Science.gov

Sample records for intensity interferometry experiments

  1. Stellar Temporal Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Tan Peng

    Stellar intensity interferometry was developed by Hanbury-Brown & Twiss [1954, 1956b, 1957, 1958] to bypass the diffraction limit of telescope apertures, with successful measurements including the determination of 32 stellar angular diameters using the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer [Hanbury-Brown et al., 1974]. This was achieved by measuring the intensity correlations between starlight received by a pair of telescopes separated by varying baselines b which, by invoking the van Cittert-Zernicke theorem [van Cittert, 1934; Zernicke, 1938], are related to the angular intensity distributions of the stellar light sources through a Fourier transformation of the equal-time complex degree of coherence gamma(b) between the two telescopes. This intensity correlation, or the second order correlation function g(2) [Glauber, 1963], can be described in terms of two-photoevent coincidence measurements [Hanbury-Brown, 1974] for our use of photon-counting detectors. The application of intensity interferometry in astrophysics has been largely restricted to the spatial domain but not found widespread adoption due to limitations by its signal-to-noise ratio [Davis et al., 1999; Foellmi, 2009; Jensen et al., 2010; LeBohec et al., 2008, 2010], although there is a growing movement to revive its use [Barbieri et al., 2009; Capraro et al., 2009; Dravins & Lagadec, 2014; Dravins et al., 2015; Dravins & LeBohec, 2007]. In this thesis, stellar intensity interferometry in the temporal domain is investigated instead. We present a narrowband spectral filtering scheme [Tan et al., 2014] that allows direct measurements of the Lorentzian temporal correlations, or photon bunching, from the Sun, with the preliminary Solar g(2)(tau = 0) = 1.3 +/- 0.1, limited mostly by the photon detector response [Ghioni et al., 2008], compared to the theoretical value of g(2)(0) = 2. The measured temporal photon bunching signature of the Sun exceeded the previous records of g(2)(0) = 1.03 [Karmakar et al

  2. A new look on Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Paul; Le Bohec, Stephan; Kieda, David; Holmes, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Intensity interferometry was introduced in the 1950's and implemented in the late 1960's with the Narrabri Interferometer. Very high angular resolution at visible wavelengths made it possible to measure stellar diameters of a few milli-arc-seconds. Air Cherenkov telescope arrays used for high energy gammaray astronomy can provide perfect sites for a revival of Intensity Interferometry in the optical region. Also, improvements in technology make the implementation of Intensity Interferometry easier and can improve sensitivity. Novel ideas on phase recovery also make it possible to reconstruct high resolution optical images of astrophysical objects in a model independent way. The capabilities and limitations of modern intensity interferometry are discussed.

  3. Intensity Interferometry for the 21ST Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horch, E. P.; van Belle, G.; Genet, R. M.; Holenstein, B. D.

    Advances in detector technology and electronic timing capabilities in recent years have resulted in a new opportunity for ultra-high resolution in astronomy using intensity interferometry. We have been working with this technology and describe here the potential as we see it. Two separate opportunities exist at present: the use of Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) detectors with existing research-grade telescopes and photomultipliers coupled with light bucket telescopes. In the future, there may also be potential for space-based intensity interferometry. While intensity interferometry is not likely to replace amplitude-based interferometry, it does have certain advantages in terms of portability, use of large baselines, narrow-band imaging, and imaging in the blue. We see a new possibility for its use particularly in stellar astrophysics for these reasons.

  4. Optical intensity interferometry through atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, P. K.; Chan, A. H.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrow-band spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photodiodes, the Solar g(2)(τ) signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of g(2)(τ) = 1.693 ± 0.003 from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  5. Intensity interferometry: optical imaging with kilometer baselines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis

    2016-07-01

    Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.

  6. A novel femtosecond-gated, high-resolution, frequency-shifted shearing interferometry technique for probing pre-plasma expansion in ultra-intense laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Feister, S. Orban, C.; Nees, J. A.; Morrison, J. T.; Frische, K. D.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2014-11-15

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interaction experiments (>10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) with dense targets are highly sensitive to the effect of laser “noise” (in the form of pre-pulses) preceding the main ultra-intense pulse. These system-dependent pre-pulses in the nanosecond and/or picosecond regimes are often intense enough to modify the target significantly by ionizing and forming a plasma layer in front of the target before the arrival of the main pulse. Time resolved interferometry offers a robust way to characterize the expanding plasma during this period. We have developed a novel pump-probe interferometry system for an ultra-intense laser experiment that uses two short-pulse amplifiers synchronized by one ultra-fast seed oscillator to achieve 40-fs time resolution over hundreds of nanoseconds, using a variable delay line and other techniques. The first of these amplifiers acts as the pump and delivers maximal energy to the interaction region. The second amplifier is frequency shifted and then frequency doubled to generate the femtosecond probe pulse. After passing through the laser-target interaction region, the probe pulse is split and recombined in a laterally sheared Michelson interferometer. Importantly, the frequency shift in the probe allows strong plasma self-emission at the second harmonic of the pump to be filtered out, allowing plasma expansion near the critical surface and elsewhere to be clearly visible in the interferograms. To aid in the reconstruction of phase dependent imagery from fringe shifts, three separate 120° phase-shifted (temporally sheared) interferograms are acquired for each probe delay. Three-phase reconstructions of the electron densities are then inferred by Abel inversion. This interferometric system delivers precise measurements of pre-plasma expansion that can identify the condition of the target at the moment that the ultra-intense pulse arrives. Such measurements are indispensable for correlating laser pre-pulse measurements

  7. Phase difference enhancement with classical intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that, as a novel function of classical intensity interferometry, a phase difference distribution recorded in the form of an interferogram can be enhanced by a factor of 2 on the basis of the classical intensity correlation. Such phase difference enhancement which is also referred to as phase difference amplification is, in general, known to be practically important since it increases sensitivity and accuracy in interferometric measurements. The method proposed in this study prevails over the existing methods in the sense that it can be readily implemented without difficulty in comparison with all other methods so far proposed, although the phase difference enhancement is limited to a factor of 2 in our method and thus so is the improvement of sensitivity and accuracy.

  8. Virtual Reference Interferometry: Theory & Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, Michael Anthony

    This thesis introduces the idea that a simulated interferogram can be used as a reference for an interferometer. This new concept represents a paradigm shift from the conventional thinking, where a reference is the phase of a wavefront that traverses a known path. The simulated interferogram used as a reference is called a virtual reference. This thesis develops the theory of virtual reference interferometry and uses it for the characterization of chromatic dispersion in short length (<1m) fibers and optical components. Characterization of chromatic dispersion on short length fiber and optical components is a very difficult challenge. Accurate measurement of first and second order dispersion is important for applications from optical component design to nonlinear photonics, sensing and communications. Techniques for short-length dispersion characterization are therefore critical to the development of many photonic systems. The current generation of short-length dispersion measurement techniques are either easy to operate but lack sufficient accuracy, or have sufficient accuracy but are difficult to operate. The use of a virtual reference combines the advantages of these techniques so that it is both accurate and easy to operate. Chromatic dispersion measurements based on virtual reference interferometry have similar accuracy as the best conventional measurement techniques due to the ability to measure first and second order dispersion directly from the interference pattern. Unique capabilities of virtual reference interferometry are demonstrated, followed by a derivation of the operational constraints and system parameters. The technique is also applied to the characterization of few-mode fibers, a hot topic in telecommunications research where mode division multiplexing promises to expand network bandwidth. Also introduced is the theory of dispersive virtual reference interferometry, which can be used to overcome the bandwidth limitations associated with the

  9. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  10. Intensity interferometry with Aqueye+ and Iqueye in Asiago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampieri, Luca; Naletto, Giampiero; Barbieri, Cesare; Barbieri, Mauro; Verroi, Enrico; Umbriaco, Gabriele; Favazza, Paolo; Lessio, Luigi; Farisato, Giancarlo

    2016-08-01

    Since a number of years our group is engaged in the design, construction and operation of instruments with very high time resolution in the optical band for applications to Quantum Astronomy and more conventional Astrophysics. Two instruments were built to perform photon counting with sub-nanosecond temporal accuracy. The first of the two, Aqueye+, is regularly mounted at the 1.8 m Copernicus telescope in Asiago, while the second one, Iqueye, was mounted at the ESO New Technology Telescope in Chile, and at the William Herschel Telescope and Telescopio Nazionale Galileo on the Roque (La Palma, Canary Islands). Both instruments deliver extraordinarily accurate results in optical pulsar timing. Recently, Iqueye was moved to Asiago to be mounted at the 1.2 m Galileo telescope to attempt, for the first time ever, experiments of optical intensity interferometry (à la Hanbury Brown and Twiss) on a baseline of a few kilometers, together with the Copernicus telescope. This application was one of the original goals for the development of our instrumentation. To carry out these measurements, we are experimenting a new way of coupling the instruments to the telescopes, by means of moderate-aperture, low-optical-attenuation multi-mode optical fibers with a double-clad design. Fibers are housed in dedicated optical interfaces attached to the focus of another instrument of the 1.8 m telescope (Aqueye+) or to the Nasmyth focus of the 1.2 m telescope (Iqueye). This soft-mount solution has the advantage to facilitate the mounting of the photon counters, to keep them under controlled temperature and humidity conditions (reducing potential systematics related to varying ambient conditions), and to mitigate scheduling requirements. Here we will describe the first successful implementation of the Asiago intensity interferometer and future plans for improving it.

  11. The potential for intensity interferometry with {gamma}-ray telescope arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wit, W. J. de; Hinton, J. A.; White, R. J.; Daniel, M. K.; Le Bohec, S.; Holder, J.

    2008-02-22

    Intensity interferometry exploits a quantum optical effect in order to measure objects with extremely small angular scales. The first experiment to use this technique was the Narrabri intensity interferometer, which was successfully used in the 1970s to measure 32 stellar diameters at optical wavelengths; some as small as 0.4 milli-arcseconds. The advantage of this technique, in comparison with Michelson interferometers, is that it requires only relatively crude, but large, light collectors equipped with fast (nanosecond) photon detectors. Ground-based {gamma}-ray telescope arrays have similar specifications, and a number of these observatories are now operating worldwide, with more extensive installations planned for the future. These future instruments (CTA, AGIS, completion 2015) with 30-90 telescopes will provide 400-4000 different baselines that range in length between 50 m and a kilometre. Intensity interferometry with such arrays of telescopes attains 50 {mu}-arcsecond resolution for a limiting m{sub v}{approx}8.5. Phase information can be extracted from the interferometric measurement with phase closure, allowing image reconstruction. This technique opens the possibility of a wide range of studies amongst others, probing the stellar surface activity and the dynamic AU scale circumstellar environment of stars in various crucial evolutionary stages. Here we focuse on the astrophysical potential of an intensity interferometer utilising planned new {gamma}-ray instrumentation.

  12. Results of 1993 Repeat-Pass SAR Interferometry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, J. D.; Hensley, S.; Madsen, S. N.; Webb, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we present results of a repeat-pass SAR interferometry experiment performed in June 1993 near Portage, Maine. Differential GPS data accurate to +/-10cm were acquired to aid in motion compensation and geolocation of targets in the imagery. The experiment and data analysis will be discussed, and results will be shown during the presentation.

  13. Very long baseline interferometry and observations of gravitational lenses using intensity fluctuations: an analysis based on intensity autocorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Ermanno F.

    2014-05-01

    A novel interferometric technique that uses the spectrum of the current fluctuations of a quadratic detector, a type of detector commonly used in Astronomy, has recently been introduced. It has major advantages with respect to classical interferometry. It can be used to observe gravitational lenses that cannot be detected with standard techniques. It can be used to carry out very long baseline interferometry. Although the original theoretical analysis, that uses wave interaction effects, is rigorous, it is not easy to understand. The present article therefore carries out a simpler analysis, using the autocorrelation of intensity fluctuations, which is easier to understand. It is based on published experiments that were carried out to validate the original theory. The autocorrelation analysis also validates simple numerical techniques, based on the autocorrelation, to model the angular intensity distribution of a source. The autocorrelation technique also allows a much simpler detection of the signal. In practice, the gravitational lens applications are the ones that can readily be done with presently available telescopes. We describe a practical example that shows that presently available VLBI radio-astronomical data can be used to observe microlensisng and millilensing in macrolensed Quasars. They may give information on the dark matter substructures in the lensing galaxies.

  14. Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Stephen; Wilson, Robert W.; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Bender, Peter; Burke, Bernard F.; Cornwell, Tim; Drever, Ronald; Dyck, H. Melvin; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Kibblewhite, Edward

    1991-01-01

    The following recommended programs are reviewed: (1) infrared and optical interferometry (a ground-based and space programs); (2) compensation for the atmosphere with adaptive optics (a program for development and implementation of adaptive optics); and (3) gravitational waves (high frequency gravitational wave sources (LIGO), low frequency gravitational wave sources (LAGOS), a gravitational wave observatory program, laser gravitational wave observatory in space, and technology development during the 1990's). Prospects for international collaboration and related issues are also discussed.

  15. Rescattering effects on intensity interferometry and initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang

    The properties of the quark-gluon plasma are being thoroughly studied by utilizing relativistic heavy ion collisions. After its invention in astronomy in the 1950s, intensity interferometry was found to be a robust method to probe the spatial and temporal information of the nuclear collisions also. Although rescattering effects are negligible in elementary particle collisions, it may be very important for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and in the future LHC. Rescattering after production will modify the measured correlation function and make it harder to extract the dynamical information from data. To better understand the data which are dimmed by this final state process, we derive a general formula for intensity interferometry which can calculate rescattering effects easily. The formula can be used both non-relativistically and relativistically. Numerically, we found that rescattering effects on kaon interferometry for RHIC experiments can modify the measured ratio of the outward radius to the sideward radius, which is a sensitive probe to the equation of state, by as large as 15%. It is a nontrivial contribution which should be included to understand the data more accurately. The second part of this thesis is on the initial conditions in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Although relativistic hydrodynamics is successful in explaining many aspects of the data, it is only valid after some finite time after nuclear contact. The results depend on the choice of initial conditions which, so far, have been very uncertain. I describe a formula based on the McLerran-Venugopalan model to compute the initial energy density. The soft gluon fields produced immediately after the overlap of the nuclei can be expanded as a power series of the proper time t. Solving Yang-Mills equations with color current conservation can give us the analytical formulas for the fields. The local color charges on the transverse plane are stochastic variables and have to be taken care of by random

  16. A daylight experiment for teaching stellar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illarramendi, M. A.; Hueso, R.; Zubia, J.; Aldabaldetreku, G.; Durana, G.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2014-07-01

    We discuss the design of a simple experiment that reproduces the operation of the Michelson stellar interferometer. The emission of stellar sources has been simulated using light emerging from circular end-faces of step-index polymer optical fibers and from diffuse reflections of laser beams. Interference fringes have been acquired using a digital camera, coupled to a telescope obscured by a double aperture lid. The experiment is analogous to the classical determination of stellar sizes by Michelson and can be used during the day. Using this experimental set-up, we can determine the size of extended sources, located at a distance of about 75 m from our telescope, with errors less than 25%.

  17. Cramer-Rao lower bound and object reconstruction performance evaluation for intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolne, Jean J.; Gerwe, David R.; Crabtree, Peter N.

    2014-07-01

    This paper addresses the fundamental performance limits of object reconstruction methods using intensity interferometry measurements. It shows examples of reconstructed objects obtained with the FIIRE (Forward-model Interferometry Image Reconstruction Estimator) code developed by Boeing for AFRL. It considers various issues when calculating the multidimensional Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) when the Fisher information matrix (FIM) is singular. In particular, when comparing FIIRE performance, characterized as the root mean square difference between the estimated and pristine objects with the CRLB, we found that FIIRE performance improved as the singularity became worse, a result not expected. We found that for invertible FIM, FIIRE yielded lower root mean squared error than the square root of the CRLB (by a factor as large as 100). This may be due to various regularization constraints (positivity, support, sharpness, and smoothness) included in FIIRE, rendering it a biased estimator, as opposed to the unbiased CRLB framework used. Using the sieve technique to mitigate false high frequency content inherent in point-by-point object reconstruction methods, we also show further improved FIIRE performance on some generic objects. It is worth noting that since FIIRE is an iterative algorithm searching to arrive at an object estimate consistent with the collected data and various constraints, an initial object estimate is required. In our case, we used a completely random initial object guess consisting of a 2-D array of uniformly distributed random numbers, sometimes multiplied with a 2-D Gaussian function.

  18. Equation of state of strongly interacting matter and intensity interferometry of thermal photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Somnath; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Chatterjee, Rupa

    2011-07-01

    We find that an equation of state (EOS) for hot hadronic matter consisting of all mesons (baryons) having M < 1.5 (2.0)GeV along with Hagedorn resonances in thermal and chemical equilibrium, matches rather smoothly with lattice EOS (p4 action, Nτ = 8) for T up to ≈200 MeV, when corrections are made for the finite volume of hadrons. Two equations of state, HHL and HHB are constructed where the above is matched to the lattice and bag model EoS respectively at a critical temperature Tc = 165MeV. We find that the particle and thermal photon spectra differ only marginally for the two equations of state at both RHIC and LHC energies. The intensity interferometry results, specially the outward correlations for thermal photons are found to be quite distinct for the two equations of state.

  19. Design and experiment on a multi-functioned and programmable piezoelectric ceramic power supply with high precision for speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Biao; Ye, Yan; Wang, Yong-hong; Yang, En-zhen

    2016-01-01

    Speckle interferometry is a method of measuring structure's tiny deformations which requires accurate phase information of interference fringes. The phase information is acquired by micro-displacement produced by piezoelectric ceramic (PZT). In order to drive the PZT micro-displacement actuator, a multi-functioned and programmable PZT power supply with high precision is designed. Calibration experiment has been done to the PZT micro-actuator in speckle interferometry. Some experiments were also done to test its relevant characteristics. The experiment results show that it has high linearity, repeatability, stability, low ripple and can meet the requirement of the reliability and displacement accuracy in speckle interferometry.

  20. Core density gradient fluctuation measurement by differential interferometry in the helically symmetric experiment stellaratora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    The interferometer system on the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) stellarator uses an expanded beam and linear detector array to realize a multichord measurement. Unlike conventional interferometry which determines the plasma phase shift with respect to a reference, directly evaluating the phase between two adjacent chords can be employed to measure the change in plasma phase with impact parameter. This approach provides a measure of the equilibrium density gradient or the density gradient fluctuations and is referred to as differential interferometry. For central chords, measurements are spatially localized due to a geometrical weighting factor and can provide information on core density gradient fluctuations. The measurement requires finite coherence between fluctuations in the two spatially offset chords. This technique is applied on the HSX stellarator to measure both broadband turbulence and coherent modes. Spatial localization is exploited to isolate core turbulence changes associated with change in magnetic configuration or heating location.

  1. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinde, Keith; Chime Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen Intensity (HI) mapping uses redshifted 21cm emission from neutral hydrogen as a 3D tracer of Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe. Imprinted in the LSS is a remnant of the acoustic waves which propagated through the primordial plasma. This feature, the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO), has a characteristic scale of ~150 co-moving Mpc, which appears in the spatial correlation of LSS. By charting the evolution of this scale over cosmic time, we trace the expansion history of the Universe, constraining the Dark Energy equation of state as it becomes a significant component, particularly at redshifts poorly probed by current BAO surveys. In this talk I will introduce CHIME, a transit radio interferometer designed specifically for this purpose. CHIME is an ambitious new telescope, being built in British Columbia, Canada, and composed of five 20m x 100m parabolic reflectors which focus radiation in one direction (east-west) while interferometry is used to resolve beams in the other (north-south). Earth rotation sweeps them across the sky, resulting in complete daily coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere. Commissioning is underway on the 40 x 37m "Pathfinder" telescope, and the full sized 100m x 100m instrument is funded and under development.

  2. Exo-zodi detection capability of the Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) instrument.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Oswald; Flatscher, Reinhold; Ergenzinger, Klaus

    2006-06-20

    The Ground-Based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment (GENIE) is intended as an Earth-based precursor for the European Darwin mission that will prepare the Darwin science program and demonstrate the required technology at system level. We propose a compact nulling interferometer design consisting of a two-telescope aperture configuration, an optional split-pupil add-on, and only four active control loops for counteracting environmentally induced disturbances. We show by simulation that the proposed instrument is able to detect, within a few minutes of observation time, exo-zodiacal dust clouds around Sunlike stars at 20 parsecs that are 20 times stronger than the local zodiacal dust cloud density.

  3. Image Reconstruction from Sparse Irregular Intensity Interferometry Measurements of Fourier Magnitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    any particular geometry of the telescope array configuration. Its inputs are a list of measurements, each specified by UV coordinate and noise...the angular subtense and desired angular resolution. Fig. 2 shows the geometry of this array and the resulting baselines assuming a zenith line-of...Telescope array geometry and corresponding set of baselines for the analyzed intensity interferometer system. Fig. 3. Division of broadband

  4. On Using Intensity Interferometry for Feature Identification and Imaging of Remote Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    We derive an approximation to the intensity covariance function of two scanning pinhole detectors, facing a distant source (e.g., a star) being occluded partially by an absorptive object (e.g., a planet). We focus on using this technique to identify or image an object that is in the line-of-sight between a well-characterized source and the detectors. We derive the observed perturbation to the intensity covariance map due to the object, showing that under some reasonable approximations it is proportional to the real part of the Fourier transform of the source's photon-flux density times the Fourier transform of the object's intensity absorption. We highlight the key parameters impacting its visibility and discuss the requirements for estimating object-related parameters, e.g., its size, velocity or shape. We consider an application of this result to determining the orbit inclination of an exoplanet orbiting a distant star. Finally, motivated by the intrinsically weak nature of the signature, we study its signal-to-noise ratio and determine the impact of system parameters.

  5. The Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography (CRICKET) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, Kenneth; Coker, Clayton; Bernhardt, Paul; Cohen, Aaron; Crane, Patrick; Kassim, Namir; Lazio, Joseph; Weiler, Kurt; Watts, Christopher; Rickard, Lee J.; Taylor, Greg; Schinzel, Frank; Philstrom, Ylva; Close, Sigrid; Colestock, Patrick; Myers, Steve; Datta, Abirhup

    We report on the Combined Radio Interferometry and COSMIC Experiment in Tomography Campaign (CRICKET) held on September 15 and 17, 2007. The experiment used the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC also known as FORMOSAT-3) in conjunction with the Very Large Array radio telescope, located near Socorro, NM, to study the ionosphere from the global scale down to the regional scale. Each COSMIC satellite includes three instruments capable of measuring the ionosphere: the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP), a UV radiometer; the GPS Occultation experiment (GOX), a dual-frequency GPS occultation receiver; and the Tri-band Beacon (TBB), a three frequency coherently radiating radio beacon. These three instruments have been demonstrated to be a powerful means for characterizing the global-scale ionosphere. The VLA when deployed at its largest extent and while operating at 73.8 MHz is incredibly sensitive to relative total electron content variations of the regional ionosphere over about a 30-100 km diameter area. In this work, we concentrate on the first set of observations on September 15, 2007 at approximately 0830 UT. We have successfully married these heterogeneous data sets, using a tomographic data fusion approach, to produce a consistent ionospheric specification from the global scale down to the regional scale.

  6. Astrophysically relevant hydrodynamics experiments using intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.; Budil, K. S.; Estabrook, K.; Glendinning, S. G.; Gold, D.; Ryutov, D.; Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R. P.; Smith, T.; Carroll, J.; McCray, R.; Liang, E.; Keilty, K.; Rubenchik, A.

    1998-04-01

    In a broad-based collaboration, we are developing a series of astrophysically relevant hydrodynamics experiments on the Nova and PetaWatt lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Issues that we are or planning to investigate are deep nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities in 2D versus 3D, relevant to core-collapse supernova explosions [J. Kane et al., Ap. J. (1997); B.A. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas (1997).]; strong-shock hydrodynamics relevant to supernova remnant formation [R.P. Drake et al., submitted, Ap. J. (1997).]; radiative blast wave development, of potential interest to gamma-ray burst models [E. Liang et al., 2nd Int. Workshop on LaboratoryAstrophysics using Intense Lasers, Mar. 19-21, 1998, Univ. of AZ.]; and cratering experiments, of possible interest to hypervelocity meteoroid impacts [A. Rubenchik et al., 2nd Int. Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics using Intense Lasers, Mar. 19-21, 1998, Univ. of AZ.]. An overview of this work will be given, and the issue of scaling will be addressed [D. Ryutov et al., in preparation for submittal to Ap. J. (1998).].

  7. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvits, L. I.; Bocanegra Bahamon, T. M.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; de Pater, I.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Rosenblatt, P.; Oberst, J.; Charlot, P.; Frey, S.; Tudose, V.

    2013-09-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a multi-disciplinary enhancement of the scientific suite of the Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE). PRIDE will exploit the technique of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of spacecraft and natural celestial radio sources by a network of Earth-based radio telescopes (Fig. 1, see [1,2]). The main "measured deliverables" of PRIDE are lateral coordinates of spacecraft in the celestial reference frame. In addition to the lateral coordinates, a by-product of PRIDE is the measurement of the line-ofsight velocity of spacecraft. It is worth to notice the synergistic nature of PRIDE measurements to other key experiments of the JUICE mission, in particular addressing the quest of Icy Moons interior and Jovian system ephemerides. In addition of providing consistency checks of a number of experiments, PRIDE is highly synergistic to a number of other JUICE experiments, in particular radio science and laser ranging ones. Tracking of the spacecraft in the gravity field of Jupiter and its satellites will allow us to not only provide valuable inputs into the determination of the spacecraft trajectory, but also to improve the ephemerides of Jupiter and the Galilean Satellites. VLBI tracking of the spacecraft, in combination with routine observations of background radio sources of the celestial reference frame, will also allow us to firmly tie the Jupiter system into the celestial reference frame. This would represent a major contribution to the Solar System celestial mechanics and the definition of the Solar System reference system. Furthermore, PRIDE will contribute to various aspects of Ganymede's, Callisto's and Europa's science. VLBI positioning and radio occultation data may represent an important and independent reference for the GALA laser altimeter data. The trajectory data during the multiple satellite flybys will help to further constrain the low order gravity field parameters. In

  8. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  9. Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Takabe, H; Arnett, D

    2000-01-19

    Astrophysics has traditionally been pursued at astronomical observatories and on theorists' computers. Observations record images from space, and theoretical models are developed to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to test theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. Intense lasers are now being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively tested against data. We describe here several areas of astrophysics--supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets--where laser experiments are under development to test our understanding of these phenomena.

  10. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) technique: A test case of the Mars Express Phobos fly-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duev, D. A.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Cimò, G.; Molera Calvés, G.; Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Gurvits, L. I.; Kettenis, M. M.; Kania, J.; Tudose, V.; Rosenblatt, P.; Marty, J.-C.; Lainey, V.; de Vicente, P.; Quick, J.; Nickola, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Kronschnabl, G.; Ploetz, C.; Haas, R.; Lindqvist, M.; Orlati, A.; Ipatov, A. V.; Kharinov, M. A.; Mikhailov, A. G.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Stevens, J.; Gulyaev, S. A.; Natush, T.; Weston, S.; Wang, W. H.; Xia, B.; Yang, W. J.; Hao, L.-F.; Kallunki, J.; Witasse, O.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The closest ever fly-by of the Martian moon Phobos, performed by the European Space Agency's Mars Express spacecraft, gives a unique opportunity to sharpen and test the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments (PRIDE) technique in the interest of studying planet-satellite systems. Aims: The aim of this work is to demonstrate a technique of providing high precision positional and Doppler measurements of planetary spacecraft using the Mars Express spacecraft. The technique will be used in the framework of Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiments in various planetary missions, in particular in fly-by mode. Methods: We advanced a novel approach to spacecraft data processing using the techniques of Doppler and phase-referenced very long baseline interferometry spacecraft tracking. Results: We achieved, on average, mHz precision (30 μm/s at a 10 s integration time) for radial three-way Doppler estimates and sub-nanoradian precision for lateral position measurements, which in a linear measure (at a distance of 1.4 AU) corresponds to ~50 m.

  11. Spatio-temporal experiments of volume elastic objects with high speed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez López, C.; Hernández Montes, M. S.; Mendoza Santoyo, F.; Gutiérrez Hernandez, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    The optical non-destructive digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique has proven to be a powerful tool in measuring vibration phenomena with a spatial resolution ranging from a few hundreds of nanometers to tens of micrometers. With the aid of high speed digital cameras it is possible to achieve simultaneously spatial and temporal resolution, and thus capable of measuring the entire object mechanical oscillation trajectory from one to several cycles. It is important to mention that due to faster computers with large data storage capacity there is an increasing interest in applying numerical simulation methods to mimic different real life objects for example, in the field of modern elastic materials and biological systems. The complex algorithms involved cannot render significant results mainly due to the rather large number of variables. In order to test these numerical simulations some experiments using optical techniques have been designed and reported. This is very important for example in measurements of the dynamic elastic properties of materials. In this work we present some preliminary results from experiments that use DHI to measure vibrations of an elastic spherical object subject to a mechanical excitation that induces resonant vibration modes in its volume. We report on the spatial and temporal effects that by their nature have a non-linear mechanical response. The use of a high speed CMOS camera in DHI assures the measurement of this nonlinear behavior as a sum of linear effects that happen during very short time lapses and with very small displacement amplitudes. We conclude by stating that complex numerical models may be compared to results using DHI, thus proposing an alternative method to prove and verify the mathematical models vs. real measurements on volumetric elastic objects.

  12. White light interferometry for quantitative surface characterization in ion sputtering experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, S. V.; Zinovev, A. V.; Tripa, C. E.; Erck, R. A.; Veryovkin, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    White light interferometry (WLI) can be used to obtain surface morphology information on dimensional scale of millimeters with lateral resolution as good as {approx}1 {micro}m and depth resolution down to 1 nm. By performing true three-dimensional imaging of sample surfaces, the WLI technique enables accurate quantitative characterization of the geometry of surface features and compares favorably to scanning electron and atomic force microscopies by avoiding some of their drawbacks. In this paper, results of using the WLI imaging technique to characterize the products of ion sputtering experiments are reported. With a few figures, several example applications of the WLI method are illustrated when used for (i) sputtering yield measurements and time-to-depth conversion, (ii) optimizing ion beam current density profiles, the shapes of sputtered craters, and multiple ion beam superposition and (iii) quantitative characterization of surfaces processed with ions. In particular, for sputter depth profiling experiments of {sup 25}Mg, {sup 44}Ca and {sup 53}Cr ion implants in Si (implantation energy of 1 keV per nucleon), the depth calibration of the measured depth profile curves determined by the WLI method appeared to be self-consistent with TRIM simulations for such projectile-matrix systems. In addition, high depth resolution of the WLI method is demonstrated for a case of a Genesis solar wind Si collector surface processed by gas cluster ion beam: a 12.5 nm layer was removed from the processed surface, while the transition length between the processed and untreated areas was 150 {micro}m.

  13. EPR experiment and 2-photon interferometry: Report of a 2-photon interference experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Y. H.; Rubin, M. H.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    After a very brief review of the historical Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) experiments, a new two-photon interference type EPR experiment is reported. A two-photon state was generated by optical parametric down conversion. Pairs of light quanta with degenerate frequency but divergent directions of propagation were sent to two independent Michelson interferometers. First and second order interference effectors were studied. Different than other reports, we observed that the second order interference visibility vanished when the optical path difference of the interferometers were much less than the coherence length of the pumping laser beam. However, we also observed that the second order interference behaved differently depending on whether the interferometers were set at equal or different optical path differences.

  14. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Kevin; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J. Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-François; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena Parra, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B.; Pen, Ue-li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Mike; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-07-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beam forming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37m long by 20m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of ~100 degrees by 1-2 degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every ~30 cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800 MHz, and directly sampled at 800 MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation. The lessons learned from its implementation will be used to inform and improve the final CHIME design.

  15. Recent experiments conducted with the Wide-field imaging interferometry testbed (WIIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisawitz, David T.; Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Bolcar, Matthew; Fienup, James R.; Iacchetta, Alexander S.; Maher, Stephen F.; Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2016-08-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to demonstrate and explore the practical limitations inherent in wide field-of-view "double Fourier" (spatio-spectral) interferometry. The testbed delivers high-quality interferometric data and is capable of observing spatially and spectrally complex hyperspectral test scenes. Although WIIT operates at visible wavelengths, by design the data are representative of those from a space-based far-infrared observatory. We used WIIT to observe a calibrated, independently characterized test scene of modest spatial and spectral complexity, and an astronomically realistic test scene of much greater spatial and spectral complexity. This paper describes the experimental setup, summarizes the performance of the testbed, and presents representative data.

  16. Spanish Intensive Courses: The South Carolina Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David P.

    The Spanish Intensive Courses sequence at the University of South Carolina, first offered in fall 1982, has become well received and highly visible in the university. The sequence has grown to three courses in fall 1983, all exceeding minimum enrollment requirements despite selective admission criteria. The success of the sequence has inspired the…

  17. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takefuji, K.; Terasawa, T.; Kondo, T.; Mikami, R.; Takeuchi, H.; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kita, H.; Sekido, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4-1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 2014 July 26 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 hr observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 ± 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  18. A small-scale experiment using microwave interferometry to investigate detonation and shock-to-detonation transition in pressed TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renslow, Peter John

    A small-scale characterization test utilizing microwave interferometry was developed to dynamically measure detonation and run to detonation distance in explosives. The technique was demonstrated by conducting two experimental series on the well-characterized explosive triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB). In the first experiment series, the detonation velocity was observed at varying porosity. The velocity during TATB detonation matched well with predictions made using CHEETAH and an empirical relation from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The microwave interferometer also captured unsteady propagation of the reaction when a low density charge was near the failure diameter. In the second experiment series, Pop-plots were produced using data obtained from shock initiation of the TATB through a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) attenuator. The results compared well to wedge test data from LANL despite the microwave interferometer test being of substantially smaller scale. The results showed the test method is attractive for rapid characterization of new and improvised explosive materials.

