Positive Affect from Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Eva; Fortier, Michelle S.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that affective experiences surrounding physical activity can contribute to the proper self-regulation of an active lifestyle. Motivation toward physical activity, as portrayed by self-determination theory, has been linked to positive affect, as has the intensity of physical activity, especially of a preferred nature. The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the interaction between situational motivation and intensity [i.e., ratings of perceived exertion (RPE)] in predicting changes in positive affect following an acute bout of preferred physical activity, namely, running. Fourty-one female runners engaged in a 30-minute self-paced treadmill run in a laboratory context. Situational motivation for running, pre- and post-running positive affect, and RPE were assessed via validated self-report questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed a significant interaction effect between RPE and introjection (P < .05) but not between RPE and identified regulation or intrinsic motivation. At low levels of introjection, the influence of RPE on the change in positive affect was considerable, with higher RPE ratings being associated with greater increases in positive affect. The implications of the findings in light of SDT principles as well as the potential contingencies between the regulations and RPE in predicting positive affect among women are discussed. PMID:22778914

  11. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  12. Analytical calculations of intense Gaussian laser beam propagating in plasmas with relativistic collision correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Gao Ruilin; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2012-10-15

    Theoretical investigations of a Gaussian laser beam propagating in relativistic plasmas have been performed with the WKB method and complex eikonal function. We consider the relativistic nonlinearity induced by intense laser beam, and present the relativistically generalized forms of the plasma frequency and electron collision frequency in plasmas. The coupled differential equations describing the propagation variations of laser beam are derived and numerically solved. The obtained simulation results present the similar variation tendency with experiments. By changing the plasma density, we theoretically analyze the feasibility of using a plasmas slab of a fixed thickness to compress the laser beam-width and acquire the focused laser intensity. The present work complements the relativistic correction of the electron collision frequency with reasonable derivations, promotes the theoretical approaching to experiments and provides effective instructions to the practical laser-plasma interactions.

  13. Dynamics of ponderomotive ion acceleration in a laser-plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalev, V. F.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    Analytical solution to the Cauchy problem for the kinetic equation describing the radial acceleration of ions under the action of the ponderomotive force of a laser beam undergoing guided propagation in transparent plasma is constructed. Spatial and temporal dependences of the ion distribution function and the integral ion characteristics, such as the density, average velocity, and energy spectrum, are obtained for an axisymmetric laser-plasma channel. The formation of a density peak near the channel boundary and the effect of ion flow breaking for a quasi-stationary laser beam are described analytically.

  14. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained. PMID:26565471

  15. Quantum Cohesion Oscillation of Electron Ground State in Low Temperature Laser Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Qingxun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Kaixi

    1996-01-01

    The development of radically new technological and economically efficient methods for obtaining chemical products and for producing new materials with specific properties requires the study of physical and chemical processes proceeding at temperature of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) K, temperature range of low temperature plasma. In our paper, by means of Wigner matrix of quantum statistical theory, a formula is derived for the energy of quantum coherent oscillation of electron ground state in laser plasma at low temperature. The collective behavior would be important in ion and ion-molecule reactions.

  16. Framed, 16-Image, Kirkpatrick-Baez Microscope for Laser-Plasma X-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Oertel, J.A.; Walsh, P.J.

    2004-10-19

    A framed, 16-image Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) type x-ray microscope has been designed for use in imaging laser-plasma x-ray emission. The reflecting elements are 16 pairs of concave mirrors arranged to reflect and focus x rays emanating from a laser-produced plasma. The resolution of the elements is 3 mm at best focus and is better than 5 mm within a 500-mm diam region. A framing camera will be used in combination with the KB optic to produce 16 gated images over a typical interval of 1.5 ns. The system is designed for use on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser facility.

  17. Laser-Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements with Triple Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, A.; Quiros, N.; Khanal, V.; Wan, W. C.; Meineke, J.; Kugland, N. L.; Morita, T.; Gregori, G.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments to investigate shocks produced by the explosive expansion of a laser-plasma plume against a gas background were performed on the Titan laser (LLNL). Knowledge of density and temperature is essential for understanding the underlying processes. Triple Langmuir probes (TLP) were used for measuring these quantities as function of time at a given location in the plasma. In the experiment, laser ablation plasma from a carbon rod expanded in hydrogen, helium, or argon ambient gas. Density and temperature jumps in the TLP measurements can be correlated with shocks detected by interferometry and proton deflectometry. This work was supported by the US DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829.

  18. Laser Plasma Vapour Deposition Of Photoconducting And High Tc Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihai A.; Apostol, Ileana; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Botila, T.; Pentia, E.; Ciurea, M. L.; Dinescu, M.; Jaklovsky, J.; Aldica, Gheorghe V.; Miu, L.; Rusu, C.; Hening, Al. A.; Mihai, S.; Constantin, C.; Stoica, Mihaela; Pausescu, P.; Cruceanu, Eugen; Pompe, Wolfgang; Wuensch, R.; Richter, Asta; Scheibe, H. J.

    1989-05-01

    Device quality PbS photoconducting films were obtained by laser plasma vapour deposition on special glass substrates at room temperature and their structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction. High Tc superconducting films of composition Dy0.2Y0.8Ba2Cu3O~7 and YBa2Cu3O~7 were deposited on sapphire substrate. It was shown for laser deposited YBa2Cu3O~7 that a buffer layer of the same composition predeposited by rf sputtering allows for getting high quality superconducting films.

  19. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  20. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Steinke, S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Shaw, B. H.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Huijts, J. V.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-10-01

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T /m , enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  1. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  2. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Alex B; McCorkindale, John C; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 10(3) eV and I  ≈  10(16) W cm(-2), it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z(2)α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d(10)5s(2)5p(6)) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z(2)α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling

  3. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Alex B.; McCorkindale, John C.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W.; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K.

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 103 eV and I  ≈  1016 W cm-2, it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z 2 α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d105s25p6) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z 2 α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling. It is also

  4. Rewriting the rules governing high intensity interactions of light with matter.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Alex B; McCorkindale, John C; Poopalasingam, Sankar; Longworth, James W; Simon, Peter; Szatmári, Sándor; Rhodes, Charles K

    2016-04-01

    The trajectory of discovery associated with the study of high-intensity nonlinear radiative interactions with matter and corresponding nonlinear modes of electromagnetic propagation through material that have been conducted over the last 50 years can be presented as a landscape in the intensity/quantum energy [I-ħω] plane. Based on an extensive series of experimental and theoretical findings, a universal zone of anomalous enhanced electromagnetic coupling, designated as the fundamental nonlinear domain, can be defined. Since the lower boundaries of this region for all atomic matter correspond to ħω ~ 10(3) eV and I  ≈  10(16) W cm(-2), it heralds a future dominated by x-ray and γ-ray studies of all phases of matter including nuclear states. The augmented strength of the interaction with materials can be generally expressed as an increase in the basic electromagnetic coupling constant in which the fine structure constant α  →  Z(2)α, where Z denotes the number of electrons participating in an ordered response to the driving field. Since radiative conditions strongly favoring the development of this enhanced electromagnetic coupling are readily produced in self-trapped plasma channels, the processes associated with the generation of nonlinear interactions with materials stand in natural alliance with the nonlinear mechanisms that induce confined propagation. An experimental example involving the Xe (4d(10)5s(2)5p(6)) supershell for which Z  ≅  18 that falls in the specified anomalous nonlinear domain is described. This yields an effective coupling constant of Z(2)α  ≅  2.4  >  1, a magnitude comparable to the strong interaction and a value rendering as useless conventional perturbative analyses founded on an expansion in powers of α. This enhancement can be quantitatively understood as a direct consequence of the dominant role played by coherently driven multiply-excited states in the dynamics of the coupling

  5. Matter wave switching in Bose-Einstein condensates via intensity redistribution soliton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, S.; Lakshmanan, M.; Muruganandam, P.

    2011-02-15

    Using time dependent nonlinear (s-wave scattering length) coupling between the components of a weakly interacting two component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), we show the possibility of matter wave switching (fraction of atoms transfer) between the components via shape changing/intensity redistribution (matter redistribution) soliton interactions. We investigate the exact bright-bright N-soliton solution of an effective one-dimensional (1D) two component BEC by suitably tailoring the trap potential, atomic scattering length, and atom gain or loss. In particular, we show that the effective 1D coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations with time dependent parameters can be transformed into the well known completely integrable Manakov model described by coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations by effecting a change of variables of the coordinates and the wave functions under certain conditions related to the time dependent parameters. We obtain the one-soliton solution and demonstrate the shape changing/matter redistribution interactions of two and three-soliton solutions for the time-independent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. The standard elastic collision of solitons occur only for a specific choice of soliton parameters.

  6. Production and dynamics of positrons in ultrahigh intensity laser-foil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Nerush, E. N.

    2016-09-01

    The electron-positron pair production accompanying interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse with a foil is studied for laser intensities higher than 1024 W cm-2. The laser energy penetrates into the foil due to the effect of the relativistic hole-boring. It is demonstrated that the electron-positron plasma is produced as a result of quantum-electrodynamical cascading in the field of the incident and reflected laser light in front of the foil. The incident and reflected laser light make up the circularly polarized standing wave in the reference frame of the hole-boring front and the pair density peaks near the nodes and anti-nodes of the wave. A model based on the particle dynamics with radiation reaction effect near the magnetic nodes is developed. The model predictions are verified by three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Prepulse effects on the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with high-Z solids

    PubMed

    Zhidkov; Sasaki; Utsumi; Fukumoto; Tajima; Saito; Hironaka; Nakamura; Kondo; Yoshida

    2000-11-01

    Kalpha emission of high-Z solid targets irradiated by an intense, short (<100 fs) laser pulse in the 10 keV region is shown to be sensitive to the electron energy cutoff, which is strongly dependent on the density gradient of the plasma corona formed by a long prepulse. The absorption rate of short laser pulses, the hot electron distribution, and x-ray emission from a Cu slab target are studied via a hybrid model, which combines the hydrodynamics, collisional particle-in-cell, and Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and via a direct spectroscopic measurement. An absorption mechanism originating from the interaction of the laser pulse with plasma waves is found to increase the absorption rate by over 30% even for a very short, s-polarized laser pulse. Calculated and measured x-ray spectra are in good agreement, confirming the electron energy cutoff.

  8. Nonlinear modes of an intense laser beam interacting with a periodic lattice of nanoparticle

    SciTech Connect

    Sepehri Javan, N. Homami, S. H. H.

    2015-08-15

    Self-guided nonlinear propagation of an intense laser beam through a periodic lattice of nanoparticle is studied. Using a perturbative method, a cubic nonlinear wave equation describing the laser-nanoparticle interaction in the weakly relativistic regime is derived. Transverse Eigen modes of the laser, nonlinear dispersion relation and its related group velocity are obtained. It is shown that the best fitted function to the transverse profile is Gaussian. Effect of the laser amplitude and also the ratio of nanoparticles radius to their separation on the nonlinear dispersion and amplitude profiles are investigated. It is found that the increase in the just mentioned parameters leads to the localization of transverse profile around the propagation axis.

  9. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Intensity Modulation by Corotating Interaction Region Stream Interfaces at 1 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Florinski, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new model that couples galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) propagation with magnetic turbulence transport and the MHD background evolution in the heliosphere. The model is applied to the problem of the formation of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) during the last solar minimum from the period between 2007 and 2009. The numerical model simultaneously calculates the large-scale supersonic solar wind properties and its small-scale turbulent content from 0.3 au to the termination shock. Cosmic rays are then transported through the background, and thus computed, with diffusion coefficients derived from the solar wind turbulent properties, using a stochastic Parker approach. Our results demonstrate that GCR variations depend on the ratio of diffusion coefficients in the fast and slow solar winds. Stream interfaces inside the CIRs always lead to depressions of the GCR intensity. On the other hand, heliospheric current sheet (HCS) crossings do not appreciably affect GCR intensities in the model, which is consistent with the two observations under quiet solar wind conditions. Therefore, variations in diffusion coefficients associated with CIR stream interfaces are more important for GCR propagation than the drift effects of the HCS during a negative solar minimum.

  10. Regimes of the interactions of high-intensity plane electromagnetic waves with electron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shiryaev, O. B.