  19. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  20. Time Delay Interferometry Experiments at the University of Florida Interferometric Simulator.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitryk, Shawn

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA space mission proposed to directly measure gravitational waves in the frequency range from 30 uHz to 1 Hz. To accomplish this LISA will utilize a modified Michelson interferometer to measure the spatial changes between three drag-free proof masses in a heliocentric orbit separated by a distance of 5 Gm. In order to accurately measure the distance between the proof masses, LISA requires ultra-stable laser signals to reduce the noise in the measurement. Any additional laser noise must be recorded and extracted from the final measurement through a method known as time-delay interferometry (TDI). The University of Florida LISA Interferometry Simulator (UFLIS) has the ability to perform a hardware-in-the-loop simulation of the LISA Constellation in order to verify laser noise stabilization and extraction techniques. We present the UFLISs' capability to replicate the expected pre-stabilized laser noise, measure and delay the laser signals due to the light-travel time along the LISA arm, and inject mock gravitational wave signals. The resulting laser beatnotes are then recorded and combined based on TDI theory to extract the laser noise and recover the injected gravitational wave signals to within the requirement proposed by the LISA mission science team. This work is supported by NASA through grants BEFS 04-0019-0019 and 07 ATFP 07-0116.

  1. The TIME-Pilot intensity mapping experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, A. T.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Chang, T. C.; Cooray, A. R.; Duband, L.; Gong, Y.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Hunacek, J.; Koch, P. M.; Li, C. T.; O'Brient, R. C.; Prouve, T.; Shirokoff, E.; Silva, M. B.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-08-01

    TIME-Pilot is designed to make measurements from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), when the first stars and galaxies formed and ionized the intergalactic medium. This will be done via measurements of the redshifted 157.7 um line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]). In particular, TIME-Pilot will produce the first detection of [CII] clustering fluctuations, a signal proportional to the integrated [CII] intensity, summed over all EoR galaxies. TIME-Pilot is thus sensitive to the emission from dwarf galaxies, thought to be responsible for the balance of ionizing UV photons, that will be difficult to detect individually with JWST and ALMA. A detection of [CII] clustering fluctuations would validate current theoretical estimates of the [CII] line as a new cosmological observable, opening the door for a new generation of instruments with advanced technology spectroscopic array focal planes that will map [CII] fluctuations to probe the EoR history of star formation, bubble size, and ionization state. Additionally, TIME-Pilot will produce high signal-to-noise measurements of CO clustering fluctuations, which trace the role of molecular gas in star-forming galaxies at redshifts 0 < z < 2. With its unique atmospheric noise mitigation, TIME-Pilot also significantly improves sensitivity for measuring the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect in galaxy clusters. TIME-Pilot will employ a linear array of spectrometers, each consisting of a parallel-plate diffraction grating. The spectrometer bandwidth covers 185-323 GHz to both probe the entire redshift range of interest and to include channels at the edges of the band for atmospheric noise mitigation. We illuminate the telescope with f/3 horns, which balances the desire to both couple to the sky with the best efficiency per beam, and to pack a large number of horns into the fixed field of view. Feedhorns couple radiation to the waveguide spectrometer gratings. Each spectrometer grating has 190 facets and provides resolving power

  2. Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2012-05-20

    Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

  3. A portable laser system for high-precision atom interferometry experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Prevedelli, M.; Giorgini, A.; Tino, G. M.; Peters, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a modular rack-mounted laser system for the cooling and manipulation of neutral rubidium atoms which has been developed for a portable gravimeter based on atom interferometry that will be capable of performing high-precision gravity measurements directly at sites of geophysical interest. This laser system is constructed in a compact and mobile design so that it can be transported to different locations, yet it still offers improvements over many conventional laboratory-based laser systems. Our system is contained in a standard 19″ rack and emits light at five different frequencies simultaneously on up to 12 fibre ports at a total output power of 800 mW. These frequencies can be changed and switched between ports in less than a microsecond. The setup includes two phase-locked diode lasers with a phase noise spectral density of less than 1 μrad/Hz1/2 in the frequency range in which our gravimeter is most sensitive to noise. We characterise this laser system and evaluate the performance limits it imposes on an interferometer.

  4. Patients' dreams and unreal experiences following intensive care unit admission.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Brigit; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Dreams and unreal experiences occur commonly in critically ill patients admitted to intensive care unit. This study describes 31 patients' dreams and explores the relationship between patients' subjective recall 12-18 months after intensive care unit discharge and their observed behaviour during their intensive care unit stay. Semi-structured interviews revealed that 74% of longer-term ICU patients (> or = 3 days) reported dreaming, with the majority also describing frightening hallucinations. Only two patients reported long-term negative psychological sequelae, but the short-term consequence of hallucinations may also have an undiscovered impact on patients' recovery.

  5. How we remember the emotional intensity of past musical experiences.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Thomas; Zimmermann, Doreen; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Listening to music usually elicits emotions that can vary considerably in their intensity over the course of listening. Yet, after listening to a piece of music, people are easily able to evaluate the music's overall emotional intensity. There are two different hypotheses about how affective experiences are temporally processed and integrated: (1) all moments' intensities are integrated, resulting in an averaged value; (2) the overall evaluation is built from specific single moments, such as the moments of highest emotional intensity (peaks), the end, or a combination of these. Here we investigated what listeners do when building an overall evaluation of a musical experience. Participants listened to unknown songs and provided moment-to-moment ratings of experienced intensity of emotions. Subsequently, they evaluated the overall emotional intensity of each song. Results indicate that participants' evaluations were predominantly influenced by their average impression but that, in addition, the peaks and end emotional intensities contributed substantially. These results indicate that both types of processes play a role: All moments are integrated into an averaged value but single moments might be assigned a higher value in the calculation of this average.

  6. How we remember the emotional intensity of past musical experiences

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Thomas; Zimmermann, Doreen; Sedlmeier, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Listening to music usually elicits emotions that can vary considerably in their intensity over the course of listening. Yet, after listening to a piece of music, people are easily able to evaluate the music's overall emotional intensity. There are two different hypotheses about how affective experiences are temporally processed and integrated: (1) all moments' intensities are integrated, resulting in an averaged value; (2) the overall evaluation is built from specific single moments, such as the moments of highest emotional intensity (peaks), the end, or a combination of these. Here we investigated what listeners do when building an overall evaluation of a musical experience. Participants listened to unknown songs and provided moment-to-moment ratings of experienced intensity of emotions. Subsequently, they evaluated the overall emotional intensity of each song. Results indicate that participants' evaluations were predominantly influenced by their average impression but that, in addition, the peaks and end emotional intensities contributed substantially. These results indicate that both types of processes play a role: All moments are integrated into an averaged value but single moments might be assigned a higher value in the calculation of this average. PMID:25177311

  7. GPS Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangrass, Frank

    1992-01-01

    This semi-annual progress report provides an overview of the work performed during the first six months of Grant NAG 1 1423, titled 'GPS Interferometry'. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based positioning and timing system. Through the use of interferometric processing techniques, it is feasible to obtain sub-decimeter position accuracies for an aircraft in flight. The proposed duration of this Grant is three years. During the first year of the Grant, the efforts are focussed on two topics: (1) continued development of GPS Interferometry core technology; and (2) rapid technology demonstration of GPS interferometry through the design and implementation of a flight reference/autoland system. Multipath error has been the emphasis of the continued development of GPS Interferometry core technology. The results have been documented in a Doctoral Dissertation and a conference paper. The design and implementation of the flight reference/autoland system is nearing completion. The remainder of this progress report summarizes the architecture of this system.

  8. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    PubMed

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome.

  9. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2006-06-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  10. An Introduction to Optical Stellar Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, A.; Lipson, S. G.; Nisenson, P.

    2014-03-01

    1. Introduction; 2 Basic concepts: a qualitative introduction; 3. Interference, diffraction and coherence; 4. Aperture synthesis; 5. Optical effects of the atmosphere; 6. Single-aperture techniques; 7. Intensity interferometry; 8. Amplitude interferometry: techniques and instruments; 9. The hypertelescope; 10. Nulling and coronagraphy; 11. A sampling of interferometric science; 12. Future ground and space projects; Appendices.

  11. Optical interferometry diagnostics in laser-driven equation of state experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R C; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Da Silva, L B; Gold, D M; Kalantar, D H; Remington, B A; Weber, S V

    1999-06-18

    We have developed and tested several optical interferometric diagnostics to measure preheat and shock velocity in high-pressure equation of state experiments on the Nova laser. Theory and practical application of interferometric measurement techniques with illustrative experimental results are presented.

  12. More intense experiences, less intense forecasts: why people overweight probability specifications in affective forecasts.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Eva C; Zhang, Jiao; Morewedge, Carey K; Vosgerau, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We propose that affective forecasters overestimate the extent to which experienced hedonic responses to an outcome are influenced by the probability of its occurrence. The experience of an outcome (e.g., winning a gamble) is typically more affectively intense than the simulation of that outcome (e.g., imagining winning a gamble) upon which the affective forecast for it is based. We suggest that, as a result, experiencers allocate a larger share of their attention toward the outcome (e.g., winning the gamble) and less to its probability specifications than do affective forecasters. Consequently, hedonic responses to an outcome are less sensitive to its probability specifications than are affective forecasts for that outcome. The results of 6 experiments provide support for our theory. Affective forecasters overestimated how sensitive experiencers would be to the probability of positive and negative outcomes (Experiments 1 and 2). Consistent with our attentional account, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications disappeared when the attention of forecasters was diverted from probability specifications (Experiment 3) or when the attention of experiencers was drawn toward probability specifications (Experiment 4). Finally, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications between forecasters and experiencers were diminished when the forecasted outcome was more affectively intense (Experiments 5 and 6).

  13. More Intense Experiences, Less Intense Forecasts: Why People Overweight Probability Specifications in Affective Forecasts

    PubMed Central

    Buechel, Eva C.; Zhang, Jiao; Morewedge, Carey K.; Vosgerau, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We propose that affective forecasters overestimate the extent to which experienced hedonic responses to an outcome are influenced by the probability of its occurrence. The experience of an outcome (e.g., winning a gamble) is typically more affectively intense than the simulation of that outcome (e.g., imagining winning a gamble) upon which the affective forecast for it is based. We suggest that, as a result, experiencers allocate a larger share of their attention toward the outcome (e.g., winning the gamble) and less to its probability specifications than do affective forecasters. Consequently, hedonic responses to an outcome are less sensitive to its probability specifications than are affective forecasts for that outcome. The results of 6 experiments provide support for our theory. Affective forecasters overestimated how sensitive experiencers would be to the probability of positive and negative outcomes (Experiments 1 and 2). Consistent with our attentional account, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications disappeared when the attention of forecasters was diverted from probability specifications (Experiment 3) or when the attention of experiencers was drawn toward probability specifications (Experiment 4). Finally, differences in sensitivity to probability specifications between forecasters and experiencers were diminished when the forecasted outcome was more affectively intense (Experiments 5 and 6). PMID:24128184

  14. Perceiving bodies in motion: expression intensity, empathy, and experience.

    PubMed

    Sevdalis, Vassilis; Keller, Peter E

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the perceptual identification of individuals' intended expression intensity in point-light displays depicting dance. Participants watched point-light displays of 200-1,000-ms duration, as well as static displays, of expressive and inexpressive dance performances. The task was to identify the intended expression intensity of the performer. The results indicate that expression intensity could be discerned reliably only from dynamic displays, even when they were as short as 200 ms, though the accuracy of judgments increased with exposure duration. Judgment accuracy for dynamic displays was positively correlated with self-report empathy indices and confidence in judgments. Accuracy for these displays also correlated with indices of informal music and dance experience. The findings are discussed in relation to sensorimotor and cognitive-emotional processes underlying action understanding and social cognition.

  15. Optical Interferometry Motivation and History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A history and motivation of stellar interferometry is presented. The topics include: 1) On Tides, Organ Pipes, and Soap Bubbles; 2) Armand Hippolyte Fizeau (1819-1896); 3) Fizeau Suggests Stellar Interferometry 1867; 4) Edouard Stephan (1837-1923); 5) Foucault Refractor; 6) Albert A. Michelson (1852-1931); 7) On the Application of Interference Methods to Astronomy (1890); 8) Moons of Jupiter (1891); 9) Other Applications in 19th Century; 10) Timeline of Interferometry to 1938; 11) 30 years goes by; 12) Mount Wilson Observatory; 13) Michelson's 20 ft Interferometer; 14) Was Michelson Influenced by Fizeau? 15) Work Continues in the 1920s and 30s; 16) 50 ft Interferometer (1931-1938); 17) Light Paths in the 50 ft Interferometer; 18) Ground-level at the 50 ft; 19) F.G. Pease (1881-1938); 20) Timeline of Optical Interferometry to 1970; 21) A New Type of Stellar Interferometer (1956); 22) Intensity Interferometer (1963- 1976; 23) Robert Hanbury Brown; 24) Interest in Optical Interferometry in the 1960s; 25) Interferometry in the Early 1970s; and 26) A New Frontier is Opened up in 1974.

  16. Particle manipulation techniques in AEgIS. Antimatter experiment: gravity, interferometry, spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Di Noto, L.; Krasnicky, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Testera, G.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2011-07-01

    The AEgIS experiment ( http://aegis.web.cern.ch ) will measure the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen. Once performed this could be the first direct test of the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter. In the AEgIS experiment a beam of antihydrogen will travel horizontally along a path of about 1 m trough a moiré deflectometer followed by a position sensitive detector. The g value will be obtained measuring the vertical displacement of the annihilation patterns. Before producing the beam, several tasks have to be performed mainly involving positron and electron plasma manipulation and particles cooling in Malmberg-Penning traps. The AEgIS experiment is currently under construction at CERN, meanwhile several tests involving particle manipulation and particle cooling are in progress. In this report some experimental results involving diocotron manipulation of plasma will be presented.

  17. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  18. Design of experiment for earth rotation and baseline parameter determination from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermanis, A.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of recovering earth rotation and network geometry (baseline) parameters are emphasized. The numerical simulated experiments performed are set up in an environment where station coordinates vary with respect to inertial space according to a simulated earth rotation model similar to the actual but unknown rotation of the earth. The basic technique of VLBI and its mathematical model are presented. The parametrization of earth rotation chosen is described and the resulting model is linearized. A simple analysis of the geometry of the observations leads to some useful hints on achieving maximum sensitivity of the observations with respect to the parameters considered. The basic philosophy for the simulation of data and their analysis through standard least squares adjustment techniques is presented. A number of characteristic network designs based on present and candidate station locations are chosen. The results of the simulations for each design are presented together with a summary of the conclusions.

  19. Far infrared tangential interferometry/polarimetry on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Geck, W. R.; Luhmann, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    Measurement of the core BT(r,t) value is essential in the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX), since the effects of paramagnetism and diamagnetism in the NSTX are expected to be considerably greater than that in higher aspect ratio tokamaks. Therefore, without independent BT(r,t) measurement, plasma parameters dependent upon BT such as the q profile and local β value cannot be evaluated. Tangential interferometer/polarimeter systems (eight channels) [H. Park, L. Guttadora, C. Domier, W. R. Geck, and N. C. Luhman, Jr., First and Second NSTX Research Forums, Princeton, NJ, 1997 (unpublished)] for the NSTX will provide temporally and radially resolved toroidal field profile [BT(r,t)] and two-dimensional electron density profile [ne(r,t)] data. The outcome of the proposed system is extremely important to the study of confinement, heating, and stability of the NSTX plasmas. The research task is largely based on utilizing existing hardware from the TFTR multichannel infrared interferometer system [D. K. Mansfield, H. K. Park, L. C. Johnson, H. Anderson, S. Foote, B. Clifton, and C. H. Ma, Appl. Opt. 26, 4469 (1987) and H. K. Park, D. K. Mansfield, and C. L. Johnson, Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostic, Los Angeles, CA, 28-30 Oct. 1987 (unpublished), pp. 96-104] which will be reconfigured into a tangential system for NSTX, and to develop the additional hardware required to complete the system.

  20. Compression of intensity interferometry signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribak, Erez N.; Shulamy, Yaron

    2016-02-01

    Correlations between photon currents from separate light-collectors provide information on the shape of the source. When the light-collectors are well separated, for example in space, transmission of these currents to a central correlator is limited by band-width. We study the possibility of compression of the photon fluxes and find that traditional compression methods have a similar chance of achieving this goal compared to compressed sensing.

  1. A Review of Astrophysics Experiments on Intense Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Arnett, D.; Drake, R.P.; Takabe, H.

    1999-03-03

    Astrophysics traditionally has been the domain of large astronomical observatories and theorists' computers, the former producing images from deep space, and the latter constructing intricate models to explain the observations. A component often missing has been the ability to quantitatively test the theories and models in an experimental setting where the initial and final states are well characterized. In a new development, intense lasers are being used to recreate aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively compared with data. We summarize here several areas of astrophysics: supernovae, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and giant planets. In each of these areas, experiments are under development at intense laser facilities to test and refine our understanding of these phenomena.

  2. High intensity positron beam and angular correlation experiments at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.; Fluss, M.J.

    1985-03-01

    A positron beam apparatus that produces a variable energy positron beam with sufficient intensity to perform new positron experiments in an ultrahigh vacuum environment has been installed at the Lawrence Livermore 100 MeV electron linac. We have installed two large area position sensitive gamma-ray detectors to measure angular correlations in two dimensions and a separate highly collimated detector to measure positronium energy distributions by time-of-flight velocity determination. Data from measurements on single crystals of Cu will be described.

  3. Expressing death risk as condensed life experience and death intensity.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-08-01

    Some risk exposures, including many medical and surgical procedures, typically carry hazards of death that are difficult to convey and appreciate in absolute terms. I propose presenting the death risk as a condensed life experience (i.e., the equivalent amount of life T that would carry the same cumulative mortality hazard for a person of the same age and sex based on life tables). For example, if the risk of death during an elective 1-hour procedure is 0.01%, and same-age and same-sex people have a 0.01% death risk over 1 month, one can inform the patient that "this procedure carries the same death risk as living 1 month of normal life." Comparative standards from other risky activities or from a person with the same disease at the same stage and same predictive profile could also be used. A complementary metric that may be useful to consider is the death intensity. The death intensity λ is the hazard function that shows the fold-risk estimate of dying compared with the reference person. The death intensity can vary substantially for different phases of the event, operation, or procedure (e.g., intraoperative, early postoperative, late postoperative), and this variability may also be useful to convey. T will vary depending on the time window for which it is computed. I present examples for calculating T and λ using literature data on accidents, ascent to Mount Everest, and medical and surgical procedures.

  4. Special topics in infrared interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  5. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  6. Atom Interferometry

    ScienceCinema

    Mark Kasevich

    2016-07-12

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  7. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kasevich, Mark

    2008-05-08

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton's constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gyroscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be used to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  8. Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Kasevich

    2008-05-07

    Atom de Broglie wave interferometry has emerged as a tool capable of addressing a diverse set of questions in gravitational and condensed matter physics, and as an enabling technology for advanced sensors in geodesy and navigation. This talk will review basic principles, then discuss recent applications and future directions. Scientific applications to be discussed include measurement of G (Newton’s constant), tests of the Equivalence Principle and post-Newtonian gravity, and study of the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition in layered superfluids. Technology applications include development of precision gryoscopes and gravity gradiometers. The talk will conclude with speculative remarks looking to the future: Can atom interference methods be sued to detect gravity waves? Can non-classical (entangled/squeezed state) atom sources lead to meaningful sensor performance improvements?

  9. A review of astrophysics experiments on intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, B. A.

    1999-11-01

    Modern, high power laser facilities open new possibilities for simulating astrophysical systems in the laboratory.(S.J. Rose, Laser & Part. Beams 9, 869 (1991); B.H. Ripin et al., Laser & Part. Beams 8, 183 (1990); B.A. Remington et al., Science 284, 1488 (1999); H. Takabe et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 41, A75 (1999); R.P. Drake, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 14505 (1999).) Scaled investigations of the hydrodynamics.(J. Kane et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2065 (1999); R.P. Drake et al., Ap. J. 500, L157 (1998); D. Ryutov et al., Ap. J. 518, 821 (1999).) and radiative transfer.(J. Wark et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2004 (1997); P.K. Patel et al., JQSRT 58, 835 (1997).) relevant to supernovae, and opacities relevant to stellar interiors.(F.J. Rogers and C.A. Iglesias, Science 263, 50 (1994); H. Merdji et al., JSQRT 58, 783 (1997).) are now possible with laser experiments. Equations of state relevant to the interiors of giant planets and brown dwarfs are also being experimentally accessed.(G.W. Collins et al., Science 281, 1178 (1998); A. Benuzzi et al., Phys. Rev. E 54, 2162 (1996).) With the construction of the NIF laser in the U.S., and the LIL and LMJ lasers in France, controlled investigations of thermonuclear burn physics will become possible in the next decade. And with existing and future ultra-high intensity short pulse lasers, investigations of relativistic astrophysical plasmas are becoming possible.(M.H. Key et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1966 (1998); F. Pegoraro et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fus. 39, B261 (1997).) A review of laboratory astrophysics experiments using intense lasers will be presented, and the potential for the future will be discussed.

  10. An in situ method for diagnosing phase shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, J.; Ma, D.; Zhang, H.; Xie, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Current diagnosing phase shifting interferometry is a time and funds consuming process. Hence a brief and effective method is necessary to satisfy the real-time testing. In this paper, mathematical solutions for errors were deduced from the difference of intensity patterns. Based on the diversity of error distributions, an effective method for distinguishing and diagnosing the error sources is proposed and verified by an elaborative designed simulation. In the actual comparison experiment, vibration, phase-shift error and intensity fluctuation were imposed to demonstrate this method. The results showed that this method can be applied into the real-time measurement and provide an in situ diagnosing technique.

  11. Characterization of Surface Modifications by White Light Interferometry: Applications in Ion Sputtering, Laser Ablation, and Tribology Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baryshev, Sergey V.; Erck, Robert A.; Moore, Jerry F.; Zinovev, Alexander V.; Tripa, C. Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained. PMID:23486006

  12. Characterization of surface modifications by white light interferometry: applications in ion sputtering, laser ablation, and tribology experiments.

    PubMed

    Baryshev, Sergey V; Erck, Robert A; Moore, Jerry F; Zinovev, Alexander V; Tripa, C Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V

    2013-02-27

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: i. Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. ii. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. iii. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained.

  13. A circuit processing method for restraining DC drift for Interferometry of micro vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hao; Wang, Xuanze; Zhai, Zhongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A circuit processing method is present to restrain DC drift after analyzing the traditional signal processing method of interferometry for micro vibration measurement. At first, the circuit diagram is designed and its mathematical model is built, then the theoretical equations of the output signal are derived with the practical parameters. By using SIMULINK simulation, the process for restraining DC drift is present on the conditions of the variations of background intensity. The validity of feedback circuit was verified through analyzing the real experiment data. Theoretical predictions match simulation results, showing that this method effectively restrains DC drift for interferometry of micro vibration measurement and it greatly improves the system's stability.

  14. Dual-wavelength in-line phase-shifting interferometry based on two dc-term-suppressed intensities with a special phase shift for quantitative phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yawei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jin, Weifeng

    2016-06-01

    To efficiently promote the phase retrieval in quantitative phase imaging, a new approach of quantitative phase extraction is proposed based on two intensities with dual wavelength after filtering the corresponding dc terms for each wavelength, in which a special phase shift is used. In this approach, only the combination of the phase-shifting technique and subtraction procedures is needed, and no additional algorithms are required. The thickness of the phase object can be achieved from the phase image, which is related to the synthetic beat wavelength. The feasibility of this method is verified by the simulated experiments of the optically transparent objects.

  15. Data System Architectures: Recent Experiences from Data Intensive Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, G.; Frame, M. T.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Latysh, N.; Krassovski, M.; Killeffer, T.; Hook, L.

    2014-12-01

    U.S. Federal agencies are frequently trying to address new data intensive projects that require next generation of data system architectures. This presentation will focus on two new such architectures: USGS's Science Data Catalog (SDC) and DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments - Arctic Data System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) to include records describing datasets, data collections, and observational or remotely-sensed data. The system was built using service oriented architecture and allows USGS scientists and data providers to create and register their data using either a standards-based metadata creation form or simply to register their already-created metadata records with the USGS SDC Dashboard. This dashboard then compiles the harvested metadata records and sends them to the post processing and indexing service using the JSON format. The post processing service, with the help of various ontologies and other geo-spatial validation services, auto-enhances these harvested metadata records and creates a Lucene index using the Solr enterprise search platform. Ultimately, metadata is made available via the SDC search interface. DOE's Next Generation Ecological Experiments (NGEE) Arctic project deployed a data system that allows scientists to prepare, publish, archive, and distribute data from field collections, lab experiments, sensors, and simulated modal outputs. This architecture includes a metadata registration form, data uploading and sharing tool, a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) tool, a Drupal based content management tool (http://ngee-arctic.ornl.gov), and a data search and access tool based on ORNL's Mercury software (http://mercury.ornl.gov). The team also developed Web-metric tools and a data ingest service to visualize geo-spatial and temporal observations.

  16. Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, several researchers, including yours truly, have been able to demonstrate theoretically that quantum photon entanglement has the potential to also revolutionize the entire field of optical interferometry, by providing many orders of magnitude improvement in interferometer sensitivity. The quantum entangled photon interferometer approach is very general and applies to many types of interferometers. In particular, without nonlocal entanglement, a generic classical interferometer has a statistical-sampling shot-noise limited sensitivity that scales like 1/Sqrt[N], where N is the number of particles (photons, electrons, atoms, neutrons) passing through the interferometer per unit time. However, if carefully prepared quantum correlations are engineered between the particles, then the interferometer sensitivity improves by a factor of Sqrt[N] (square root of N) to scale like 1/N, which is the limit imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. For optical (laser) interferometers operating at milliwatts of optical power, this quantum sensitivity boost corresponds to an eight-order-of-magnitude improvement of signal to noise. Applications are to tests of General Relativity such as ground and orbiting optical interferometers for gravity wave detection, Laser Interferometer Gravity Observatory (LIGO) and the European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), respectively.

  17. Nonlocal Pancharatnam phase in two-photon interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Poonam; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Supurna

    2010-09-15

    We propose a polarized intensity interferometry experiment, which measures the nonlocal Pancharatnam phase acquired by a pair of Hanbury-Brown-Twiss photons. The setup involves two polarized thermal sources illuminating two polarized detectors. Varying the relative polarization angle of the detectors introduces a two-photon geometric phase. Local measurements at either detector do not reveal the effects of the phase, which is an optical analog of the multiparticle Aharonov-Bohm effect. The geometric phase sheds light on the three-slit experiment and suggests ways of tuning entanglement.

  18. Analysis of the feasibility of an experiment to measure carbon monoxide in the atmosphere. [using remote platform interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortner, M. H.; Alyea, F. N.; Grenda, R. N.; Liebling, G. R.; Levy, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of measuring atmospheric carbon monoxide from a remote platform using the correlation interferometry technique was considered. It has been determined that CO data can be obtained with an accuracy of 10 percent using this technique on the first overtone band of CO at 2.3 mu. That band has been found to be much more suitable than the stronger fundamental band at 4.6 mu. Calculations for both wavelengths are presented which illustrate the effects of atmospheric temperature profiles, inversion layers, ground temperature and emissivity, CO profile, reflectivity, and atmospheric pressure. The applicable radiative transfer theory on which these calculations are based is described together with the principles of the technique.

  19. Precision Selenodesy via Differential Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry. Ph.D. Thesis; [Apollo lunar surface experiments package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The technique of differential very-long baseline interferometry was used to measure the relative positions of the ALSEP transmitters at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 lunar landing sites with uncertainties less than 0.005 of geocentric arc. These measurements yielded improved determinations of the selenodetic coordinates of the Apollo landing sites, and of the physical libration of the moon. By means of a new device, the differential Doppler receiver (DDR), instrumental errors were reduced to less than the equivalent of 0.001. DDRs were installed in six stations of the NASA spaceflight tracking and data network and used in an extensive program of observations beginning in March 1973.

  20. Investigating the Mercalli Intensity Scale through "Lived Experience"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The modified Mercalli (MM) intensity scale is composed of 12 increasing levels of intensity that range from imperceptible shaking to catastrophic destruction and is designated by Roman numerals I through XII. Although qualitative in nature, it can provide a more concrete model for middle and high school students striving to understand the dynamics…

  1. Intense convection over West Africa during AMMA SOP3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenouo, André; Sall, Saïdou Moustapha; Badiane, Daouda; Gaye, Amadou Thierno; Kamga Mkankam, F.

    2016-11-01

    ERA-Interim product from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) assimilation of African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) resources, Meteosat satellite images, and synoptic observations were used to study local- and regional-scale environments associated with intense convective systems during the AMMA-SOP3 experiment over West Africa in the Northern Hemisphere of summer 2006. The convective system, from the 21st to 23rd of August 2006, was more active at 0000 and 1800 UTC showing diurnal cycle of deep convection over West Africa where the African easterly waves (AEWs) are developed downstream. Downstream barotropic and baroclinic energy conversions associated with strong AEWs are important for the maintenance of AEW activity in West Africa. Barotropic energy conversions dominate south of the African easterly jet (AEJ), while baroclinic energy conversions are most important north of the AEJ. From a dynamical viewpoint, the low-level vorticity presents strong positive values over the sea and Sahara zone, indicating that exists on the cyclonic shear side of the African easterly jet, which is consistent with baroclinic growth. The 925-hPa equivalent potential temperature structure show a maximum over the Sahara which corresponds to the depression observed in this region. A mosaic of three hourly infrared (IR) satellite images, depicts a very distinct signal from an initial region of convection, developing through several stages and moving off the African coast. These observations, along with those available from the World Weather Watch, provide an opportunity to carry out numerical weather prediction (NWP) studies over West Africa utilizing high resolution limited area models.

  2. Precision Geodesy via Radio Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hinteregger, H F; Shapiro, I I; Robertson, D S; Knight, C A; Ergas, R A; Whitney, A R; Rogers, A E; Moran, J M; Clark, T A; Burke, B F

    1972-10-27

    Very-long-baseline interferometry experiments, involving observations of extragalactic radio sources, were performed in 1969 to determine the vector separations between antenna sites in Massachusetts and West Virginia. The 845.130-kilometer baseline was estimated from two separate experiments. The results agreed with each other to within 2 meters in all three components and with a special geodetic survey to within 2 meters in length; the differences in baseline direction as determined by the survey and by interferometry corresponded to discrepancies of about 5 meters. The experiments also yielded positions for nine extragalactic radio sources, most to within 1 arc second, and allowed the hydrogen maser clocks at the two sites to be synchronized a posteriori with an uncertainty of only a few nanoseconds.

  3. Deep frequency modulation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberding, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Laser interferometry with pm/Hz precision and multi-fringe dynamic range at low frequencies is a core technology to measure the motion of various objects (test masses) in space and ground based experiments for gravitational wave detection and geodesy. Even though available interferometer schemes are well understood, their construction remains complex, often involving, for example, the need to build quasi-monolithic optical benches with dozens of components. In recent years techniques have been investigated that aim to reduce this complexity by combining phase modulation techniques with sophisticated digital readout algorithms. This article presents a new scheme that uses strong laser frequency modulations in combination with the deep phase modulation readout algorithm to construct simpler and easily scalable interferometers.

  4. Fluorescence interferometry: principles and applications in biology.

    PubMed

    Bilenca, Alberto; Cao, Jing; Colice, Max; Ozcan, Aydogan; Bouma, Brett; Raftery, Laurel; Tearney, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The use of fluorescence radiation is of fundamental importance for tackling measurement problems in the life sciences, with recent demonstrations of probing biological systems at the nanoscale. Usually, fluorescent light-based tools and techniques use the intensity of light waves, which is easily measured by detectors. However, the phase of a fluorescence wave contains subtle, but no less important, information about the wave; yet, it has been largely unexplored. Here, we introduce the concept of fluorescence interferometry to allow the measurement of phase information of fluorescent light waves. In principle, fluorescence interferometry can be considered a unique form of optical low-coherence interferometry that uses fluorophores as a light source of low temporal coherence. Fluorescence interferometry opens up new avenues for developing new fluorescent light-based imaging, sensing, ranging, and profiling methods that to some extent resemble interferometric techniques based on white light sources. We propose two experimental realizations of fluorescence interferometry that detect the interference pattern cast by the fluorescence fields. This article discusses their measurement capabilities and limitations and compares them with those offered by optical low-coherence interferometric schemes. We also describe applications of fluorescence interferometry to imaging, ranging, and profiling tasks and present experimental evidences of wide-field cross-sectional imaging with high resolution and large range of depth, as well as quantitative profiling with nanometer-level precision. Finally, we point out future research directions in fluorescence interferometry, such as fluorescence tomography of whole organisms and the extension to molecular interferometry by means of quantum dots and bioluminescence.

  5. Polarization Phase-Shift Interferometry: A Simple Laboratory Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    An interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration. The interferogram is acquired with a digital camera and processed. Using polarization components the interferogram is phase-shifted and four different interferograms are acquired. The experiment is proposed as an introduction to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses.

  6. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  7. Correlating Sampling and Intensity Statistics in Nanoparticle Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-08-01

    In this article, [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014). J. Appl. Cryst. 47, 1016-1025] it was shown that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye-Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys. (1948), 19, 742-753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. Three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos [theta], to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos [theta]B/cos [theta], corrects this problem.

  8. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; ...

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  9. Patients' experiences of being in an intensive care unit: a select literature review.

    PubMed

    Stein-Parbury, J; McKinley, S

    2000-01-01

    A total of 26 research studies on patients' experiences of being in an intensive care unit were reviewed. The studies were selected because they focused on experiences typical in intensive care units. Many patients recalled their time in the intensive care unit, sometimes in vivid detail. Patients recalled not only experiences that were negative but also ones that were neutral and even positive. Positive experiences included a sense of safety and security promoted especially by nurses. Negative experiences included impaired cognitive functioning and discomforts such as problems with sleeping, pain, and anxiety. The review indicates steps critical care staff can take to develop better ways to understand patients' experiences. Meeting such challenges can improve the quality of patients' experiences and reduce anxiety and may offset potential adverse effects of being a patient in an intensive care unit.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  11. A Loschmidt cell combined with holographic interferometry for binary diffusion experiments in gas mixtures including first measurements on the argon-neon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttig, D.; Vogel, E.; Bich, E.; Hassel, E.