    2008-01-15

    A set of fully nonlinear equations is derived from the Maxwell equations and the electron and ion fluid dynamics in one-dimensional geometry as a model of the interactions of extremely intense plane electromagnetic waves with cold locally non-neutral electron-ion plasmas. The problem is solved for phase velocities close to the speed of light numerically and with the help of asymptotic techniques. Depending on the field magnitudes, three nonlinear regimes are found to occur in the system. At plane-wave intensities inducing relativistic electron fluid dynamics but insufficient to cause significant ion motions, the model reverts to the classic Akhiezer-Polovin problem and yields its solutions describing the nonlinear self-modulation of the electromagnetic fields in plasmas. The types of regimes sustained at field strengths entailing substantial ion dynamics are the self-modulation with a splitting of the plane-wave field spectrum into a set of closely spaced bands, and the harmonics generation with a spectrum comprising broadly distanced bands. The latter two regimes correspond to a subcritical and an overcritical range of the plasma longitudinal field potentials.

  11. Intense laser field effects on p-d exchange interaction in single manganese doped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira Moura, Fabio; Qu Fanyao; Gargano, Ricardo

    2011-11-01

    We have developed a comprehensive theory about optical control of p - d exchange interaction between spins of hole and Mn{sup 2+} in single-manganese doped GaAs material irradiated by a monochromatic, linearly polarized, intense pulsed laser field (PLF) under nonresonant conditions. The p - d exchange interaction leads to formation of magnetic polaron. While the PLF induces a dressed acceptor Coulomb potential, which transforms single center problem into the one with two virtual positively charged centers, resembling hydrogen molecule ion (H{sub 2}{sup +}). The dichotomy of hole wave functions, determined by the laser-intensity, affects strongly the p - d exchange interaction as well as binding energy of magnetic polaron. Increasing the laser intensity reduces the magnetic polaron binding energy. At larger excitation intensity, the magnetic polaron can be completely dissolved.

  12. Plasma shaping in laser-plasma accelerators: injection, energy boost and beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaury, Cedric

    2015-11-01

    The longitudinal density profile is a key parameter to optimize the properties of electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. Tailored density profile can notably be used to control injection or increase the electron energy via density tapering. Here we present three different experiments illustrating the use of density tailoring for injecting, increasing the energy or focusing relativistic electron beams. First, we discuss results on shock-front injection in a gas mixture. We show that shocks allow to confine injection and hence to reduce significantly the beam energy spread, compared to pure ionization injection. Then we demonstrate that, with a different setup, shock fronts can also be used to rephase the electron beam with the wakefield. Using this setup we obtained an increase of the electron energy by almost 50 percent. Finally, we present the principle of the laser-plasma lens and show that this device can be used to reduce the electron beam divergence by a factor of almost 3. This last result is of particular importance for applications requiring beam transport; the divergence reduction should actually be sufficient to avoid transverse emittance growth in quadrupole triplets, provided that the energy spread is lower than 3 percent (chromatic emittance growth is due to the combination of large divergence and energy spread).

  13. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  14. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancé, Antoine; Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme; Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas; Specka, Arnd; Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S.; Mora, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  15. Ion acceleration from the interaction of ultra-intense lasers with solid foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew Mark

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 10 18 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by affecting the contamination layer from which they originate. Radiative heating was employed as a method of removing contamination from palladium targets doped with deuterium. We present evidence that ions heavier than protons can be accelerated if hydrogenous contaminants that cover the laser target can be removed. We show that deuterons can be accelerated from the deuterated-palladium target, which has been radiatively heating to remove contaminants. Impinging a deuteron beam onto a tritiated-titanium catcher could lead to the development of a table-top source of short-pulse, 14-MeV fusion neutrons. We also show that by using an argon-ion sputter gun, contaminants from one side of the laser target can be selectively removed without affecting the other side. We show that irradiating a thin metallic foil with an ultra-intense laser pulse produces a proton beam with a yield of 1.5--2.5 10 11 and temperature, kT = 1.5 MeV with a maximum proton energy >9 MeV. Removing contaminants from the front surface of the laser target with an argon-ion sputter gun, had no observable effect on the proton beam. However, removing contaminants from the back surface of the laser target reduced the proton beam by two orders of magnitude to, at most, a yield of ˜10 9 and a maximum proton energy <4 MeV. Based on these observations, we conclude that the majority (>99%) of high energy protons (E > 5 MeV) from the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a thin foil originate on the back surface of the foil---as predicted by the TNSA model. Our experimental results are in agreement with PIC simulations showing back surface protons reach energies up to 13 MeV, while front

  16. Absorption of ultra-intense intense laser pulse in self-generated pair plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grismayer, Thomas; Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Plasma physics in extreme fields requires taking into account Quantum Electrodynamics effects such as non-linear Compton scattering and Breit-Wheeler pair production. Such effects intervene in laser-plasma interactions at ultra high intensities (I >1023 W/cm2). The self-consistent modeling of these scenarios is challenging since some localized regions of ultra-intense field will produce a vast number of pairs that may cause memory overflow during the simulation. To overcome this issue, we have developed a merging algorithm that allows merging a large number of particles into fewer particles with higher particle weights while conserving local particle distributions. This algorithm is crucial to investigate the laser absorption in self-generated pair plasmas. During the interaction, the laser energy is converted into pairs and photons and the absorption become significant when the plasma density reaches the critical density. We present the results of 3D PIC-QED simulations (Osiris 2.0) showing the respective fraction of laser energy transferred into pairs and photons. The dependence of the laser absorption on the laser parameters for various configurations is also discussed.

  17. Return current and proton emission from wire targets interacting with an intense short pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beg, Farhat

    2004-05-01

    One of the important characteristics of short pulse high intensity laser-solid interactions is the generation of energetic charged particles, which result from the very efficient conversion of laser energy into hot electrons. Since the electrons in the electric field of the laser have relativistic quiver motions, the temperature of the hot electron distribution of the plasma produced at such extreme intensities can become very high. A large number of hot electrons (1013-1014) having an average energy of the order of 1-2 MeV can be generated as intensities exceed 1019 Wcm-2. Since the resulting beam current exceeds the Alfvén limit, a neutralizing return current of cold plasma electrons moving in the opposite direction is produced. Another source of return current is that due to the escape of very energetic electrons from the target, which then creates a large electrostatic potential due to charge separation. These return currents can cause significant ohmic heating. In addition escaping electrons establish the large electrostatic fields, accelerating a large number of protons from the target with energies of 10's of MeV. The experiments reported here were performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the VULCAN laser facility at intensity greater than 5 x1019 Wcm-2 on wire targets. In some shots an additional wire or foil was placed nearby. The laser was blocked by the main wire target so that no laser light reached the additional wire or foil. Three main observations were made: (i) a Z-pinch was driven in the wire due to the return current, (ii) optical transition radiation (OTR) at 2w was generated and (iii) energetic proton emission was observed. The wire targets were observed to be ohmically heated and were m=0 unstable. The OTR emission is likely due to electron bunches accelerated by the ponderomotive force of the laser. The proton emission was in a form of thin disk perpendicular to the wire and centered on the wire at the laser focus. Proton

  18. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  19. A numerical Maxwell Schrödinger model for intense laser matter interaction and propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Bandrauk, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present in this paper an original ab initio Maxwell-Schrödinger model and a methodology to simulate intense ultrashort laser pulses interacting with a 3D H +2-gas in the nonlinear nonperturbative regime under and beyond Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The model we present is the first one to our knowledge (excepted in [E. Lorin, S. Chelkowski, A. Bandrauk, A Maxwell-Schrödinger model for non-perturbative laser-molecule interaction and some methods of numerical computation, Proceeding CRM, vol. 41, American Mathematics Society, 2007], where a one-dimensional version is presented) to be totally nonperturbative, vectorial and multidimensional, taking into account ionization, and high order nonlinearities going far beyond classical nonlinear Maxwell or Schrödinger models. After a presentation of the model and a short mathematical study, we examine some numerical approximations for its computation. In particular, we focus on the polarization computation allowing an efficient coupling between the Maxwell and time dependent Schrödinger equations (TDSE), and on an efficient parallelization. Examples of numerical computations of high order harmonic generation and of electric field propagation are presented for one molecule and up to 512, thus highlighting cooperative effects in harmonic generation at high order.

  20. Experimental study on electron transport in high intensity laser solid interaction w/o cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, Sophie; Guillou, P.; Batani, D.; Rousseaux, C.; Kodama, R.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2005-10-01

    New electron transport results have been obtained in the interaction of a high intensity laser with planar solid target w/o gold cone. The experiment has been performed at the LULI Laboratory with the 100 TW laser facility. The interaction took place either at 1.057 μm or at 0.53 μm wavelength. The targets consist of three layers planar targets molecularly bonded w/o gold cone glued on the front side. The target thickness and the surface size, the target holder, the ASE of the laser and its focalisation point have been varied in order to study their influence on the electron transport. Several diagnostics were implemented: visible rear side imaging, HISAC, X-ray-Kα imaging and spectroscopy and the angular distribution of the emitted protons. In our conditions, no significant cone effect was observed. Nevertheless these results seem to indicate that the behaviour of the fast electrons is highly influenced by the target mass.

  1. Two Decades of Progress in Understanding and Control of Laser Plasma Instabilities in Indirect Drive Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David S.

    2015-11-01

    Our understanding of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments--ns pulses with ~kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ~keV electron temperatures--to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ~4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to the their control. The need to interpret and understand these detailed LPI experimental results has inspired an evolution of theoretical models, from 1D fluids with linear plasma wave responses to individual beams via a three-wave interaction, to today's fully nonlinear, 2D and 3D fluid and kinetic simulations of systems whose LPI dynamics are dominated by wave-wave and wave-particle nonlinearity. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. This talk will review the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. High field plasmonics and laser-plasma acceleration in solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgattoni, A.; Fedeli, L.; Cantono, G.; Ceccotti, T.; Macchi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of low intensity laser pulses with metal nano-structures is at the basis of plasmonics and the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SP) is one of its building blocks. Some of the configurations adopted in classical plasmonics can be explored considering high intensity lasers interacting with properly structured targets. SP excitation at intensities such that the electrons quiver at relativistic velocities, poses new questions and might open new frontiers for manipulation and amplification of high power laser pulses. Here we discuss two configurations which show evidence of the resonant coupling between relativistically intense laser pulses with the SPs on plasma targets with surface modulations. Evidences of SP excitation were observed in a recent experiment when a high contrast (1012), high intensity laser pulse (I=5\\centerdot {{10}19} W cm-2) was focussed on a grating target (engraved surface at sub-micron scale); a strong emission of multi-MeV electron bunches accelerated by SPs was observed only in conditions for the resonant SP excitation. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the Light-Sail (LS) Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) regime show how the plasmonic resonant coupling of the laser light with the target rippling, affects the growth of Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI) driven by the radiation pressure.

  3. Feasibility of intensive parent-child interaction therapy (I-PCIT): Results from an open trial

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Bagner, Daniel M.; Slavec, Janine; Hungerford, Gabriela; Kent, Kristine; Babinski, Dara; Derefinko, Karen; Pasalich, Dave

    2014-01-01

    Objective The current pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of an intensive and more condensed version of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (90 minute sessions for 5 days/week over the course of 2 weeks). Method Using an open trial design, 11 children (M child age = 5.01 years) and their mothers completed a baseline period of 2 weeks, a treatment period of 2 weeks, and a post-treatment evaluation. A follow-up evaluation was also conducted 4 months following treatment completion. Across all assessments, mothers completed measures of child behavior and parenting stress, and observational data was collected during three 5-minute standard situations that vary in the degree of parental control (child-led play, parent-led play, & clean-up). Results All 11 families completed the intervention with extremely high attendance and reported high satisfaction. Results across both mother report and observations showed that: a) externalizing behavior problems were stable during the baseline period; b) treatment was effective in reducing externalizing behavior problems (ds = 1.67-2.50), improving parenting skills (ds = 1.93-6.04), and decreasing parenting stress (d = .91); and c) treatment gains were maintained at follow-up (ds = .53-3.50). Conclusions Overall, preliminary data suggest that a brief and intensive format of a parent-training intervention is a feasible and effective treatment for young children with externalizing behavior problems with clinical implications for improving children's behavioral impairment in a very brief period of time. PMID:26097286

  4. Laser Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense laser Pulse with thi foils

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M

    2004-03-12

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by U{sub p} = ([1 + I{lambda}{sup 2}/1.3 x 10{sup 18}]{sup 1/2} - 1) m{sub o}c{sup 2}, where I{lambda}{sup 2} is the irradiance in W{micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2} and m{sub o}c{sup 2} is the electron rest mass.At laser irradiance of I{lambda}{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup 20} W{micro}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target.

  5. Measurement of the relaxation time of hot electrons in laser-solid interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Shepherd, R; Chung, H K; Dyer, G; Faenov, A; Fournier, K B; Hansen, S B; Hunter, J; Kemp, A; Pikuz, T; Ping, Y; Widmann, K; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-08-22

    The authors have measured the relaxation time of hot electrons in short pulse laser-solid interactions using a picosecond time-resolved x-ray spectrometer and a time-integrated electron spectrometer. Employing laser intensities of 10{sup 17}, 10{sup 18}, and 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, they find increased laser coupling to hot electrons as the laser intensity becomes relativistic and thermalization of hot electrons at timescales on the order of 10 ps at all laser intensities. They propose a simple model based on collisional coupling and plasma expansion to describe the rapid relaxation of hot electrons. The agreement between the resulting K{sub {alpha}} time-history from this model with the experiments is best at highest laser intensity and less satisfactory at the two lower laser intensities.

  6. Water-window microscopy using compact, laser-plasma source based on Ar/He double stream gas-puff target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Skorupka, Marcin; Bartnik, Andrzej; Kostecki, Jerzy; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Mirosław; Wegrzynski, Lukasz; Fok, Tomasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2013-05-01

    Photon-based (bosonic-type) imaging at short wavelength vs. electron, or recently neutron, imaging has additional advantages due to different interaction of photons with matter and thus high resolution photon-based imaging is still of high interest to the scientific community. In this work we try to combine the advantages of employing compact, laboratory type laser-plasma short wavelength source, based on Ar/He gas puff target, emitting incoherent radiation, with the "water-window" spectral range. This unique combination is highly suitable for biological imaging, and allows developing a small size microscopy setup, which might be used in various fields of science and technology. Thus, in this paper we report on recent advances in "water-window" desk-top microscopy setup employing a laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas puff target and Wolter type-I objective. The system allows capturing magnified images of the objects with ~1 μm spatial resolution up to ~40 μm thickness and single SXR pulse exposure time as low as 3 ns. For the SXR microscope Ar plasma was produced by focusing of the pumping laser pulses, from Nd:YAG laser (Eksma), by a lens onto a gas puff target. EUV radiation from the plasma was collected and focused by an ellipsoidal, axi-symmetrical nickel coated condenser mirror, developed by Rigaku, Inc. The condenser is a broad-band optic, capable of efficiently reflecting radiation from the EUV range down to SXR region with energy cut-off of ~800 eV. To spectrally narrow the emission from argon plasma a free-standing titanium filter (Lebow) was used. Spectrally filtered radiation illuminates the sample. Then the sample was imaged onto a SXR sensitive back-illuminated, CCD camera (Andor) by a Wolter type-I reflective objective. A characterization and optimization of both the source and the microscope setups are presented and discussed.

  7. Space-charge effects in ultra-high current electron bunches generated by laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Grinner, F. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Maier, A. R.; Becker, S.; Mikhailova, J. M.

    2009-02-11

    Recent advances in laser-plasma accelerators, including the generation of GeV-scale electron bunches, enable applications such as driving a compact free-electron-laser (FEL). Significant reduction in size of the FEL is facilitated by the expected ultra-high peak beam currents (10-100 kA) generated in laser-plasma accelerators. At low electron energies such peak currents are expected to cause space-charge effects such as bunch expansion and induced energy variations along the bunch, potentially hindering the FEL process. In this paper we discuss a self-consistent approach to modeling space-charge effects for the regime of laser-plasma-accelerated ultra-compact electron bunches at low or moderate energies. Analytical treatments are considered as well as point-to-point particle simulations, including the beam transport from the laser-plasma accelerator through focusing devices and the undulator. In contradiction to non-self-consistent analyses (i.e., neglecting bunch evolution), which predict a linearly growing energy chirp, we have found the energy chirp reaches a maximum and decreases thereafter. The impact of the space-charge induced chirp on FEL performance is discussed and possible solutions are presented.

  8. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  9. Emission of energetic protons from relativistic intensity laser interaction with a cone-wire target.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, B S; Yabuuchi, T; Sawada, H; Higginson, D P; Link, A; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Krasheninnikov, S I; Beg, F N

    2012-11-01

    Emission of energetic protons (maximum energy ∼18 MeV) from the interaction of relativistic intensity laser with a cone-wire target is experimentally measured and numerically simulated with hybrid particle-in-cell code, lsp [D. R. Welch et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 063105 (2006)]. The protons originate from the wire attached to the cone after the OMEGA EP laser (670 J, 10 ps, 5 × 10^{18} W/cm^{2}) deposits its energy inside the cone. These protons are accelerated from the contaminant layer on the wire surface, and are measured in the radial direction, i.e., in a direction transverse to the wire length. Simulations show that the radial electric field, responsible for the proton acceleration, is excited by three factors, viz., (i) transverse momentum of the relativistic fast electrons beam entering into the wire, (ii) scattering of electrons inside the wire, and (iii) refluxing of escaped electrons by "fountain effect" at the end of the wire. The underlying physics of radial electric field and acceleration of protons is discussed.

  10. Characterization of the fast electrons distribution produced in a high intensity laser target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, B.; Chen, C. D.; Patel, P. K.; McLean, H.; Beg, F. N.

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on the Titan laser (∼150 J, 0.7 ps, 2 × 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory were carried out in order to study the properties of fast electrons produced by high-intensity, short pulse laser interacting with matter under conditions relevant to Fast Ignition. Bremsstrahlung x-rays produced by these fast electrons were measured by a set of compact filter-stack based x-ray detectors placed at three angles with respect to the target. The measured bremsstrahlung signal allows a characterization of the fast electron beam spectrum, conversion efficiency of laser energy into fast electron kinetic energy and angular distribution. A Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series was used to model the bremsstrahlung signal and infer a laser to fast electron conversion efficiency of 30%, an electron slope temperature of about 2.2 MeV, and a mean divergence angle of 39°. Simulations were also performed with the hybrid transport code ZUMA which includes fields in the target. In this case, a conversion efficiency of laser energy to fast electron energy of 34% and a slope temperature between 1.5 MeV and 4 MeV depending on the angle between the target normal direction and the measuring spectrometer are found. The observed temperature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum, and therefore the inferred electron spectrum are found to be angle dependent.

  11. Revisiting argon cluster formation in a planar gas jet for high-intensity laser matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Y.; Hagmeijer, R.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the size of argon clusters generated with a planar nozzle, based on the optical measurements in conjunction with theoretical modelling. Using a quasi-one dimensional model for the moments of the cluster size distribution, we determine the influence of critical physical assumptions. These refer to the surface tension depending on the presence of thermal equilibrium, the mass density of clusters, and different methods to model the growth rate of the cluster radius. We show that, despite strong variation in the predicted cluster size, , the liquid mass ratio, g, can be determined with high trustworthiness, because g is predicted as being almost independent of the specific model assumptions. Exploiting this observation, we use the calculated value for g to retrieve the cluster size from optical measurements, i.e., calibrated Rayleigh scattering and interferometry. Based on the measurements of the cluster size vs. the nozzle stagnation pressure, we provide a new power law for the prediction of the cluster size in experiments with higher values of the Hagena parameter (Γ*>104 ) . This range is of relevance for experiments on high-intensity laser matter interactions.

  12. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Describing a cold-Maxwell fluid system with a spatially-discrete, unbounded Lagrangian is problematic for numerical modeling since boundary conditions must be applied after the variational step. Accurate solutions may still be attained, but do not technically satisfy the derived energy conservation law. The size of the numerical domain, the order accuracy of the discrete approximations used, and the type of boundary conditions applied influence the behavior of the artificially-bounded system. To encode the desired boundary conditions of the equations of motion, we include time-dependent terms into the discrete Lagrangian. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the energy loss. Results of a spatially-discrete, time-dependent Lagrangian system (with approximations of second-order accuracy in space and fourth order in time) will be presented. The fields and total energy will be compared with models of the same accuracy using a time-independent variational approach as well as a non-variational approach. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  13. Efficient second- and third-harmonic radiation generation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mamta; Gupta, D. N.; Suk, H.

    2015-06-15

    We propose an idea to enhance the efficiency of second- and third-harmonic generation by considering the amplitude-modulation of the fundamental laser pulse. A short-pulse laser of finite spot size is modeled as amplitude modulated in time. Amplitude-modulation of fundamental laser contributes in quiver velocity of the plasma electrons and produces the strong plasma-density perturbations, thereby increase in current density at second- and third-harmonic frequency. In a result, the conversion efficiency of harmonic generation increases significantly. Power conversion efficiency of harmonic generation process is the increasing function of the amplitude-modulation parameter of the fundamental laser beam. Harmonic power generated by an amplitude modulated laser is many folds higher than the power obtained in an ordinary case.

  14. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    PubMed

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments. PMID:25430346

  15. New Basic Physics Derived from Laser Plasma Interaction (lirpp Vol. 10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * VARIOUS PHENOMENA * COMPLETION OF THE EQUATION OF MOTION BY NONLINEAR FORCES * NONLINEAR PRINCIPLE * CONTAINMENT FORCE OF HADRONS IN NUCLEI AND PHASE TRANSITION INTO QUARK GLUON PLASMA * Acknowledgements * References

  16. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L.

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  17. An advanced high resolution x-ray imager for laser-plasma interaction observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennetiere, D.; Troussel, Ph.; Courtois, C.; Wrobel, R.; Audebert, P.

    2013-11-01

    We present here the latest results obtained with our high resolution broadband X-ray microscope. These results, both spatial and spectral, were obtained in several facilities such as Berlin's synchrotron Bessy II and LULI's laser ELFIE 100TW. The results show clearly the opportunity in high resolution microscopy that offer mirror based diagnostics.

  18. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  19. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-05-01

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  20. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocarlan, C.; Wiggins, S. M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2013-09-15

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive self-focusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.0 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}, the peak normalized laser vector potential, a{sub 0}, increases from 1.0 to 1.85 close to the entrance plane of the capillary compared with a{sub 0} = 1.41 when the plume is neglected.

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Fast holographic cinematography of a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barikhin, B. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Nedolugov, V. I.

    1990-11-01

    A fast holographic cinematography method was used in an investigation of a laser plasma initiated at the surfaces of metal samples by pulses from a rhodamine laser. The time evolution of the electron densities and heavy-particle concentrations was determined and a study was made of the nature of motion of a shock wave front. A weak dependence of the evolution of the shock wave velocity on the target materials (aluminum, copper, zinc) was observed in the average power density range 10-25 MW/cm2. A faster increase in the dimensions of a refracting plasma region, compared with a luminous region, and strong expulsion of cold air by an erosion plasma were recorded.

  2. Beam loading in a laser-plasma accelerator using a near-hollow plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-12-15

    Beam loading in laser-plasma accelerators using a near-hollow plasma channel is examined in the linear wake regime. It is shown that, by properly shaping and phasing the witness particle beam, high-gradient acceleration can be achieved with high-efficiency, and without induced energy spread or emittance growth. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in this plasma channel geometry. Matched propagation of electron beams can be achieved by the focusing force provided by the channel density. For positron beams, matched propagation can be achieved in a hollow plasma channel with external focusing. The efficiency of energy transfer from the wake to a witness beam is calculated for single ultra-short bunches and bunch trains.

  3. Framed, 16-image, Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope for laser-plasma x-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Oertel, J.A.; Walsh, P.J.

    2004-10-01

    A framed, 16-image, Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB)-type x-ray microscope has been designed for use in imaging laser-plasma x-ray emission. The reflecting elements are 16 pairs of concave mirrors arranged to reflect and focus x rays emanating from a laser-produced plasma. The resolution of the elements is 3 {mu}m at best focus and is better than 5 {mu}m within a 400-{mu}m-diam region. A framing camera will be used in combination with the KB optic to produce 16 gated x-ray images in the energy range from 1.5 to 7 keV over a typical interval of 1.5 ns. This system is designed for use on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  4. Model of a microwave beam coupling to CO 2 laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraway, E. L.; Sokol, M.; Grossman, B. G.