    2011-10-01

    A new variant of the Loschmidt technique has been developed for measuring binary diffusion coefficients in gas mixtures in a temperature range from 10 to 80 °C and for pressures between 0.1 and 1 MPa. The two half cells of the thermostatted diffusion cell have a rectangular cross section and are fixed one upon the other. They can be connected and separated by means of a sliding plate provided with a pneumatically operated seal. The concentration in both half cells is determined simultaneously during the diffusion process using an optical system for holographic interferometry for each. The change in the refractive index results in an interference pattern which is recorded as a function of time. The concentrations of the diffusing components are derived by means of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation. The binary diffusion coefficients are calculated via the integrated ideal diffusion equation for the complete mole fraction range performing only a unique diffusion experiment. The performance of the apparatus is demonstrated on first measurements on the argon-neon system at 293.15 K. Separate refractive index measurements are carried out leading to values for the first refractivity virial coefficient of the pure gases with an estimated uncertainty of ±0.1%. This low uncertainty is required for the aimed uncertainty of ±0.5...1% for the diffusion measurements to determine the concentration and density dependences of the binary diffusion coefficient.

  12. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) the one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    1997-12-01

    EUV lithography is a promising and viable candidate for circuit fabrication with 0.1-micron critical dimension and smaller. In order to achieve diffraction-limited performance, all-reflective multilayer-coated lithographic imaging systems operating near 13-nm wavelength and 0.1 NA have system wavefront tolerances of 0.27 nm, or 0.02 waves RMS. Owing to the highly-sensitive resonant reflective properties of multilayer mirrors and extraordinarily tight tolerances set forth for their fabrication, EUV optical systems require at-wavelength EUV interferometry for final alignment and qualification. This dissertation discusses the development and successful implementation of high-accuracy EUV interferometric techniques. Proof-of-principle experiments with a prototype EUV point-diffraction interferometer for the measurement of Fresnel zoneplate lenses first demonstrated sub-wavelength EUV interferometric capability. These experiments spurred the development of the superior phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI), which has been implemented for the testing of an all-reflective lithographic-quality EUV optical system. Both systems rely on pinhole diffraction to produce spherical reference wavefronts in a common-path geometry. Extensive experiments demonstrate EUV wavefront-measuring precision beyond 0.02 waves RMS. EUV imaging experiments provide verification of the high-accuracy of the point-diffraction principle, and demonstrate the utility of the measurements in successfully predicting imaging performance. Complementary to the experimental research, several areas of theoretical investigation related to the novel PS/PDI system are presented. First-principles electromagnetic field simulations of pinhole diffraction are conducted to ascertain the upper limits of measurement accuracy and to guide selection of the pinhole diameter. Investigations of the relative merits of different PS/PDI configurations accompany a general study of the most significant sources

  14. Simulations for single-dish intensity mapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot-Sazy, M.-A.; Dickinson, C.; Battye, R. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Maffei, B.; Noviello, F.; Remazeilles, M.; Wilkinson, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    H I intensity mapping is an emerging tool to probe dark energy. Observations of the redshifted H I signal will be contaminated by instrumental noise, atmospheric and Galactic foregrounds. The latter is expected to be four orders of magnitude brighter than the H I emission we wish to detect. We present a simulation of single-dish observations including an instrumental noise model with 1/f and white noise, and sky emission with a diffuse Galactic foreground and H I emission. We consider two foreground cleaning methods: spectral parametric fitting and principal component analysis. For a smooth frequency spectrum of the foreground and instrumental effects, we find that the parametric fitting method provides residuals that are still contaminated by foreground and 1/f noise, but the principal component analysis can remove this contamination down to the thermal noise level. This method is robust for a range of different models of foreground and noise, and so constitutes a promising way to recover the H I signal from the data. However, it induces a leakage of the cosmological signal into the subtracted foreground of around 5 per cent. The efficiency of the component separation methods depends heavily on the smoothness of the frequency spectrum of the foreground and the 1/f noise. We find that as long as the spectral variations over the band are slow compared to the channel width, the foreground cleaning method still works.

  15. Birth Tourism and Neonatal Intensive Care: A Children's Hospital Experience.

    PubMed

    Mikhael, Michel; Cleary, John P; Dhar, Vijay; Chen, Yanjun; Nguyen, Danh V; Chang, Anthony C

    2016-12-01

    Objective The aim of this article is to examine characteristics of birth tourism (BT) neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods This was a retrospective review over 3 years; BT cases were identified, and relevant perinatal, medical, social, and financial data were collected and compared with 100 randomly selected non-birth tourism neonates. Results A total of 46 BT neonates were identified. They were more likely to be born to older women (34 vs. 29 years; p < 0.001), via cesarean delivery (72 vs. 48%; p = 0.007), and at a referral facility (80 vs. 32%; p < 0.001). BT group had longer hospital stay (15 vs. 7 days; p = 0.02), more surgical intervention (50 vs. 21%; p < 0.001), and higher hospital charges (median $287,501 vs. $103,105; p = 0.003). One-third of BT neonates were enrolled in public health insurance program and four BT neonates (10%) were placed for adoption. Conclusion Families of BT neonates admitted to the NICU face significant challenges. Larger studies are needed to better define impacts on families, health care system, and society.

  16. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  17. Speckle interferometry of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Jack

    1988-01-01

    This final report for NASA Contract NAGw-867 consists of abstracts of the first three papers in a series of four appearing in Icarus that were funded by the preceding contract NAGw-224: (1) Speckle Interferometry of Asteroids I. 433 Eros; (2) Speckle Interferometry of Asteroids II. 532 Herculina; (3) Speckle Interferometry of Asteroids III. 511 Davida and its Photometry; and the fourth abstract attributed to NAGw-867, (4) Speckle Interferometry of Asteroids IV. Reconstructed images of 4 Vesta; and a review of the results from the asteroid interferometry program at Steward Observatory prepared for the Asteroids II book, (5) Speckle Interferometry of Asteroids. Two papers on asteroids, indirectly related to speckle interferometry, were written in part under NAGw-867. One is in press and its abstract is included here: Photometric Geodesy of Main-Belt Asteroids. II. Analysis of Lightcurves for Poles, Periods and Shapes; and the other paper, Triaxial Ellipsoid Dimensions and Rotational Pole of 2 Pallas from Two Stellar Occultations, is included in full.

  18. Phase-shift interferometry with a digital photocamera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    A phase-shift interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration with additional polarization components. A guideline is provided to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses.

  19. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, M. J.

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurement satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  20. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  1. Preview of Blackbeard interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.J.

    1992-09-01

    Blackbeard is a broadband VHF measurements satellite experiment designed and built by the Space Science and Technology division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Blackbeard is a piggy-back experiment on the ALEXIS satellite to be launched into a 70 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of 750 km. The satellite experimental operation and data retrieval are controlled through a telemetry link from the Satellite Operations Center (SOC) located at Los Alamos, NM. The primary experimental objectives of Blackbeard are three-fold: (1) Study the dispersion of broad-band impulsive electromagnetic signals -- in particular, the higher-order amplitude and phase distortion due to propagation through the ionosphere. These depend on ionospheric conditions and irregularities. (2) Utilize RF interferometry and scintillation techniques in the low VHF-band to determine the size and extent of ionospheric irregularities and wave structure -- both natural and artificially induced. This narrow-band data will be used to categorize the ionospheric media as undisturbed, oscillatory, or turbulent. These parameters will then be input into transfer function simulations for broad-band propagation and compared with broad-band propagation data from Blackbeard. (3) Survey and characterize background noise in the VHF-band-consisting of (1) cataloging broadcast amplitudes and signatures and mapping their global pattern, and (2) cataloging the signatures of lightning events. Also, correlate emissions in the visible and VHF bands in an attempt to confirm broad-band RF emissions assumed to be associated with lightning.

  2. Deep Wideband Single Pointings and Mosaics in Radio Interferometry: How Accurately Do We Reconstruct Intensities and Spectral Indices of Faint Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, U.; Bhatnagar, S.; Owen, F. N.

    2016-11-01

    Many deep wideband wide-field radio interferometric surveys are being designed to accurately measure intensities, spectral indices, and polarization properties of faint source populations. In this paper, we compare various wideband imaging methods to evaluate the accuracy to which intensities and spectral indices of sources close to the confusion limit can be reconstructed. We simulated a wideband single-pointing (C-array, L-Band (1-2 GHz)) and 46-pointing mosaic (D-array, C-Band (4-8 GHz)) JVLA observation using a realistic brightness distribution ranging from 1 μJy to 100 mJy and time-, frequency-, polarization-, and direction-dependent instrumental effects. The main results from these comparisons are (a) errors in the reconstructed intensities and spectral indices are larger for weaker sources even in the absence of simulated noise, (b) errors are systematically lower for joint reconstruction methods (such as Multi-Term Multi-Frequency-Synthesis (MT-MFS)) along with A-Projection for accurate primary beam correction, and (c) use of MT-MFS for image reconstruction eliminates Clean-bias (which is present otherwise). Auxiliary tests include solutions for deficiencies of data partitioning methods (e.g., the use of masks to remove clean bias and hybrid methods to remove sidelobes from sources left un-deconvolved), the effect of sources not at pixel centers, and the consequences of various other numerical approximations within software implementations. This paper also demonstrates the level of detail at which such simulations must be done in order to reflect reality, enable one to systematically identify specific reasons for every trend that is observed, and to estimate scientifically defensible imaging performance metrics and the associated computational complexity of the algorithms/analysis procedures. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  3. Neutron interferometry in a temperature controlled vacuum environment for the search of dark energy and other precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggu, Parminder; Cory, D.; Pushin, D.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Huber, M.; Arif, M.; Shahi, C.; Haun, R.; Snow, M.; Li, K.; Skavysh, V.; Heacock, B.; Young, A.; iNDEX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The neutron interferometer is a sensitive tool to study neutron interactions in materials. Vibrations, acoustic waves, and temperature gradients can introduce phase shifts and reduce the SNR. Low neutron flux and an interest in measuring increasingly smaller phases makes it necessary for experiments to run over long periods of time. Hence, the interferometer needs to have excellent phase stability. It has been shown that by using Quantum Information Algorithms, one can make the interferometer insensitive to vibrations. In this work, we are trying to remove phase instability due to T variations. At the NCNR, the interferometer has been placed inside a vacuum chamber to decouple it from the environment and increase overall temperature stability. An Al vacuum chamber was machined and assembled to test the concept of an interferometer in vacuum and measure phase stability with the ultimate goal of using an interferometer in vacuum in an experiment searching for dark energy.

  4. Chemical Actinometry: Using o-Nitrobenzaldehyde to Measure Lamp Intensity in Photochemical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kristine L.; Hites, Ronald A.

    2000-07-01

    A simple actinometry experiment that could be used in graduate or undergraduate laboratory courses is described. The photochemical reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) irradiated with a medium-pressure mercury vapor lamp is used to calculate the intensity of light over the wavelength range of 300-410 nm. The reactant disappearance rate can be quantitated by gas chromatography or by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry. The calculations necessary to convert the kinetic measurements to intensity are discussed. This experiment provides an easy way to determine the intensity of different light sources over a specific wavelength range, information that could be necessary in studying various environmentally relevant photochemical reactions.

  5. Status and plans for recoil separators for experiments with intense stable beams from ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seweryniak, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Argonne fragment mass analyzer (FMA) has been a very important component of the experimental program at the ATLAS facility for many years and is expected to be a viable instrument for experiments with more intense beams which will become available when the ATLAS intensity upgrade is completed. Several upgrades of FMA itself and of the FMA detector suite in preparation for high-intensity beams will be presented. To accommodate experiments with extremely low cross sections, such as studies of super-heavy nuclei, construction of the Argonne gas-filled analyzer (AGFA), which will be complementary to FMA, was proposed. The design considerations for AGFA will be discussed.

  6. Stimulus intensity determines experience-dependent modifications in neocortical neuron firing rates

    PubMed Central

    Glazewski, Stanislaw; Barth, Alison L

    2015-01-01

    Although subthreshold inputs of neocortical sensory neurons are broadly tuned, the spiking output is more restricted. These subthreshold inputs provide a substrate for stimulus intensity-dependent changes their spiking output, as well as for experience-dependent plasticity to alter firing properties. Here we investigated how different stimulus intensities modified the firing output of individual neurons in layer 2/3 of the mouse barrel cortex. Decreasing stimulus intensity over a 30-fold range lowered the firing rates evoked by principal whisker stimulation and reduced the overall size of the responding ensemble in whisker-undeprived animals. We then examined how these responses were changed after single-whisker experience (SWE). After 7 days of SWE, the mean magnitude of response to spared whisker stimulation at the highest stimulus intensity was not altered. However, lower-intensity whisker stimulation revealed a more than 10-fold increase in mean firing output compared with control animals. Also, under control conditions, only ∽15% of neurons showed any firing at low stimulus intensity, compared with more than 70% of neurons after SWE. However, response changes measured in the immediately surrounding representations were detected only for the highest stimulus intensity. Overall, these data showed that the measurement of experience-dependent changes in the spike output of neocortical neurons was highly dependent upon stimulus intensity. PMID:25546174

  7. High-precision self-adaptive phase-calibration method for wavelength-tuning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueliang; Zhao, Huiying; Dong, Longchao; Wang, Hongjun; Liu, Bingcai; Yuan, Daocheng; Tian, Ailing; Wang, Fangjie; Zhang, Chupeng; Ban, Xinxing

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a high-precision self-adaptive phase-calibration method for performing wavelength-tuning interferometry. Our method is insensitive to the nonlinearity of the phase shifter, even under random control. Intensity errors derived from laser voltage changes can be restrained by adopting this approach. Furthermore, this method can effectively overcome the influences from the background and modulation intensities in the interferogram, regardless of the phase structure. Numerical simulations and experiments are implemented to verify the validity of this high-precision calibration method.

  8. Nonclassicality Criteria in Multiport Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigovacca, L.; Di Franco, C.; Metcalf, B. J.; Walmsley, I. A.; Kim, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Interference lies at the heart of the behavior of classical and quantum light. It is thus crucial to understand the boundaries between which interference patterns can be explained by a classical electromagnetic description of light and which, on the other hand, can only be understood with a proper quantum mechanical approach. While the case of two-mode interference has received a lot of attention, the multimode case has not yet been fully explored. Here we study a general scenario of intensity interferometry: we derive a bound on the average correlations between pairs of output intensities for the classical wavelike model of light, and we show how it can be violated in a quantum framework. As a consequence, this violation acts as a nonclassicality witness, able to detect the presence of sources with sub-Poissonian photon-number statistics. We also develop a criterion that can certify the impossibility of dividing a given interferometer into two independent subblocks.

  9. An evaluation of water vapor radiometer data for calibration of the wet path delay in very long baseline interferometry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, C. E.; Himwich, W. E.; Clark, T. A.; Ma, C.

    1991-01-01

    The internal consistency of the baseline-length measurements derived from analysis of several independent VLBI experiments is an estimate of the measurement precision. The paper investigates whether the inclusion of water vapor radiometer (WVR) data as an absolute calibration of the propagation delay due to water vapor improves the precision of VLBI baseline-length measurements. The paper analyzes 28 International Radio Interferometric Surveying runs between June 1988 and January 1989; WVR measurements were made during each session. The addition of WVR data decreased the scatter of the length measurements of the baselines by 5-10 percent. The observed reduction in the scatter of the baseline lengths is less than what is expected from the behavior of the formal errors, which suggest that the baseline-length measurement precision should improve 10-20 percent if WVR data are included in the analysis. The discrepancy between the formal errors and the baseline-length results can be explained as the consequence of systematic errors in the dry-mapping function parameters, instrumental biases in the WVR and the barometer, or both.

  10. Empowerment in intensive care: patient experiences compared to next of kin and staff beliefs.

    PubMed

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2009-12-01

    Experiences of critically ill patients are an important aspect of the quality of care in intensive care units. If next of kin and staff try to empower the patient, this is probably performed in accordance with their beliefs about what patients experience as empowering. As intensive care patients often have difficulties communicating, staff and next of kin need to interpret their wishes, but there is limited knowledge about how correct picture next of kin and staff have of the intensive care patient's experiences. The aim of this study was to compare intensive care patients' experiences of empowerment with next of kin and staff beliefs. Interviews with 11 intensive care patients, 12 next of kin and 12 staff were conducted and analysed using a content analysis method. The findings showed that the main content is quite similar between patient experiences, next of kin beliefs and staff beliefs, but a number of important differences were identified. Some of these differences were regarding how joy of life and the will to fight were generated, the character of relationships, teamwork, humour, hope and spiritual experiences. Staff and next of kin seemed to regard the patient as more unconscious than the patient him/herself did.

  11. Bandwidth in bolometric interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlassier, R.; Bunn, E. F.; Hamilton, J.-Ch.; Kaplan, J.; Malu, S.

    2010-05-01

    Context. Bolometric interferometry is a promising new technology with potential applications to the detection of B-mode polarization fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A bolometric interferometer will have to take advantage of the wide spectral detection band of its bolometers to be competitive with imaging experiments. A crucial concern is that interferometers are assumed to be significantly affected by a spoiling effect known as bandwidth smearing. Aims: We investigate how the bandwidth modifies the work principle of a bolometric interferometer and affects its sensitivity to the CMB angular power spectra. Methods: We obtain analytical expressions for the broadband visibilities measured by broadband heterodyne and bolometric interferometers. We investigate how the visibilities must be reconstructed in a broadband bolometric interferometer and show that this critically depends on hardware properties of the modulation phase shifters. If the phase shifters produce shifts that are constant with respect to frequency, the instrument works like its monochromatic version (the modulation matrix is not modified), while if they vary (linearly or otherwise) with respect to frequency, one has to perform a special reconstruction scheme, which allows the visibilities to be reconstructed in frequency subbands. Using an angular power spectrum estimator that accounts for the bandwidth, we finally calculate the sensitivity of a broadband bolometric interferometer. A numerical simulation is performed that confirms the analytical results. Results: We conclude that (i) broadband bolometric interferometers allow broadband visibilities to be reconstructed regardless of the type of phase shifters used and (ii) for dedicated B-mode bolometric interferometers, the sensitivity loss caused by bandwidth smearing is quite acceptable, even for wideband instruments (a factor of 2 loss for a typical 20% bandwidth experiment).

  12. Quantitative comparison of experiment and theory for intense ultrashort laser-induced dissociation of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, A. M.; Anis, F.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Johnson, Nora G.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for intense ultrashort pulse laser-induced dissociation of H2^+ were performed under near identical conditions producing results for quantitative comparison. The 3D momentum distribution was measured for the fragments of an H2^+ beam after interaction with 10 fs, 790 nm pulses at intensities of 10^14, 10^13, and 10^12 W/cm^2. In parallel, the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation was solved in the Born-Oppenheimer representation including nuclear, rotational, and electronic excitation. To obtain angularly-resolved kinetic energy release distributions necessary to compare to measurements, the final wavefunctions, projected onto the scattering states, are averaged over the vibrational state, intensity volume, and thermal distribution appropriate to the experiment. The results of these measurements and calculations are contrasted, testing the quantitative agreement of theory and experiment for ultrashort pulses at these intensities.

  13. LISA Long-Arm Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of LISA Long-Arm Interferometry is presented. The contents include: 1) LISA Interferometry; 2) Constellation Design; 3) Telescope Design; 4) Constellation Acquisition; 5) Mechanisms; 6) Optical Bench Design; 7) Phase Measurement Subsystem; 8) Phasemeter Demonstration; 9) Time Delay Interferometry; 10) TDI Limitations; 11) Active Frequency Stabilization; 12) Spacecraft Level Stabilization; 13) Arm-Locking; and 14) Embarassment of Riches.

  14. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste

    Optical Long Baseline Interferometry provides unrivalled angular resolution on bright and compact astrophysical sources. The link between the observables (interferometric phase and contrast) and the image of the source is a Fourier transform expressed first by van Cittert and Zernike. Depending on the source size and the amount of information collected, the analysis of these Fourier components allows a measurement of the typical source size, a parametric modelling of its spatial structures, or a model-independent image reconstruction to be carried. In the past decades, optical long baseline interferometry provided fundamental measurements for astronomy (ex. Cepheids distances, surface-brightness relations) as well as iconic results such as the first images of stellar surfaces other than the Sun. Optical long baseline interferometers exist in the Northern and Southern hemisphere and are open to the astronomical community with modern level of support. We provide in this chapter an introduction to the fundamental principles of optical interferometry and introduce the currently available facilities.

  15. Interferometry science center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, A. I.

    2002-01-01

    The Interferometry Science Center (ISC) is operated jointly by Caltech and JPL and is part of NASA's Navigator Program. The ISC has been created to facilitate the timely and successful execution of scientific investigations within the Navigator program, particularly those that rely on observations from NASA's interferometer projects. Currently, ISC is expected to provide full life cycle support for the Keck Interferometer, the Starlight mission, the Space Interferometry Mission, and the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. The nature and goals of ISc will be described.

  16. 2013 Interferometry Forum Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, G.; Ridgway, S.; ten Brummelaar, T.

    2014-04-01

    The 2013 Interferometry Forum was organized around a list of topics - each topic had a moderator and an archivist. Each participant in the forum had one or more assignments - this was not a meeting for passive participation. The following summaries are a slightly edited version of those notes; conclusions and recommendations are presented at the end of the document(An expanded version of the Forum Report may be found online at the IAU Commission 54 website, http://iau-c54.wikispaces.com/2013+Interferometry+Forum).

  17. Hot electron generation and energy coupling in planar experiments with shock ignition high intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M. S.; Krauland, C.; Alexander, N.; Zhang, S.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Theobald, W.; Borwick, E.; Ren, C.; Yan, R.; Haberberger, D.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    Hot electrons produced in nonlinear laser plasma interactions are critical issues for shock ignition (SI) laser fusion. We conducted planar target experiments to characterize hot electron and energy coupling using the high energy OMEGA EP laser system at SI high intensities. Targets were multilayered foils consisting of an ablator (either plastic or lithium) and a Cu layer to facilitate hot electron detection via fluorescence and bremsstrahlung measurements. The target was first irradiated by multi-kJ, low-intensity UV beams to produce a SI-relevant mm-scale hot ( 1 keV) preformed plasma. The main interaction pulse, either a kJ 1-ns UV pulse with intensity 1.6x1016 Wcm-2 or a kJ 0.1-ns IR pulse with intensity up to 2x1017 Wcm-2was injected at varied timing delays. The high intensity IR beam was found to strongly interact with underdense plasmas breaking into many filaments near the quarter critical density region followed by propagation of those filaments to critical density, producing hot electrons with Thot 70 keV in a well-contained beam. While the high intensity UV beam showed poor energy coupling. Details of the experiments and the complementary PIC modeling results will be presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE under contracts DE-NA0002730 (NLUF) and DE-SC0014666 (HEDLP).

  18. Correction of dephasing oscillations in matter-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Chang, W. T.; Stefanov, A.; Pooch, A.; Hwang, I. S.; Günther, A.; Stibor, A.

    2014-03-01

    Vibrations, electromagnetic oscillations, and temperature drifts are among the main reasons for dephasing in matter-wave interferometry. Sophisticated interferometry experiments, e.g., with ions or heavy molecules, often require integration times of several minutes due to the low source intensity or the high velocity selection. Here we present a scheme to suppress the influence of such dephasing mechanisms—especially in the low-frequency regime—by analyzing temporal and spatial particle correlations available in modern detectors. Such correlations can reveal interference properties that would otherwise be washed out due to dephasing by external oscillating signals. The method is shown experimentally in a biprism electron interferometer where a perturbing oscillation is artificially introduced by a periodically varying magnetic field. We provide a full theoretical description of the particle correlations where the perturbing frequency and amplitude can be revealed from the disturbed interferogram. The original spatial fringe pattern without the perturbation can thereby be restored. The technique can be applied to lower the general noise requirements in matter-wave interferometers. It allows for the optimization of electromagnetic shielding and decreases the efforts for vibrational or temperature stabilization.

  19. The MERIT (nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, A.; Grudiev, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pernegger, Heinz; Steerenberg, R.R.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; /Rutherford /Oak Ridge /Brookhaven /Princeton U. /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  20. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.g.; Tsang, t.; Mokbov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Princeton U. /Rutherford /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam. Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  1. The MERIT(nTOF-11) High Intensity Liquid Mercury Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Ethymiopoulos,I.; Fabich, A.; Palm, M.; Lettry, J.; Haug, F.; Pernegger, H.; Steerenberg, R.; Grudiev, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Tsang, T.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT(nTOF-11) experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for a high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast-extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of 30 x 10{sup 12} per pulse. The target system, based on a free mercury jet, is capable of intercepting a 4-MW proton beam inside a 15-T magnetic field required to capture the low energy secondary pions as the source for intense muon beams. Particle detectors installed around the target setup measure the secondary particle flux out of the target and can probe cavitation effects in the mercury jet when excited by an intense proton beam.Preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented here.

  2. Parents' Experiences during Their Infant's Transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Sharon W.; Spillet, Marydee A.; Cronin, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Limited literature exists which examines how parents of infants hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) transition from their infant's NICU hospital stay to home. This study examines the question, "What are the experiences of parents during their infant's transition from the NICU to home?" Grounded theory methods served as the…

  3. Is compliance with hand disinfection in the intensive care unit related to work experience?

    PubMed

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Chierego, Marialuisa; Byl, Bauduin; Menestrina, Nicola; Carollo, Tiziana; Struelens, Marc; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    The performance of hand disinfection by staff in a 31-bed department of intensive care was monitored. During 32 hours of observation, 727 opportunities for hand disinfection were observed, and the compliance rate was 27.9%. The level of work experience was not correlated with hand disinfection compliance rates.

  4. Using Infant Massage Following a Mother's Unfavorable Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Experiences: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappin, Grace

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the synchronous behaviors enacted by mother and infant with blindness. In the study, a mother's less than optimal experience with the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) had a profound effect not only on her and her infant son, who was born 3 months prematurely and was visually impaired, but also on…

  5. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  6. Digitally Enhanced Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Ware, Brent; Lay, Oliver; Dubovitsky, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Spurious interference limits the performance of many interferometric measurements. Digitally enhanced interferometry (DEI) improves measurement sensitivity by augmenting conventional heterodyne interferometry with pseudo-random noise (PRN) code phase modulation. DEI effectively changes the measurement problem from one of hardware (optics, electronics), which may deteriorate over time, to one of software (modulation, digital signal processing), which does not. DEI isolates interferometric signals based on their delay. Interferometric signals are effectively time-tagged by phase-modulating the laser source with a PRN code. DEI improves measurement sensitivity by exploiting the autocorrelation properties of the PRN to isolate only the signal of interest and reject spurious interference. The properties of the PRN code determine the degree of isolation.

  7. A LISA Interferometry Primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2010-01-01

    A key challenge for all gravitational wave detectors in the detection of changes in the fractional difference between pairs of test masses with sufficient precision to measure astrophysical strains with amplitudes on the order of approx.10(exp -21). ln the case of the five million km arms of LISA, this equates to distance measurements on the ten picometer level. LISA interferometry utilizes a decentralized topology, in which each of the sciencecraft houses its own light sources, detectors, and electronics. The measurements made at each of the sciencecraft are then telemetered to ground and combined to extract the strain experienced by the constellation as a whole. I will present an overview of LISA interferometry and highlight some of the key components and technologies that make it possible.

  8. FIFE-Jobsub: a grid submission system for intensity frontier experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Box, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Fermilab Intensity Frontier Experiments use an integrated submission system known as FIFE-jobsub, part of the FIFE (Fabric for Frontier Experiments) initiative, to submit batch jobs to the Open Science Grid. FIFE-jobsub eases the burden on experimenters by integrating data transfer and site selection details in an easy to use and well-documented format. FIFE-jobsub automates tedious details of maintaining grid proxies for the lifetime of the grid job. Data transfer is handled using the Intensity Frontier Data Handling Client (IFDHC) [1] tool suite, which facilitates selecting the appropriate data transfer method from many possibilities while protecting shared resources from overload. Chaining of job dependencies into Directed Acyclic Graphs (Condor DAGS) is well supported and made easier through the use of input flags and parameters.

  9. FIFE-Jobsub: a grid submission system for intensity frontier experiments at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The Fermilab Intensity Frontier Experiments use an integrated submission system known as FIFE-jobsub, part of the FIFE (Fabric for Frontier Experiments) initiative, to submit batch jobs to the Open Science Grid. FIFE-jobsub eases the burden on experimenters by integrating data transfer and site selection details in an easy to use and well-documented format. FIFE-jobsub automates tedious details of maintaining grid proxies for the lifetime of the grid job. Data transfer is handled using the Intensity Frontier Data Handling Client (IFDHC) [1] tool suite, which facilitates selecting the appropriate data transfer method from many possibilities while protecting shared resources from overload. Chaining of job dependencies into Directed Acyclic Graphs (Condor DAGS) is well supported and made easier through the use of input flags and parameters.

  10. A threat to the understanding of oneself: Intensive care patients' experiences of dependency

    PubMed Central

    Lykkegaard, Kristina; Delmar, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the meaning of dependency on care as experienced by intensive care patients. Literature on the subject is sparse, but research from nonintensive settings shows that dependency is often experienced negatively. The study is based on in-depth qualitative semistructured interviews with three former patients characterized as narratives. The analysis is inspired by a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The study has found that dependency is experienced as difficult and that the experience seems to be attached to the relationship to oneself. Patients feel powerless and experience shame, their understanding of self is threatened, and they fight for independence in the course after intensive care. The findings might be influenced by the study being conducted in a Western country setting, where independence is valued. They can be used as means of reflection on nursing practice and matters such as communication and patient participation. PMID:23809023

  11. A threat to the understanding of oneself: intensive care patients' experiences of dependency.

    PubMed

    Lykkegaard, Kristina; Delmar, Charlotte

    2013-06-28

    This study examines the meaning of dependency on care as experienced by intensive care patients. Literature on the subject is sparse, but research from nonintensive settings shows that dependency is often experienced negatively. The study is based on in-depth qualitative semistructured interviews with three former patients characterized as narratives. The analysis is inspired by a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The study has found that dependency is experienced as difficult and that the experience seems to be attached to the relationship to oneself. Patients feel powerless and experience shame, their understanding of self is threatened, and they fight for independence in the course after intensive care. The findings might be influenced by the study being conducted in a Western country setting, where independence is valued. They can be used as means of reflection on nursing practice and matters such as communication and patient participation.

  12. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for the measurement of temperature and concentration in various crystal growth experiments destined for space. The method measures refractive index changes in the experiment test cell. A refractive index change can be caused by concentration changes, temperature changes, or a combination of temperature and concentration changes. If the refractive index changes are caused by temperature and concentration changes occurring simultaneously in the experiment test cell, the contributions by the two effects cannot be separated by conventional measurement methods. By using two wavelengths, two independent interferograms can be produced from the reconstruction of the hologram. The two interferograms will be different due to dispersion properties of fluid materials. These differences provide the additional information that allows the separation of simultaneously occurring temperature and concentration gradients. There is no other technique available that can provide this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort are to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. To achieve these objectives, the accuracy and sensitivity of the technique must be determined for geometry's and materials that are relevant to the Materials Processing in the Space program of NASA. This will be achieved through the use of a specially designed two-color holographic interferometry breadboard optical system. In addition to experiments to achieve the primary goals, the breadboard will also provide inputs to the design of an optimum space flight system.

  13. Managing Hardware Configurations and Data Products for the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincks, A. D.; Shaw, J. R.; Chime Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) is an ambitious new radio telescope project for measuring cosmic expansion and investigating dark energy. Keeping good records of both physical configuration of its 1280 antennas and their analogue signal chains as well as the ˜100 TB of data produced daily from its correlator will be essential to the success of CHIME. In these proceedings we describe the database-driven software we have developed to manage this complexity.

  14. Immersion Mirau interferometry for label-free live cell imaging in an epi-illumination geometry

    PubMed Central

    Lyulko, Oleksandra V.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In cell biology studies it is often important to avoid the damaging effects caused by fluorescent stains or UV-light. Immersion Mirau Interferometry (IMI) is an epi-illumination label-free imaging technique developed at the Columbia University Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. It is based on the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and represents a novel approach for interferometric imaging of living cells in medium. To accommodate the use of medium, a custom immersion Mirau interferometric attachment was designed and built in-house. The space between the reference mirror and the beam splitter is filled with liquid to ensure identical optical paths in the test and reference arms. The interferometer is mountable onto a microscope objective. The greatest limitation of standard PSI is the sensitivity to environmental vibrations, because it requires consecutive acquisition of several interferograms. We are developing Simultaneous Immersion Mirau Interferometry (SIMI), which facilitates simultaneous acquisition of all interferograms and eliminates the effects of vibration. Polarization optics, incorporated into the design, introduces a phase delay to one of the components of the test beam. This enables simultaneous creation and spatial separation of two interferograms, which are combined with the background image to reconstruct the intensity map of the specimen. Our results of imaging live and fixed cells with IMI and SIMI show that this system produces images of a quality that is sufficient to perform targeted cellular irradiation experiments. PMID:24392197

  15. Neutrino Oscillations at the Intensity Frontier: The NOvA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzikoutelis, Athanasios

    2013-02-01

    The "NuMI Off-Axis electron-neutrino Appearance" (NOvA) is a second generation, long- baseline, neutrino oscillation, experiment. It is made of two detectors, a large Far detector (14 ktons) and a similar Near detector (222 tons), both made of mostly active scintillator and separated by 810 km. Along with the 700 kW NuMI-beam upgrade (a prelude to the Intensity Frontier), it will be the leading neutrino experiment at Fermilab. In the wake of the recent measurement of the θ13 mixing angle, NOvA is positioned to see evidence of the neutrino mass hierarchy, possibly to resolve the θ23 octant ambiguity, and begin the study of the CP violation at the lepton sector. The experiment is under construction. The design and potential of this experiment is presented here along with the current status.

  16. Precision surveying using very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. W.; Clark, T. A.; Coates, R.; Ma, C.; Robertson, D. S.; Corey, B. E.; Counselman, C. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Wittels, J. J.; Hinteregger, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    Radio interferometry measurements were used to measure the vector baselines between large microwave radio antennas. A 1.24 km baseline in Massachusetts between the 36 meter Haystack Observatory antenna and the 18 meter Westford antenna of Lincoln Laboratory was measured with 5 mm repeatability in 12 separate experiments. Preliminary results from measurements of the 3,928 km baseline between the Haystack antenna and the 40 meter antenna at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory in California are presented.

  17. Improvement of depth resolution in depth-resolved wavenumber-scanning interferometry using wavenumber-domain least-squares algorithm: comparison and experiment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yulei; Jia, Quanjie; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Qiquan; Yang, Qiyu; Ye, Shuangli; He, Zhaoshui; Zhou, Yanzhou; Xie, Shengli

    2016-05-01

    It is important to improve the depth resolution in depth-resolved wavenumber-scanning interferometry (DRWSI) owing to the limited range of wavenumber scanning. In this work, a new nonlinear iterative least-squares algorithm called the wavenumber-domain least-squares algorithm (WLSA) is proposed for evaluating the phase of DRWSI. The simulated and experimental results of the Fourier transform (FT), complex-number least-squares algorithm (CNLSA), eigenvalue-decomposition and least-squares algorithm (EDLSA), and WLSA were compared and analyzed. According to the results, the WLSA is less dependent on the initial values, and the depth resolution δz is approximately changed from δz to δz/6. Thus, the WLSA exhibits a better performance than the FT, CNLSA, and EDLSA.

  18. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Cobb, J.M.; Smith, P.C.; Ramchandani, P.; Begen, F.M.; Padkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  19. Future Looks Bright for Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    First Light for the PRIMA instrument The PRIMA instrument [1] of the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) recently saw "first light" at its new home atop Cerro Paranal in Chile. When fully operational, PRIMA will boost the capabilities of the VLTI to see sources much fainter than any previous interferometers, and enable astrometric precision unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility. PRIMA will be a unique tool for the detection of exoplanets. First Light of the PRIMA Instrument ESO PR Photo 29a/08 Preparing for PRIMA "PRIMA is specifically designed to see if one star 'wobbles' to and fro because it is has unseen planetary companions", says instrument scientist Gerard van Belle. "This allows us to not only detect exoplanets, but to measure their mass." PRIMA's expected astrometric precision of tens of micro-arcseconds is unmatched by any other existing astronomical facility, whether on the ground or in orbit [2]. In addition to taking astrometric measurements PRIMA will be the key to the imaging of faint sources with the VLTI using the science instruments AMBER and MIDI. Interferometry combines the light received by two or more telescopes, concentrating on tiny differences between the signals to measure angles with exquisite precision. Using this technique PRIMA can pick out details as sharply as a single telescope with a diameter equivalent to the largest distance between the telescopes. For the VLTI, the distance between the two telescope elements is about 200 metres. The PRIMA instrument is unique amongst the VLTI instruments, in that it is effectively two interferometers in one. PRIMA will take data from two sources on the sky simultaneously: the brighter source can be used for tracking, allowing the interferometer to "stare" at the fainter source for longer than is now possible with conventional interferometers. Although there have been earlier pathfinder experiments to test this technique, PRIMA represents the first facility

  20. Spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    A bibliographic guide is presented to publications of spatial interferometry techniques applied to optical astronomy. Listings appear in alphabetical order, by first author, as well as in specific subject categories listed in chronological order, including imaging theory and speckle interferometry, experimental techniques, and observational results of astronomical studies of stars, the Sun, and the solar system.

  1. Vibration Analysis by Speckle Interferometry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The vibrational modes of complex systems can be visualized with high sensitivity by laser light speckle interferometry. Electronic speckle pattern...interferometry (ESPI), in contrast to holography, does not use photo-chemical storage media but shows a live image of the vibrational modes created by

  2. The intensity reduction of ground shadow To deliver better viewing experiences of soccer videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jaeseung; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Changick; Bhaskaran, Vasudev

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method for reducing the intensity of shadows cast on the ground in outdoor sports videos to provide TV viewers with a better viewing experience. In the case of soccer videos taken by a long-shot camera technique, it is difficult for viewers to discriminate the tiny objects (i.e., soccer ball and player) from the ground shadows. The algorithm proposed in this paper comprises three modules, such as long-shot detection, shadow region extraction and shadow intensity reduction. We detect the shadow region on the ground by using the relationship between Y and U values in YUV color space and then reduce the shadow components depending on the strength of the shadows. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme offers useful tools to provide a more comfortable viewing environment and is amenable to real-time performance even in a software based implementation.

  3. [Care of mothers of newborns in intensive care units: experiences, feelings and expectations of the mothers].

    PubMed

    Belli, M A

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences, feelings and expectation of mothers of high risk newborns. The population was a group of 20 mothers of high risk newborns of three hospitals in the City of São Paulo. Interview with the mothers was the method of data collection containing opened and structured questions. It was verified that most of the mothers had none or only a little interaction with the newborn after delivery; the eye contact was the most referred during the staying of the newborn in the Intensive Care Unity; all of them demonstrated interest in participating in the care of the newborn and expressed the need of information concerning to the health status of the newborn, the Intensive Care Unity environment and the hospital team. Several were the feelings expressed and the motives that indicated the needs of the mothers.

  4. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  5. Shot-Peening Intensities VS. Eddy Current Signals as Seen in Iterative Treatment-Measurement Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, N.; Frishman, A. M.; Shen, Y.; Lo, C. C. H.

    2009-03-01

    We report on progress in a swept high frequency eddy current (SHFEC) technique for characterization of surface residual stress on shot-peened superalloy surfaces. Our aim here is to demonstrate the sensitivity of our measurement for practical shot peening intensities, i.e. at 4˜6 A. First, we present our improved probe and instrumentation being sufficiently sensitive to resolve the surface conditions at these low Almen intensities, where our earlier measurements encountered noise problems. The previous coil was also larger (18 mm in diameter) than desirable. Our new probe integrates smaller coils (12 mm in diameter, forming an AC bridge) and on-board electronics on a common printed circuit board, mutually connected at the shortest possible distance. The operational-amplifier-based electronics acts as impedance buffers, and maintains the cabling impedance at the characteristic 50 Ω between the probe board and the instruments. We have thus reduced the instrumentation noises. Second, we present the result of an iterative treatment-measurement experiment, performed on a 2"-by-3" Inconel 718 block specimen, initially polished to a mirror finish. After an initial baseline SHFEC measurement, we performed shot peening, an Almen strip deflection measurement, and a SHFEC measurement as one iteration cycle, and repeated the cycles multiple times at predetermined intervals. We will show the resulting SHFEC signals (i.e. lift-off normalized vertical-component signals) plotted against the Almen intensities. We then draw several conclusions from the experimental data, including a) the SHFEC signals increase monotonically in correlation with the Almen intensity increase, and b) the SHFEC signals exhibit sufficient deviations to resolve 4˜6 A intensities, while c) the SHFEC signals indicate saturation of the Inconel 718 response against peening, but the saturation occurs later in the iteration than indicated by the A-series Almen strip.

  6. Polarimetry and Interferometry Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    EN-SET-081bis Fig 2.2 Digital Elevation Model and Interferogramme of Mount Etna taken in X-Band during the SIR-C Mission Digital elevation...time which can not be possible by manual process. However, systems mounted on aircrafts, UAV’s, and satellites as well will allow an actual updating...Wadge 1997]. Fig2.2 shows the fringes and the terrain model of the Etna Volcano in Sicilia, Italy, obtained by SAR interferometry using the X-SAR

  7. Developments In Moire Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Daniel

    1982-06-01

    Recent progress in high-sensitivity moire interferometry is reviewed. Interference patterns reveal full-field contour maps of in-plane displacements. Sensitivity corresponds to moire with 1200 lines/mm (30,480 //in.) for most examples, but approaches the theoretical limit of X/2 displacement per fringe in one demonstration. Techniques for producing cross-line phase gratings on specimens are described, as well as use of real and virtual reference gratings. Carrier patterns and optical filtering are used to cancel initial or no-load patterns. Diverse applications are illustrated.

  8. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  9. The critical angle in seismic interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Wijk, K.; Calvert, A.; Haney, M.; Mikesell, D.; Snieder, R.

    2008-01-01

    Limitations with respect to the characteristics and distribution of sources are inherent to any field seismic experiment, but in seismic interferometry these lead to spurious waves. Instead of trying to eliminate, filter or otherwise suppress spurious waves, crosscorrelation of receivers in a refraction experiment indicate we can take advantage of spurious events for near-surface parameter extraction for static corrections or near-surface imaging. We illustrate this with numerical examples and a field experiment from the CSM/Boise State University Geophysics Field Camp.

  10. Subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feng; Lu, Xiaoyun; Dong, Bin; Ma, Xichao; Xiao, Wen

    2016-11-01

    A novel subaperture stitching interferometry based on digital holography is developed to measure the deformation of spherical surfaces. The subaperture measurement is performed by off-axis digital holography on single exposure. Then, the subaperture phase maps are obtained by digital holographic reconstruction, in which the phase aberration caused by position errors of each subaperture measurement is effectively compensated by the method of numerical parametric lens. After that, the full aperture phase map is retrieved by a subaperture stitching algorithm, in which the relative alignment errors of adjacent subapertures are eliminated with an iterative process of stitching optimization. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed interferometry, which provides a rapid and robust way to measure spherical surfaces with high resolution and precision. A practical example is given to demonstrate the performance of this method. The stitching result shows good agreement with the full-aperture result.

  11. Speckle Interferometry with Amateur-Class Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harshaw, Richard; Wuthrich, Ethan; Dolbear, Kyle

    2015-05-01

    The relatively young field of speckle interferometry of close double stars has up to now been the domain of large telescopes and expensive scientific CCD cameras. With the advent of relatively inexpensive and high-performance CCD cameras, the domain of speckle interferometry has been extended into the serious amateur realm allowing amateurs with equipment as small as 8-inches aperture to do actual speckle analysis of binary star systems. This paper describes the work of one such team of amateur astronomers and students as part of their course work for an on-line scientific research experience course provided on-line by Cuesta College of San Luis Obispo, California. An explanation of speckle and how it works is followed by a discussion of how the camera was calibrated, then a discussion of the research methodology. Results of calibration and double star measurements are then given and implications of the process and results discussed.

  12. A New Neutron Interferometry Facility at NCNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Chandra; Wietfeldt, Fred; Huber, Michael; Pushin, Dmitry; Arif, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    A neutron interferometer splits an incoming neutron beam into two coherent partial beams, which travel on different paths and then recombine to form an interference pattern. This pattern is used to precisely determine the phase shift of a sample in one of the paths, thus the neutron interaction potential in the sample can be measured with high precision. A new neutron interferometry setup (NIOFa) has been constructed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). This new facility is mainly focused on spin based interferometry, which will expand its applications in both quantum computation and material research. New spin-control mechanisms are being tested; including thin-film spin flippers and efficient polarizing double cavity super mirrors. Doubling the neutron's degrees of freedom inside the interferometer promises exciting new quantum mechanical experiments and research capabilities. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  13. Validating Laser-Induced Birefringence Theory with Plasma Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cecilia

    2015-09-02

    Intense laser beams crossing paths in plasma is theorized to induce birefringence in the medium, resulting from density and refractive index modulations that affect the polarization of incoming light. The goal of the associated experiment, conducted on Janus at Lawrence Livermore’s Jupiter Laser Facility, was to create a tunable laser-plasma waveplate to verify the relationship between dephasing angle and beam intensity, plasma density, plasma temperature, and interaction length. Interferometry analysis of the plasma channel was performed to obtain a density map and to constrain temperature measured from Thomson scattering. Various analysis techniques, including Fast Fourier transform (FFT) and two variations of fringe-counting, were tried because interferograms captured in this experiment contained unusual features such as fringe discontinuity at channel edges, saddle points, and islands. The chosen method is flexible, semi-automated, and uses a fringe tracking algorithm on a reduced image of pre-traced synthetic fringes. Ultimately, a maximum dephasing angle of 49.6° was achieved using a 1200 μm interaction length, and the experimental results appear to agree with predictions.

  14. Complex master slave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Rivet, Sylvain; Maria, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Feuchter, Thomas; Leick, Lasse; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-02-08

    A general theoretical model is developed to improve the novel Spectral Domain Interferometry method denoted as Master/Slave (MS) Interferometry. In this model, two functions, g and h are introduced to describe the modulation chirp of the channeled spectrum signal due to nonlinearities in the decoding process from wavenumber to time and due to dispersion in the interferometer. The utilization of these two functions brings two major improvements to previous implementations of the MS method. A first improvement consists in reducing the number of channeled spectra necessary to be collected at Master stage. In previous MSI implementation, the number of channeled spectra at the Master stage equated the number of depths where information was selected from at the Slave stage. The paper demonstrates that two experimental channeled spectra only acquired at Master stage suffice to produce A-scans from any number of resolved depths at the Slave stage. A second improvement is the utilization of complex signal processing. Previous MSI implementations discarded the phase. Complex processing of the electrical signal determined by the channeled spectrum allows phase processing that opens several novel avenues. A first consequence of such signal processing is reduction in the random component of the phase without affecting the axial resolution. In previous MSI implementations, phase instabilities were reduced by an average over the wavenumber that led to reduction in the axial resolution.

  15. The SPIRAL2 Project and experiments with high-intensity rare isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewitowicz, Marek

    2011-09-01

    The SPIRAL2 facility at GANIL, which entered recently in the construction phase consists of a new superconducting linear accelerator delivering high intensity, up to 40 MeV, light (proton, deuteron, 3-4He) beams as well as a large variety of 14.5 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion beams and the associated Rare Isotope Beam facility. Using a dedicated converter and the 5 mA deuteron beam, a neutron-induced fission rate is expected to approach 1014 fissions/s for high-density UCx target. The energies of accelerated RIBs will reach 5-10 MeV/nucleon for fission fragments and 20 MeV/nucleon for neutron-deficient nuclei. The physics case of SPIRAL2 is based on the use of high intensity RIBs & stable-ion beams and on possibilities to perform several experiments simultaneously. A use of these beams at a new low-energy ISOL facility (DESIR) and their acceleration to several MeV/nucleon will open new possibilities in nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and reaction dynamics studies. The high intensities (up to 1011pps) and a high cost of RIBs impose a use of the most efficient and innovative detection systems like ACTAR, FAZIA, GASPARD, HELIOS, NEDA, PARIS and a new separator/spectrometer S3.

  16. Future changes in daily snowfall intensity projected by large ensemble regional climate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the future changes in daily snowfall intensity in Japan analyzing the large ensemble regional climate experiments. Dynamical downscalings are conducted by Non-Hydrostatic Regional Climate Model (NHRCM) with 20 km from the global climate projections using Meteorological Research Institute-Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-AGCM). Fifty ensemble experiments are performed in the present climate. For the future climate projections, 90 ensemble experiments are performed based on the six patterns of SST changes in the periods when 4 K rise in global-mean surface air temperature is projected. The accumulated snowfall in winter decreases in Japan except for the northern parts of Japan. Especially, the inland areas in the Sea of Japan side, which is famous for the heaviest snowfall region in the world, shows the remarkable decrease in snowfall in the future climate. The experiments also show increased number of days without snowfall and decreased number of days with weak snowfall due to significant warming in the most parts of Japan. On the other hand, the extreme daily snowfall, which occurs once ten years, would increase at higher elevations in the Sea of Japan side. This means that extreme daily snowfall in the present climate would occur more frequently in the future climate. The warmer atmosphere can contain more water vapor and warmer ocean can supply more water vapor to the low atmosphere. The surface air temperature at higher elevations is still lower than 0 degree Celsius, which could result in the increased extreme daily snowfall.

  17. Two color holographic interferometry for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Weber, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Holographic interferometry is a primary candidate for determining temperature and concentration in crystal growth experiments designed for space. The method measures refractive index changes within the fluid of an experimental test cell resulting from temperature and/or concentration changes. When the refractive index changes are caused by simultaneous temperature and concentration changes, the contributions of the two effects cannot be separated by single wavelength interferometry. By using two wavelengths, however, two independent interferograms can provide the additional independent equation required to determine the two unknowns. There is no other technique available that provides this type of information. The primary objectives of this effort were to experimentally verify the mathematical theory of two color holographic interferometry (TCHI) and to determine the practical value of this technique for space application. In the foregoing study, the theory of TCHI has been tested experimentally over a range of interest for materials processing in space where measurements of temperature and concentration in a solution are required. New techniques were developed and applied to stretch the limits beyond what could be done with existing procedures. The study resulted in the production of one of the most advanced, enhanced sensitivity holographic interferometers in existence. The interferometric measurements made at MSFC represent what is believed to be the most accurate holographic interferometric measurements made in a fluid to date. The tests have provided an understanding of the limitations of the technique in practical use.

  18. Special topics in infrared interferometry. [Michelson interferometer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in IR interferometry related to the development of a Michelson interferometer are treated. The selection and reading of the signal from the detector to the analog to digital converter is explained. The requirements for the Michelson interferometer advance speed are deduced. The effects of intensity modulation on the interferogram are discussed. Wavelength and intensity calibration of the interferometer are explained. Noise sources (Nyquist or Johnson noise, phonon noise), definitions of measuring methods of noise, and noise measurements are presented.

  19. meeting summary: Third COMPARE Workshop: A Model Intercomparison Experiment of Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Track Prediction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Masashi; Leslie, Lance; Kurihara, Yoshio; Elsberry, Russell L.; Yamasaki, Masanori; Kamahori, Hirotaka; Abbey, Robert, Jr.; Bessho, Kotaro; Calvo, Javier; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Clark, Peter; Desgagne, Michel; Hong, Song-You; Majewski, Detlev; Malguzzi, Piero; McGregor, John; Mino, Hiroshi; Murata, Akihiko; Nachamkin, Jason; Roch, Michel; Wilson, Clive

    2001-09-01

    The Third Comparison of Mesoscale Prediction and Research Experiment (COMPARE) workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan, on 13-15 December 1999, cosponsored by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Japan Science and Technology Agency, and the World Meteorological Organization. The third case of COMPARE focuses on an event of explosive tropical cyclone [Typhoon Flo (9019)] development that occurred during the cooperative three field experiments, the Tropical Cyclone Motion experiment 1990, Special Experiment Concerning Recurvature and Unusual Motion, and TYPHOON-90, conducted in the western North Pacific in August and September 1990. Fourteen models from nine countries have participated in at least a part of a set of experiments using a combination of four initial conditions provided and three horizontal resolutions. The resultant forecasts were collected, processed, and verified with analyses and observational data at JMA. Archived datasets have been prepared to be distributed to participating members for use in further evaluation studies. In the workshop, preliminary conclusions from the evaluation study were presented and discussed in the light of initiatives of the experiment and from the viewpoints of tropical cyclone experts. Initial conditions, depending on both large-scale analyses and vortex bogusing, have a large impact on tropical cyclone intensity predictions. Some models succeeded in predicting the explosive deepening of the target typhoon at least qualitatively in terms of the time evolution of central pressure. Horizontal grid spacing has a very large impact on tropical cyclone intensity prediction, while the impact of vertical resolution is less clear, with some models being very sensitive and others less so. The structure of and processes in the eyewall clouds with subsidence inside as well as boundary layer and moist physical processes are considered important in the explosive development of tropical cyclones. Follow-up research activities in this case

  20. Haze in the Grand Canyon: An evaluation of the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of the most spectacular natural sights on earth. Approximately 4 million visitors travel to Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) each year to enjoy its majestic geological formations and intensely colored views. However, visibility in GCNP can be impaired by small increases in concentrations of fine suspended particles that scatter and absorb light; the resulting visibility degradation is perceived as haze. Sulfate particles are a major factor in visibility impairment at Grand Canyon in summer and winter. Many wintertime hazes at GCNP are believed to result from the accumulation of emissions from local sources during conditions of air stagnation, which occur more frequently in winter than in summer. In January and February 1987, the National Park Service (NPS) carried out a large-scale experiment known as the Winter Haze Intensive Tracer Experiment (WHITEX) to investigate the causes of wintertime haze in the region of GCNP and Canyonlands National Park. The overall objective of WHITEX was to assess the feasibility of attributing visibility impairment in specific geographic regions to emissions from a single point source. The experiment called for the injection of a tracer, deuterated methane (CD{sub 4}), into one of the stacks of the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), a major coal-fired power plant located 25 km from the GCNP boundary and 110 km northeast of Grand Canyon Village. A network of field stations was established in the vicinity -- mostly to the northeast of GCNP and NGS -- to measure CD{sub 4} concentrations, atmospheric aerosol and optical properties, and other chemical and physical attributes. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  2. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  3. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Malbet, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share an interest in long baseline stellar interferometry. It was established in 1995 and is the focus of activity of the IAU Working Group on Optical/Infrared Interferometry. Here you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, news items, recent papers and preprints, and resources for further research. The email news forum was established in 2001 to complement the website and to facilitate exchanges and collaborations. The forum includes an email exploder and an archived list of discussions. You are invited to explore the forum and website at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov. Work by PRL was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. Infrasonic interferometry of stratospherically refracted microbaroms--a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Julius T; El Allouche, Nihed; Simons, Dick G; Ruigrok, Elmer N; Wapenaar, Kees; Evers, Läslo G

    2013-10-01

    The atmospheric wind and temperature can be estimated through the traveltimes of infrasound between pairs of receivers. The traveltimes can be obtained by infrasonic interferometry. In this study, the theory of infrasonic interferometry is verified and applied to modeled stratospherically refracted waves. Synthetic barograms are generated using a raytracing model and taking into account atmospheric attenuation, geometrical spreading, and phase shifts due to caustics. Two types of source wavelets are implemented for the experiments: blast waves and microbaroms. In both numerical experiments, the traveltimes between the receivers are accurately retrieved by applying interferometry to the synthetic barograms. It is shown that microbaroms can be used in practice to obtain the traveltimes of infrasound through the stratosphere, which forms the basis for retrieving the wind and temperature profiles.

  5. A Novel Femtosecond-gated, High-resolution, Frequency-shifted Shearing Interferometry Technique for Probing Pre-plasma Expansion in Ultra-intense Laser Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-17

    the broadband 800 nm seed pulse of the probe beam is optically filtered using Schott RG850 glass , moving the central wavelength to 840 nm by prefer...via a β-barium borate crystal (AR/AR coated, 300 μm thick, Type I). During imaging, two optical notch filters (Semrock FF01-420/10-25; 10 nm bandwidth

  6. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  7. Iranian nurses’ experiences of brain dead donors care in intensive care units: A phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Shayesteh; Kanani, Tahereh; Abedi, Heidarali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Care of brain dead donors is complex, critical, and sensitive and has a direct and positive impact on the end result of organ and tissue transplantation process. This study describes the nurses’ experiences of care of brain dead donors in intensive care units (ICU). Materials and Methods: This research was performed by phenomenological method that is a qualitative approach. Purposive sampling was used to gather the data. The researcher reached to data saturation by deep interviews conducted with eight participants from ICU nurses in Isfahan hospitals who cooperated in care of brain dead donors. Data analysis was performed according to Colaizzi analysis method. Results: Interviews were analyzed and the results of analysis led to “Excruciating tasks” as the main theme formed by psychological effects of facing the situation, heavy and stressful care, defect of scientific knowledge, conflict between feeling and duty, outcome of attitude change in behavior, emotional responses to perceived psychological afflictions, doubt to medical diagnosis, spiritual perceptions, and biological responses when faced with the situation. Conclusion: Caring of brain dead organ donors is difficult and stressful for intensive care nurses and can be a threat for nurses’ health and quality of nursing care. So, providing suitable physical, mental, and working conditions is necessary to make suitable background to maintain and increase nurses’ health and quality of care and effective cooperation of this group of health professionals in organ procurement process. PMID:24554946

  8. A tunable, linac based, intense, broad-band THz source forpump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, J.; Adolphsen, C.; Corbett, J.; Dolgashev, V.; Durr, H.; Fazio, M.; Fisher, A.; Frisch, J.; Gaffney, K.; Guehr, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hoffmann, M.; Hogan, M.; Holtkamp, N.; Huang, X.; Huang, Z.; Kirchmann, P.; LaRue, J.; Limborg, C.; Lindenberg, A.; Loos, H.; Maxwell, T.; Nilsson, A.; Raubenheimer, T.; Reis, D.; Ross, M.; Shen, Z. -X.; Stupakov, G.; Tantawi, S.; Tian, K.; Wu, Z.; Xiang, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2015-02-02

    We propose an intense THz source with tunable frequency and bandwidth that can directly interact with the degrees of freedom that determine the properties of materials and thus provides a new tool for controlling and directing these ultrafast processes as well as aiding synthesis of new materials with new functional properties. This THz source will broadly impact our understanding of dynamical processes in matter at the atomic-scale and in real time. Established optical pumping schemes using femtosecond visible frequency laser pulses for excitation are extended into the THz frequency regime thereby enabling resonant excitation of bonds in correlated solid state materials (phonon pumping), to drive low energy electronic excitations, to trigger surface chemistry reactions, and to all-optically bias a material with ultrashort electric fields or magnetic fields. A linac-based THz source can supply stand-alone experiments with peak intensities two orders of magnitude stronger than existing laser-based sources, but when coupled with atomic-scale sensitive femtosecond x-ray probes it opens a new frontier in ultrafast science with broad applications to correlated materials, interfacial and liquid phase chemistry, and materials in extreme conditions.

  9. Gas Filled RF Resonator Hadron Beam Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Abrams, Robert; Dinkel, Holly; Freemire, Ben; Johnson, Rolland; Kazakevich, Grigory; Tollestrup, Alvin; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-06-01

    MW-class beam facilities are being considered all over the world to produce an intense neutrino beam for fundamental particle physics experiments. A radiation-robust beam monitor system is required to diagnose the primary and secondary beam qualities in high-radiation environments. We have proposed a novel gas-filled RF-resonator hadron beam monitor in which charged particles passing through the resonator produce ionized plasma that changes the permittivity of the gas. The sensitivity of the monitor has been evaluated in numerical simulation. A signal manipulation algorithm has been designed. A prototype system will be constructed and tested by using a proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab.

  10. Validating under-resolved turbulence intensities for PIV experiments in canonical wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kevin; Monty, J. P.; Hutchins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The discrepancy between measured turbulence intensity obtained from experiments in wall-bounded turbulence and the fully resolved reference results (usually from DNS datasets) are often attributed to spatial resolution issues, especially in PIV measurements due to the presence of spatial averaging within the interrogation region/volume. In many cases, in particular at high Reynolds numbers (where there is a lack of DNS data), there is no attempt to verify that this is the case. There is a risk that attributing unexpected PIV statistics to spatial resolution, without careful checks, could mask wider problems with the experimental setup or test facility. Here, we propose a robust technique to validate the under-resolved PIV obtained turbulence intensity profiles for canonical wall-bounded turbulence. This validation scheme is independent of Reynolds number and does not rely on empirical functions. It is based on arguments that (1) the viscous-scaled small-scale turbulence energy is invariant with Reynolds number and that (2) the spatially under-resolved measurement is sufficient to capture the large-scale energy. This then suggests that we can estimate the missing energy from volume-filtered DNS data at much lower Reynolds numbers. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and estimation profiles for all three velocity components, demonstrating that the estimation tool successfully computes the missing energy for given spatial resolutions over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. A database for a canonical turbulent boundary layer and associated MATLAB function are provided that enable this missing energy to be calculated across a range of interrogation volume sizes, so that users do not require access to raw DNS data. This methodology and tool will provide PIV practitioners, investigating canonical wall-bounded turbulent flow with a convenient check of the effects of spatial resolution on a given experiment.

  11. Neutron interferometry with cold stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineeva, Taisiya; Arif, M.; Huber, M. G.; Shahi, C. B.; Clark, C. W.; Cory, D. G.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Pushin, D. A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is amongst the most precise methods for characterizing neutron interactions by measuring the relative difference between two neutron paths, one of which contains a sample-of-interest. Because neutrons carry magnetic moment and are deeply penetrating, they are excellent probes to investigate properties of magnetic materials. The advantage of NI is its unique sensitivity which allows to directly measure magnetic and structural transitions in materials. Up to now NI has been sparingly used in material research due to its sensitivity to environmental noise. However, recent successes in implementing Quantum Error Correction principles lead to an improved NI design making it robust against mechanical vibrations. Following these advances, a new user facility at the National Institute for Standards and Technology was built to study condensed matter applications, biology and quantum physics. Incorporating cold sample stage inside NI is the first of its kind experiment which can be carried out on large range of temperatures down to 4K. Upon successful realization, it will open new frontiers to characterize magnetic domains, phase transitions and spin properties in a variety of materials such as, for example, iron-based superconductors and spintronic materials. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  12. Nurses’ Experiences of Futile Care at Intensive Care Units: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Yekefallah, Leili; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Manoochehri, Houman; Hamid, Alavi Majd

    2015-01-01

    The concept and meaning of futile care depends on the existing culture, values, religion, beliefs, medical achievements and emotional status of a country. We aimed to define the concept of futile care in the viewpoints of nurses working in intensive care units (ICUs). In this phenomenological study, the experiences of 25 nurses were explored in 11 teaching hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization in Ghazvin province in the northwest of Iran. Personal interviews and observations were used for data collection. All interviews were recorded as well as transcribed and codes, subthemes and themes were extracted using Van Manen’s analysis method. Initially, 191 codes were extracted. During data analysis and comparison, the codes were reduced to 178. Ultimately, 9 sub-themes and four themes emerged: uselessness, waste of resources, torment, and aspects of futility. Nurses defined futile care as “useless, ineffective care giving with wastage of resources and torment of both patients and nurses having nursing and medical aspects” As nurses play a key role in managing futile care, being aware of their experiences in this regard could be the initial operational step for providing useful care as well as educational programs in ICUs. Moreover, the results of this study could help nursing managers adopt supportive approaches to reduce the amount of futile care which could in turn resolve some of the complications nurses face at these wards such as burnout, ethical conflicts, and leave. PMID:25946928

  13. Spectroscopic Analysis of High Intensity Laser Beam Jets Interaction Experiments on the Leopard Laser at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, E. E.; Weller, M. E.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Moschella, J. J.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyapsteva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; University of Nevada Reno Team

    2013-10-01

    Results of Ar gas-puff experiments performed on the high power Leopard laser at UNR are presented. Flux density of laser radiation in focal spot was up to 2 × 1016 W/cm2 (pulse duration was 0.8 ns and laser wavelength was 1.057 μm). Specifically, spectroscopic analysis of K-shell Ar spectra are investigated and compared as functions of the orientation of the laser beam to linear gas jet. The laser beam axis was positioned either along the jet plane or orthogonal to it at a distance of 1 mm from the nozzle output. The diagnostics used included a time-integrated x-ray spectrometer along with a set of filtered Si diodes with various cutoff energies. In order to identify lines, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) kinetic model was utilized and was also used to determine plasma parameters such as electron temperature and density. The importance of the spectroscopic study of high intensity laser beam-jets interaction experiments is discussed. This work was supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno, and in part by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreements DE-NA0001984 and DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  14. Autonomy gone awry: a cross-cultural study of parents' experiences in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Orfali, Kristina; Gordon, Elisa J

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines parents' experiences of medical decision-making and coping with having a critically ill baby in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) from a cross-cultural perspective (France vs. U.S.A.). Though parents' experiences in the NICU were very similar despite cultural and institutional differences, each system addresses their needs in a different way. Interviews with parents show that French parents expressed overall higher satisfaction with the care of their babies and were better able to cope with the loss of their child than American parents. Central to the French parents' perception of autonomy and their sense of satisfaction were the strong doctor-patient relationship, the emphasis on medical certainty in prognosis versus uncertainty in the American context, and the "sentimental work" provided by the team. The American setting, characterized by respect for parental autonomy, did not necessarily translate into full parental involvement in decision-making, and it limited the rapport between doctors and parents to the extent of parental isolation. This empirical comparative approach fosters a much-needed critique of philosophical principles by underscoring, from the parents' perspective, the lack of "emotional work" involved in the practice of autonomy in the American unit compared to the paternalistic European context. Beyond theoretical and ethical arguments, we must reconsider the practice of autonomy in particularly stressful situations by providing more specific means to cope, translating the impersonal language of "rights" and decision-making into trusting, caring relationships, and sharing the responsibility for making tragic choices.

  15. Acute confusion and unreal experiences in intensive care patients in relation to the ICU syndrome. Part II.

    PubMed

    Granberg, A; Engberg, I B; Lundberg, D

    1999-02-01

    The intensive care unit syndrome (ICU syndrome) is defined as an altered emotional state occurring in a highly stressful environment, which may manifest itself in various forms such as delirium, confusion, crazy dreams or unreal experiences. The purpose of this part of a study of patients' experiences is to describe and illuminate patients' experiences of acute confusion, disorientation, wakefulness, dreams and nightmares during and after their stay in the ICU. The data were obtained from 19 ventilated patients, who were interviewed twice and had stayed at least 36 hours in the ICU, the first interview being about one week after discharge from the ICU, and the second 4-8 weeks later. The hermeneutic approach used when interpreting and analysing the text from the interviews revealed that patients' experiences of unreal experiences were often associated with intense fear. Intense or continuous unbearable fear seems to result in frightening unreal experiences, which further increase the level of fear. Care actions or caring relationships with relatives or nurses can reduce this fear, which can help to prevent the occurrence and/or duration and intensity of the unreal experiences. Trust and confidence in nurses or significant others and feelings of self-control or trust in self-control seemed to reduce the risk of unreal experiences so that adverse stimuli might only trigger a mild confusion.

  16. Atomic interferometry test of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-11-01

    Atomic interferometry can be used to probe dark energy models coupled to matter. We consider the constraints coming from recent experimental results on models generalizing the inverse power law chameleons such as f (R ) gravity in the large curvature regime, the environmentally dependent dilaton and symmetrons. Using the tomographic description of these models, we find that only symmetrons with masses smaller than the dark energy scale can be efficiently tested. In this regime, the resulting constraints complement the bounds from the Eötwash experiment and exclude small values of the symmetron self-coupling.

  17. Probing dark energy with atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    Theories of dark energy require a screening mechanism to explain why the associated scalar fields do not mediate observable long range fifth forces. The archetype of this is the chameleon field. Here we show that individual atoms are too small to screen the chameleon field inside a large high-vacuum chamber, and therefore can detect the field with high sensitivity. We derive new limits on the chameleon parameters from existing experiments, and show that most of the remaining chameleon parameter space is readily accessible using atom interferometry.

  18. Absolute distance measurement based on multiple self-mixing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhiwei; Yu, Yangyang; Gao, Bingkun; Jiang, Chunlei

    2017-04-01

    To improve the precision of distance measurement using laser Self-Mixing Interferometry (SMI) and compute short distance, we propose a method of Multiple Self-Mixing Interferometry (MSMI) that is modulated with a triangular wave. The principle of this method has been described in this paper. Experiments at different distances and amplitudes of modulation current are based on the proposed method. Low-priced and easily operated experimental devices are built. Experimental results show that a resolution of 2.7 mm can be achieved for absolute distance ranging from 2.2 to 23 cm.