    2002-04-01

    We have designed a transmission line model of the microwave coupling mechanism for a microwave pumped CO 2 laser. The model is a total loss ridge waveguide transmission line having nonuniform impedance. The laser plasma is modeled as a frequency-dependent lossy dielectric and acts as a distributed resistance in the length of the microwave cavity. The coupling structure of the microwaves is designed not to be resonant at the microwave source frequency of 2.45 GHz at 1 kW and propagating the total microwave field energy to be absorbed without internal reflection. An exact solution to this general transmission line propagation constant for a shunt resistance along length of the guide is found. The measurements and predictions of the parameters of the plasma conductivity as a function of the attenuation constant agree closely.

  5. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  6. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometryfor controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans,Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler,D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-06-25

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma basedaccelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beamto push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase viaponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulseis discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beamof a_0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a_1 = 0.8 both focused on the middleof a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ~; 260 mu mlong gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the collidingpulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of thecolliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, whichsuggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV.

  7. Narrow bandwidth Thomson photon source development using Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Steinke, S.; Tsai, H.-E.; Rykovanov, S. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Bonatto, A.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-11-01

    Compact, high-quality photon sources at MeV energies are being developed based on Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). Simulations are presented on production of controllable narrow bandwidth sources using the beam and plasma capabilities of LPAs. An independent scattering laser, combined with appropriate pulse shaping and laser guiding is important to realize high photon yield. Plasma optics are described to tailor beam divergence in cm-scale distances, reducing photon source bandwidth. The LPA can further be used to de-accelerate the electron beam after photon production to reduce undesired radiation. Combination of laser driven and beam driven deceleration is presented to reduce residual beam energy, as is important for a laboratory or field operable source. Design of experiments and laser capabilities to combine these elements will be presented, towards a compact photon source system.

  8. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  9. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ronghao; Lu, Haiyang; Shou, Yinren; Lin, Chen; Zhuo, Hongbin; Chen, Chia-erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-09-01

    The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0 μ m . The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  10. Analysis on laser plasma emission for characterization of colloids by video-based computer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati; Lumbantoruan, Hendra Damos; Isnaeni

    2016-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a sensitive technique for characterization of colloids with small size and low concentration. There are two types of detection, optical and acoustic. Optical LIBD employs CCD camera to capture the plasma emission and uses the information to quantify the colloids. This technique requires sophisticated technology which is often pricey. In order to build a simple, home-made LIBD system, a dedicated computer program based on MATLAB™ for analyzing laser plasma emission was developed. The analysis was conducted by counting the number of plasma emissions (breakdowns) during a certain period of time. Breakdown probability provided information on colloid size and concentration. Validation experiment showed that the computer program performed well on analyzing the plasma emissions. Optical LIBD has A graphical user interface (GUI) was also developed to make the program more user-friendly.

  11. GeV Electron Beams from a Capillary Discharge Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-07-08

    Laser plasma acceleration (LPA) up to 1 GeV has been realized at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by using a capillary discharge waveguide. In this paper, the capillary discharge guided LPA system including a broadband single-shot electron spectrometer is described. The spectrometer was designed specifically for LPA experiments and has amomentumacceptance of 0.01 - 1.1 GeV/c with a percent level resolution. Experiments using a 33 mm long, 300 mu m diameter capillary demonstrated the generation of high energy electron beams up to 1 GeV. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, selftrapping and acceleration were found to be stabilized producing 460 MeV electron beams.

  12. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from

  13. Tunable Radiation Source by Coupling Laser-Plasma-Generated Electrons to a Periodic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Chen, Z. L.; Kon, A.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, H. B.; Zhang, B. H.; Gu, Y. Q.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Wang, L.; Yu, M. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Kodama, R.

    2011-12-23

    Near-infrared radiation around 1000 nm generated from the interaction of a high-density MeV electron beam, obtained by impinging an intense ultrashort laser pulse on a solid target, with a metal grating is observed experimentally. Theoretical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation suggest that the radiation is caused by the Smith-Purcell mechanism. The results here indicate that tunable terahertz radiation with tens GV/m field strength can be achieved by using appropriate grating parameters.

  14. Laser-plasma debris from a rotating cryogenic-solid-Xe target

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Sho; Inaoka, Yutaka; Hiraishi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the characteristics of laser plasma debris that is responsible for damaging optics. The debris is composed of fast ions, neutral particles, and fragments, and originates from a solid Xe target on a rotating drum that we developed as an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The ice fragments appear to be a problem most notably with solid Xe targets; however, we find that the damage induced by Xe ice fragments can be avoided by simply reducing the laser pulse energy. We find the number of fast neutral particles to be an order of magnitude less than the number of ions, and we clarify that the plasma debris is primarily composed of fast ions. In addition, we find that the number of fast ions having a few dozen keV of energy decreases when using the rotating target compared with the rest target. We attribute this to a gas curtain effect from the Xe gas localized at the rotating target surface. We estimate the sputtering rate of the Mo/Si mirror, which is caused primarily by the fast ions, to be 104 nm/1x10{sup 6} shots at 190 mm from the source plasma and at an 11.25 deg. angle from the incident laser beam. Up to the 1x10{sup 6} shots exposure, remarkable degradation of the mirror reflectivity is not observed though the sputtering damages the mirror. Mitigation of the ions by using gas and/or magnetic fields will further improve the mirror lifetime. By comparing with a liquid jet Xe target, we conclude that the sputtering rate per conversion efficiency when using the solid Xe targets on the rotating drum is the same as that when using the liquid Xe targets. The high conversion efficiency of 0.9% in the rotating drum solid Xe target makes this technique useful for developing laser plasma EUV sources.

  15. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Matthew M.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 1018 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 1018 W/cm2), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by Up = ([1 + Iλ2/1.3 x 1018]1/2 - 1) m{sub o}c2, where Iλ2 is the irradiance in W μm2/cm2 and moc2 is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of Iλ2 ~ 1020 W μm2/cm2, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by

  16. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liseykina, T.; Mulser, P.; Murakami, M.

    2015-03-15

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term “vacuum heating.” The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.3−1.2)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2} in the plasma target with the electron density of n{sub e}λ{sup 2}∼10{sup 23}cm{sup −3}μm{sup 2}, the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain Iλ{sup 2}≅(10{sup 18}−10{sup 20}) Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}, a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.14−3.5)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}

  17. Dense Helical Electron Bunch Generation in Near-Critical Density Plasmas with Ultrarelativistic Laser Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ronghao; Liu, Bin; Lu, Haiyang; Zhou, Meilin; Lin, Chen; Sheng, Zhengming; Chen, Chia-erh; He, Xiantu; Yan, Xueqing

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism for emergence of helical electron bunch(HEB) from an ultrarelativistic circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in near-critical density(NCD) plasma is investigated. Self-consistent three-dimensional(3D) Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations are performed to model all aspects of the laser plasma interaction including laser pulse evolution, electron and ion motions. At a laser intensity of 1022 W/cm2, the accelerated electrons have a broadband spectrum ranging from 300 MeV to 1.3 GeV, with the charge of 22 nano-Coulombs(nC) within a solid-angle of 0.14 Sr. Based on the simulation results, a phase-space dynamics model is developed to explain the helical density structure and the broadband energy spectrum. PMID:26503634

  18. Propagation of an ultra-short, intense laser in a relativistic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A.B.; Decker, C.D.

    1997-12-31

    A Maxwell-relativistic fluid model is developed to describe the propagation of an ultrashort, intense laser pulse through an underdense plasma. The model makes use of numerically stabilizing fast Fourier transform (FFT) computational methods for both the Maxwell and fluid equations, and it is benchmarked against particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Strong fields generated in the wake of the laser are calculated, and the authors observe coherent wake-field radiation generated at harmonics of the plasma frequency due to nonlinearities in the laser-plasma interaction. For a plasma whose density is 10% of critical, the highest members of the plasma harmonic series begin to overlap with the first laser harmonic, suggesting that widely used multiple-scales-theory, by which the laser and plasma frequencies are assumed to be separable, ceases to be a useful approximation.

  19. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  20. Sound Velocity and Diffraction Intensity Measurements Based on Raman-Nath Theory of the Interaction of Light and Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, John F.; Austin, Stephen

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the measurement of the velocity of sound in various liquids based on the Raman-Nath theory of light-sound interaction. Utilizes an analog computer program to calculate the intensity of light scattered into various diffraction orders. (CP)

  1. Interactive effects of photoperiod and light intensity on blood physiological and biochemical reactions of broilers grown to heavy weights

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of photoperiod, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. The experiment was consisted of a factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomize...

  2. Intensive Interaction as a Novel Approach in Social Care: Care Staff's Views on the Practice Change Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Graham; Elford, Helen; Leeming, Catherine; Crabbe, Marion

    2008-01-01

    Background: Intensive Interaction is an approach to developing the pre-verbal communication and sociability of people with severe or profound and multiple learning disabilities and autism. Previous research has indicated many potential benefits; however, the approach is not consistently used in social care. Aim: To report on the significant and…

  3. Interactive effects of herbivory and competition intensity determine invasive plant performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing; Siemann, Evan

    2012-10-01

    Herbivory can reduce plant fitness, and its effects can be increased by competition. Though numerous studies have examined the joint effects of herbivores and competitors on plant performance, these interactive effects are seldom considered in the context of plant invasions. Here, we examined variation in plant performance within a competitive environment in response to both specialist and generalist herbivores using Chinese tallow as a model species. We combined tallow plants from native and invasive populations to form all possible pairwise combinations, and designated invasive populations as stronger neighbours and native populations as weaker neighbours. We found that when no herbivory was imposed, invasive populations always had higher total biomass than natives, regardless of their neighbours, which is consistent with our assumption of increased competitive ability. Defoliation by either generalist or specialist herbivores suppressed plant growth but the effects of specialists were generally stronger for invasive populations. Invasive populations had their lowest biomass when fed upon by specialists while simultaneously competing with stronger neighbours. The root/shoot ratios of invasive populations were lower than those of native populations under almost all conditions, and invasive plants were taller than native plants overall, especially when herbivores were present, suggesting that invasive populations may adopt an "aboveground first" strategy to cope with herbivory and competition. These results suggest that release from herbivores, especially specialists, improves an invader's performance and helps to increase its competitive ability. Therefore, increasing interspecific competition intensity by planting a stronger neighbour while simultaneously releasing a specialist herbivore may be an especially effective method of managing invasive plants.

  4. Short communication: Changes in fluorescence intensity induced by soybean soluble polysaccharide-milk protein interactions during acidification.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Wang, W J; Xu, X J; Meng, Y C; Zhang, L W; Chen, J; Qiu, R

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between stabilizer and milk protein are believed to influence the stabilizing behavior of the milk system. We investigated changes in fluorescence intensity induced by interactions of soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS) and milk protein (Mp) during acidification. The fluorescence intensity (If) of Mp increased as pH decreased from 6.8 to 5.2. Compared with Mp alone, If of SSPS-Mp mixtures increased as the pH decreased from 6.8 to 5.2. We found that the If of the SSPS-Mp mixture decreased in a pH range from 5.2 to 3.6, which indicated a change in the polarity microenvironment around the Trp residues. We also found that the maximum emission wavelength (λmax) shifted from 337 to 330nm as pH decreased from 6.8 to 3.6, in further support of SSPS interacting with the polar portion of Mp during acidification. Furthermore, an excited monomeric molecule (pyrene exciplex) was found as a ground-state pyrene formed and a broad band was shown at about 450nm. The intensity ratio of the first peak to the third peak (I1:I3) of Mp increased slightly, and the ratio of intensity of pyrene exciplex to monomer (Ie:Im) decreased because pyrene molecules were located in a less hydrophobic microenvironment during acidification. However, the ratio of I1:I3 decreased clearly at pH below 5.6 and the ratio of Ie:Im showed the opposite trend in the SSPS-Mp mixture. Changes in intrinsic and exogenous fluorescence intensity confirmed that interactions of SSPS and Mp could change the polarity of the microenvironment and that SSPS probably interacted with the polar portion of Mp. These results could give insight into the behavior of stabilizers in acid milk products. PMID:26476946

  5. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams up to 18 MeV/nucleon via self-generated plasma fields in relativistic laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago, Miguel; Kreuzer, Christian; Shah, Rahul; Fernandez, Juan; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team; Ludwig-Maximilian-University Team

    2015-11-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators seldom achieve narrow energy spreads, and never without serious compromises in efficiency, particle yield, etc. Using massive computer simulations, we identify a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~ TV/m) and magnetic (~ 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma - separating the ion acceleration from the energy spread reduction. Consistent with the scheme, we experimentally demonstrate aluminum and carbon ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at energies up to 310 MeV (11.5 MeV/nucleon) and 220 MeV (18.3 MeV/nucleon), respectively, with high conversion efficiency (~ 5%, i.e., 4J out of 80J laser). This is achieved with 0.12 PW high-contrast Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils with optimal thicknesses of up to 250 nm that scale with laser intensity. When increasing the focused laser intensity fourfold (by reducing the focusing optic f/number twofold), the spectral-peak energy increases twofold. These results pave the way for next generation compact accelerators suitable for applications. For example, 400 MeV (33.3 MeV/nucleon) carbon-ion beam with narrow energy spread required for ion fast ignition could be generated using PW-class lasers.

  6. Study of fast electron jet produced from interaction of intense laser beam with solid target at oblique incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi Rao, Bobbili; Arora, Vipul; Anant Naik, Prasad; Dass Gupta, Parshotam

    2012-11-15

    Fast electrons generated along target normal direction from the interaction of intense ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses ({lambda}{sub 0} = 800 nm) with planar copper target at 45 Degree-Sign incidence angle have been experimentally studied under different interaction conditions. Angular spread and energy spectrum of the fast electrons was measured for both p- and s-polarized laser irradiation at intensities in the range 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16}- 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} (for a fixed pulse duration of 45 fs) and for pulse duration in the range 45 fs-1.2 ps (for a fixed laser fluence of 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} J/cm{sup 2}). The fast electrons were observed consistently along the target normal direction over the entire range of interaction conditions in the form of a collimated jet, within a half cone angle of 20 Degree-Sign . The fast electrons have continuous energy spectrum with effective temperature 290 keV and 160 keV, respectively, for p- and s-polarized 45 fs laser pulse irradiation at intensity 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. Scaling laws for temperature of fast electrons with laser intensity and pulse duration were obtained. The experimental results have been explained on the basis of laser absorption and fast electron generation through the resonance absorption mechanism.

  7. Climate-driven variation in the intensity of a host-symbiont animal interaction along a broad elevation gradient.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Leandro; Laiolo, Paola; Mironov, Sergey; García, Mónica; Magaña, Oscar; Jovani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Gradients of environmental stress may affect biotic interactions in unpredictable ways responding to climate variation, depending on the abiotic stress tolerance of interacting partners. Here, we study the effect of local climate on the intensity of feather mites in six mountain passerines along a 1400 m elevational gradient characterized by shifting temperature and rainfall. Although obligatory symbionts of warm-blooded organisms are assumed to live in mild and homeothermic environments, those inhabiting external, non-blood-irrigated body portions of the host organism, such as feather mites, are expected to endure exposure to the direct influence of a fluctuating climate. As expected, feather mite intensity declined with elevation in all bird species, a pattern that was also found in cold-adapted passerines that have typical alpine habits. The elevation cline was mainly explained by a positive effect of the average temperature upon mite intensity in five of the six species studied. Precipitation explained less variance in mite intensity than average temperature, and showed a negative correlation in half of the studied species. We found no climate-driven migration of mites along the wings of birds, no replacement of mite species along elevation gradients and no association with available food resources for mites (estimated by the size of the uropygial gland). This study suggests that ectosymbionts of warm-blooded animals may be highly sensitive to climatic variation and become less abundant under stressful environmental conditions, providing empirical evidence of the decline of specialized biotic interactions among animal species at high elevations. PMID:25025873

  8. Climate-Driven Variation in the Intensity of a Host-Symbiont Animal Interaction along a Broad Elevation Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Meléndez, Leandro; Laiolo, Paola; Mironov, Sergey; García, Mónica; Magaña, Oscar; Jovani, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Gradients of environmental stress may affect biotic interactions in unpredictable ways responding to climate variation, depending on the abiotic stress tolerance of interacting partners. Here, we study the effect of local climate on the intensity of feather mites in six mountain passerines along a 1400 m elevational gradient characterized by shifting temperature and rainfall. Although obligatory symbionts of warm-blooded organisms are assumed to live in mild and homeothermic environments, those inhabiting external, non-blood-irrigated body portions of the host organism, such as feather mites, are expected to endure exposure to the direct influence of a fluctuating climate. As expected, feather mite intensity declined with elevation in all bird species, a pattern that was also found in cold-adapted passerines that have typical alpine habits. The elevation cline was mainly explained by a positive effect of the average temperature upon mite intensity in five of the six species studied. Precipitation explained less variance in mite intensity than average temperature, and showed a negative correlation in half of the studied species. We found no climate-driven migration of mites along the wings of birds, no replacement of mite species along elevation gradients and no association with available food resources for mites (estimated by the size of the uropygial gland). This study suggests that ectosymbionts of warm-blooded animals may be highly sensitive to climatic variation and become less abundant under stressful environmental conditions, providing empirical evidence of the decline of specialized biotic interactions among animal species at high elevations. PMID:25025873

  9. Tunable radiation source by coupling laser-plasma-generated electrons to a periodic structure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Chen, Z L; Zhuo, H B; Kon, A; Nakatsutsumi, M; Wang, H B; Zhang, B H; Gu, Y Q; Wu, Y C; Zhu, B; Wang, L; Yu, M Y; Sheng, Z M; Kodama, R

    2011-12-23

    Near-infrared radiation around 1000 nm generated from the interaction of a high-density MeV electron beam, obtained by impinging an intense ultrashort laser pulse on a solid target, with a metal grating is observed experimentally. Theoretical modeling and particle-in-cell simulation suggest that the radiation is caused by the Smith-Purcell mechanism. The results here indicate that tunable terahertz radiation with tens GV/m field strength can be achieved by using appropriate grating parameters. PMID:22243162

  10. Evolution dynamics of charge state distribution in neon interaction with x-ray pulses of variant intensities and durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-03-01

    The level population and charge state distribution (CSD) of the neon atomic system interacting with x-ray pulses of variant intensities and durations at a central photon energy of 1110 eV are investigated by solving the time-dependent rate equations. The laser beam has a circular spot size with a Gaussian intensity pattern and the time history of the intensity is represented by Gaussian distribution in time. As an example, the CSD as a function of time is given at different distances from the spot center for an x-ray beam of intensity 1.5 × 1017 W/cm2 and duration 75 fs (fs) for a spot size of 1 μm (full width at half maximum). The final CSD after averaging over the space and time is compared with a recent experiment and good agreement is found between the theory and experiment. Then systematic investigations are carried out to study the evolution of CSD with a wide range of intensity from 1.0 × 1015 W/cm2 to 1.0 × 1019 W/cm2 and duration from 30 fs to 100 fs. The results show that at intensities lower than 1.0 × 1015 W/cm2, the CSD shows a typical physical picture of weak x-ray photoionization of the neutral atomic neon. At higher intensity, i.e., larger than 5.0 × 1016 W/cm2, the dominant ionization stages are Ne7+ and Ne8+, while the fractions of ions in the Ne3+-Ne6+ stages are low for all laser durations and intensities.

  11. The use of high energy laser-plasma sources in soft X-ray contact microscopy of living biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Botto, C.; Moret, M.; Milani, M.; Lucchini, G.; Eidmann, K.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia Donin, C.; Poletti, G.; Ford, T.; Stead, A.

    2002-11-01

    In this paper the results of an experiment on soft X-ray contact microscopy using a laser-plasma source are presented. A resolution of 50 nm has been achieved imaging pig sperm cells, while other specimens, such as algae and yeast cells, showed internal details, proving the technique to be a powerful tool for biological investigations. Original biological information has been obtained and the conditions for optimal image formation have been studied.

  12. Ion heating and thermonuclear neutron production from high-intensity subpicosecond laser pulses interacting with underdense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, S; Najmudin, Z; Malka, V; Krushelnick, K; Marle, C; Walton, B; Wei, M S; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E

    2002-10-14

    Thermonuclear fusion neutrons produced by D(d,n)3He reactions have been measured from the interaction of a high-intensity laser with underdense deuterium plasmas. For an input laser energy of 62 J, more than (1.0+/-0.2)x10(6) neutrons with a mean kinetic energy of (2.5+/-0.2) MeV were detected. These neutrons were observed to have an isotropic angular emission profile. By comparing these measurements with those using a secondary solid CD2 target it was determined that neutrons are produced from direct ion heating during this interaction.

  13. Controlled electron bunch generation in the few-cycle ultra-intense laser-solid interaction scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    The generation of Maxwellian or exponentially decaying spectra in the interaction of ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses with solid foils is very general observation both in experiments and simulations. Yet, the physical origin of this observation is not well understood. For a very idealized situation of plane wave, plane and cold target interaction, we show that both randomization between individual electron bunches accelerated by the laser through the plasma as well as randomization during a single bunch are not observable in particle-in-cell simulations. Hence they are not accountable for the apparent thermalization (exponential spectrum).

  14. Plant competitive interactions and invasiveness: searching for the effects of phylogenetic relatedness and origin on competition intensity.

    PubMed

    Dostál, Petr

    2011-05-01

    The invasion success of introduced plants is frequently explained as a result of competitive interactions with native flora. Although previous theory and experiments have shown that plants are largely equivalent in their competitive effects on each other, competitive nonequivalence is hypothesized to occur in interactions between native and invasive species. Small overlap in resource use with unrelated native species, improved competitiveness, and production of novel allelochemicals are all believed to contribute to the invasiveness of introduced species. I tested all three assumptions in a common-garden experiment by examining the effect of plant origin and relatedness on competition intensity. Competitive interactions were explored within 12 triplets, each consisting of an invasive species, a native congeneric (or confamilial) species, and a native heterogeneric species that are likely to interact in the field. Plants were grown in pots alone or in pairs and in the absence or the presence of activated carbon to control for allelopathy. I found that competition intensity was not influenced by the relatedness or origin of competing neighbors. Although some exotic species may benefit from size advantages and species-specific effects in competitive interactions, none of the three mechanisms investigated is likely to be a principal driver of their invasiveness.

  15. Magnetooptical Faraday and Light-Scattering Diagnostics of Laser Plasma in Leopard Laser Facility at UNR/NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Yates, K.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Yasin, E.; Wiewior, P.; Astanovitsky, A.; Chaly, O.; Kindel, J.

    2009-11-01

    Laser plasma of the solid target on Leopard Laser Facility at University of Nevada Reno was investigated using polarimetry, interferometry and laser-scattering diagnostics. 50 TW Nd:glass Leopard laser operates on 1056 nm wavelength, 10 J energy and 1ns/400 fs pulse width. Power flux on a target surface varied from 10^14 to 10^19W/cm^2 with 20 μm focus spot from off-axis parabola. The diagnostic of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser plasma was carried out using three-channel polarinterferometer with Faraday, shadow and interferogram channels. Ultrafast two-frame shadowgrams/interferograms with two probing beams with orthogonal polarizations were used for investigation of fast moving plasma phenomena (jets, ionization front propagation). Continuous 1W green DPSS-laser with external modulation was used for light scattering experiments for investigation of the late-time micro-particles generation in laser plasma with expected large charge number of the grain Z ˜ 100-1000.

  16. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  17. Observation of Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Radiation from Laser-Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kando, Masaki; Kawase, Keigo; Daito, Izuru; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Fukuda, Yuji; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kameshima, Takashi; Faenov, Anatoly Ya.; Pikuz, Tatiana A.; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2009-07-01

    When an intense short laser pulse interacts with plasmas, the nonlinear interaction causes various phenomena such as high energy particle generation, strong radiation in the x-ray to THz frequency range. Formation of solitons is one of these interesting topics and has been studied mainly from theoretical aspects. Solitons are formed in an underdense plasma in the process of the laser pulse frequency downshift. They store a portion of the EM wave energy with the polarization inherited from the laser pulse-driver and emit it at the plasma-vacuum interface in the form of low frequency EM bursts. Solitons were observed experimentally by proton-beam imaging and in the visible-near-infrared emissions from the plasma. A low frequency EM radiation emission has also been observed in our experiments. The interpretation invokes the relativistic electromagnetic solitons. We present the results of the polarization-resolved measurements of low frequency radiation from the plasma region irradiated by the intense laser pulse. A dominant component of the observed THz radiation has the same polarization as the driver laser pulse.