  19. Progress towards photon-counting infrared arrays for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscher, David F.; Seneta, Eugene B.; Sun, Xiaowei; Young, John S.; Finger, Gert

    2016-08-01

    The advent of low-dark-current eAPD arrays in the near infrared ushers in the possibility for photon-counting, high quantum efficiency detectors at these wavelengths. Such detectors would revolutionise the sensitivity of interferometry because near-infrared wavelengths are at the "sweet spot" between the corrupting effects of atmospheric seeing at shorter wavelengths and thermal noise at longer wavelengths. We report on laboratory experiments with cooled Selex Saphira detectors aimed at demonstrating photon-counting performance with these devices by exploiting enhanced avalanche gain and multiple non-destructive readouts. We explain the optimum modes for employing these detectors in interferometry.

  20. Ensemble experiments using a nested LETKF system to reproduce intense vortices associated with tornadoes of 6 May 2012 in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Hiromu; Kunii, Masaru; Yokota, Sho; Tsuyuki, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Takemasa

    2015-12-01

    Experiments simulating intense vortices associated with tornadoes that occurred on 6 May 2012 on the Kanto Plain, Japan, were performed with a nested local ensemble transform Kalman filter (LETKF) system. Intense vortices were reproduced by downscale experiments with a 12-member ensemble in which the initial conditions were obtained from the nested LETKF system analyses. The downscale experiments successfully generated intense vortices in three regions similar to the observed vortices, whereas only one tornado was reproduced by a deterministic forecast. The intense vorticity of the strongest tornado, which was observed in the southernmost region, was successfully reproduced by 10 of the 12 ensemble members. An examination of the results of the ensemble downscale experiments showed that the duration of intense vorticities tended to be longer when the vertical shear of the horizontal wind was larger and the lower airflow was more humid. Overall, the study results show that ensemble forecasts have the following merits: (1) probabilistic forecasts of the outbreak of intense vortices associated with tornadoes are possible; (2) the miss rate of outbreaks should decrease; and (3) environmental factors favoring outbreaks can be obtained by comparing the multiple possible scenarios of the ensemble forecasts.

  1. Inside the research incubator: a case study of an intensive undergraduate research experience for nursing a midwifery students.

    PubMed

    Kain, Victoria J; Hepworth, Julie; Bogossian, Fiona; McTaggart, Lya

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are an increasing component of nursing and midwifery degrees. The Summer Research Scholarship Programme (SRSP) is a tertiary education initiative in Australia to provide an intensive undergraduate research experience. Between 2009 and 2010, six students and four academic faculty mentors in School of Nursing and Midwifery participated in an inaugural SRSP. This study explores the experiences of both students and faculty mentors to determine how this undergraduate research experience impacted student learning and interest in research. A qualitative case study approach was used to explore the research experiences of undergraduate student and faculty participants in an inaugural undergraduate research programme. Based on the results of two surveys four main themes were identified: (1) acquisition of research skills, (2) expectations, (3) academic engagement, and (4) continued interest in research. An intensive undergraduate research experience is a valuable component of student learning that has the capacity to contribute to immediate and longer-term learning and research outcomes.

  2. Distinguishing between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos withtwo-particle interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Thomas D.

    2006-03-02

    Two-particle interferometry, a second-order interferenceeffect, is explored as another possible tool to distinguish betweenmassive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. A simple theoretical framework isdiscussed in the context of several gedanken experiments. The method canin principle provide both the mass scale and the quantum nature of theneutrino for a certain class of incoherent left-handed sourcecurrents.

  3. Testing Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-01-07

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28} e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup 28} e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  4. How to Test Atom and Neutron Neutrality with Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Geraci, Andrew A.; Hogan, Jason; Kasevich, Mark

    2008-03-28

    We propose an atom-interferometry experiment based on the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect which detects an atom charge at the 10{sup -28}e level, and improves the current laboratory limits by 8 orders of magnitude. This setup independently probes neutron charges down to 10{sup -28}e, 7 orders of magnitude below current bounds.

  5. Stellar Interferometry from the Ground and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stellar Interferometry began more than 80 years ago with the pioneering measurement of the diameter of Betelqueuse by Michelson and Pease using a 20 foot beam mounted at the top of the 10011 Hooker telescope at Mt. Wilson. Essentially no other work was done in this field until the 1960's when Hanbury-Brown and his colleagues developed and used the Intensity Interferometer at Narrabri, Australia to measure the diameters of a number of important hot stars. The modern period of Stellar Interferometry really began in the 1970's with the successes of 3 or 4 small research groups in the US and Europe, and scientific and technical progress in the field has been outstanding, particularly in the last decade. This has lead to the development of two major ground based facilities: NASA's own Keck Interferometer and ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer, and a number of space interferometers such as the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), among others. I will review the principles, history, and scientific progress in the field both on the ground and in space, and I will discuss a mission concept under development here at NASA Goddard, the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer, a near-term mid-infrared imaging interferometer, which can serve as a scientific and technical pre-cursor for some of the more ambitious concepts being discussed within the Astronomical and NASA communities.

  6. Swiss Experiment: Design, implemention and use of a cross-disciplinary infrastructure for data intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, N.; Salehi, A.; Clifton, A.; Bavay, M.; Aberer, K.; Parlange, M. B.; Lehning, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has long been known that environmental processes are cross-disciplinary, but data has continued to be acquired and held for a single purpose. Swiss Experiment is a rapidly evolving cross-disciplinary, distributed sensor data infrastructure, where tools for the environmental science community stem directly from computer science research. The platform uses the bleeding edge of computer science to acquire, store and distribute data and metadata from all environmental science disciplines at a variety of temporal and spatial resolutions. SwissEx is simultaneously developing new technologies to allow low cost, high spatial and temporal resolution measurements such that small areas can be intensely monitored. This data is then combined with existing widespread, low density measurements in the cross-disciplinary platform to provide well documented datasets, which are of use to multiple research disciplines. We present a flexible, generic infrastructure at an advanced stage of development. The infrastructure makes the most of Web 2.0 technologies for a collaborative working environment and as a user interface for a metadata database. This environment is already closely integrated with GSN, an open-source database middleware developed under Swiss Experiment for acquisition and storage of generic time-series data (2D and 3D). GSN can be queried directly by common data processing packages and makes data available in real-time to models and 3rd party software interfaces via its web service interface. It also provides real-time push or pull data exchange between instances, a user management system which leaves data owners in charge of their data, advanced real-time processing and much more. The SwissEx interface is increasingly gaining users and supporting environmental science in Switzerland. It is also an integral part of environmental education projects ClimAtscope and O3E, where the technologies can provide rapid feedback of results for children of all ages and where the

  7. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modelling during Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Haoyu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in the spring of 2003 in Colorado, USA. Initial forward model validation work is concentrating on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. This paper will focus on the ability of forward Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) modelling, combined with snowpack measurements to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th Intensive Observing Period (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike the earlier IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. Observations of upwelling and downwelling tree radiobrightness will be used to formulate a simple model for the effect of trees within the field of view. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo s Ground- Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7). These analyses will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  8. Demeter/ICE Experiment: Study of low frequency transmitter intensity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Moldovan, I.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Al-Haddad, E.; Biagi, P. F.; Parrot, M.

    2012-04-01

    We report on low frequency (LF) transmitter signal recorded by the 'Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We mainly consider the signal emitted by the Brasov broadcasting station (25.60E, 45.75N) at frequency of about 153 kHz. We analyze the reception conditions of this transmitter several weeks before the occurrence of the Vrancea earthquakes, on October, 27th, 2004. Ground-based observations revealed the presence of sudden decrease of the Y-component of the magnetic field at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), at about 68 km from the epicenter, as reported by Moldovan et al. (Rom. Journ. Phys., Vol. 54, Nos. 1-2, p. 249-261, Bucharest, 2009). In this contribution we attempt to check if the LF Brasov signal was also subject to similar disturbances as observed by the ground-station. We focus on the variation of the LF transmitter intensity levels, several weeks before and after the Vrancea earthquake occurrence. We discuss the physical parameters which may disturb the signal reception in particular the geomagnetic activity and the signal to noise ratios.

  9. Noise-assisted Ramsey interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, U.

    2013-12-01

    I analyze a metrological strategy for improving the precision of frequency estimation via Ramsey interferometry with strings of atoms in the presence of correlated dephasing. This strategy does not employ entangled states but rather a product state which evolves into a stationary state under the influence of correlated dephasing. It is shown that by using this state an improvement in precision compared to standard Ramsey interferometry can be gained. This improvement is not an improvement in scaling; i.e., the estimation precision has the same scaling with the number of atoms as the standard quantum limit but gains an improvement proportional to the free evolution time in the Ramsey interferometer. Since a stationary state is used, this evolution time can be substantially larger than in standard Ramsey interferometry which is limited by the coherence time of the atoms.

  10. Techniques in Broadband Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J

    2004-01-04

    This is a compilation of my patents issued from 1997 to 2002, generally describing interferometer techniques that modify the coherence properties of broad-bandwidth light and other waves, with applications to Doppler velocimetry, range finding, imaging and spectroscopy. Patents are tedious to read in their original form. In an effort to improve their readability I have embedded the Figures throughout the manuscript, put the Figure captions underneath the Figures, and added section headings. Otherwise I have resisted the temptation to modify the words, though I found many places which could use healthy editing. There may be minor differences with the official versions issued by the US Patent and Trademark Office, particularly in the claims sections. In my shock physics work I measured the velocities of targets impacted by flyer plates by illuminating them with laser light and analyzing the reflected light with an interferometer. Small wavelength changes caused by the target motion (Doppler effect) were converted into fringe shifts by the interferometer. Lasers having long coherence lengths were required for the illumination. While lasers are certainly bright sources, and their collimated beams are convenient to work with, they are expensive. Particularly if one needs to illuminate a wide surface area, then large amounts of power are needed. Orders of magnitude more power per dollar can be obtained from a simple flashlamp, or for that matter, a 50 cent light bulb. Yet these inexpensive sources cannot practically be used for Doppler velocimetry because their coherence length is extremely short, i.e. their bandwidth is much too wide. Hence the motivation for patents 1 & 2 is a method (White Light Velocimetry) for allowing use of these powerful but incoherent lamps for interferometry. The coherence of the illumination is modified by passing it through a preparatory interferometer.

  11. Analytical model for calibrating laser intensity in strong-field-ionization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Anh-Thu; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Xu; Lin, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with atoms and molecules depends extremely nonlinearly on the laser intensity. Yet experimentally there still exists no simple reliable methods for determining the peak laser intensity within the focused volume. Here we present a simple method, based on an improved Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev model, that would allow the calibration of laser intensities from the measured ionization signals of atoms or molecules. The model is first examined by comparing ionization probabilities (or signals) of atoms and several simple diatomic molecules with those from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We then show the possibility of using this method to calibrate laser intensities for atoms, diatomic molecules as well as large polyatomic molecules, for laser intensities from the multiphoton ionization to tunneling ionization regimes.

  12. The development of astronomical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2009-08-01

    Astronomical interferometry was pioneered by Fizeau and Michelson in the 19th century. In the 1920s, the first stellar diameters were measured. The development of radio interferometry began in the 1950s, and led to the construction of powerful synthesis arrays operating at cm, mm, and sub-mm wavelengths. Modern computer and control technology has enabled the interferometric combination of light from separate telescopes also in the visible and infrared regimes. Imaging with milliarcsecond resolution and astrometry with microarcsecond precision have thus become reality.

  13. High-Speed Digital Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Vine, Glenn; Shaddock, Daniel A.; Ware, Brent; Spero, Robert E.; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Digitally enhanced heterodyne interferometry (DI) is a laser metrology technique employing pseudo-random noise (PRN) codes phase-modulated onto an optical carrier. Combined with heterodyne interferometry, the PRN code is used to select individual signals, returning the inherent interferometric sensitivity determined by the optical wavelength. The signal isolation arises from the autocorrelation properties of the PRN code, enabling both rejection of spurious signals (e.g., from scattered light) and multiplexing capability using a single metrology system. The minimum separation of optical components is determined by the wavelength of the PRN code.

  14. Using atom interferometry to detect dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.

    2016-04-01

    We review the tantalising prospect that the first evidence for the dark energy driving the observed acceleration of the universe on giga-parsec scales may be found through metre scale laboratory-based atom interferometry experiments. To do that, we first introduce the idea that scalar fields could be responsible for dark energy and show that in order to be compatible with fifth force constraints, these fields must have a screening mechanism which hides their effects from us within the solar system. Particular emphasis is placed on one such screening mechanism known as the chameleon effect where the field's mass becomes dependent on the environment. The way the field behaves in the presence of a spherical source is determined and we then go on to show how in the presence of the kind of high vacuum associated with atom interferometry experiments, and when the test particle is an atom, it is possible to use the associated interference pattern to place constraints on the acceleration due to the fifth force of the chameleon field - this has already been used to rule out large regions of the chameleon parameter space and maybe one day will be able to detect the force due to the dark energy field in the laboratory.

  15. Synchronous two-wavelength temporal interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Gao, Zhan; Qin, Jie; Li, Guangyu; Feng, Ziang; Wang, Shengjia

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry is an optical measuring method with the character of non-destructive, high sensitivity and high accuracy. However, its measurement range is limited by the phase ambiguity. Hence the method with two separate different wavelengths light source is introduced to enlarge the measurement range. As for the two-wavelength interferometry case, phase shifting is the traditional way to acquire the phase map, it needs to repeat the measurement twice, which means the measurement cannot be accomplished in real time. Hence to solve the problem, a temporal sequence interferometry has been used. This method can obtain the desired phase information in real time by using the Fourier transform methods of the interferogram recorded in a sequence while the object is being deformed. But, it is difficult to retrieve the phase information directly due to the multi extreme points in one period of the cosine function. In this paper, an algorithm based on the wavelet ridge analysis is adopted to retrieve the two wavelength phase fluctuation caused by the displacement simultaneously. The preliminary experiment is conducted and the results are compared with theoretical simulations to validate the proposed approach. The laser emits light with two wavelengths 532 nm and 473 nm, two separated interference patterns in time sequence are detected by the CCD camera in the same time. The overlapped interferograms of two colors are analyzed by this algorithm and the corresponding phase information are obtained. The maximum error value between the simulation and theory is 0.03 um and the relative error is 0.33%.

  16. Measurement of neutron scattering lengths using neutron interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Chandra B.

    This thesis describes the details on building a new Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOFa), the measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He, and the measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length bc of 4He at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the NCNR devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. This new facility, NIOFa, is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He was done using a (220) single silicon crystal skew symmetric interferometer. This experiment requires both a polarized beam and a polarized target. We report bi = -2.35 +/- 0.014 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). This experiment is a revision of the previous experiment which was done in 2008, and partially explains the non-zero phase shift seen in 2008 experiment even if target cell was completely unpolarized. The measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length b c of the 4He was done using a (111) single silicon crystal interferometer. The neutron interferometry and optics facility at NIST had been used previously to determine the coherent scattering lengths for n- 1H, n-2H, and n-3He to less than 1% relative uncertainty. We report bc of the 4He

  17. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  18. Monitoring grazing intensity: an experiment with canopy spectra applied to satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Zhao, Ying; Zheng, Jiajia; Luo, Juhua; Zhang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of grassland grazing intensity (GI) and its detailed spatial distribution are important for grassland management and ecological protection. Remote sensing has great potential in these areas, but its use is still limited. This study analyzed the impacts of grazing on biophysical properties of vegetation and suggested using biomass to quantify GI because of its stability and interpretability. In comparison to a single spectral index, such as the red edge index (REI), combining REI and a cellulose absorption ratio index calculated from hyperspectral data performs better for biomass estimation. Further, an auxiliary spectral index, called the grazing monitoring index (GMI), was developed based on differences in spectral reflectance in the infrared range. Experiments in a grazing area of the Inner Mongolia grassland indicated that GMI can identify GI, with three range intervals (GMI <0, 0-1, and ≥1) used to describe the biomass distribution. The results showed that combining GMI and biomass was more successful than existing approaches for identifying the grassland variability resulting from the spatial heterogeneity of grazing behavior. The thresholds of biomass for four GI levels (ungrazed, lightly grazed, moderately grazed, and heavily grazed) could be determined by the intersections of biomass distributions. In addition, the approach developed at the on-ground canopy scale was extended to remotely sensed Hyperion data. The results showed that the approach could successfully identify the grazing treatments of blocks in the experimental grazing area. Overall, our study provides inspiration and ideas for using satellite remote sensing for evaluating plant production, standing biomass, and livestock impacts.

  19. Study Of Ho Lo-Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiabi

    1987-10-01

    Holo-speckle interferometry (HSI), as a 3-D displacement measuring method is studied in this paper. Three types of HSI are given. The average intensity distributions of its holographic and speckle interference fringes on the output planes are derived. The range of mea-surement and the problem of repositioning holograms for two-reference-beam HSI are disscussed. The results show that the upper limit of out-of-plane displacement is related to the parameters of the optical system and the in-plane displacement of specimen but the upper limit of in-plane displacement is determined by the paremeters only. The rigid body rotation of hologram in reconstruction process of two-reference-beam HSI influences the formation of interference fringes but the rigid body traslation does not have the influence.

  20. The Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is the next major space mission in NASA's Origins program after SIRTF. The SIM architecture uses three Michelson interferometers in low-earth orbit to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute astrometric measurements on approx. 40,000 stars. SIM will also provide synthesis imaging in the visible waveband to a resolution of 10 milliarcsecond, and interferometric nulling to a depth of 10(exp -4). A near-IR (1-2 micron) capability is being considered. Many key technologies will be demonstrated by SIM that will be carried over directly or can be readily scaled to future Origins missions such as TPF. The SIM spacecraft will carry a triple Michelson interferometer with baselines in the 10 meter range. Two interferometers act as high precision trackers, providing attitude information at all time, while the third one conducts the science observations. Ultra-accurate laser metrology and active systems monitor the systematic errors and to control the instrument vibrations in order to reach the 4 microarcsecond level on wide-angle measurements. SIM will produce a wealth of new astronomical data. With an absolute positional precision of 4 microarcsecond, SIM will improve on the best currently available measures (the Hipparcos catalog) by 2 or 3 orders of magnitude, providing parallaxes accurate to 10% and transverse velocities to 0.2 km/s anywhere in the Galaxy, to stars as faint as 20th magnitude. With the addition of radial velocities, knowledge of the 6-dimension phase space for objects of interest will allow us to attack a wide array of previously inaccessible problems such as: search for planets down to few earth masses; calibration of stellar luminosities and by means of standard candles, calibration of the cosmic distance scale; detecting perturbations due to spiral arms, disk warps and central bar in our galaxy; probe of the gravitational potential of the Galaxy, several kiloparsecs out of the galactic plane; synthesis imaging

  1. New Methods in Moire Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnek, Robert

    Experimental observations and measurements are the essential source of information necessary for correct development of mathematical models of real materials. Moire interferometry offers high sensitivity in full-field measurements of the in-plane displacements on the surface of the specimen. The (+OR-)45(DEGREES) method of moire interferometry increases the efficiency of a three-beam interferometer making its use outside of an optical laboratory more practical. Analysis of the (+OR-)45(DEGREES) method is provided. A concept of the vector representation of the fringe gradient is introduced and used in the analysis. Although existing systems require coherent light, the proposed system can use a relatively broad spectral bandwidth. Features that are related to the vibration sensitivity of such an instrument are investigated analytically. The basic concepts of an achromatic moire interferometry system are developed. Attachment of the critical elements of the system to the specimen solves the problem of relative rigid body motions, including vibrations, between the specimen and the virtual reference grating. Application of a laser diode light source reduces size, weight and cost of the interferometer making moire interferometry more practical for most materials testing laboratories. Laboratory tests confirmed the developed methods. This work enhances the probability of successful construction of a portable moire interferometer for measurements outside of the optical laboratory, in a mechanical testing or field environment.

  2. Polarimetric Interferometry - Remote Sensing Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    This lecture is mainly based on the work of S.R. Cloude and presents examples for remote sensing applications Polarimetric SAR Interferometry...PolInSAR). PolInSAR has its origins in remote sensing and was first developed for applications in 1997 using SIRC L-Band data [1,2]. In its original form it

  3. Diffusion in solids with holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dingyu

    1996-12-01

    It is of great importance for the formation of p-n junction in semiconductors by penetrating some impurities through the depth near the surface, so it has long been paid attention to control the concentration distribution of impurities during the diffusion process. In recent years, ionic carburizing, and ion bombardment penetration etc. for the treatment of metal surface have also attracted by material sciences. It requires that the diffusion depth and the diffusion time of the impurities should be under precise control. Different methods, such as the method of radioisotopic detection and the method of chemical analysis have been adopted, however, the reports of different workers are very different, especially in the real time measurement, so, finding new method is never ending. In 1984, H. Fenichel have performed experiments on the solutions of table salt and sugar with the method of holographic interferometry. As for metals which are opaque for the visible light, but they become transparent by making them into a very thin film so that, in principle, the diffusion of atoms within a film is capable of measure by holographic interferometry. Alternatively, the electromagnetic waves within 1 - 70 micrometers wavelengths may be utilized, some materials, such as high purified germanium and silicon are good materials for infrared transmission. Some fluorides of alkaline-earth metals have high transmittance in the range of 1 - 8 micrometers , the concentration of impurities in the semiconductor and metal surface treatment are of 1015 - 1020 atoms per cubic cm, which is capable of detection.

  4. Intensive care unit admission of obstetric cases: a single centre experience with contemporary update.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vivian K S; Lo, T K; Tsang, H H; Lau, W L; Leung, W C

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVES. To review the characteristics of a series of obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in a regional hospital in 2006-2010, to compare them with those of a similar series reported from the same hospital in 1989-1995 and a series reported from another regional hospital in 1998-2007. DESIGN. Retrospective case series. SETTING. A regional hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Obstetric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Kwong Wah Hospital from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2010. RESULTS. From 2006 to 2010, there were 67 such patients admitted to the intensive care unit (0.23% of total maternities and 2.34% of total intensive care unit admission), which was a higher incidence than reported in two other local studies. As in the latter studies, the majority were admitted postpartum (n=65, 97%), with postpartum haemorrhage (n=39, 58%) being the commonest cause followed by pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (n=17, 25%). In the current study, significantly more patients had had elective caesarean sections for placenta praevia but fewer had had a hysterectomy. The duration of intensive care unit stay was shorter (mean, 1.8 days) with fewer invasive procedures performed than in the two previous studies, but maternal and neonatal mortality was similar (3% and 6%, respectively). CONCLUSION. Postpartum haemorrhage and pregnancy-induced hypertension were still the most common reasons for intensive care unit admission. There was an increasing trend of intensive care unit admissions following elective caesarean section for placenta praevia and for early aggressive intervention of pre-eclampsia. Maternal mortality remained low but had not decreased. The intensive care unit admission rate by itself might not be a helpful indicator of obstetric performance.

  5. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0

  6. Novel characterization of the nonlinear refractive response of materials using spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Amanda; Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Characterization of the nonlinear refractive index of a material is important in order to fully understand the nonlinear propagation of femtosecond laser pulses. The most common method to obtaining the nonlinear refractive index is Z-scan. However, since it averages over pulse duration and beam profile, Z-scan is not reliable when there is time- and intensity-dependence of the nonlinear response. The new method we are exploring to make these nonlinear refractive index measurements is spatially and spectrally resolved interferometry (SSRI). SSRI is a method that can give a simultaneous measurement of the spatial wave-front across the frequency or temporal profile of the pulse. The SSRI method proves better in measuring response at specific y and t, allowing it to measure both delayed response and saturation effects. The ability to make a measurement in both dimensions enables understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics in other experiments as cross-wave polarization and filamentation.

  7. High intensity surge and seasonal effects in the dark current of the Nimbus-4 BUV experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Goldberg, R. A.; Vette, J. I.; Felton, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    Seasonal global maps of the dark current produced by corpuscular radiation contributing to the background level of the Nimbus-4 Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument were developed, using BUV monochrometer nighttime data in the pulse counting mode during solar and magnetically quiet periods. The existence of high intensity surges has been discovered which occur on a sporadic basis and which cause sufficient enhancements of dark current within the subauroral regions to produce background levels similar to those within the South Atlantic anomaly. Examples are provided of the nominal quiet dark current intensity maps, and the variability and implications of the surge data are discussed.

  8. Remote monitoring of the earthquake cycle using satellite radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tim J

    2002-12-15

    The earthquake cycle is poorly understood. Earthquakes continue to occur on previously unrecognized faults. Earthquake prediction seems impossible. These remain the facts despite nearly 100 years of intensive study since the earthquake cycle was first conceptualized. Using data acquired from satellites in orbit 800 km above the Earth, a new technique, radar interferometry (InSAR), has the potential to solve these problems. For the first time, detailed maps of the warping of the Earth's surface during the earthquake cycle can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few tens of metres and a precision of a few millimetres. InSAR does not need equipment on the ground or expensive field campaigns, so it can gather crucial data on earthquakes and the seismic cycle from some of the remotest areas of the planet. In this article, I review some of the remarkable observations of the earthquake cycle already made using radar interferometry and speculate on breakthroughs that are tantalizingly close.

  9. Effects of an Intensive Disability-Focused Training Experience on University Faculty Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Seely, John R.; Gerdes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates the short-term effects of a disability-focused training on the disability-related self-efficacy of university faculty. Three consecutive cohorts of faculty (N = 102) participated in an intensive four-day training institute focused on understanding and supporting university students with disabilities. Self-efficacy for…

  10. An Intensive Programme on Education for Sustainable Development: The Participants' Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the framework of an intensive programme (IP) organised by UNESCO and addressed to young graduate professionals to prepare them for a career in fields related to sustainability. The aims of the IP were to address participants' environmental awareness and to develop attitudes and skills related to environmental planning and…

  11. Reverse Transfer: Experiences of International Chinese Students in Intensive English Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of international Chinese undergraduate students enrolled in United States.colleges and universities in the past few years. Many began their journey in an intensive English program of a four-year university due to lack of English proficiency. Instead of continuing their study at the same institution, a considerable number of…

  12. Saying It "More Intensely": Using Sensory Experience To Teach Poetry Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baart, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Suggests the best way to help high school students write poetry is to bring them to memories that would stimulate the expression of everything more intensely. Describes four workshops that appeal to the senses: scent writing, taste writing, music writing, and sight writing. (RS)

  13. Optical and Infrared Interferometry IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Jayadev K.; Creech-Eakman, Michelle J.; Malbet, Fabien

    2014-08-01

    Optical and IR Interferometry IV at the SPIE 2014 symposium in Montreal had a strong and vibrant program. After initial fears about budget cuts and travel-funding constraints, the Program Committee had to work hard to accommodate as many quality submissions as possible. Innovative, creative and visionary work ensured that the field has progressed well, despite the bleak funding climate felt in the US, Europe and elsewhere. Montreal proved an excellent venue for this, the largest of Interferometry conferences and the only one that brings together practitioners from the world over. Let us summarize a few highlights to convey a glimpse of the excitement that is detailed in the rest of these Proceedings.

  14. Integrated optics for astronomical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, P. V. S.; Ghasempour, A.; Alexandre, D.; Leite, A. M. P.; Garcia, P. J. V.; Reynaud, F.

    2011-05-01

    Integrated optics is a well established technology that finds its main applications in the fields of optical communication and sensing. However, it is expanding into new areas, and in the last decade application in astronomical interferometry has been explored. In particular, several examples have been demonstrated in the areas of beam control and combination. In this paper, different examples of application integrated optics devices for fabrication of beam combiners for astronomical interferometry is given. For the multiaxial beam combiners, a UV laser direct writing unit is used for mask fabrication. The operation principles of the coaxial combiners fabricated in hybrid sol-gel were validated using an interferometric set-up. These results demonstrate that hybrid sol-gel technology can produce quality devices, opening the possibility of rapid prototyping of new designs and concepts.

  15. White Light Heterodyne Interferometry SNR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-09

    INTRODUCTION The subject of heterodyne interferometry, most successfully demonstrated for astronomy in the long- wave infrared (LWIR) at the...zero sun -like star puts out 4 × 107 photons/s/m2/nm at the surface of the earth at this wavelength, which corresponds to a power per unit bandwidth...MID- WAVE AND LONG- WAVE INFRARED While there is a significant penalty to the heterodyne approach in the visible through short- wave infrared (SWIR

  16. Lucky interferometry for displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioniţă, Bogdan; Logofătu, Petre Cătălin; Apostol, Dan

    2009-11-01

    We extrapolated the lucky imaging technique, mostly used in astronomy, to the field of interferometry for displacement measurement. From the batch of interferograms generated by a Twyman-Green-type interferometer and acquired by a CCD camera, those with high overall contrast were selected and fitted to a sinusoidal function. The high-contrast interferograms showed a significantly lower dispersion and, consequently, a lower uncertainty of the measured displacement.

  17. Holographic Interferometry The Twentieth Anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1985-08-01

    Professor Ryszard Pryputniewicz of Worcester Polytechnic Institute has assembled a significant group of papers on the subject of holographic interferometry in celebration of the first twenty years of activity in this field. Several of these papers were received too late for inclusion in this issue but will be published as a group in the next issue of Optical Engineering. Taken together, these papers are an indication of the tremendous progress made during the twenty years of this field's existence.

  18. Astronomical Observations by Speckle Interferometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-12

    FIELD GROUP IUB-GROUP Speckle Interferometry; Extrasolar Planets; Brown Dwarfs; ,, IAsteroids; Diffraction Limited Imaging; Image Processing...the astrophysi- of T. It is likely that careful visual inspection should cal parameters of r Per which are summarized in Table have detected the...SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES y Per AND . Cyg 566 TAME V. Residuals to the speckle observations of y Per. TABLE VI. Preliminaq astrophysical parameters for y Per

  19. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proc.IGARSS’99...IV, Ottawa, Vol. XXXIV, part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for...bistatic interferometric SAR configurations. In: Proc.IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J

  20. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proceedings of...part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for bistatic interferometric...SAR configurations. In: Proceedings of IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Papathanassiou, K

  1. Geometric Landau-Zener interferometry.

    PubMed

    Gasparinetti, S; Solinas, P; Pekola, J P

    2011-11-11

    We propose a new type of interferometry, based on geometric phases accumulated by a periodically driven two-level system undergoing multiple Landau-Zener transitions. As a specific example, we study its implementation in a superconducting charge pump. We find that interference patterns appear as a function of the pumping frequency and the phase bias, and clearly manifest themselves in the pumped charge. We also show that the effects described should persist in the presence of realistic decoherence.

  2. Chemical Environment Effects on K[beta]/K[alpha] Intensity Ratio: An X-Ray Fluorescence Experiment on Periodic Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham, Chaney R.; Chase, Jeffery M.; Nivens, Delana A.; Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) data from an energy-dispersive XRF instrument were used to investigate the chlorine K[alpha] and K[beta] peaks in several group 1 salts. The ratio of the peak intensity is sensitive to the local chemical environment of the chlorine atoms studied in this experiment and it shows a periodic trend for these salts. (Contains 1…

  3. Edge effects in composites by moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnek, R.; Post, D.; Herakovich, C.

    1983-01-01

    The very high sensitivity of moire interferometry has permitted the present edge effect experiments to be conducted at a low average stress and strain level, assuring linear and elastic behavior in the composite material samples tested. Sensitivity corresponding to 2450 line/mm moire was achieved with a 0.408 micron/fringe. Simultaneous observations of the specimen face and edge displacement fields showed good fringe definition despite the 1-mm thickness of the specimens and the high gradients, and it is noted that the use of a carrier pattern and optical filtering was effective in even these conditions. Edge effects and dramatic displacement gradients were confirmed in angle-ply composite laminates.

  4. Nanoscale defect detection by heterodyne interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Haoshan; Li Yuhe; Wang Dongsheng; Tong Xiaolei; Liu Mei

    2009-03-10

    We construct an instrument that facilitates the measurement of nanoscale defects. It is based on heterodyne interferometry with phase measurement that utilizes a polarizing beam splitter to form a measuring signal and an oscillating cantilever tip that acts as a scanning probe to get the measurement values of sample topography. The dependence of the tip displacement on the variation of tip-sample distance and the comb scanning of the sample topography are investigated by experiments. The results prove that the tip displacement increases and is enough to be discriminated in various positions where the sample is approached. The system has been successfully utilized to measure the defect characterization by measuring the pitch of the standard sample. The results also show that the heterodyne system has good repeatability, a large measurement range, and high accuracy, with a measurement stability of 0.5 nm.

  5. Low Coherence Interferometry in Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, A.; Seyda, V.; Herzog, D.; Emmelmann, C.; Schönleber, M.; Kogel-Hollacher, M.

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is an additive layer manufacturing technology that offers several advantages compared to conven- tional methods of production such as an increased freedom of design and a toolless production suited for variable lot sizes. Despite these attractive aspects today's state of the art SLM machines lack a holistic process monitoring system that detects and records typical defects during production. A novel sensor concept based on the low coherence interferometry (LCI) was integrated into an SLM production setup. The sensor is mounted coaxially to the processing laser beam and is capable of sampling distances along the optical axis. Measurements during and between the processing of powder layers can reveal crucial topology information which is closely related to the final part quality. The overall potential of the sensor in terms of quality assurance and process control is being discussed. Furthermore fundamental experiments were performed to derive the performance of the system.

  6. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, Alexander D.; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-07-15

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic clocks. Atom interferometry is now reaching maturity as a powerful art with many applications in modern science. In this review the basic tools for coherent atom optics are described including diffraction by nanostructures and laser light, three-grating interferometers, and double wells on atom chips. Scientific advances in a broad range of fields that have resulted from the application of atom interferometers are reviewed. These are grouped in three categories: (i) fundamental quantum science, (ii) precision metrology, and (iii) atomic and molecular physics. Although some experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates are included, the focus of the review is on linear matter wave optics, i.e., phenomena where each single atom interferes with itself.