  18. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S. A.; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y.-Y.; Korzekwa, R.; Tsai, H.-E.; Pai, C.-H.; Quevedo, H.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Martinez, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Borger, T.; Spinks, M.; Donovan, M.; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre’s length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy. PMID:23756359

  19. Magnetic Field Measurement in Magnetized Laser Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, S.; Wallace, M. S.; Arias, A.; Morita, T.; Plechaty, C.; Huntington, C.; Martinez, D.; Ross, S. J.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. The measurements are difficult when the field orientation is fluctuating in the plasma volume or when the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. Based on an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011), we implemented a solution to this problem to the field measurement in magnetized laser plasmas. High resolution spectra were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for plasmas created by 20 J, 400 fs Leopard laser pulses in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. The components of the Al III 3s 2S1/2 - 3p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 were recorded with space resolution along the direction normal to the target, which coincided with the magnetic field radius. In several shots, the spectra were time gated for 10 ns at different values of the magnetic field. In these measurements the Zeeman splitting was not resolved, but the magnetic field strength can be measured from the difference between the widths of the line profiles. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  20. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-06-15

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation ({Delta}Z = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range {lambda} = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N{sub e} (the electron density), T{sub e} (the electron temperature), and T{sub ionz} (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  1. Laser Plasma Soft X-Ray Contact Microscopy of Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Hirozumi; Takeichi, Akihiro; Noda, Shoji

    1994-08-01

    Microstructures of polymer composites are observed with a good contrast and with a submicron spatial resolution by contact soft X-ray microscopy with a laser plasma as a soft X-ray source. An iron target was irradiated by a YAG laser ( 2ω=532 nm, 0.4 J) at laser power density of 2.5×1012 W/cm2 and the emitted soft X-rays were filtered with a thin aluminum foil. For a 0.1-µ m-thick poly acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene specimen, poly-butadiene or copolymer of butadiene spheres of about 500 nm diameter, which are selectively stained with osmium, is observed with soft X-rays in the wavelength region between 17 and 20 nm. For a 4-µ m-thick polyvinyl chloride film specimen formed by polymer powder compaction, peripheral areas of holes, grain boundaries, and areas probably degraded by HCl reduction are observed with soft X-rays in the wavelength region mainly around 2 nm.

  2. Analysis of EUV Oxygen Spectra from LLNL SSPX and UNR Laser Plasma Source of ``Sparky''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, P. G.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, U. I.; Williamson, K. M.; Weller, M. E.; Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Struve, K. W.

    2008-11-01

    In our recent work [Wilcox et al, RSI (2008, in press)] we applied a non- LTE kinetic model of oxygen to analyze an oxygen spectrum between 140 and 240 å, produced on LLNL SSPX. Here we study the whole collection of recent experimental SSPX EUV oxygen spectra produced under different plasma conditions, specifically in the broad range of temperatures from as low as 15 eV up to 280 eV, and at an electron density of around 10 ^14 cm-3. In addition, we analyze new experimental data from EUV oxygen and carbon spectra, recorded at much higher density at the compact laser plasma source of ``Sparky'' at UNR . The comprehensive comparison of EUV oxygen spectra from both experiments with theoretical calculations was accomplished, and temperature and density sensitive lines were identified.This work is relevant to diagnostics of plasma with low -- Z ions and Tokamak plasma in particular. Work is supported by DOE under grant DE-FG02-08ER54951 and in part under NNSA Coop. Agr. DE-FC52-06NA27588 and DE-FC52-06NA27586. Work at LLNL was performed under auspices of the DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA2344.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy and modeling of Cu on the SSPX Spheromak and laser plasma 'Sparky'

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, M. E.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, U. I.; Petkov, E. E.; Wilcox, P. G.; Osborne, G. C.; Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2012-10-15

    Impurities play a critical role in magnetic fusion research. In large quantities, impurities can cool and dilute plasma creating problems for achieving ignition and burn; however in smaller amounts the impurities could provide valuable information about several plasma parameters through the use of spectroscopy. Many impurity ions radiate within the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range. Here, we report on spectra from the silver flat field spectrometer, which was implemented at the Sustained Spheromak Physics experiment (SSPX) to monitor ion impurity emissions. The chamber within the SSPX was made of Cu, which makes M-shell Cu a prominent impurity signature. The Spect3D spectral analysis code was utilized to identify spectral features in the range of 115-315 A and to more fully understand the plasma conditions. A second set of experiments was carried out on the compact laser-plasma x-ray/EUV facility 'Sparky' at UNR, with Cu flat targets used. The EUV spectra were recorded between 40-300 A and compared with results from SSPX.

  4. DNA strand breaks induced by soft X-ray pulses from a compact laser plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Wiechec, Anna; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Bartnik, Andrzej; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Pina, Ladislav; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2016-03-01

    Application of a compact laser plasma source of soft X-rays in radiobiology studies is demonstrated. The source is based on a laser produced plasma as a result of irradiation of a double-stream gas puff target with nanosecond laser pulses from a commercially available Nd:YAG laser. The source allows irradiation of samples with soft X-ray pulses in the "water window" spectral range (wavelength: 2.3-4.4 nm; photon energy: 280-560 eV) in vacuum or a helium atmosphere at very high-dose rates and doses exceeding the kGy level. Single-strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DBS) induced in DNA plasmids pBR322 and pUC19 have been measured. The different conformations of the plasmid DNA were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. An exponential decrease in the supercoiled form with an increase in linear and relaxed forms of the plasmids has been observed as a function of increasing photon fluence. Significant difference between SSB and DSB in case of wet and dry samples was observed that is connected with the production of free radicals in the wet sample by soft X-ray photons and subsequent affecting the plasmid DNA. Therefore, the new source was validated to be useful for radiobiology experiments.

  5. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  6. Quasi-monoenergetic laser-plasma acceleration of electrons to 2 GeV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Yi, S A; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Y-Y; Korzekwa, R; Tsai, H-E; Pai, C-H; Quevedo, H; Dyer, G; Gaul, E; Martinez, M; Bernstein, A C; Borger, T; Spinks, M; Donovan, M; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Ditmire, T; Downer, M C

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators of only a centimetre's length have produced nearly monoenergetic electron bunches with energy as high as 1 GeV. Scaling these compact accelerators to multi-gigaelectronvolt energy would open the prospect of building X-ray free-electron lasers and linear colliders hundreds of times smaller than conventional facilities, but the 1 GeV barrier has so far proven insurmountable. Here, by applying new petawatt laser technology, we produce electron bunches with a spectrum prominently peaked at 2 GeV with only a few per cent energy spread and unprecedented sub-milliradian divergence. Petawatt pulses inject ambient plasma electrons into the laser-driven accelerator at much lower density than was previously possible, thereby overcoming the principal physical barriers to multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration: dephasing between laser-driven wake and accelerating electrons and laser pulse erosion. Simulations indicate that with improvements in the laser-pulse focus quality, acceleration to nearly 10 GeV should be possible with the available pulse energy.

  7. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  8. Investigations of laser plasmas dynamics by means of real and virtual Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Gambino, N.; Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Musumeci, F.; Spitaleri, A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a novel technique for LPP-Laser Produced Plasmas investigation, combining high time resolved measurements using compact Langmuir Probes with the output of a theoretical model called HYBLAS developed on purpose, which is able to simulate the charged particles collected by a so-called virtual probe. It will be shown that with an appropriate experimental set-up and with the use of a Matlab software able to accurately analyze the experimental I-V curves, laser plasmas can be investigated properly even if the probe is placed very close to the target surface. This permits not only to study the plume expansion with a high temporal resolution, but also to estimate correctly the self-generated coulomb electric field inside the plume and to detect the inner structure of the the first upcoming expanding plasma. HYBLAS is able to predict and describe the plume expansion at relatively low power densities and is a powerful method to compare directly the experimental current signals with the numerical results if the initial conditions are settled properly. A direct comparison of the theoretical data with the experimental ones realized on different metal targets shows that our method is able to predict properly the overall plasma expansion in the nanosecond laser pulse duration regime. The virtual probe method was moreover tested by comparing the numerical results with another numerical code called MULTI, which simulate the expansion by combining the hydrodynamics equations to a multigroup method in order to include the radiation transport. (authors)

  9. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation.

  10. Interactions between light intensity and phosphorus nutrition affect the phosphate-mining capacity of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Vance, Carroll P; White, Philip J; Zhang, Fusuo; Shen, Jianbo

    2014-07-01

    Light intensity affects photosynthetic carbon (C) fixation and the supply of carbon to roots. To evaluate interactions between carbon supply and phosphorus (P) supply, effects of light intensity on sucrose accumulation, root growth, cluster root formation, carboxylate exudation, and P uptake capacity were studied in white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) grown hydroponically with either 200 µmol m(-2) s(-1) or 600 µmol m(-2) s(-1) light and a sufficient (50 µM P) or deficient (1 µM P) P supply. Plant biomass and root:shoot ratio increased with increasing light intensity, particularly when plants were supplied with sufficient P. Both low P supply and increasing light intensity increased the production of cluster roots and citrate exudation. Transcripts of a phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase gene (LaPEPC3) in cluster roots (which is related to the exudation of citrate), transcripts of a phosphate transporter gene (LaPT1), and P uptake all increased with increasing light intensity, under both P-sufficient and P-deficient conditions. Across all four experimental treatments, increased cluster root formation and carboxylate exudation were associated with lower P concentration in the shoot and greater sucrose concentration in the roots. It is suggested that C in excess of shoot growth capabilities is translocated to the roots as sucrose, which serves as both a nutritional signal and a C-substrate for carboxylate exudation and cluster root formation. PMID:24723402

  11. The Scaling of Positron Production in Intense Laser-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Link, A.; Fiuza, F.; Hazi, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Tommasini, R.; Williams, G. J.; Sentoku, Y.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Audebert, P.; Fedosejevs, R.; Kerr, S.; Hill, M.; Hoarty, D.; Hobbs, L.; James, S.

    2014-10-01

    The dependence of positron yield on laser energy was observed to be nonlinear through experiments using the laser facilities at Jupiter, OMEGA EP, and ORION for laser energies of 100 - 1500 J and intensities of 1018 -1020 Watts/cm2. The measured yield increases as ~E2, faster than that predicted by simple estimates using GEANT4. This scaling results from a combination of higher energy electrons produced at increased laser intensity and the presence of unexpected recirculation of MeV electrons in the mm-thick target. Experimental results together with analytical and Monte-Carlo simulations of the data will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and funded by LDRD (#12-ERD-062).

  12. Scaling high-order harmonic generation from laser-solid interactions to ultrahigh intensity.

    PubMed

    Dollar, F; Cummings, P; Chvykov, V; Willingale, L; Vargas, M; Yanovsky, V; Zulick, C; Maksimchuk, A; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2013-04-26

    Coherent x-ray beams with a subfemtosecond (<10(-15)  s) pulse duration will enable measurements of fundamental atomic processes in a completely new regime. High-order harmonic generation (HOHG) using short pulse (<100  fs) infrared lasers focused to intensities surpassing 10(18)  W cm(-2) onto a solid density plasma is a promising means of generating such short pulses. Critical to the relativistic oscillating mirror mechanism is the steepness of the plasma density gradient at the reflection point, characterized by a scale length, which can strongly influence the harmonic generation mechanism. It is shown that for intensities in excess of 10(21)  W cm(-2) an optimum density ramp scale length exists that balances an increase in efficiency with a growth of parametric plasma wave instabilities. We show that for these higher intensities the optimal scale length is c/ω0, for which a variety of HOHG properties are optimized, including total conversion efficiency, HOHG divergence, and their power law scaling. Particle-in-cell simulations show striking evidence of the HOHG loss mechanism through parametric instabilities and relativistic self-phase modulation, which affect the produced spectra and conversion efficiency.

  13. Scaling high-order harmonic generation from laser-solid interactions to ultrahigh intensity.

    PubMed

    Dollar, F; Cummings, P; Chvykov, V; Willingale, L; Vargas, M; Yanovsky, V; Zulick, C; Maksimchuk, A; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2013-04-26

    Coherent x-ray beams with a subfemtosecond (<10(-15)  s) pulse duration will enable measurements of fundamental atomic processes in a completely new regime. High-order harmonic generation (HOHG) using short pulse (<100  fs) infrared lasers focused to intensities surpassing 10(18)  W cm(-2) onto a solid density plasma is a promising means of generating such short pulses. Critical to the relativistic oscillating mirror mechanism is the steepness of the plasma density gradient at the reflection point, characterized by a scale length, which can strongly influence the harmonic generation mechanism. It is shown that for intensities in excess of 10(21)  W cm(-2) an optimum density ramp scale length exists that balances an increase in efficiency with a growth of parametric plasma wave instabilities. We show that for these higher intensities the optimal scale length is c/ω0, for which a variety of HOHG properties are optimized, including total conversion efficiency, HOHG divergence, and their power law scaling. Particle-in-cell simulations show striking evidence of the HOHG loss mechanism through parametric instabilities and relativistic self-phase modulation, which affect the produced spectra and conversion efficiency. PMID:23679739

  14. Changes in Intensity of Serotonin Syndrome Caused by Adverse Interaction between Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and Serotonin Reuptake Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity. PMID:24577320

  15. Contrasting effects of land use intensity and exotic host plants on the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Vieira, Marcos Costa; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Human land use tends to decrease the diversity of native plant species and facilitate the invasion and establishment of exotic ones. Such changes in land use and plant community composition usually have negative impacts on the assemblages of native herbivorous insects. Highly specialized herbivores are expected to be especially sensitive to land use intensification and the presence of exotic plant species because they are neither capable of consuming alternative plant species of the native flora nor exotic plant species. Therefore, higher levels of land use intensity might reduce the proportion of highly specialized herbivores, which ultimately would lead to changes in the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks. This study investigates the community-wide effects of land use intensity on the degree of specialization of 72 plant-herbivore networks, including effects mediated by the increase in the proportion of exotic plant species. Contrary to our expectation, the net effect of land use intensity on network specialization was positive. However, this positive effect of land use intensity was partially canceled by an opposite effect of the proportion of exotic plant species on network specialization. When we analyzed networks composed exclusively of endophagous herbivores separately from those composed exclusively of exophagous herbivores, we found that only endophages showed a consistent change in network specialization at higher land use levels. Altogether, these results indicate that land use intensity is an important ecological driver of network specialization, by way of reducing the local host range of herbivore guilds with highly specialized feeding habits. However, because the effect of land use intensity is offset by an opposite effect owing to the proportion of exotic host species, the net effect of land use in a given herbivore assemblage will likely depend on the extent of the replacement of native host species with exotic ones.

  16. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies. PMID:25832224

  17. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  18. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. J. Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  19. Laser-matter interaction at intensities of 10 sup 12 W/cm sup 2 and below

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.R.; Dingus, R.S.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Kopp, R.A.; Stover, E.K.; Watt, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    For single pulsed laser-matter interactions at sufficiently high intensity, the electron density in the ablated vapor is large enough to absorb the laser radiation before it can reach the dense target material. The resulting interaction can be described in terms of energy flows: laser energy is absorbed in the plasma in front of the target and reappears as thermal electron energy and secondary radiation, part of which impinges upon and heats the dense target material at the dense material-vapor interface. This heating in turn drives ablation, thereby providing a self-consistent mass source for the laser absorption, energy conversion, and transmission. Under typical conditions of laser intensity, pulse width and spot size, the flow patterns can be strongly two-dimensional. We have modified the inertial confinement fusion code LASNEX to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects for the relatively low intensity, long-pulse-length conditions to interest in many laser-related applications. The unique aspect to our treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model, at present, treats the dense material as a rigid, two-dimensional simulational mass and heat reservoir, suppressing all hydrodynamical motion in the dense material. The modeling is being developed and refined through simulation of experiments, as well as through the investigation of internal inconsistencies, and some simulations of model problems. 5 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  20. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Doppler backscattered-signal diagnostics of laser-induced surface hydrodynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Kurochkin, Nikolay N.; Markov, V. N.; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Pogosov, G. A.; Chastukhin, E. M.

    1995-02-01

    A method is proposed for on-line monitoring of laser industrial processing. The method is based on optical heterodyne measurements of the Doppler backscattering signal generated in the interaction zone. Qualitative and quantitative information on hydrodynamic flows in the interaction zone can be obtained. A report is given of measurements, carried out at cw CO2 laser radiation intensities up to 1 kW cm-2, on the surfaces of a number of condensed materials irradiated in the monostatic interaction configuration.

  1. Interactive effects of photoperiod and light intensity on blood physiological and biochemical reactions of broilers grown to heavy weights.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, H A; Purswell, J L; Collier, S D; Branton, S L

    2013-04-01

    The effects of photoperiod, light intensity, and their interaction on blood acid-base balance, metabolites, and electrolytes in broiler chickens under environmentally controlled conditions were examined in 2 trials. A 3 × 3 factorial experiment in a randomized complete block design was used in this study. In each trial, all treatment groups were provided 23L:1D with 20 lx of intensity from placement to 7 d, and then subjected to the treatments. The 9 treatments consisted of 3 photoperiods [long/continuous (23L:1D) from d 8 to 56, regular/intermittent (2L:2D), and short/nonintermittent (8L:16D) from d 8 to 48 and 23L:1D from d 49 to 56, respectively] and exposure to 3 light intensities (10, 5.0, and 0.5 lx) from d 8 through d 56 at 50% RH. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. Venous blood samples were collected on d 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56. Main effects indicated that short/nonintermittent photoperiod significantly (P < 0.05) reduced BW, pH, partial pressure of O2, saturated O2, Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), osmolality, triiodothyronine (T3), and total protein along with significantly (P < 0.05) elevated partial pressure of CO2, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and lactate concentrations. In addition, there were no effects of photoperiod on HCO3(-), glucose, anion gap, and thyroxine (T4). Plasma corticosterone was not affected by photoperiod, light intensity, or their interaction. There was no effect of light intensity on most of the blood variables examined. Acid-base regulation during photoperiod and light intensity exposure did not deteriorate despite a lower pH and higher partial pressure of CO2 with normal HCO3(-). These results indicate that continuous exposure of broiler chickens to varying light intensities had a minor effect on blood physiological variables, whereas the short photoperiod markedly affected most blood physiological variables without inducing physiological stress in broilers.

  2. Linking market interaction intensity of 3D Ising type financial model with market volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wen; Ke, Jinchuan; Wang, Jun; Feng, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic interaction models in physics have been used to investigate the complex phenomena of economic systems. The simple interactions involved can lead to complex behaviors and help the understanding of mechanisms in the financial market at a systemic level. This article aims to develop a financial time series model through 3D (three-dimensional) Ising dynamic system which is widely used as an interacting spins model to explain the ferromagnetism in physics. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the financial model and numerical analysis for both the simulation return time series and historical return data of Hushen 300 (HS300) index in Chinese stock market, we show that despite its simplicity, this model displays stylized facts similar to that seen in real financial market. We demonstrate a possible underlying link between volatility fluctuations of real stock market and the change in interaction strengths of market participants in the financial model. In particular, our stochastic interaction strength in our model demonstrates that the real market may be consistently operating near the critical point of the system.

  3. An application of laser-plasma acceleration: towards a free-electron laser amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Labat, M.; Evain, C.; Marteau, F.; Briquez, F.; Khojoyan, M.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Chapuis, L.; Hubert, N.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; El Ajjouri, M.; Bouvet, F.; Dietrich, Y.; Valléau, M.; Sharma, G.; Yang, W.; Marcouillé, O.; Vétéran, J.; Berteaud, P.; El Ajjouri, T.; Cassinari, L.; Thaury, C.; Lambert, G.; Andriyash, I.; Malka, V.; Davoine, X.; Tordeux, M. A.; Miron, C.; Zerbib, D.; Tavakoli, K.; Marlats, J. L.; Tilmont, M.; Rommeluère, P.; Duval, J. P.; N'Guyen, M. H.; Rouqier, A.; Vanderbergue, M.; Herbeaux, C.; Sebdouai, M.; Lestrade, A.; Leclercq, N.; Dennetière, D.; Thomasset, M.; Polack, F.; Bielawski, S.; Szwaj, C.; Loulergue, A.

    2016-03-01

    The laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) presently provides electron beams with a typical current of a few kA, a bunch length of a few fs, energy in the few hundred MeV to several GeV range, a divergence of typically 1 mrad, an energy spread of the order of 1%, and a normalized emittance of the order of π.mm.mrad. One of the first applications could be to use these beams for the production of radiation: undulator emission has been observed but the rather large energy spread (1%) and divergence (1 mrad) prevent straightforward free-electron laser (FEL) amplification. An adequate beam manipulation through the transport to the undulator is then required. The key concept proposed here relies on an innovative electron beam longitudinal and transverse manipulation in the transport towards an undulator: a ‘demixing’ chicane sorts the electrons according to their energy and reduces the spread from 1% to one slice of a few ‰ and the effective transverse size is maintained constant along the undulator (supermatching) by a proper synchronization of the electron beam focusing with the progress of the optical wave. A test experiment for the demonstration of FEL amplification with an LPA is under preparation. Electron beam transport follows different steps with strong focusing with permanent magnet quadrupoles of variable strength, a demixing chicane with conventional dipoles, and a second set of quadrupoles for further focusing in the undulator. The FEL simulations and the progress of the preparation of the experiment are presented.

  4. Converting spatial to pseudotemporal resolution in laser plasma analysis by simultaneous multifiber spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Bulatov; Krasniker; Schechter

    2000-07-01

    Traditional chemical analysis based on laser plasma spectroscopy (LPS) requires time-gated detectors, to avoid the initial signal from the hot plasma. These detectors are expensive and often need to be cooled and protected against vapor condensation. We suggest a low-cost setup that may replace these gated detectors, while maintaining acceptable analytical performance. The proposed setup is a result of investigation of plasma-front propagation in LPS analysis. It is known that the LPS plasma propagation is similar to the shock wave propagation after a strong explosion in the atmosphere. We found that the propagation of the plasma fits well the Sedov blast wave theory, providing a good agreement between the theoretical and experimental figures. A proper observation geometry, which is perpendicular to the plasma expansion vector, enables converting spatial to temporal resolution. We take advantage of the fact that the plasma reaches a given distance above the analyzed surface at a certain time delay. Therefore, a single optical fiber, positioned at a well-defined geometry, can provide spectral information corresponding to a certain time delay. A multifiber imaging spectrometer provides information corresponding to a series of delay times, which is adequate for analysis of a variety of matrixes. It was found that the performance of the nongated detector observing a narrow solid angle is similar to that of a gated one observing the whole plasma. For one particular example, observing the plasma from a distance of 4.5 mm is equivalent to a delay of 4 micros and integration time of 2 mircos. The ratio of spectral lines of two elements was investigated using the spatially resolved (nongated) setup, and it was found that this mode is advantageous when internal calibration is applied. It was concluded that sensitive LPS analyses can be carried out by less expensive (nongated) detectors. PMID:10905339

  5. Experiments on the interaction of intense femtosecond radiation with dense plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1996-01-24

    An upgraded KrF{sup {asterisk}} (248 nm) system producing a pulse energy of {approximately} 400 mJ, a pulse width of {approximately} 220 fs, and focal intensities above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, has been constructed, tested, operated, and used in experimental studies. The spatial morphology of channeled radiation in plasmas has been measured with a spatial resolution of {approximately} 30 {mu}m and damage studies of fused silica indicate that femtosecond (200 - 300 fs) 248 nm radiation has a damage limit not exceeding {approximately} 50 GW/cm{sup 2}, an unfavorably low level. 2 figs.

  6. Recent experiment on fast electron transport in ultra-high intensity laser interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Baton, S.; Koenig, M.; Guillou, P.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Rousseaux, C.; Gremillet, L.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Kodama, R.; Ozaki, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Rassuchine, J.; Cowan, T.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.

    2008-05-01

    We performed an experiment with cone targets in planar geometry devoted to the study of fast electron generation, propagation, and target heating. This was done at LULI with the 100 TW laser at intensities up to 1019 W/cm2. Fast electrons penetration, with and without cones, was studied with different diagnostics (Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy, visible emission) for ω or 2ω irradiation. At ω, the pre-plasma generated by the laser pedestal fills the cone and prevents the beam from reaching the tip.