  7. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors. PMID:27557592

  8. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-08-25

    Here, we describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  9. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Krygier, A; Cochran, G E; Foster, P S; Scott, G G; Wilson, L A; Bailey, J; Bourgeois, N; Hernandez-Gomez, C; Neely, D; Rajeev, P P; Freeman, R R; Schumacher, D W

    2016-08-25

    We describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating. Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.

  10. Academics' Perceptions of the Purpose of Undergraduate Research Experiences in a Research-Intensive Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anna; Howitt, Susan; Wilson, Kate; Roberts, Pam

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of research experiences as core components of undergraduate curricula implies that students will be exposed to and situated within the research activities of their university. Such experiences thus provide a new prism through which to view the relations between teaching, research and learning. The intentions and actions of academics…

  11. Plasmonic interferometry: Probing launching dipoles in scanning-probe plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollet, Oriane; Bachelier, Guillaume; Genet, Cyriaque; Huant, Serge; Drezet, Aurélien

    2014-03-01

    We develop a semi-analytical method for analyzing surface plasmon interferometry using scanning-probe tips as SP launchers. We apply our approach to Young double-hole interferometry experiments in a scanning tunneling microscope discussed recently in the literature as well as to new experiments—reported here—with an aperture near-field scanning optical microscope source positioned near a ring-like aperture slit in a thick gold film. In both experimental configurations, the agreement between experiments and model is very good. Our work reveals the role of the launching dipole orientations and magnetic versus electric dipole contributions to the interference imaging process. It also stresses the different orientations of the effective dipoles associated with the two different scanning-probe techniques.

  12. Observation of Aharonov-Bohm effects by neutron interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Samuel A.; Klein, Anthony G.

    2010-09-01

    The special and unique techniques of neutron interferometry have been used to observe a number of topological effects. These include the quantum mechanical phase shift of a neutron due to the Earth's rotation (the quantum analog of the Michelson-Gale-Pearson experiment with light), the phase shift of a particle carrying a magnetic moment (a neutron) encircling a line charge (the Aharonov-Casher effect) and the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, observed with a pulsed magnetic field solenoid and time-of-flight neutron detection. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Aharonov-Bohm paper, we provide an overview of the neutron interferometry technique and a description of these three historic experiments.

  13. Holographic Interferometry--A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Frutos, A. M.; de la Rosa, M. I.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the problem of analyzing a phase object, separating the contribution due to thickness variations and that due to refractive index variations. Discusses the design of an interferometer and some applications. Provides diagrams and pictures of holographic images. (YP)

  14. Using Atom Interferometry to Search for New Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2009-12-11

    Atom interferometry is a rapidly advancing field and this Letter proposes an experiment based on existing technology that can search for new short distance forces. With current technology it is possible to improve the sensitivity by up to a factor of 10{sup 2} and near-future advances will be able to rewrite the limits for forces with ranges from 100 {micro}m to 1km.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant by Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, G.; D'Amico, G.; Tino, G. M.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    We report on the latest determination of the Newtonian gravitational constant G using our atom interferometry gravity gradiometer. After a short introduction on the G measurement issue we will provide a description of the experimental method employed, followed by a discussion of the experimental results in terms of sensitivity and systematic effects. Finally, prospects for future cold atom-based experiments devoted to the measurement of this fundamental constant are reported.

  16. An intense and unforgettable experience: the lived experience of malignant wounds from the perspectives of patients, caregivers and nurses.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Susan J

    2010-12-01

    Malignant wounds occur infrequently, but are typically described as devastating and overwhelming. However, there has been little formalised research, and the vast majority of existing malignant wound literature comprises reports of health care professionals from their management of the physical symptoms. Few studies have investigated the lived experience from the perspectives of patients and nurses and none have investigated the experiences of lay caregivers caring for a patient with a malignant wound. As a result, there has been little mention in existing literature of the non physical issues associated with malignant wounds or how they might be addressed. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in knowledge by investigating the lived experience of malignant wounds from the perspectives of those living it. In-depth interviews were conducted with patients, caregivers and nurses. The data were analysed thematically within a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology to show four themes: (i) malodour; (ii) new mode of being-in-the-world; (iii) still room for hope and (iv) enduring memories. Although this study confirmed previous findings that malodour was one of the worst aspects of malignant wounds, it was significant that the other three themes occurred in the previously largely overlooked psychosocial domain.

  17. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience

    PubMed Central

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians’ and nurses’ perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients’ rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients’ rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals. PMID:26839675

  18. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-28

    The visible spectrum of H{sub 3}{sup +} is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H{sub 3}{sup +} up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H{sub 3}{sup +} and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  19. [Plasmacoagulase-negative Staphylococcus sepsis: experience in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Pérez Fernández, J M; Soler Carreras, C; Esque Ruiz, M T; Llagostera Benedico, J; Carbonell-Estrany, X

    1987-08-01

    Among 1,049 admissions in the newborn department, during 18 months, authors found 148 positive blood cultures to staphylococci epidermidis (EPN). Recovery of EPN from blood should not be dismissed as a contaminant. 11 newborn were considered to have septicemia by EPN, that means 1.04% of all admissions and 5.6% of babies admitted in intensive care. They find that catheters (100%), assisted ventilation (45.4%) and previous surgery (36.3%) are significant predisposing risk factors. Clinical and laboratory pattern was not different of other sepsis except its late onset. Two patient died. Vancomycin is considered the drug of choice.

  20. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  1. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-01

    The visible spectrum of H3 + is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H3 + up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H3 + and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  2. Monitoring gas reservoirs by seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Priolo, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to image spatial anomalies in the subsurface, without the need of recordings from seismic sources, such as earthquakes or explosions. Furthermore, the temporal variation of ambient seismic noise's can be used to infer temporal changes of the seismic velocities in the investigated medium. Such temporal variations can reflect changes of several physical properties/conditions in the medium. For example, they may be consequence of stress changes, variation of hydrogeological parameters, pore pressure and saturation changes due to fluid injection or extraction. Passive image interferometry allows to continuously monitor small temporal changes of seismic velocities in the subsurface, making it a suitable tool to monitor time-variant systems such as oil and gas reservoirs or volcanic environments. The technique does not require recordings from seismic sources in the classical sense, but is based on the processing of noise records. Moreover, it requires only data from one or two seismic stations, their locations constraining the sampled target area. Here we apply passive image interferometry to monitor a gas storage reservoir in northern Italy. The Collalto field (Northern Italy) is a depleted gas reservoir located at 1500 m depth, now used as a gas storage facility. The reservoir experience a significant temporal variation in the amount of stored gas: the injection phases mainly occur in the summer, while the extraction take place mostly in winter. In order to monitor induced seismicity related to gas storage operations, a seismic network (the Collalto Seismic Network) has been deployed in 2011. The Collalto Seismic Network is composed by 10 broadband stations, deployed within an area of about 20 km x 20 km, and provides high-quality continuous data since January 1st, 2012. In this work we present preliminary results from ambient noise interferometry using a two-months sample of continuous seismic data, i.e. from October 1st, 2012, to the

  3. Chameleon dark energy and atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Benjamin; Khoury, Justin; Haslinger, Philipp; Jaffe, Matt; Müller, Holger; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Atom interferometry experiments are searching for evidence of chameleon scalar fields with ever-increasing precision. As experiments become more precise, so too must theoretical predictions. Previous work has made numerous approximations to simplify the calculation, which in general requires solving a three-dimensional nonlinear partial differential equation. This paper calculates the chameleonic force using a numerical relaxation scheme on a uniform grid. This technique is more general than previous work, which assumed spherical symmetry to reduce the partial differential equation to a one-dimensional ordinary differential equation. We examine the effects of approximations made in previous efforts on this subject and calculate the chameleonic force in a setup that closely mimics the recent experiment of Hamilton et al. Specifically, we simulate the vacuum chamber as a cylinder with dimensions matching those of the experiment, taking into account the backreaction of the source mass, its offset from the center, and the effects of the chamber walls. Remarkably, the acceleration on a test atomic particle is found to differ by only 20% from the approximate analytical treatment. These results allow us to place rigorous constraints on the parameter space of chameleon field theories, although ultimately the constraint we find is the same as the one we reported in Hamilton et al. because we had slightly underestimated the size of the vacuum chamber. This computational technique will continue to be useful as experiments become even more precise and will also be a valuable tool in optimizing future searches for chameleon fields and related theories.

  4. Experiment and simulation of novel liquid crystal plasma mirrors for high contrast, intense laser pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Cochran, G. E.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Here, we describe the first demonstration of plasma mirrors made using freely suspended, ultra-thin films formed dynamically and in-situ. We also present novel particle-in-cell simulations that for the first time incorporate multiphoton ionization and dielectric models that are necessary for describing plasma mirrors. Dielectric plasma mirrors are a crucial component for high intensity laser applications such as ion acceleration and solid target high harmonic generation because they greatly improve pulse contrast. We use the liquid crystal 8CB and introduce an innovative dynamic film formation device that can tune the film thickness so that it acts as its own antireflection coating.more » Films can be formed at a prolonged, high repetition rate without the need for subsequent realignment. High intensity reflectance above 75% and low-field reflectance below 0.2% are demonstrated, as well as initial ion acceleration experimental results that demonstrate increased ion energy and yield on shots cleaned with these plasma mirrors.« less

  5. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C. J. Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  6. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.; Mason, Bryan M.S.; Garcia, John A. C.; Lewin, Jan S.; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Stasney, C. Richard; Frank, Steven J.; Schwartz, David L.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Ang, K. Kian

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.

  7. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  8. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  9. Secondary desertification due to salinization of intensively irrigated lands: The Israeli experience.

    PubMed

    Banin, A; Fish, A

    1995-01-01

    Secondary salinization of intensively irrigated lands is an increasingly alarming redesertification process experienced in many irrigated regions of the developed countries. The major cause is a profound interference in the geochemical/salt balances of irrigated regions. A case-in-point is the recent salinization of the Yizre'el Valley, a 20,000 ha intensively irrigated region in Israel. The extremely intensive and advanced agroecosystem developed in the region since the 1940s included pumping and importing irrigation water by the National Water Carrier, large-scale reclamation and reuse of municipal sewage water, winter flood impoundment in reservoirs for summer irrigation, and cloud seeding to enhance rainfall. Modern irrigation methods were applied, including sprinkler, trickle, moving-line, and center-pivot systems. Water use efficiency at any level was very high. Nevertheless, large-scale salinization of regional water resources and many fields had developed in the mid-1980s. Reconstructing and evaluating the water and salt balances of the Yizre'el Valley (using Cl as the representative salt constituent) shows that as water use in the valley increased to about 60 million m(3) per year, the importing of soluble salts by water totaled 15,000 tons of Cl per year. Recirculated salt - salt picked up by impounded surface water and applied to fields - increased significantly and in the late 1980s amounted to more than 9,000 tons Cl per year. The source of recirculated salts was the accumulated salts in soils and in the shallow aquifer in the valley, which were leached by floodwater or drained or infiltrated into reservoirs, grossly and adversely affecting water quality. Analysis of the Yizre'el Valley's case points to the utmost importance of maintaining the geochemical balances in addition to increasing irrigation efficiency. An irrigated region may achieve geochemical balance by the following means: limiting the extent of irrigated areas, developing a well

  10. Progress in interferometry for LISA at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spero, Robert; Bachman, Brian; de Vine, Glenn; Dickson, Jeffrey; Klipstein, William; Ozawa, Tetsuo; McKenzie, Kirk; Shaddock, Daniel; Robison, David; Sutton, Andrew; Ware, Brent

    2011-05-01

    Recent advances at JPL in experimentation and design for LISA interferometry include the demonstration of time delay interferometry using electronically separated end stations, a new arm-locking design with improved gain and stability, and progress in flight readiness of digital and analog electronics for phase measurements.

  11. Digital Holographic Interferometry for Airborne Particle Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-19

    hologram and its extinction cross section, and a computational demonstration that holographic interferometry can resolve aerosol particle size ...holographic interferometry can resolve aerosol particle size evolution. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of...Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols workshop, Smolenice, Slovak Republic (2013). 7. Poster : Digital Holographic Imaging of Aerosol Particles In-Flight

  12. Astronomical imaging by pupil plane interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez

    1989-01-01

    Comparing rotational shear interferometry to standard speckle interferometry, it is found that it is easier in the first case to separate the atmospheric phases from the object transform phases. Phase closure and blind deconvolution should be directly applicable. Laboratory simulations were conducted to verify theoretical predictions and computer simulations for the phase closure case, and preliminary results show promise.

  13. Caring for newborns in the presence of their parents: the experience of nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Santin, Karine Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Deíse Moura

    2011-01-01

    The nurse has a key role in involving parents in the care of newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to comprehend how the nurses experience the care provided to newborns in the presence of the parents. This is a qualitative study using social phenomenology, with the participation of seven nurses, interviewed between January and February 2009. The nurses perceived the needs of parents; had positive expectations regarding the care provided and acknowledge themselves to be the link between them, helping them to live with the hospitalized child. However, in emergencies, the nurses had difficulties in caring for the neonate in the presence of the parents. The nurses positively evaluated the presence of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit, involving them permanently in the care of the newborn. The study evokes the emergence of a care context (nurse/neonate/parents) that precedes the proximity between the subjects and the demands presented by them.

  14. Digital scrapbooking as a standard of care in neonatal intensive care units: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Subhani, Muhammad T; Kanwal, Ifrah

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a digital photo scrapbooking project as a standard of care for the parents of infants admitted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Photographs were taken from birth until discharge or expiry at special moments during the infant's hospitalization and used to create a digital scrapbook with daily notes by the parents. The scrapbook and original photos were provided on a CD at discharge or at expiry. Parents and their families unanimously appreciated the photos and the opportunity to record their thoughts, and considered the CDs as a lifetime treasure. Digital photo journaling could be implemented as a standard of care at other institutions with a commitment from the nursing and ancillary staff of the NICU and labor and delivery department, with possible support from volunteers.

  15. Assessing the Performance of a Medical Intensive Care Unit: A 5-year single-center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Anushiravani, Amir; Masoompour, Seyed Masoom

    2017-01-01

    Patient care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is complex and expensive, serving to provide optimal outcome as well as the adequate use of resources. Our objective was to determine variables associated with admission practices, processes of care, and clinical outcomes for critically ill patients. Admission records of a 10-bed ICU were gathered during a 5-year period. Variables such as average length of stay, bed turnover, bed occupancy rate, and turnover interval were evaluated. Of the 1719 patients evaluated, 54% were men. Mortality was highest between 10 pm and 2 am. There was no significant difference in ICU mortality during different days of the week. We showed that nonoffice hour admissions were not associated with poorer clinical outcomes, and significant differences in ICU mortality and ICU length of stay were not seen. Moreover, hospital mortality rates were not significantly higher for patients admitted to our ICU on weekends, at nights, or any day of the week.

  16. Impact of Clinical Pharmacist on the Pediatric Intensive Care Practice: An 11-Year Tertiary Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Heidi M.; Fryer, Karen R.; Graner, Kevin K.; Arteaga, Grace M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: With increasing complexity of critical care medicine comes an increasing need for multidisciplinary involvement in care. In many institutions, pharmacists are an integral part of this team, but long-term data on the interventions performed by pharmacists and their effects on patient care and outcomes are limited. We aimed to describe the role of pediatric clinical pharmacists in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) practice. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of pharmacy interventions in the PICU at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, from 2003-2013, with a distinct period of increased pharmacist presence in the PICU from 2008 onward. We compared demographic and outcome data on patients who did and who did not have pharmacy interventions during 2 periods (2003–2007 and 2008–2013). RESULTS: We identified 27,773 total interventions by pharmacists during the 11-year period, of which 79.8% were accepted by the clinical team. These interventions were made on 10,963 unique PICU admissions and prevented 5867 order entry errors. Pharmacists' interventions increased year over year, including a significant change in 2008. Patients who required pharmacy involvement were younger, sicker, and had longer intensive care unit, hospital, and ventilator duration. Average central line infections and central line entry rates decreased significantly over the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Increased pharmacist presence in the PICU is associated with increased interventions and prevention of adverse drug events. Pharmacist participation during rounds and order entry substantially improved the care of critically sick children and should be encouraged. PMID:26380569

  17. A numerical field experiment approach for determining probabilities of microburst intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.; Zweifel, Terry

    1992-01-01

    Several investigators had determined that some atmospheric parameters were related to the formation and severity of microbursts. For example, Caracena pointed out the relationship between a dry adiabatic lapse rate and microbursts in 'The crash of Delta Flight 191 at Dallas-Fort Worth international airport'. These early investigations led to the idea that numeric modeling of microbursts with varying atmospheric parameters might define 'signatures' that could lead to determining the probability of microburst intensity. The idea was that, by using already available sensors (such as static air temperature, pressure altitude, and radar reflectivity) onboard an aircraft, a reliable prediction of microburst existence and intensity could be formed. Such data could be used to create an 'expert meteorologist' using either artificial intelligence or other techniques that could be used in either reactive or look-ahead systems to vary sensitivity thresholds and coordinate the inputs from different detecting systems. To this end, Honeywell contracted to have the microburst simulations run. The questions to be addressed were the following: using the sensor set available to the aircraft (e.g. temperature, radar reflectivity, etc.), can we calculate the probability that (1) a microburst could be formed? and (2) that the resultant winds would be of sufficient magnitude to threaten the aircraft? Over a two year period, a data set of 1800 microburst simulations was accumulated. Verification of the microburst simulation was obtained using the results of other independent researchers and actual comparison to microburst events in Orlando and Denver. Some of the results from the simulation have already been incorporated into Honeywell's Windshear Detection and Guidance System with excellent results. Various aspects of this investigation are presented in viewgraph form.

  18. The Syrian civil war: The experience of the Surgical Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Ozdogan, Hatice Kaya; Karateke, Faruk; Ozdogan, Mehmet; Cetinalp, Sibel; Ozyazici, Sefa; Gezercan, Yurdal; Okten, Ali Ihsan; Celik, Muge; Satar, Salim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Since the civilian war in Syria began, thousands of seriously injured trauma patients from Syria were brought to Turkey for emergency operations and/or postoperative intensive care. The aim of this study was to present the demographics and clinical features of the wounded patients in Syrian civil war admitted to the surgical intensive care units in a tertiary care centre. Methods: The records of 80 trauma patients admitted to the Anaesthesia, General Surgery and Neurosurgery ICUs between June 1, 2012 and July 15, 2014 were included in the study. The data were reviewed regarding the demographics, time of presentation, place of reference, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and Injury Severity Score (ISS), surgical procedures, complications, length of stay and mortality. Results: A total of 80 wounded patients (70 males and 10 females) with a mean age of 28.7 years were admitted to surgical ICUs. The most frequent cause of injury was gunshot injury. The mean time interval between the occurrence of injury and time of admission was 2.87 days. Mean ISS score on admission was 21, and mean APACHE II score was 15.7. APACHE II scores of non-survivors were significantly increased compared with those of survivors (P=0.001). No significant differences was found in the age, ISS, time interval before admission, length of stay in ICU, rate of surgery before or after admission. Conclusion: The most important factor affecting mortality in this particular trauma-ICU patient population from Syrian civil war was the physiological condition of patients on admission. Rapid transport and effective initial and on-road resuscitation are critical in decreasing the mortality rate in civil wars and military conflicts. PMID:27375683

  19. Power and Flow Experience in Time-Intensive Business Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiili, Kristian; Lainema, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Power is an influential component of social interaction and there are reasons for thinking that it may have important effects both on decision-making and psychological and interpersonal processes. The aim of this paper was to study the relations between the feeling of power, decision-making and flow experience in a collaborative business…

  20. Life's Little Problems: An Intensive Look at the Daily Experiences of Young Children. Informal Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfson, Bernice J.; Jackson, Philip W.

    Three studies were conducted in an initial attempt to investigate the psychological importance of trivial everyday frustrations encountered by preschool children. Study 1 analyzed the frequency and quality of experiences that could be interpreted as interfering in some way with children's natural pursuit of their desires. In a nursery school…

  1. Intensity and Passion: On Musical Experience, Layers of Meaning, and Stages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varkøy, Øivind; Westby, Inger Anne

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors link the discussion of differing musical experiences to Frede V. Nielsen's exploration of music as a multifarious universe of meaning, which, in encounter with the listener's receptive consciousness, presents different layers of musical meaning. The focal point of the article is that which Nielsen refers to…

  2. TDRS orbit determination by radio interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavloff, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    In support of a NASA study on the application of radio interferometry to satellite orbit determination, MITRE developed a simulation tool for assessing interferometry tracking accuracy. The Orbit Determination Accuracy Estimator (ODAE) models the general batch maximum likelihood orbit determination algorithms of the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) with the group and phase delay measurements from radio interferometry. ODAE models the statistical properties of tracking error sources, including inherent observable imprecision, atmospheric delays, clock offsets, station location uncertainty, and measurement biases, and through Monte Carlo simulation, ODAE calculates the statistical properties of errors in the predicted satellites state vector. This paper presents results from ODAE application to orbit determination of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) by radio interferometry. Conclusions about optimal ground station locations for interferometric tracking of TDRS are presented, along with a discussion of operational advantages of radio interferometry.

  3. [Intensive care and home artificial ventilation. How do nurses experience artificial respiratory care in the home of patients?].

    PubMed

    Gödecke, Christiane; Kohlen, Helen

    2013-04-01

    In Germany, the number of patients who receive artificial respiration in their own home is increasing. One reason for long time ventilation is the rise of technical possibilities. Bringing "intensive care" to the home of people challenges original understandings of home care. While intensive care and artificial respiration are technology-oriented, home-care is social-oriented, respecting the familiar environment of the patient. An international literature review reveals that research has been done by investigating the experiences of relatives and patients but not those of nurses. The few studies with a focus on nurses relate to themes of privacy and how to set limits. In Germany, not one study could be found that dealt with the question of how nurses experience artificial respiratory care in patients' homes. Considering the involved changes of care, the question rises, how nurses experience artificial respiratory care in the home of patients. This research is explorative and allows an insight into what home care is like when technology comes in. The exploration is based on eight narrative interviews with nurses who are experiencing respiratory care for patients in their home. The findings reveal professional challenges nurses have to face when caring for patients who are dependent on technological devices. The relatives are included in the caring activities and cooperating with them is crucial.

  4. 50 years of holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Karl A.

    2015-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Robert L. Powell and I discovered holographic interferometry while working at the Radar Laboratory of the University of Michigan's Institute of Science and Technology. I have worked in this field for this entire time span, watched it grow from an unexplored technology to become a widespread industrial testing method, and I have contributed to these developments. In this paper, I will trace my history in this field from our discovery to my involvement in its theory and applications. I will conclude with a discussion of digital holography, which is currently replacing photographic holography for most research and industrial applications.

  5. An Interferometry Imaging Beauty Contest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Cotton, William D.; Hummel, Christian A.; Monnier, John D.; Zhaod, Ming; Young, John S.; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Meimon, Serge C.; Mugnier, Laurent; LeBesnerais, Guy; Thiebaut, Eric; Tuthill, Peter G.; Hani, Christopher A.; Pauls, Thomas; DuvertI, Gilles; Garcia, Paulo; Kuchner, Marc

    2004-01-01

    We present a formal comparison of the performance of algorithms used for synthesis imaging with optical/infrared long-baseline interferometers. Six different algorithms are evaluated based on their performance with simulated test data. Each set of test data is formated in the interferometry Data Exchange Standard and is designed to simulate a specific problem relevant to long-baseline imaging. The data are calibrated power spectra and bispectra measured with a ctitious array, intended to be typical of existing imaging interferometers. The strengths and limitations of each algorithm are discussed.

  6. Aperture masking interferometry research simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Luo, Qiufeng; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Xian Ling; Tao, Chunkan; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhou, Bifang; Chen, Hanliang

    2004-10-01

    Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) is one of the high-resolution astronomical image observation technologies. It is also an important research way to the Optical Aperture Synthesis (OAS). The theory of OAS is simply introduced and AMI simulation method is raised. The mathematics model is built and the interferogram fringes are got. The aperture mask u-v coverage is discussed and one image reconstruction method is done. The reconstructed image result is got with CLEAN method. Shortcoming of this work is also referred and the future research work is mentioned at last.

  7. Characterization of micro structure through hybrid interference and phase determination in broadband light interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Tang, Yan; Zhu, Jiangping; Deng, Qinyuan; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Lixin; Hu, Song

    2017-03-10

    Broadband light interferometry, which is a well-developed method for surface profiling, has been applied with great success in the past years. Conventional multi-wavelength interferometric surface profilers mostly utilize the light irradiance to locate the zero fringe order, but the accuracy and stability can be negatively influenced by intensity fluctuations and external light disturbance, which is a serious problem. In this paper we discuss a hybrid technique combining light intensity and spectral modulation to determine zero optical path difference in which the light instability can be effectively suppressed. Additionally, the phase evaluation at each pixel will provide a high vertical resolution to obtain the characterization of the micro structure. The hybrid-interference method will not only improve the sensitivity of the measurement system but also level up the robustness and stability. Both simulation and experiment on a micro-dome structure have been presented to verify the effectiveness. Furthermore, the proposed method may be promising to replace the previously intensity-based method, especially in a complex application environment.

  8. Diagnosis of Ultrafast Laser-Heated Metal Surfaces and Plasma Expansion with Absolute Displacement Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Clarke, S. A.; Taylor, A. J.; Forsman, A.

    2004-07-01

    We report on the development of a novel technique to measure the critical surface displacement in intense, ultrashort, laser-solid target experiments. Determination of the critical surface position is important for understanding near solid density plasma dynamics and transport from warm dense matter systems, and for diagnosing short scale length plasma expansion and hydrodynamic surface motion from short pulse, laser-heated, solid targets. Instead of inferring critical surface motion from spectral power shifts using a time-delayed probe pulse or from phase shifts using ultrafast pump-probe frequency domain interferometry (FDI), this technique directly measures surface displacement using a single ultrafast laser heating pulse. Our technique is based on an application of a Michelson Stellar interferometer to microscopic rather than stellar scales, and we report plasma scale length motion as small as 10 nm. We will present results for motion of plasmas generated from several target materials (Au, Al, Au on CH plastic) for a laser pulse intensity range from 1011 to 1016 W/cm2. Varying both, the pulse duration and the pulse energy, explores the dependence of the expansion mechanism on the energy deposited and on the peak intensity. Comparisons with hydrocodes reveal the applicability of hydrodynamic models.

  9. Phase and fringe order determination in wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-04-18

    A method to obtain unambiguous surface height measurements using wavelength scanning interferometry with an improved repeatability, comparable to that obtainable using phase shifting interferometry, is reported. Rather than determining the conventional fringe frequency-derived z height directly, the method uses the frequency to resolve the fringe order ambiguity, and combine this information with the more accurate and repeatable fringe phase derived z height. A theoretical model to evaluate the method's performance in the presence of additive noise is derived and shown to be in good agreement with experiments. The measurement repeatability is improved by a factor of ten over that achieved when using frequency information alone, reaching the sub-nanometre range. Moreover, the z-axis non-linearity (bleed-through or ripple error) is reduced by a factor of ten. These order of magnitude improvements in measurement performance are demonstrated through a number of practical measurement examples.

  10. Photofragmentation Beam Splitters for Matter-Wave Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Geyer, Philipp; von Issendorff, Bernd; Haslinger, Philipp; Arndt, Markus

    2014-12-01

    Extending the range of quantum interferometry to a wider class of composite nanoparticles requires new tools to diffract matter waves. Recently, pulsed photoionization light gratings have demonstrated their suitability for high mass matter-wave physics. Here, we extend quantum interference experiments to a new class of particles by introducing photofragmentation beam splitters into time-domain matter-wave interferometry. We present data that demonstrate this coherent beam splitting mechanism with clusters of hexafluorobenzene and we show single-photon depletion gratings based both on fragmentation and ionization for clusters of vanillin. We propose that photofragmentation gratings can act on a large set of van der Waals clusters and biomolecules which are thermally unstable and often resilient to single-photon ionization.

  11. Homodyne digital interferometry for a sensitive fiber frequency reference.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Silvie; McRae, Terry G; Gray, Malcolm B; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2014-07-28

    Digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry enables robust interferometric sensitivity to be achieved in an optically simple configuration by shifting optical complexity into the digital signal processing regime. We use digitally enhanced homodyne interferometry in a simple, all-fiber Michelson interferometer to achieve a frequency reference stability of better than 20 Hz/√Hz from 10 mHz to 1 Hz, satisfying, for the first time in an all fiber system, the stability requirements for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow On mission. In addition, we have demonstrated stability that satisfies the future mission objectives at frequencies down to 1 mHz. This frequency domain stability translates into a fractional Allan deviation of 3.3 × 10(-17) for an integration time of 55 seconds.

  12. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Laboy, Alycia F; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T L

    2012-07-15

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety.

  13. Detector modules and spectrometers for the TIME-Pilot [CII] intensity mapping experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, Jonathon; Bock, James; Bradford, C. Matt; Bumble, Bruce; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Cheng, Yun-Ting; Cooray, Asantha; Crites, Abigail; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Gong, Yan; Li, Chao-Te; O'Brient, Roger; Shirokoff, Erik; Shiu, Corwin; Sun, Jason; Staniszewski, Zachary; Uzgil, Bade; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This proceeding presents the current TIME-Pilot instrument design and status with a focus on the close-packed modular detector arrays and spectrometers. Results of laboratory tests with prototype detectors and spectrometers are discussed. TIME-Pilot is a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array under development that will study the Epoch of Reionization (the period of time when the first stars and galaxies ionized the intergalactic medium) by mapping the fluctuations of the redshifted 157:7 μm emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z 5:2 to 8:5. As a tracer of star formation, the [CII] power spectrum can provide information on the sources driving reionization and complements 21 cm data (which traces neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium). Intensity mapping provides a measure of the mean [CII] intensity without the need to resolve and detect faint sources individually. We plan to target a 1 degree by 0.35 arcminute field on the sky and a spectral range of 199-305 GHz, producing a spatial-spectral slab which is 140 Mpc by 0.9 Mpc on-end and 1230 Mpc in the redshift direction. With careful removal of intermediate-redshift CO sources, we anticipate a detection of the halo-halo clustering term in the [CII] power spectrum consistent with current models for star formation history in 240 hours on the JCMT. TIME-Pilot will use two stacks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one stack per polarization) with a resolving power R 100 and a spectral range of 183 to 326 GHz. The range is divided into 60 spectral channels, of which 16 at the band edges on each spectrometer serve as atmospheric monitors. The diffraction gratings are curved to produce a compact instrument, each focusing the diffracted light onto an output arc sampled by the 60 bolometers. The bolometers are built in buttable dies of 8 (low freqeuency) or 12 (high frequency) spectral channels by 8 spatial channels and are mated to the spectrometer stacks. Each detector

  14. The brain on art: intense aesthetic experience activates the default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Vessel, Edward A.; Starr, G. Gabrielle; Rubin, Nava

    2012-01-01

    Aesthetic responses to visual art comprise multiple types of experiences, from sensation and perception to emotion and self-reflection. Moreover, aesthetic experience is highly individual, with observers varying significantly in their responses to the same artwork. Combining fMRI and behavioral analysis of individual differences in aesthetic response, we identify two distinct patterns of neural activity exhibited by different sub-networks. Activity increased linearly with observers' ratings (4-level scale) in sensory (occipito-temporal) regions. Activity in the striatum (STR) also varied linearly with ratings, with below-baseline activations for low-rated artworks. In contrast, a network of frontal regions showed a step-like increase only for the most moving artworks (“4” ratings) and non-differential activity for all others. This included several regions belonging to the “default mode network” (DMN) previously associated with self-referential mentation. Our results suggest that aesthetic experience involves the integration of sensory and emotional reactions in a manner linked with their personal relevance. PMID:22529785

  15. Fast six-channel pyrometer for warm-dense-matter experiments with intense heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P.A.; Kulish, M.I.; Mintsev, V.; Nikolaev, D.N.; Ternovoi, V.Ya.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Udrea, S.; Tahir, N.A.; Varentsov, D.; Hug, A.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes a fast multi-channel radiation pyrometer that was developed for warmdense-matter experiments with intense heavy ion beams at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI). The pyrometer is capable of measuring of brightness temperatures from 2000 K to 50000 K, at 6 wavelengths in visible and near-infrared parts of spectrum, with 5 nanosecond temporal resolution and several micrometers spatial resolution. The pyrometer's spectral discrimination technique is based on interference filters, which act as filters and mirrors to allow for simultaneous spectral discrimination of the same ray at multiple wavelengths.

  16. LHC cryogenics – new experience of run with increased beam energy and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Delprat, L.; Ferlin, G.; Rogez, E.; Tavian, L.

    2017-03-01

    After the LHC first long shut down (LS1), when necessary consolidation and maintenance activities were performed on different technical systems, the Large Hadron Collider was progressively cooled down from ambient to operation temperatures from May of 2014. Prior to physics run with increased beam energy to 6.5 TeV/beam, increased beam intensity and modified beam injection scheme, several qualifications and tests affecting cryogenic system have been performed to ensure stable run of the accelerator. New beam parameters were gradually applied to the accelerator, reducing operational margins of cryogenic capacity from previous run. The process optimization and related updates in the control system were applied. This paper will briefly recall the main consolidations performed on the cryogenic system during LS1. The cool down process and behaviour of the cryogenic system during qualifications and tests will be presented. Difficulties and applied solutions during the run will be discussed. The availability and helium losses statistics for full year operation of 2015 will be given.

  17. High-intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of solid tumor: Chinese clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Akira; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Kun; Hasumura, Hiromi; Liu, Botao; Fu, Yurui; Yang, Zaocheng

    2006-05-01

    As a non-invasive modality, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy has been received an interest for the treatment of solid tumor. There are some makers of HIFU for the equipment in China. The Sonic CZ901 is developed from the Mianyang stream that has a great advantage for guiding by color Doppler ultrasound imaging. For the research about possibility of this equipment, we evaluate the clinical usefulness to the solid tumor of HIFU treatment at Wujing general hospital in Beijing. We elucidate the result in 28 cases with benign and malignant tumor (Uterine myoma:16, Benign prostatic hypertrophy:5, Benign breast tumor:2, Breast cancer:1, Retroperitoneal tumor:1, Pheochromocytoma:1, Liver cancer: 2) . After 14˜90days, all cases show the reduction of tumor size (Max.3.2cm, Min.1.6cm, :Mean 2.2cm reduced), and the blood flow of tumor completely reduced in 7/23, partially reduced in16/23. Clinical symptoms disappeared in 7, clearly improved in 14, improved in 7. All treatments had no adverse event except for two cases of liver cancer. They felt an abdominal pain that controllable by medicine and it improved within 6hours. It is concluded that HIFU with guide by ultrasound imaging is very safe, painless and effective as the anti-tumor treatment.