  7. MeV negative ion source from ultra-intense laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Doria, D.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A. A.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2012-02-15

    Experimental demonstration of negative ion acceleration to MeV energies from sub-micron size droplets of water spray irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses is presented. Thanks to the specific target configuration and laser parameters, more than 10{sup 9} negative ions per steradian solid angle in 5% energy bandwidth are accelerated in a stable and reliable manner. To our knowledge, by virtue of the ultra-short duration of the emission, this is by far the brightest negative ion source reported. The data also indicate the existence of beams of neutrals with at least similar numbers and energies.

  8. Configuration interaction singles natural orbitals: An orbital basis for an efficient and size intensive multireference description of electronic excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.; Hohenstein, Edward G.

    2015-01-14

    Multireference quantum chemical methods, such as the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method, have long been the state of the art for computing regions of potential energy surfaces (PESs) where complex, multiconfigurational wavefunctions are required, such as near conical intersections. Herein, we present a computationally efficient alternative to the widely used CASSCF method based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) expansion built from the state-averaged natural orbitals of configuration interaction singles calculations (CISNOs). This CISNO-CASCI approach is shown to predict vertical excitation energies of molecules with closed-shell ground states similar to those predicted by state averaged (SA)-CASSCF in many cases and to provide an excellent reference for a perturbative treatment of dynamic electron correlation. Absolute energies computed at the CISNO-CASCI level are found to be variationally superior, on average, to other CASCI methods. Unlike SA-CASSCF, CISNO-CASCI provides vertical excitation energies which are both size intensive and size consistent, thus suggesting that CISNO-CASCI would be preferable to SA-CASSCF for the study of systems with multiple excitable centers. The fact that SA-CASSCF and some other CASCI methods do not provide a size intensive/consistent description of excited states is attributed to changes in the orbitals that occur upon introduction of non-interacting subsystems. Finally, CISNO-CASCI is found to provide a suitable description of the PES surrounding a biradicaloid conical intersection in ethylene.

  9. Charge steering of laser plasma accelerated fast ions in a liquid spray — creation of MeV negative ion and neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schnürer, M.; Abicht, F.; Priebe, G.; Braenzel, J.; Prasad, R.; Borghesi, M.; Andreev, A.; Nickles, P. V.; Jequier, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-11-15

    The scenario of “electron capture and loss” has been recently proposed for the formation of negative ion and neutral atom beams with up to MeV kinetic energy [S. Ter-Avetisyan, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 051501 (2011)]. Validation of these processes and of their generic nature is here provided in experiments where the ion source and the interaction medium have been spatially separated. Fast positive ions accelerated from a laser plasma source are sent through a cold spray where their charge is changed. Such formed neutral atom or negative ion has nearly the same momentum as the original positive ion. Experiments are released for protons, carbon, and oxygen ions and corresponding beams of negative ions and neutral atoms have been obtained. The electron capture and loss phenomenon is confirmed to be the origin of the negative ion and neutral atom beams. The equilibrium ratios of different charge components and cross sections have been measured. Our method is general and allows the creation of beams of neutral atoms and negative ions for different species which inherit the characteristics of the positive ion source.

  10. Designing STUD Pulses to control laser-plasma instabilities and adapt to changing plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan

    2011-10-01

    Designing spike trains of uneven duration and delay, or STUD pulses, for ICF targets in direct and indirect drive and for shock ignition will be explored. Taming stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering (SRS and SBS) as well as two plasmon decay, and harnessing their hot electron generation properties for fast heating purposes at higher intensities will be explored. Theoretical statistical models capturing the essential physics of STUD pulse propagation, hot spot scrambling and SRS and SBS interaction will be presented. How to control LPI in crossing pairs of beams by staggering or interleaving their STUD pulse profiles when no interaction is desired and overlapping them when energy transfer is desirable, will be demonstrated. Technological advances required to bring about the STUD pulse program including time lenses for psec time scale modulated pulses and psec time scale resolved SRS and SBS detection lasting for nsecs and laser hot spot scrambling plasma cells will be discussed. Work supported by a grant from DOE NNSA SSAA Program and a Phase I SBIR from OFES.

  11. Impact of Pre-Plasma on Fast Electron Generation and Transport from Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, J.; McGuffey, C.; Krauland, C.; Jarrott, L. C.; Sorokovikova, A.; Qiao, B.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Beg, F. N.; Wei, M. S.; Park, J.; Link, A.; Chen, H.; McLean, H. S.; Wagner, C.; Minello, V.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A.; Spinks, M.; Gaul, E.; Dyer, G.; Hegelich, B. M.; Martinez, M.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results and analysis from recent short pulse laser matter experiments using the Texas Petawatt Laser to study the impact of pre-plasma on fast electron generation and transport. The experimental setup consisted of 3 separate beam elements: a main, high intensity, short pulse beam for the interaction, a secondary pulse of equal intensity interacting with a separate thin foil target to generate protons for side-on proton imaging and a third, low intensity, wider beam to generate a varied scale length pre-plasma. The main target consisted of a multilayer planar Al foil with a buried Cu fluor layer. The electron beam was characterized with multiple diagnostics, including several bremsstrahlung spectrometers, magnetic electron spectrometers and Cu-K α imaging. The protons from the secondary target were used to image the fields on the front of the target in the region of laser plasma interaction. Features seen in the interaction region by these protons will be presented along with characteristics of the generated electron beam. This work performed under the auspices of the US DOE under Contracts DE-FOA-0000583 (FES, NNSA).

  12. Plasmon-Enhanced Electron Acceleration in Intense Laser Metal-Cluster Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Th.; Doeppner, T.; Passig, J.; Schaal, Ch.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2007-04-06

    We have measured the energy and angular-resolved electron emission from medium-sized silver clusters (N{approx_equal}500-2000) exposed to dual laser pulses of moderate intensity (I{approx}10{sup 13-14} W/cm{sup 2}). When the second pulse excites the plasmon resonantly, we observe enhanced emission along the laser polarization axis. The asymmetry of the electron spectrum is strongly increasing with electron energy. Semiclassical simulations reveal the following mechanism: Electrons bound in highly excited states can leave, return to, and traverse the cluster. Those electrons that return at zero plasmon deflection and traverse the cluster during a favorable plasmon half-cycle can experience maximum acceleration by the evolving polarization field. As a result of these constraints energetic electrons are emitted in direction of the laser polarization axis in subcycle bursts.

  13. Hard x-ray production from high intensity laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sefcik, J. A., LLNL

    1998-06-03

    Intense laser (> 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and cost advantage for multiple axis views and have the potential for much higher spatial and temporal resolution than is achievable with accelerator sources We have begun a series of experiments using the Petawatt Laser system at LLNL to determine the potential of these sources for radiography applications Absolutely calibrated spectra extending to 20 MeV and high resolution radiographs through a {rho}r{>=}150 gm/cm{sup 2} have been obtained The physics of these sources and the scaling relationships and laser technology required to provide the dose levels necessary for radiography applications will be discussed Diagnostics of the laser produced electrons and photons will be addressed

  14. Radiation emission from ultra-relativistic plasma electrons in short-intense laser light interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R.; Boyd, TJM

    2016-05-01

    Intense femtosecond laser light incident on overcritical density plasmas has shown to emit a prolific number of high-order harmonics of the driver frequency, with spectra characterised by power-law decays. When the laser pulse is p-polarised, plasma effects do modify the harmonic spectrum, weakening the so-called universal decay index p = 8/3 to 5/3. In this work appeal is made to a single particle radiation model in support of the predictions from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Using these, we further show that the emission radiated by electrons -those that are relativistically accelerated inside the plasma, after being expelled into vacuum, the so-called Brunel electrons- is characterised not only by the plasma line but also by ultraviolet harmonic orders characterised by the 5/3 decay index.

  15. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  16. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  17. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Feasibility of investigation of optical breakdown statistics using multifrequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanov, S. F.

    1990-06-01

    A method proposed for investigating the statistics of bulk optical breakdown relies on multifrequency lasers, which eliminates the influence of the laser radiation intensity statistics. The method is based on preliminary recording of the peak intensity statistics of multifrequency laser radiation pulses at the caustic using the optical breakdown threshold of K8 glass. The probability density distribution function was obtained at the focus for the peak intensities of the radiation pulses of a multifrequency laser. This method may be used to study the self-interaction under conditions of bulk optical breakdown of transparent dielectrics.

  18. High Light Intensity Leads to Increased Peroxule-Mitochondria Interactions in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Mathur, Neeta; Bou Daher, Firas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Peroxules are thin protrusions from spherical peroxisomes produced under low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress. Whereas, stress mitigation favors peroxule retraction, prolongation of the ROS stress leads to the elongation of the peroxisome into a tubular form. Subsequently, the elongated form becomes constricted through the binding of proteins such as dynamin related proteins 3A and 3B and eventually undergoes fission to increase the peroxisomal population within a cell. The events that occur in the short time window between peroxule initiation and the tubulation of the entire peroxisome have not been observed in living plant cells. Here, using fluorescent protein aided live-imaging, we show that peroxules are formed after only 4 min of high light (HL) irradiation during which there is a perceptible increase in the cytosolic levels of hydrogen peroxide. Using a stable, double transgenic line of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a peroxisome targeted YFP and a mitochondrial targeted GFP probe, we observed sustained interactions between peroxules and small, spherical mitochondria. Further, it was observed that the frequency of HL-induced interactions between peroxules and mitochondria increased in the Arabidopsis anisotropy1 mutant that has reduced cell wall crystallinity and where we show accumulation of higher H2O2 levels than wild type plants. Our observations suggest a testable model whereby peroxules act as interaction platforms for ROS-distressed mitochondria that may release membrane proteins and fission factors. These proteins might thus become easily available to peroxisomes and facilitate their proliferation for enhancing the ROS-combating capability of a plant cell. PMID:26870732

  19. Sudden perturbation approximations for interaction of atoms with intense ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugovskoy, Andrey; Bray, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The response of an atom to the action of a pulse shorter than the Kepler period of the optically-active electron is often treated analytically using the sudden-perturbation approximation (SPA). It relies on the truncation of the evolution operator expansion in a series over the dimensionless parameter ɛ sys τ L, where ɛ sys is the system-dependent characteristic energy and τ L is the pulse duration. We examine the SPA with the use of a basis-based solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) for the case of a hydrogen atom interacting with two different types of ultrashort pulses, a half-cycle pulse and a few-cycle pulse. The length-gauge form of the electron-field interaction potential is used. The SPA transition probabilities are shown to deviate slightly but systematically from the correct values for the positive-energy states in the region where the sudden-perturbation condition is violated. It is shown that the SPA expectation value of the electron displacement as a function of time differ qualitatively from what follows from the ab initio TDSE solution. Nevertheless, the SPA is shown to be a good approximation for the description of the expectation value of the electron momentum.

  20. Interaction between hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus and the suprachiasmatic nucleus determines intensity of food anticipatory behavior

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Galvan, Guadalupe; Yi, Chun-Xia; van der Vliet, Jan; Jhamandas, Jack H.; Panula, Pertti; Angeles-Castellanos, Manuel; del Carmen Basualdo, María; Escobar, Carolina; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2011-01-01

    Food anticipatory behavior (FAA) is induced by limiting access to food for a few hours daily. Animals anticipate this scheduled meal event even without the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the biological clock. Consequently, a food-entrained oscillator has been proposed to be responsible for meal time estimation. Recent studies suggested the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) as the site for this food-entrained oscillator, which has led to considerable controversy in the literature. Herein we demonstrate by means of c-Fos immunohistochemistry that the neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which signals the rest phase in nocturnal animals, is reduced when animals anticipate the scheduled food and, simultaneously, neuronal activity within the DMH increases. Using retrograde tracing and confocal analysis, we show that inhibition of SCN neuronal activity is the consequence of activation of GABA-containing neurons in the DMH that project to the SCN. Next, we show that DMH lesions result in a loss or diminution of FAA, simultaneous with increased activity in the SCN. A subsequent lesion of the SCN restored FAA. We conclude that in intact animals, FAA may only occur when the DMH inhibits the activity of the SCN, thus permitting locomotor activity. As a result, FAA originates from a neuronal network comprising an interaction between the DMH and SCN. Moreover, this study shows that the DMH–SCN interaction may serve as an intrahypothalamic system to gate activity instead of rest overriding circadian predetermined temporal patterns. PMID:21402951