  18. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100. The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} mathrm {W}/mathrm {Hz}^{1/2}. This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  19. Testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellstede, Gerold O.; Perlick, Volker; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the theoretical foundations for testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry. Apart from some nondegeneracy conditions to be imposed, our discussion applies to all nonlinear electrodynamical theories of the Plebański class, i.e., to all Lagrangians that depend only on the two Lorentz-invariant scalars quadratic in the field strength. The main idea of the experiment proposed here is to use the fact that, according to nonlinear electrodynamics, the phase velocity of light should depend on the strength and on the direction of an electromagnetic background field. There are two possible experimental setups for testing this prediction with Michelson interferometry. The first possibility is to apply a strong electromagnetic field to the beam in one arm of the interferometer and to compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off. The second possibility is to place the whole interferometer in a strong electromagnetic field and to rotate it. If an electromagnetic field is placed in one arm, the interferometer could have the size of a gravitational wave detector, i.e., an arm length of several hundred meters. If the whole interferometer is placed in an electromagnetic field, one would have to do the experiment with a tabletop interferometer. As an alternative to a traditional Michelson interferometer, one could use a pair of optical resonators that are not bigger than a few centimeters. Then the whole apparatus would be placed in the background field and one would either compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off or one would rotate the apparatus with the field kept switched on. We derive the theoretical foundations for these types of experiments, in the context of an unspecified nonlinear electrodynamics of the Plebański class, and we discuss their feasibility. A null result of the experiment would place bounds on the parameters of the

  20. Optical-fiber vibration sensor using step interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, J A; García, P

    1996-10-01

    An all-fiber vibration sensor based on step interferometry is described. The sensor consists of a modified Michelson interferometer in which the ends of the reference and signal arms are assembled and fixed together to produce regular distributed interference fringes. Five photodetectors with relative phase shifts of π/2 placed on the fringes acquire five intensity patterns simultaneously. One reconstructs the vibration amplitude by using the well-known five-step algorithm. A vibration sensor with these characteristics was constructed, and its performance was investigated.

  1. Non-sequential double ionization of Ne in intense laser pulses: a coincidence experiment.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, R; Feuerstein, B; Fischer, D; Dorn, A; Schroter, C; Deipenwisch, J; Lopez-Urrutia, J R; Hohr, C; Neumayer, P; Ullrich, J; Rottke, H; Trump, C; Wittmann, M; Korn, G; Sandner, W

    2001-03-26

    The dynamics of Neon double ionization by 25 fs, 1.0 PW/cm 2 laser pulses at 795 nm has been studied in a many particle coincidence experiment. The momentum vectors of all ejected atomic fragments (electrons and ions) have been measured using combined electron and recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy. Electron emission spectra for double and single ionization will be discussed. In both processes the mean electron energies differ considerably and high energetic electrons with energies of more than 120 eV have been observed for double ionization. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the rescattering model.

  2. Multifrequency perturbations in matter-wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, A.; Rembold, A.; Schütz, G.; Stibor, A.

    2015-11-01

    High-contrast matter-wave interferometry is essential in various fundamental quantum mechanical experiments as well as for technical applications. Thereby, contrast and sensitivity are typically reduced by decoherence and dephasing effects. While decoherence accounts for a general loss of quantum information in a system due to entanglement with the environment, dephasing is due to collective time-dependent external phase shifts, which can be related to temperature drifts, mechanical vibrations, and electromagnetic oscillations. In contrast to decoherence, dephasing can, in principle, be reversed. Here, we demonstrate in experiment and theory a method for the analysis and reduction of the influence of dephasing noise and perturbations consisting of several external frequencies in an electron interferometer. This technique uses the high spatial and temporal resolution of a delay-line detector to reveal and remove dephasing perturbations by second-order correlation analysis. It allows matter-wave experiments under perturbing laboratory conditions and can be applied, in principle, to electron, atom, ion, neutron, and molecule interferometers.

  3. The Tromso Infant Faces Database (TIF): Development, Validation and Application to Assess Parenting Experience on Clarity and Intensity Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Maack, Jana K.; Bohne, Agnes; Nordahl, Dag; Livsdatter, Lina; Lindahl, Åsne A.W.; Øvervoll, Morten; Wang, Catharina E. A.; Pfuhl, Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Newborns and infants are highly depending on successfully communicating their needs; e.g., through crying and facial expressions. Although there is a growing interest in the mechanisms of and possible influences on the recognition of facial expressions in infants, heretofore there exists no validated database of emotional infant faces. In the present article we introduce a standardized and freely available face database containing Caucasian infant face images from 18 infants 4 to 12 months old. The development and validation of the Tromsø Infant Faces (TIF) database is presented in Study 1. Over 700 adults categorized the photographs by seven emotion categories (happy, sad, disgusted, angry, afraid, surprised, neutral) and rated intensity, clarity and their valance. In order to examine the relevance of TIF, we then present its first application in Study 2, investigating differences in emotion recognition across different stages of parenthood. We found a small gender effect in terms of women giving higher intensity and clarity ratings than men. Moreover, parents of young children rated the images as clearer than all the other groups, and parents rated “neutral” expressions as more clearly and more intense. Our results suggest that caretaking experience provides an implicit advantage in the processing of emotional expressions in infant faces, especially for the more difficult, ambiguous expressions. PMID:28392772

  4. Contrast and Intensity upgrades to the Texas Petawatt laser for hadron generation and non-linear QED experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M.; Arefiev, Alexey; Ditmire, Todd; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gillis; Gaul, Erhard; Labun, Lance; Luedtke, Scott; Martinez, Mikael; McCarry, Edward; Stark, David; Pomerantz, Ishay; Tiwari, Ganesh; Toncian, Toma

    2015-11-01

    Advances in laser-based hadron generation, especially with respect to particle energy, as well as reaching the new regime of radiation dominated plasmas and non-linear QED, require laser fields of Petavolts per meter that preferably interact with very high density, overcritical plasmas. To achieve these conditions we are upgrading the Texas Petawatt Laser both respect to on-target laser intensity and laser-contrast, aiming to reach intensities of ~ 5x1022 W/cm2 and pulse contrast parameters allowing the interaction with overcritical, yet ultrathin, sub-micron targets. We will report on the planned experiments aimed at ion acceleration, neutron generation and the first experimental measurement of radiation reactions to motivate the chosen upgrade parameters. We will further report on the technical changes to the laser and present first measurements of the achieved intensity and contrast parameters. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045) and the National Institute of Health SBIR.

  5. Experience with position sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Schultz, A.J.; Felcher, G.P.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Montague, D.G.; Dejus, R.J.

    1990-05-07

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with {approximately}1 {mu}s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Experience with position-sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. K.; Haumann, J. R.; Epperson, J. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Schultz, A. J.; Felcher, G. P.; Montague, D. G.; Dejus, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron-scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron-scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm × 30 cm, ˜3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm diameter, ˜0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm × 20 cm, ˜5 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a 40 cm × 40 cm, ˜4 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, ˜1.6 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical 3He proportional-counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in diameter and 60 cm long and has ˜14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with ˜1 μs precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs.

  7. Hair removal using intense pulsed light (EpiLight): patient satisfaction, our experience, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Lucian; Menachem, Meital; Ramon, Ytzhack; Shoshani, Oren; Rissin, Yaron; Eldor, Liron; Egozi, Dana; Peled, Isaac J; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2005-01-01

    Applications for intense pulsed light (IPL) for hair removal are gaining favor among other methods, including lasers, because of its noninvasive nature, versatility regarding different skin and hair types, safety, and ease of use. Hair removal using IPL was performed from January 2002 to December 2003 on 108 consecutive patients. Eighty of these patients answered a questionnaire and were enrolled in the study group. The investigated parameters were hair and skin type, number of pulses, fluence, pulse duration, pulse delay, the filters used, and the treated area. The patient assessment of improvement (satisfaction) rate was graded from 1 to 5 points: 1, worse; 2, no improvement; 3, mild improvement; 4, good result; and 5, excellent result. The patients had between 1 and 13 treatments most of them during 2 to 6 sessions. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported no complications. Prolonged erythema for more than 7 days was reported by 16.25%, blisters by 6.25%, temporary hyperpigmentation by 8.75%, leukotrichia was present in 1 case, and 1 case of persistent hypopigmentation was noted in a young girl. An increased number of complications and a decreased satisfaction rate were noted with higher skin types, but it was not statistically significant. Patients who underwent fewer treatments (1-3 treatments) were more satisfied compared with those who had more than 7 treatments (P < 0.02). Sixty percent of the patients rated their satisfaction to be good to excellent and 65% would ill recommend this treatment to their friends. To minimize the complication rate the authors found that the preset parameters should be adjusted at every treatment session according to the skin response at the previous one. Permanent hair removal cannot be guaranteed and it is not possible to predict the improvement rate. Nevertheless, based on patient satisfaction rate in this study, the authors recommend using IPL for hair removal.

  8. Initial experience with a radiology imaging network to newborn and intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Witt, R M; Cohen, M D; Appledorn, C R

    1991-02-01

    A digital image network has been installed in the James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children on the Indiana University Medical Center to create a limited all digital imaging system. The system is composed of commercial components, Philips/AT&T CommView system, (Philips Medical Systems, Shelton, CT; AT&T Bell Laboratories, West Long Beach, NJ) and connects an existing Philips Computed Radiology (PCR) system to two remote workstations that reside in the intensive care unit and the newborn nursery. The purpose of the system is to display images obtained from the PCR system on the remote workstations for direct viewing by referring clinicians, and to reduce many of their visits to the radiology reading room three floors away. The design criteria includes the ability to centrally control all image management functions on the remote workstations to relieve the clinicians from any image management tasks except for recalling patient images. The principal components of the system are the Philips PCR system, the acquisition module (AM), and the PCR interface to the Data Management Module (DMM). Connected to the DMM are an Enhanced Graphics Display Workstation (EGDW), an optical disk drive, and a network gateway to an ethernet link. The ethernet network is the connection to the two Results Viewing Stations (RVS) and both RVSs are approximately 100 m from the gateway. The DMM acts as an image file server and an image archive device. The DMM manages the image data base and can load images to the EGDW and the two RVSs. The system has met the initial design specifications and can successfully capture images from the PCR and direct them to the RVSs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Multi-Photon Quantum Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2007-06-01

    Based on the investigation of multi-photon entanglement, as produced by stimulated parametric down-conversion, a technique is presented to create heralded ``noon'' states. The relevance for interferometry will be discussed. Furthermore we explored the use of photon-number resolving detectors in Mach-Zehnder type of interferometers. Our current detectors can distinguish 0, 1, 2, to7, photon impacts. Although the overall collection and detection efficiency of photons is well below unity (about 0.3) the photon number resolving property is still very useful if combined with coherent input states since those state are eigenstates of the photon annihilation operator. First we analyze the coherent state interferometer with a single photon-number resolving detector, revealing the strong non-linear response of an interferometer in the case of Fock-state projection. Second, we use two such detectors together with a Baysian phase estimation strategy to demonstrate that it is possible to achieve the standard quantum limit independently from the true value of the phase shift. This protocol is unbiased and saturates the Cramer-Rao phase uncertainty bound and, therefore, is an optimal phase estimation strategy. As a final topic it will be shown how quantum interferometry combined with micromechanical structures can be used to investigate quantum superpositions and quantum decoherence of macroscopic objects.

  10. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  11. Survey of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of conflict in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marie; Throndson, Karen; Girardin, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of Canadian critical care nurses' experiences of and responses to situations of conflict in the ICU. Through a 35-item web-based survey, members of the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses were asked questions regarding the types, causes and frequency of conflict experienced, the nursing interventions found most helpful in situations of conflict, and the resources found most helpful in responding to situations of conflict. A total of 241 nurses responded to the survey. The mean age of the nurses was 43 years, and the majority were female (89.2%), direct care providers (66.4%), with greater than 11 years of experience in critical care (58.3%), and working in medical/surgical ICUs (66.4%) in tertiary care hospitals (67.2%). Approximately 51% of the nurses reported being involved in at least one situation of conflict related to the management of a patient in the last week worked. The most common types of conflict encountered were disagreements between the team and family (46.5%) or within the team (35.3%). The nurses acknowledged the importance of clear, consistent and honest communication with patients and families when conflict arises and rank-ordered the resources found most helpful to patients, families, and nurses in conflict situations. Implications for practice and education are discussed and recommendations for future research are outlined.

  12. Computer-intensive simulation of solid-state NMR experiments using SIMPSON.

    PubMed

    Tošner, Zdeněk; Andersen, Rasmus; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Conducting large-scale solid-state NMR simulations requires fast computer software potentially in combination with efficient computational resources to complete within a reasonable time frame. Such simulations may involve large spin systems, multiple-parameter fitting of experimental spectra, or multiple-pulse experiment design using parameter scan, non-linear optimization, or optimal control procedures. To efficiently accommodate such simulations, we here present an improved version of the widely distributed open-source SIMPSON NMR simulation software package adapted to contemporary high performance hardware setups. The software is optimized for fast performance on standard stand-alone computers, multi-core processors, and large clusters of identical nodes. We describe the novel features for fast computation including internal matrix manipulations, propagator setups and acquisition strategies. For efficient calculation of powder averages, we implemented interpolation method of Alderman, Solum, and Grant, as well as recently introduced fast Wigner transform interpolation technique. The potential of the optimal control toolbox is greatly enhanced by higher precision gradients in combination with the efficient optimization algorithm known as limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno. In addition, advanced parallelization can be used in all types of calculations, providing significant time reductions. SIMPSON is thus reflecting current knowledge in the field of numerical simulations of solid-state NMR experiments. The efficiency and novel features are demonstrated on the representative simulations.

  13. Applications of chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage to atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David L.; Kinast, Joseph M.; Johnson, David M. S.; Radojevic, Antonije M.; Timmons, Brian P.; Stoner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    We present robust atom optics, based on chirped Raman adiabatic rapid passage (ARP), in the context of atom interferometry. Such ARP light pulses drive coherent population transfer between two hyperfine ground states by sweeping the frequency difference of two fixed-intensity optical fields with large single photon detunings. Since adiabatic transfer is less sensitive to atom temperature and non-uniform Raman beam intensity than standard Raman pulses, this approach should improve the stability of atom interferometers operating in dynamic environments. In such applications, chirped Raman ARP may also provide advantages over the previously demonstrated stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, which requires precise modulation of beam intensity and zeroing of the single photon detuning. We demonstrate a clock interferometer with chirped Raman ARP pulses, and compare its stability to that of a conventional Raman pulse interferometer. We also discuss potential improvements to inertially sensitive atom interferometers. Copyright 2011 by The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Starting experience with non-invasive ventilation in paediatric intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, F; de Halleux, Q; Ruiz, N; Scalfaro, P; Cotting, J; Stucki, P

    2003-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation in pressure support (NIV) is well described in the adult and child over 5 years. However, its use in children less than 1 year of age remains anecdotal. We report our preliminary experience with the use of NIV in six children aged from 5 days to 10 months. NIV was delivered with a flow generator (VPAP IIST, Resmed Ltd, North Ryde, NSW, Australia) in association with specific tubings and a nasal mask. The use of NIV resulted in a significant decrease of both the respiratory rate (from 53 to 39 breaths per min, p < 0.01) and the PvCO(2) (from 9.33 to 6.28 kPa, p < 0.01). These results show that NIV can be used in children under 1 year of age with improvement of physiological parameters.

  15. A Numerical Simulation and Statistical Modeling of High Intensity Radiated Fields Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    Tests are conducted on a quad-redundant fault tolerant flight control computer to establish upset characteristics of an avionics system in an electromagnetic field. A numerical simulation and statistical model are described in this work to analyze the open loop experiment data collected in the reverberation chamber at NASA LaRC as a part of an effort to examine the effects of electromagnetic interference on fly-by-wire aircraft control systems. By comparing thousands of simulation and model outputs, the models that best describe the data are first identified and then a systematic statistical analysis is performed on the data. All of these efforts are combined which culminate in an extrapolation of values that are in turn used to support previous efforts used in evaluating the data.

  16. Optimization of parameters affecting signal intensity in an LTQ-orbitrap in negative ion mode: A design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Lemonakis, Nikolaos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Gikas, Evagelos

    2016-01-15

    A multistage optimization of all the parameters affecting detection/response in an LTQ-orbitrap analyzer was performed, using a design of experiments methodology. The signal intensity, a critical issue for mass analysis, was investigated and the optimization process was completed in three successive steps, taking into account the three main regions of an orbitrap, the ion generation, the ion transmission and the ion detection regions. Oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were selected as the model compounds. Overall, applying this methodology the sensitivity was increased more than 24%, the resolution more than 6.5%, whereas the elapsed scan time was reduced nearly to its half. A high-resolution LTQ Orbitrap Discovery mass spectrometer was used for the determination of the analytes of interest. Thus, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were infused via the instruments syringe pump and they were analyzed employing electrospray ionization (ESI) in the negative high-resolution full-scan ion mode. The parameters of the three main regions of the LTQ-orbitrap were independently optimized in terms of maximum sensitivity. In this context, factorial design, response surface model and Plackett-Burman experiments were performed and analysis of variance was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for signal intensity. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by maximizing the desirability function. Our observation showed good agreement between the predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum conditions.

  17. Full-sensitivity depth-resolved measurements of displacement fields inside weakly scattering materials using wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Pablo D.; Chakraborty, Semanti

    2012-10-01

    This paper extends Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry into three dimensions. A Wavelength Scanning Interferometry (WSI) system is proposed which provides displacement fields inside the volume of semi-transparent scattering materials with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional displacement sensitivity. The main driver to develop such a system is the need to determine constitutive parameters (mainly elastic constants) of materials such as polymers and biological tissues so that their behavior can be modeled computationally. The sample is illuminated by three non-coplanar collimated beams around the observation direction. Sequences of two-dimensional interferograms are recorded while the frequency of the laser is tuned at a constant rate. Each pixel thus records and intensity signal which temporal frequency encodes the optical path difference between the illumination and reference beams for a particular point on the sample. Fourier transformation along the time axis reconstructs the magnitude and phase of the material's microstructure. Different optical paths along each illumination direction are required in order to separate or multiplex, in the frequency domain, the signals corresponding to each sensitivity vector. In this way, all the information required to reconstruct the location and the 3D displacement vector of scattering points within the volume in the material is recorded simultaneously. A controlled validation experiment is performed, which confirms the ability of the technique to provide three dimensional displacement distributions inside semitransparent scattering materials.

  18. Bibliography of spatial interferometry in optical astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gezari, Daniel Y.; Roddier, Francois; Roddier, Claude

    1990-01-01

    The Bibliography of Spatial Interferometry in Optical Astronomy is a guide to the published literature in applications of spatial interferometry techniques to astronomical observations, theory and instrumentation at visible and infrared wavelengths. The key words spatial and optical define the scope of this discipline, distinguishing it from spatial interferometry at radio wavelengths, interferometry in the frequency domain applied to spectroscopy, or more general electro-optics theoretical and laboratory research. The main bibliography is a listing of all technical articles published in the international scientific literature and presented at the major international meetings and workshops attended by the spatial interferometry community. Section B summarizes publications dealing with the basic theoretical concepts and algorithms proposed and applied to optical spatial interferometry and imaging through a turbulent atmosphere. The section on experimental techniques is divided into twelve categories, representing the most clearly identified major areas of experimental research work. Section D, Observations, identifies publications dealing specifically with observations of astronomical sources, in which optical spatial interferometry techniques have been applied.

  19. Harnessing spectral property of dual wavelength white LED to improve vertical scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Chong, Wee Keat; Li, Xiang; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2013-07-01

    Unlike a conventional white light source that emits a continuous and broad spectrum of light, the dual wavelength white light emitting diode (LED) generates white light by mixing blue and yellow lights, so there are two distinct peaks in its intensity spectrum. Prior works had shown that the spectral property of the dual wavelength white LED can affect the vertical scanning interferometry negatively if the spectral effects are not compensated. In this paper, we shall examine this issue by modeling the spectral property and variation of the dual wavelength white LED, followed by investigating its effects on the interference signal of vertical scanning interferometry. Instead of compensating the spectral effects of the dual wavelength white LED, we harness its spectral property to improve the performance of a phase-based height reconstruction algorithm in vertical scanning interferometry.

  20. Design of an intense ion source and LEBT for Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Sun, L. T.; Cui, B. Q.; Lian, G.; Yang, Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Tang, X. D.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing Jinping Underground Nuclear Astrophysics experiment (JUNA) will take the advantage of the ultralow background in China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), high current accelerator driven by on an ECR source and highly sensitive detector to study directly a number of important reactions for the first time within their relevant stellar energy range. A 2.45 GHz ECR ion source is one of its key components to provide 10 emA H+, 10 emA He+ and 2.0 emA He2+ beams for the study of (p,γ), (p,α), (α,p) and (α,γ) reactions in the first phase of the JUNA project. Ion beam is extracted from the source with energies up to 50 kV/q. The following low energy beam transport (LEBT) system transports and matches the ion beam from the exit of ion source to the acceleration tube (AT). The design status of the ECR ion source and LEBT system for the JUNA project are presented. The potential risks of the ion source are also discussed and analysed.

  1. High sensitivity moiré interferometry with compact achromatic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnek, Robert

    Experimental observations and measurements are the sources of information essential for correct development of mathematical models of real structural materials. Moiré interferometry offers high sensitivity in full-field measurements of in-plane displacements on the surface of a specimen. Although it is a powerful method in experimental stress analysis, it has some shortcomings. One is that existing systems require highly coherent light. The only sufficient source of light for this application is a long cavity laser, which is relatively expensive and at best cumbersome. Another shortcoming is that measurements must be performed in a vibration-free environment, such as that found on a holographic table. These requirements limit the use of existing moiré interferometers to a holographic laboratory. In this paper a modified concept of compensation is presented, which permits the use of a chromatic source of light in a compact moiré system. The compensator provides order in the angles of incident light for each separate wavelength, so that the virtual reference grating created by each wavelength in a continuous spectrum is identical in frequency and spatial position. The result is a virtual reference grating that behaves exactly like that created in coherent light. With this development the use of a laser diode, which is a non-coherent light source of tiny dimensions, becomes practical. The special configuration of the optics that create the virtual grating allows its synchronization with the specimen grating and leads to an interferometer design that is relatively insensitive to the vibrations found in a mechanical testing laboratory. Sensitivity to relative motion is analyzed theoretically. This development provides the oppurtunity to apply moiré interferometry to solid mechanics problems that cannot be studied in an optics laboratory. Experimental verification of the optical concepts is provided. A compact moiré interferometer based on the presented idea was

  2. Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News (OLBIN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Malbet, Fabien

    2010-07-01

    The Optical Long Baseline Interferometry News (OLBIN) is a website and forum for scientists, engineers, and students who share a common interest in long-baseline stellar interferometry. Through OLBIN you will find links to projects devoted to stellar interferometry, as well as news items, recent papers and preprints, notices of upcoming meetings, and resources for further research. This paper describes the history of the website, how it has evolved to serve the community, and the current plans for its future development. The website can be found at http://olbin.jpl.nasa.gov/.

  3. Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry used for assessment of optical properties in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2013-02-01

    Frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry, which employs a frequency-modulated coherent light source and examines the intensity fluctuation of the resulting scattered light using a heterodyne detection scheme, was utilized to evaluate the optical properties of liquid phantoms made of Intralipid® and Indian ink. Based on the diffusion theory, nonlinear fits to the power spectrum of the heterodyne-detected light intensity are performed and discussed in detail, and the optical properties of liquid phantoms are consequently retrieved.

  4. A very intense neutrino super beam experiment for leptonic CP violation discovery based on the European spallation source linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baussan, E.; Blennow, M.; Bogomilov, M.; Bouquerel, E.; Caretta, O.; Cederkäll, J.; Christiansen, P.; Coloma, P.; Cupial, P.; Danared, H.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Dracos, M.; Ekelöf, T.; Eshraqi, M.; Fernandez Martinez, E.; Gaudiot, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Koutchouk, J.-P.; Lindroos, M.; Loveridge, P.; Matev, R.; McGinnis, D.; Mezzetto, M.; Miyamoto, R.; Mosca, L.; Ohlsson, T.; Öhman, H.; Osswald, F.; Peggs, S.; Poussot, P.; Ruber, R.; Tang, J. Y.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Wurtz, J.

    2014-08-01

    Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few μs with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 σ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 σ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

  5. The Generation of Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss Optical Beams for High-precision Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Ludovico; Fulda, Paul; Bond, Charlotte; Brueckner, Frank; Brown, Daniel; Wang, Mengyao; Lodhia, Deepali; Palmer, Rebecca; Freise, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thermal noise in high-reflectivity mirrors is a major impediment for several types of high-precision interferometric experiments that aim to reach the standard quantum limit or to cool mechanical systems to their quantum ground state. This is for example the case of future gravitational wave observatories, whose sensitivity to gravitational wave signals is expected to be limited in the most sensitive frequency band, by atomic vibration of their mirror masses. One promising approach being pursued to overcome this limitation is to employ higher-order Laguerre-Gauss (LG) optical beams in place of the conventionally used fundamental mode. Owing to their more homogeneous light intensity distribution these beams average more effectively over the thermally driven fluctuations of the mirror surface, which in turn reduces the uncertainty in the mirror position sensed by the laser light. We demonstrate a promising method to generate higher-order LG beams by shaping a fundamental Gaussian beam with the help of diffractive optical elements. We show that with conventional sensing and control techniques that are known for stabilizing fundamental laser beams, higher-order LG modes can be purified and stabilized just as well at a comparably high level. A set of diagnostic tools allows us to control and tailor the properties of generated LG beams. This enabled us to produce an LG beam with the highest purity reported to date. The demonstrated compatibility of higher-order LG modes with standard interferometry techniques and with the use of standard spherical optics makes them an ideal candidate for application in a future generation of high-precision interferometry. PMID:23962813

  6. Phonon Counting and Intensity Interferometry of a Nanomechanical Resonator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-04

    Lörch, J. Qian, A. Clerk, F. Marquardt, and K. Ham- merer, Phys. Rev. X 4, 011015 (2014). [34] COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5, http://www.comsol.com/. [35] W...optomechanical coupling and optical/acoustic quality factor, via finite- element method (FEM) simulation in COMSOL Mul- tiphysics [34], according to the

  7. Experience of the MALA bag in the open abdomen management in an obstetrical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Malagón Reyes, Ricardo Mauricio; Reyes Mendoza, Luis Emilio; Angeles Vásquez, María de Jesús; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: As indicações atuais para a gestão de abdómen aberto são a cirurgia de controlo de danos, a abordagem de sepsis intraabdominal grave, a síndrome de compartimento abdominal, o encerramento da parede abdominal sob tensão e a perda de massa da parede abdominal.Objetivo: Descrever a experiência em gestão e cirurgias de abdómen aberto usando a bolsa MALA (Maior Absorção de Líquido Abdominal).Material e Métodos: Estudo descritivo, incluindo todos os doentes com o diagnóstico de abdómen aberto gerido com a bolsa MALA internados na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos Obstétricos de Fevereiro de 2009 a Junho de 2012.Resultados: Dos 25 casos identificados no período do estudo, sete foram eliminados por arquivos incompletos, permanecendo 18 casos para a análise. A média de idade foi de 31,5 anos. Setenta e oito por cento dos doentes eram multíparas, 50% com uma história de dois ou mais partos, 83% com uma cesariana anterior e 78% histerectomizadas, por atonia uterina, na maioria dos casos. A principal indicação para tratamento cirúrgico foi o controlo de danos. Uma doente morreu e uma segunda foi transferida para outra instituição, tendo as demais tido melhoria clínica. Doze doentes (67%) permaneceram menos de 14 dias na Unidade de Cuidados Intensivos Obstétricos e apenas uma precisou de mais de 30 dias na unidade.Conclusão: A bolsa MALA pode oferecer uma opção económica e eficaz para a gestão cirúrgica abdominal aberta, bem como umatécnica de drenagem.

  8. Moire interferometry with increased sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bongtae; Post, Daniel

    The basic sensitivity of moire interferometry was increased beyond the previously conceived theoretical limit. This was accomplished by creating the virtual reference grating inside a refractive medium instead of air, thus shortening the wavelength of light. A very compact four-beam moire interferometer in a refractive medium was developed for microscopic viewing, which produced a basic sensitivity of 208 nm per fringe order, corresponding to moire with 4800 lines per mm. Its configuration made it inherently stable and relatively insensitive to environmental disturbances. An optical microscope was employed as the image recording system to obtain high spatial resolution. The method was demonstrated for deformation of a thick graphite/epoxy composite at the 0/90 deg ply interface.

  9. Recording materials for holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichine, Mikhail V.; Skokov, Gleb R.; Ratcliffe, David B.; Kumonko, Petr I.; Sazonov, Yury A.

    1999-08-01

    We present a general review of our current recording materials suitable for laser interferometry applications. The review will cover fine-grain Silver-Halide materials sensitive to the red (PFG-01) and green (VRP-M) spectral ranges. These products have characteristics very similar to the old Agfa products 8E75 and 8E56. Additionally ultra-fine grain red-sensitive and panchromatic Silver-Halide materials will be covered as well as products based on dichromated gelatin. In each case detailed characteristics of each emulsion type will be presented and recommended processing schemes will be discussed in the context of both Pulsed and CW radiation sources. The choice of commercially available substrate and material dimensions will be mentioned.

  10. Probing atmospheric structure with infrasonic ambient noise interferometry (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Evers, L. G.; Fricke, J.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient noise interferometry attempts to reconstruct the impulse response of a linear system undergoing excitations by a random forcing. The method has proven to be quite general, finding applications in diverse fields such as ultrasonics, helioseismology, regional and global seismology, ocean acoustics, and exploration seismology. Due to the pervasive random forcing of microbaroms, the study of atmospheric infrasound can benefit from approaches developed in the field of interferometry as well. Moreover, continuous noise sources, such as microbaroms, provide a means to quantify the strong time-dependent changes inherent in the structure of the atmosphere. For pairs of infrasonic sensors separated by distances between 1 and 15 km, direct arrivals have been observed in long-time correlations of ambient noise from stations within 3 different networks: the network operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the I53US array, and the Utah 07 experiment. As in seismic ambient noise studies, these interferometric arrivals show dispersive properties characteristic of guided wave propagation. As a result, infrasonic ambient noise interferometry can provide information on the gross structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. At Fourpeaked Volcano, Alaska, a surface-based temperature inversion produced a strong waveguide between two infrasound sensors. The propagation time of the interferometric arrivals shifted over the course of several days in close correspondence with regional temperature trends at nearby meteorological stations. Independent ECMWF data confirms the existence of a temperature inversion during this time period. Analysis of 4 infrasound sensors near Park City, Utah, further demonstrates the ability of infrasonic ambient noise interferometry to retrieve guided waves between stations separated by 5 to 10 km. Among the 4 stations, we observe strong interferometric arrivals on different station pairs at different times, attesting to variable atmospheric

  11. Fringe Formation in Dual-Hologram Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    A first order geometrical optics treatment of holograms combined with the generation of interference fringes by two point sources is used to describe reference fringe formation in non-diffuse dual-hologram interferometry.

  12. Some applications of holographic interferometry in biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbeni, Jean P. L.

    1992-03-01

    Holographic interferometry is well adapted for the determination of 2D strain fields in osseous structures. The knowledge of those strain fields is important for the understanding of structure behavior such as arthrosis.

  13. The path to interferometry in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Savini, G.; Holland, W.; Absil, O.; Defrère, D.; Spencer, L.; Leisawitz, D.; Rizzo, M.; Juanola-Paramon, R.; Mozurkewich, D.

    2016-08-01

    For over two decades, astronomers have considered the possibilities for interferometry in space. The first of these missions was the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), but that was followed by missions for studying exoplanets (e.g Terrestrial Planet Finder, Darwin), and then far-infrared interferometers (e.g. the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope, the Far-Infrared Interferometer). Unfortunately, following the cancellation of SIM, the future for space-based interferometry has been in doubt, and the interferometric community needs to reevaluate the path forward. While interferometers have strong potential for scientific discovery, there are technological developments still needed, and continued maturation of techniques is important for advocacy to the broader astronomical community. We review the status of several concepts for space-based interferometry, and look for possible synergies between missions oriented towards different science goals.

  14. Advanced interferometry at Carl Zeiss (Summary Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechel, Michael F.

    1992-10-01

    Research at Carl Zeiss has led to some innovative solutions in the field of optical test methods and interferometry. One example is the method of `direct measuring interferometry' (DMI), which was developed to overcome the problems of vibration and air turbulence when testing big astronomical primaries and is now the heart of the Carl Zeiss laser-interferometer DIRECT 100. Since DMI offers real-time capabilities for the wavefront evaluation, a built-in frame-memory can act as an `electronic hologram' and opens very elegant ways for in-situ correction of small residual errors, for easy aspherical testing, a very simple way of two- wavelength-interferometry, or a new discipline of time-resolved interferometry.

  15. Classical Stückelberg interferometry of a nanomechanical two-mode system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitner, Maximilian J.; Ribeiro, Hugo; Kölbl, Johannes; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2016-12-01

    Stückelberg interferometry is a phenomenon that has been well established for quantum-mechanical two-level systems. Here, we present classical two-mode interference of a nanomechanical two-mode system, realizing a classical analog of Stückelberg interferometry. Our experiment relies on the coherent energy exchange between two strongly coupled, high-quality factor nanomechanical resonator modes. Furthermore, we discuss an exact theoretical solution for the double-passage Stückelberg problem by expanding the established finite-time Landau-Zener single-passage solution. For the parameter regime explored in the experiment, we find that the Stückelberg return probability in the classical version of the problem formally coincides with the quantum case, which reveals the analogy of the return probabilities in the quantum-mechanical and the classical version of the problem. This result qualifies classical two-mode systems at large to simulate quantum-mechanical interferometry.

  16. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertarelli, A.; Berthome, E.; Boccone, V.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Charitonidis, N.; Charrondiere, C.; Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N.; Masi, A.; Marques dos Santos, S. D.; Moyret, P.; Peroni, L.; Redaelli, S.; Scapin, M.

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.).

  17. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  18. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts detected by the SIGNE experiment. 1: Correlation between intensity and spectral hardness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargatis, Vincent E.; Liang, Edison P.; Hurley, Kevin C.; Barat, C.; Eveno, E.; Niel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We study the continuum spectral evolution of 16 gamma-ray bursts detected by the Franco-Soviet SIGNE experiment in 1981-1982 by fitting time resolved (0.5 s) spectra in count space with simple thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron models. We find that there is no single characteristic of spectral evolution: we see hard-to-soft, soft-to-hard, luminosity-hardness tracking, and chaotic evolution. We perform correlation studies between instantaneous burst intensity and spectral temperature for seven bursts. While we basically confirm the existence of a correlation between these variables as originally claimed by Golenetskii et al. (1983) we find higher values and a broader range of correlation indices.

  19. Fringe formation in dual-hologram interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W.

    Reference-fringe formation in nondiffuse dual-hologram interferometry is described by combining a first-order geometrical hologram treatment with interference fringes generated by two point sources. The first-order imaging relationships can be used to describe reference-fringe patterns for the geometry of the dual-hologram interferometry. The process can be completed without adjusting the two holograms when the reconstructing wavelength is less than the exposing wavelength, and the process is found to facilitate basic intereferometer adjustments.

  20. Measuring Close Binary Stars with Speckle Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Measuring Close Binary Stars with Speckle Interferometry Keith T. Knox Air Force Research Laboratory ABSTRACT Speckle interferometry...Labeyrie, 1970) is a well-tested and still used method for detecting and measuring binary stars that are closer together than the width of the...orientation of the binary star system (Horch, 1996, Tokovinin, 2010). In this talk, a method for analyzing the fringes in the power spectrum will be

  1. An experimental study of nonclassical effects in two-photon interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junlin

    Two-photon interferometry is a relatively new field with applications ranging from precise measurements of optical phase shifts to fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. In contrast to conventional single-photon interferometry, two-photon interferometry typically involves measuring correlations between two detectors placed in two different output ports of an interferometer. Of particular interest is two-photon interferometry with entangled photon pairs, in which case it is often possible to observe effects that are not possible with classical fields. Because these entanglement effects are becoming increasingly important in Quantum Information Processing (QIP) applications, there is currently a strong need for further exploration of new ideas, basic physics, and experimental techniques of two-photon interferometry. Contained herein are the results of three new two-photon interferometry experiments using entangled photon pairs produced by a Type-I Parametric Down-Conversion (PDC) source. In the first experiment, we demonstrate a new technique for compensating for two-photon interferometer beamsplitter asymmetries by manipulating the polarization degree of freedom in the system. Roughly speaking, projective polarization measurements are used to re-balance the magnitude of various two-photon amplitudes that were made distinguishable by non-ideal refection and transmission coefficients of a key beamsplitter. In the second experiment, we utilize a short coherence-length continuous-wave (CW) PDC pump laser to explore two-photon interferometry in a new intermediate regime between the more familiar extremal cases which use either a long coherence-length CW pump or an ultra-short pulsed pump laser. These results provide new insight into the role of PDC pump coherence in two-photon interferometry. Finally, we use two-photon interferometry to experimentally investigate entangled "photon holes", which is a new form of entanglement that arises from the correlated absence of

  2. Complex amplitude correlation for compensation of large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Svanbro, Angelica; Sjoedahl, Mikael

    2006-12-01

    The use of complex amplitude correlation to compensate for large in-plane motion in digital speckle pattern interferometry is investigated. The result is compared with experiments where digital speckle photography (DSP) is used for compensation. An advantage of using complex amplitude correlation instead of intensity correlation (as in DSP) is that the phase change describing the deformation is retrieved directly from the correlation peak, and there is no need to compensate for the large movement and then use the interferometric algorithms. A discovered drawback of this method is that the correlation values drop quickly if a phase gradient larger than {pi} is present in the subimages used for cross correlation. This means that, for the complex amplitude correlation to be used, the size of the subimages must be well chosen or a third parameter in the cross-correlation algorithm that compensates for the phase variation is needed.Correlation values and wrapped phase maps from the two techniques (intensity and complex amplitude correlation) are presented.

  3. Superheterodyne configuration for two-wavelength interferometry applied to absolute distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Sébastien; Salvadé, Yves; Droz, Nathalie; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    We present a new superheterodyne technique for long-distance measurements by two-wavelength interferometry (TWI). While conventional systems use two acousto-optic modulators to generate two different heterodyne frequencies, here the two frequencies result from synchronized sweeps of optical and radio frequencies. A distributed feedback laser source is injected in an intensity modulator that is driven at the half-wave voltage mode. A radio-frequency signal is applied to this intensity modulator to generate two optical sidebands around the optical carrier. This applied radio frequency consists of a digital ramp between 13 and 15 GHz, with 1 ms duration and with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. Simultaneously, the laser source is frequency modulated by a current modulation that is synchronized on the radio-frequency ramp as well as on a triangle waveform. These two frequency-swept optical signals at the output of the modulator illuminate a Michelson interferometer and create two distinct distance-dependent heterodyne frequencies on the photodetector. The superheterodyne signal is then detected and bandpass filtered to retrieve the absolute distance measurement. Experiments between 1 and 15 m confirm the validity of this new concept, leading to a distance accuracy of +/- 50 microm for a 1 ms acquisition time.

  4. Superheterodyne configuration for two-wavelength interferometry applied to absolute distance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Le Floch, Sebastien; Salvade, Yves; Droz, Nathalie; Mitouassiwou, Rostand; Favre, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    We present a new superheterodyne technique for long-distance measurements by two-wavelength interferometry (TWI). While conventional systems use two acousto-optic modulators to generate two different heterodyne frequencies, here the two frequencies result from synchronized sweeps of optical and radio frequencies. A distributed feedback laser source is injected in an intensity modulator that is driven at the half-wave voltage mode. A radio-frequency signal is applied to this intensity modulator to generate two optical sidebands around the optical carrier. This applied radio frequency consists of a digital ramp between 13 and 15 GHz, with 1 ms duration and with an accuracy of better than 1 ppm. Simultaneously, the laser source is frequency modulated by a current modulation that is synchronized on the radio-frequency ramp as well as on a triangle waveform. These two frequency-swept optical signals at the output of the modulator illuminate a Michelson interferometer and create two distinct distance-dependent heterodyne frequencies on the photodetector. The superheterodyne signal is then detected and bandpass filtered to retrieve the absolute distance measurement. Experiments between 1 and 15 m confirm the validity of this new concept, leading to a distance accuracy of {+-} 50 {mu}m for a 1 ms acquisition time.

  5. The Michelson Interferometry Summer School Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Danner, R.

    2001-05-01

    The Michelson Interferometry Summer Schools exists to support the scientific community in building expertise in optical and infrared long-baseline interferometry. The lectures emphasize the fundamentals of astronomical interferometry, including the engineering and design of interferometers, the astrophysical potential of current and future instruments, and methods of observation, data reduction, and interpretation. The schools engage speakers from the interferometry community both in the United States and overseas, and seek to provide opportunities not only to teach but for students to interact with a broad range of specialists in the field. The schools followed on initially from the Workshop on Optical/IR Interferometry organized by USNO and JPL in 1998, and were then shaped into a cycle of three separate schools from 1999 to 2001 (engineering, astrophysics, data reduction). The current status and future plans for the schools will be described. The schools are funded through NASA's Origins Program and the Space Interferometry mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with additional support from participating groups.

  6. The influence of surgical experience, type of instructions given to patients and patient sex on postoperative pain intensity following lower wisdom tooth surgery.

    PubMed

    Matijević, Marko; Uzarević, Zvonimir; Gvozdić, Vlatka; Mikelić, Valentina Matijević; Leović, Dinko; Macan, Darko

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which the intensity of postoperative pain in the first seven days after lower wisdom tooth extraction is affected by operator experience, patient level of information and patient sex. Postoperative pain intensity after lower wisdom tooth extraction was assessed in 108 patients. Depending on the type of information given to each patient individually, the patients were divided into two groups: test group in which patients were provided with detailed standard written and verbal instructions and control group where patients only received detailed standard written instructions about treatment after surgery. Each of these two groups was divided into three subgroups depending on operator experience. Results of this study showed that the type of information irrespective of being given verbally or not had no effects on postoperative pain intensity, whereas operator experience and patient sex influenced postoperative pain intensity.

  7. Synchrotron Light Interferometry at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks

    2004-07-01

    The hyper-nuclear physics program at JLAB requires an upper limit on the RMS momentum spread of {delta}p/p < 3 x 10{sup -5}. The momentum spread is determined by measuring the beam width at a dispersive location (D {approx} 4m) in the transport line to the experimental halls. Ignoring the epsilon-beta contribution to the intrinsic beam size, this momentum spread corresponds to an upper bound on the beam width of {sigma}{sub beam} < 120 {micro}m. Typical techniques to measure and monitor the beam size are either invasive or do not have the resolution to measure such small beam sizes. Using interferometry of the synchrotron light produced in the dispersive bend, the resolution of the optical system can be made very small. The non-invasive nature of this measurement allows continuous monitoring of the momentum spread. Two synchrotron light interferometers have been built and installed at JLAB, one each in the Hall-A and Hall-C transport lines. The devices operate over a beam current range from 20 {micro}A to 120 {micro}A and have a spatial resolution of 10um. The structure of the interferometers, the experience gained during its installation, beam measurements and momentum spread stability are presented. The dependence of the measured momentum spread on beam current will be presented.

  8. General Relativistic Effects in Atom Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Savas; Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-03-17

    Atom interferometry is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. We begin by explaining the non-relativistic calculation of the phase shift in an atom interferometer and deriving its range of validity. From this we develop a method for calculating the phase shift in general relativity. This formalism is then used to find the relativistic effects in an atom interferometer in a weak gravitational field for application to laboratory tests of general relativity. The potentially testable relativistic effects include the non-linear three-graviton coupling, the gravity of kinetic energy, and the falling of light. We propose experiments, one currently under construction, that could provide a test of the principle of equivalence to 1 part in 10{sup 15} (300 times better than the present limit), and general relativity at the 10% level, with many potential future improvements. We also consider applications to other metrics including the Lense-Thirring effect, the expansion of the universe, and preferred frame and location effects.

  9. Ball bearing measurement with white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Joanna; Han, Sen; Novak, Erik

    2009-06-01

    Requirements on high-performance of ball bearings in terms of the loads they experience and their reliability are increasing as the automotive, aerospace, and power generation industries look to cut costs, reduce emissions, and improve efficiency. Most bearings are evaluated with a stylus profiler or with a bright field scopes or microscopes for form, roughness, and defect classification. Two-dimensional stylus measurements captures only very localized surface profiles unless multiple scans are performed which slow the measurement time unacceptably; this leads to inadequate sampling and sometimes greatly varying results based on location and directionality of the line scan. Bright field microscopes deliver only the lateral information about defects but not their depth, volume or surface roughness. White light interferometry can be very successfully utilized in the measurement of full field form, roughness and defect detection and is gaining adoption. They provide rapid, accurate, three-dimensional imaging compatible with the newly developed ISO 3D surface parameters which are expected to rapidly displace traditional 2D metrics. These surface parameters allow for better characterization of surface structure and better understanding of the production process and bearing and race wear. New 3D filtering techniques allow effective separation of form, waviness, and roughness for highly accurate and repeatable bearing qualification.

  10. Application of Phase Shifted, Laser Feedback Interferometry to Fluid Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovryn, Ben; Eppell, Steven J.; Andrews, James H.; Khaydarov, John

    1996-01-01

    We have combined the principles of phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) and laser-feedback interferometry (LFI) to produce a new instrument that can measure both optical path length (OPL) changes and discern sample reflectivity variations. In LFI, coherent feedback of the incident light either reflected directly from a surface or reflected after transmission through a region of interest will modulate the output intensity of the laser. LFI can yield a high signal-to-noise ratio even for low reflectivity samples. By combining PSI and LFI, we have produced a robust instrument, based upon a HeNe laser, with high dynamic range that can be used to measure either static (dc) or oscillatory changes along the optical path. As with other forms of interferometry, large changes in OPL require phase unwrapping. Conversely, small phase changes are limited by the fraction of a fringe that can be measured. We introduce the phase shifts with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) and use either the Carre or Hariharan algorithms to determine the phase and visibility. We have determined the accuracy and precision of our technique by measuring both the bending of a cantilevered piezoelectric bimorph and linear ramps to the EOM. Using PSI, sub-nanometer displacements can be measured. We have combined our interferometer with a commercial microscope and scanning piezoelectric stage and have measured the variation in OPL and visibility for drops of PDMS (silicone oil) on coated single crystal silicon. Our measurement of the static contact angle agrees with the value of 68 deg stated in the literature.

  11. Progress in electron- and ion-interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselbach, Franz

    2010-01-01

    In the 1970s the prominent goal was to overcome the limitations of electron microscopy caused by aberrations of electron lenses by the development of electron holography. In the meantime this problem has been solved, not only in the roundabout way of holography, but directly by correcting the aberrations of the lenses. Nevertheless, many quantitative electron microscopical measurement methods—e.g. mapping and visualization of electric and magnetic fields—were developed within the context of holography and have become fields of their own. In this review we focus on less popular electron interferometric experiments which complement the field of electron holography. The paper is organized as follows. After a short sketch of the development of electron biprism interferometry after its invention in 1954, recent advances in technology are discussed that made electron biprism interferometry an indispensable tool for solving fundamental and applied questions in physics: the development and preparation of conventional and single-atom field electron and field ion sources with their extraordinary properties. Single- and few-atom sources exhibit spectacular features: their brightness at 100 keV exceeds that of conventional field emitters by two orders in magnitude. Due to the extremely small aberrations of diode field emitter extraction optics, the virtual source size of single-atom tips is on the order of 0.2 nm. As a consequence it illuminates an area 7 cm in diameter on a screen at a distance of 15 cm coherently. Projection electron micrographs taken with these sources reach spatial resolutions of atomic dimensions and in-line holograms are—due to the absence of lenses with their aberrations—not blurred. Their reconstruction is straightforward. By addition of a carbon nanotube biprism into the beam path of a projection microscope a lensless electron interferometer has been realized. In extremely ultrahigh vacuum systems flicker noise is practically absent in the new

  12. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. BETTII uses a double-Fourier Michelson interferometer to simultaneously obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets; the long baseline provides subarcsecond angular resolution, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. Here, we present key aspects of the overall design of the mission and provide an overview of the current status of the project. We also discuss briefly the implications of this experiment for future space-based far-infrared interferometers.

  13. Application of digital phase-shift holographic interferometry to weak shock waves propagating at Mach 1.007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukaki, Toshiharu

    2010-02-01

    Digital phase-shift holographic interferometry was applied to visualize weak shock waves and related phenomena quantitatively. This method of interferometry is an improved version of double-exposure holographic interferometry using digital image processing and a phase shift method. The obtained interferograms were analyzed using the Carré method. To evaluate the applicability of the interferometry to quantitatively visualize the phenomena, density profiles behind weak spherical shock waves generated with 500 μg of silver azide were examined. The results of the numerical analysis performed with the hydrocode AUTODYN were compared with those of the experiment. The Mach number of visualized shock waves was estimated to be 1.007 ± 0.001 at the pressure transducer near the test section. At the shock fronts, the density difference between the experimental and numerical results was within 0.3%.

  14. Experimental investigation of micromechanical behavior of advanced materials by moiré interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Xinlin; Qin, Yuwen; Dai, Fulong

    1996-09-01

    Several typical instances show that moiré interferometry is an effective experimental method for micromechanics study of advanced materials. By using moiré interferometry, stress-induced martensitic transformation plastic zone in ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline ceramics (Ce-TZP) is studied. The experimental results show that the stress-induced transformation at room temperature is not uniform within the transformation zone and the phenomenon of microscopic plastic flow localization for transformation is revealed. Meanwhile, the experimental investigation of the pseudoelasticity behavior of Cu-Zn-Al polycrystalline shape memory alloy and bending behavior of carbon-fiber aluminium laminates (CALL) are reported. The experiments reveal some important features of the deformation processes of the materials. Finally, the measuring ability of moiré interferometry for micromechanics study is discussed.

  15. The real-time display of interferometry data for Goldstone radar astronomy data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    A method for visualizing radar interferometry data in real time has been developed for the Goldstone radar astronomy ranging data-acquisition system. The presentation is similar in appearance to a vector field display or data-based grid. This form was selected to facilitate the recognition of characteristic patterns of local variation in the phase and magnitude of complex elements in a two-dimensional data array. The design emphasized efficiency under the demands of real-time processing and remote monitoring. The interferometry 'phase-magnitude' presentation, as it has come to be called, has been used to monitor radar interferometry experiments on three targets, beginning with the asteroid 4179 Toutatis, and continuing with Mars and Mercury.

  16. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  17. Stitching interferometry of aspherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haensel, Thomas; Nickel, Andreas; Schindler, Axel

    2001-12-01

    Sub-aperture stitching interferometry (SASI) is an appropriate method to measure either large optical plane surface topologies or aspheres with strong deviation from the flatness with standard interferometers. Using SASI the surface shape is measured with a higher lateral resolution by multiple adjacent sub-aperture measurements with a sufficient overlap of the neighboring areas. In a second step, the total surface shape is composed with the help of a computer code by stitching the sub-aperture areas together. The overlap areas allow fitting. By means of a regression analysis, tilt and vertical displacement of adjacent areas are calculated and minimized. A confidence band calculated using a MATLAB based code describes the accuracy of the composition. The variance of this estimation is inverse proportional to the peak to valley value (PV) of the measured area and decreases with a 10-3 scaling of the width of the overlapping area. A statistical experimental design method is used to minimize the number of sub-apertures to be measured. The accuracy of the stitched total surface measurement can be increased with the help of model calculations by optimizing (i) the position of the sub-aperture, which was regarded as a standard, and (ii) the sequence of the stitched adjacent areas.

  18. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  19. Precision optical interferometry in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    POINTS, an astrometric Optical interferometer with a nominal measurement accuracy of 5 microarcseconds for the angle between a pair of stars separated by about 90 deg, is presently under consideration by two divisions of NASA-OSSA. It will be a powerful new multi-disciplinary tool for astronomical research. If chosen as the TOPS-1 (Toward Other Planetary Systems) instrument by the Solar-System Exploration Division, it will perform a definitive search for extra-solar planetary systems, either finding and characterizing a large number of them or showing that they are far less numerous than now believed. If chosen as the AIM (Astrometric Interferometry Mission) by the Astrophysics Division, POINTS will open new areas of astrophysical research and change the nature of the questions being asked in some old areas. In either case. it will be the first of a new class of powerful instruments in space and will prove the technology for the larger members of that class to follow. Based on a preliminary indication of the observational needs of the two missions, we find that a single POINTS mission will meet the science objectives of both TOPS-1 and AIM. The instrument detects dispersed fringe (channel led spectrum) and therefore can tolerate large pointing errors.

  20. KERNEL PHASE IN FIZEAU INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Martinache, Frantz

    2010-11-20

    The detection of high contrast companions at small angular separation appears feasible in conventional direct images using the self-calibration properties of interferometric observable quantities. The friendly notion of closure phase, which is key to the recent observational successes of non-redundant aperture masking interferometry used with adaptive optics, appears to be one example of a wide family of observable quantities that are not contaminated by phase noise. In the high-Strehl regime, soon to be available thanks to the coming generation of extreme adaptive optics systems on ground-based telescopes, and already available from space, closure phase like information can be extracted from any direct image, even taken with a redundant aperture. These new phase-noise immune observable quantities, called kernel phases, are determined a priori from the knowledge of the geometry of the pupil only. Re-analysis of archive data acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS instrument using this new kernel-phase algorithm demonstrates the power of the method as it clearly detects and locates with milliarcsecond precision a known companion to a star at angular separation less than the diffraction limit.

  1. Optical Biosensing: Kinetics of Protein A-IGG Binding Using Biolayer Interferometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jo Leanna; Scott, Israel M.; McMurry, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment has been developed using biolayer interferometry (BLI), an optical biosensing technique similar to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), in which students obtain and analyze kinetic data for a protein-protein interaction. Optical biosensing is a technique of choice to determine kinetic and affinity…

  2. Simulating intracrater ash recycling during mid-intensity explosive activity: high temperature laboratory experiments on natural basaltic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pichavant, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Direct observations of mid-intensity eruptions, in which a huge amount of ash is generated, indicate that ash recycling is quite common. The recognition of juvenile vs. recycled fragments is not straightforward, and no unequivocal, widely accepted criteria exist to support this. The presence of recycled glassy fragments can hide primary magmatic information, introducing bias in the interpretations of the ongoing magmatic and volcanic activity. High temperature experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure on natural samples to investigate the effects of reheating on morphology, texture and composition of volcanic ash. Experiments simulate the transformation of juvenile glassy fragments that, falling into the crater or in the upper part of the conduit, are recycled by following explosions. Textural and compositional modifications obtained in laboratory are compared with similar features observed in natural samples in order to identify some main general criteria to be used for the discrimination of recycled material. Experiments were carried out on tephra produced during Strombolian activity, fire fountains and continuous ash emission at Etna, Stromboli and Vesuvius. Coarse glassy clasts were crushed in a nylon mortar in order to create an artificial ash, and then sieved to select the size interval of 1-0.71 mm. Ash shards were put in a sealed or open quartz tube, in order to prevent or to reproduce effects of air oxidation. The tube was suspended in a HT furnace at INGV-Pisa and kept at different temperatures (up to to 1110°C) for increasing time (0.5-12 hours). Preliminary experiments were also performed under gas flux conditions. Optical and electron microscope observations indicate that high temperature and exposure to the air induce large modifications on clast surface, ranging from change in color, to incipient plastic deformation till complete sintering. Significant change in color of clasts is strictly related to the presence of air, irrespective of

  3. The Intense Microwave Prototype (IMP) free electron laser, 140 gigahertz microwave system for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, B.; Ferguson, S. W.

    1991-09-01

    This paper will present the design, construction, and magnetic test results of the Intense Microwave Prototype (IMP) Free Electron Laser and all of the Microwave System special hardware developed for operation as a plasma heating source for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. The test results presented will not include electron beam data for the FEL. Those tests will begin in November 1991. The master oscillator for the FEL is a 140 GHz, 400 kW gyrotron. Microwave power will be transmitted to the entrance to the wiggler by waveguide, miter bends, a waveguide-to-free-space vlasov mode convertor, and aluminum quasi-optical mirrors. The electron beam of approx. 2.5 k amps up to 7.5 MeV, and greater than 10(exp 8) A/ sq m-rad brightness will be introduced colinear with the microwave beam into the FEL. The IMP FEL is tunable and made up to both permanent and electromagnets. It is 5.5 meters long with a 10 cm period between shaped steel pole tips. The electromagnets are water cooled, carry up to 140 amps continuously and can be adjusted to vary the wiggler fields from 600 to 5500 gauss. The spent electron beam will be dumped into a water cooled, lead shielded carbon dump. The microwave pulses, at up to 5 GW power levels, will be transmitted through a series of mirrors to the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. Another swinging mirror will reflect the microwave power into a microwave dump/calorimeter for accelerator and FEL conditioning.

  4. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Tedesco, Marco; deRoo, Roger; England, Anthony W.; Gu, Hao-Yu; Pham, Hanh; Boprie, David; Graf, Tobias; Koike, Toshio; Armstrong, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8 ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3& Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (Feb., 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan s Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37 GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  5. Local Scale Radiobrightness Modeling During the Intensive Observing Period-4 of the Cold Land Processes Experiment-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; de Roo, R.; England, A. W.; Gu, H.; Pham, H.; Boprie, D.; Graf, T.; Koike, T.; Armstrong, R.; Brodzik, M.; Hardy, J.; Cline, D.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX-1) was designed to provide microwave remote sensing observations and ground truth for studies of snow and frozen ground remote sensing, particularly issues related to scaling. CLPX-1 was conducted in 2002 and 2003 in Colorado, USA. One of the goals of the experiment was to test the capabilities of microwave emission models at different scales. Initial forward model validation work has concentrated on the Local-Scale Observation Site (LSOS), a 0.8~ha study site consisting of open meadows separated by trees where the most detailed measurements were made of snow depth and temperature, density, and grain size profiles. Results obtained in the case of the 3rd Intensive Observing Period (IOP3) period (February, 2003, dry snow) suggest that a model based on Dense Medium Radiative Transfer (DMRT) theory is able to model the recorded brightness temperatures using snow parameters derived from field measurements. This paper focuses on the ability of forward DMRT modelling, combined with snowpack measurements, to reproduce the radiobrightness signatures observed by the University of Michigan's Truck-Mounted Radiometer System (TMRS) at 19 and 37~GHz during the 4th IOP (IOP4) in March, 2003. Unlike in IOP3, conditions during IOP4 include both wet and dry periods, providing a valuable test of DMRT model performance. In addition, a comparison will be made for the one day of coincident observations by the University of Tokyo's Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer-7 (GBMR-7) and the TMRS. The plot-scale study in this paper establishes a baseline of DMRT performance for later studies at successively larger scales. And these scaling studies will help guide the choice of future snow retrieval algorithms and the design of future Cold Lands observing systems.

  6. Peptides and proteins in matter wave interferometry: Challenges and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Ugur; Geyer, Philipp; Mairhofer, Lukas; Brand, Christian; Doerre, Nadine; Rodewald, Jonas; Schaetti, Jonas; Koehler, Valentin; Mayor, Marcel; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in matter wave physics suggest that quantum interferometry with biologically relevant nanomaterials is becoming feasible for amino acids, peptides, proteins and RNA/DNA strands. Quantum interference of biomolecules is interesting as it can mimic Schrödinger's cat states with molecules of high mass, elevated temperature and biological functionality. Additionally, the high internal complexity can give rise to a rich variety of couplings to the environment and new handles for quantitative tests of quantum decoherence. Finally, matter wave interferometers are highly sensitive force sensors and pave the way for quantum-assisted measurements of biomolecular properties in interaction with tailored or biomimetic environments. Recent interferometer concepts such as the Kapitza-Dirac-Talbot-Lau interferometer (KDTLI) or the Optical Time-domain Matter Wave interferometer (OTIMA) have already proven their potential for quantum optics in the mass range beyond 10000 amu and for metrology. Here we show our advances in quantum interferometry with vitamins and peptides and discuss methods of realizing cold, intense and sufficiently slow beams of synthetically tailored or hydrated polypeptides with promising properties for a new generation of quantum optics.

  7. High-intensity static magnetic field exposure devices for in vitro experiments on biopharmaceutical plant factories in aerospace environments.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    Three high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) exposure devices have been designed and realized for application to in vitro experimental research on hairy root cultures, supposed to grow in extreme environments- as those of space aircrafts- for producing biopharmaceutical molecules. The devices allow the exposure at two different levels of induction magnetic (B) field (250 mT and 500 mT) plus sham for blind exposure. The exposure levels can be considered representative of possible B-fields experienced within the habitat of a spacecraft in presence of active magnetic shielding systems. Each device can house a single 85-mm diameter Petri dish. Numerical simulations have been performed to accurately evaluate the B-field distribution in the biological target. Numerical results have been confirmed by measured data, proving that designed setups allows exposure to SMFs with a homogeneity better than 90%. The exposure devices will be employed for experiments scheduled within BIOxTREME research project, funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  8. Frequency-shifted interferometry for fiber-optic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei

    This thesis studies frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI), a useful and versatile technique for fiber-optic sensing. I first present FSI theory by describing practical FSI configurations and discussing the parameters that affect system performance. Then, I demonstrate the capabilities of FSI in fiber-optic sensor multiplexing and high sensitivity chemical analysis. We implemented a cryogenic liquid level sensing system in which an array of 3 fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors was interrogated by FSI. Despite sensors' spectral overlap, FSI is able to separate sensor signals according to their spatial locations and to measure their spectra, from which whether a sensor is in liquid or air can be unambiguously determined. I showed that a broadband source paired with a fast tunable filter can be used in FSI systems as the light source. An array of 9 spectrally overlapping FBGs was successfully measured by such a system, indicating the potential of system cost reduction as well as measurement speed improvement. I invented the the FSI-CRD technique, a highly sensitive FSI-based fiber cavity ring-down (CRD) method capable of deducing minuscule loss change in a fiber cavity from the intensity decay rate of continuous-wave light circulating in the cavity. As a proof-of-principle experiment, I successfully measured the fiber bend loss introduced in the fiber cavity with FSI-CRD, which was found to be 0.172 dB/m at a bend radius of 12.5 mm. We then applied FSI-CRD to evanescent-field sensing. We incorporated fiber tapers as the sensor head in the system and measured the concentration of 1-octyne solutions. A minimum detectable 1-octyne concentration of 0.29% was achieved with measurement sensitivity of 0.0094 dB/% 1-octyne. The same system also accurately detected the concentration change of sodium chloride (NaCl) and glucose solutions. Refractive index sensitivity of 1 dB/RIU with a measurement error of 1x10-4 dB was attined for NaCl solutions. Finally, I proposed a

  9. Measuring subwavelength spatial coherence with plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, Drew; Li, Dongfang; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    Optical interferometry has enabled quantification of the spatial and temporal correlations of electromagnetic fields, which laid the foundations for the theory of optical coherence. Despite significant advances in fundamental theories and applications, the measurement of nanoscale coherence lengths for highly incoherent optical fields has remained elusive. Here, we employ plasmonic interferometry (that is, optical interferometry with surface plasmons) to characterize the spatial degree of coherence of light beams down to subwavelength scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼330 nm for an incident wavelength of 500 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact coherence meter that integrates this method with an image sensor. Precise determination of spatial coherence can advance high-resolution imaging and tomographic schemes, and provide an experimental platform for the development and testing of optical coherence theories at the nanoscale.

  10. Mechanical design control and implementation of a new movable intensity profile beamline monitor for the TRIUMF parity experiment 497

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Thomas C.

    1995-05-01

    Two new movable beam intensity profile monitors have been installed into the TRIUMF Parity Experiment 497 Beamlines. Each unit serves two functions. Firstly, the beam median position, in a plane normal to the beam, is detected by split plate Secondary Emission Monitors. This information is used to lock the beam into the position of the movable monitor to within a few μm's via high band width ferrite core steering magnets operating in tandem in a closed loop servo feedback control system. Secondly, the beam profile and intensity is detected via a multi-wire secondary emission non-movable monitor, where the data provides high precision values regarding centroidal positions and profiles. The centroid position of the beam is statistically determined to an accuracy of ±10 μm from a data record length of 1 second. The design of each device adheres to strict standards of mechanically rigid construction. The split plate SEM accuracy and repeatability is better than 15 μm with an absolute resolution limit of 0.4 μm. Maximum travel is 2 inches in the vertical plane. Since the device is mechanically modular and both degrees of freedom are combined into a single mechanical unit, fast and easy handling is possible for maintenance in radioactive areas. The actuators are dc servo motors with tachometers driven by linear servo power amplifiers. These amplifiers are used in lieu of pulse width modulated amps to eliminate noise produced by the switching circuits. Position sensing is done by variable reluctance type absolute rotary encoders providing 16 bit resolution over the full range of travel. Positioning is done manually using a self centring potentiometer on the control panel that provides a ± velocity command signal to the power amplifiers. This configuration ensures good controllability over a very large range of positioning speeds hence making 0.4 μm incremental positioning possible, as well as, fast relocations over large relative distances. The precision movement

  11. Advances in Small-Telescope Speckle Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David J.

    2016-06-01

    The current revolution in CMOS camera technology has enabled a new generation of small telescope systems targeted at the measurement of close binary systems using the techniques of speckle interferometry and bispectrum analysis. These inexpensive, ultra-sensitive, high resolution cameras are now outperforming CCD technology, and come at a truly affordable price. In addition, dedicated, user-friendly speckle interferometry reduction software has been developed for the amateur, making it easy to perform the otherwise complicated data processing tasks. This talk will address these recent advances in hardware and software, and describe some of the results of the informal amateur-professional collaboration that has formed around them.

  12. Holographic interferometry: A user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, D.

    1993-10-01

    This manual describes the procedures and components necessary to produce a holographic interferogram of a flow field in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. In contrast to classical interferometry, holographic interferometry records the amplitude and phase distribution of a lightwave passing through the flow field at some instant of time. This information can then be reconstructed outside the wind tunnel for visual analysis and digital processing, yielding precise characterizations of aerodynamic phenomena. The reconstruction and subsequent hologram image storage process is discussed, with particular attention paid to the digital image processor and the data reduction technique.

  13. Shear-strain contours from moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, D.; Czarnek, R.; Joh, D.

    1985-01-01

    The development of whole-field contour maps of shear strains gamma (xy), derived from displacement fields obtained by moire interferometry with 2400 lines/mm, is described. The use of mechanical differentiation to obtain cross-derivatives of displacements and the use of graphical additive moire to sum the cross-derivatives are explained. Quantitative analysis in the small-strain domain is possible because of the high sensitivity of moire interferometry. The applicability of this technique is shown by the testing of a short epoxy beam under three-point bending.

  14. Altimetry Using GPS-Reflection/Occultation Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardellach, Estel; DeLaTorre, Manuel; Hajj, George A.; Ao, Chi

    2008-01-01

    A Global Positioning System (GPS)- reflection/occultation interferometry was examined as a means of altimetry of water and ice surfaces in polar regions. In GPS-reflection/occultation interferometry, a GPS receiver aboard a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth is used to determine the temporally varying carrier- phase delay between (1) one component of a signal from a GPS transmitter propagating directly through the atmosphere just as the GPS transmitter falls below the horizon and (2) another component of the same signal, propagating along a slightly different path, reflected at glancing incidence upon the water or ice surface.

  15. Real-time trichromatic holographic interferometry: preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albe, Felix; Bastide, Myriam; Desse, Jean-Michel; Tribillon, Jean-Louis H.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper we relate our preliminary experiments on real- time trichromatic holographic interferometry. For this purpose a CW `white' laser (argon and krypton of Coherent- Radiation, Spectrum model 70) is used. This laser produces about 10 wavelengths. A system consisting of birefringent plates and polarizers allows to select a trichromatic TEM00 triplet: blue line ((lambda) equals 476 nm, 100 mW), green line ((lambda) equals 514 nm, 100 mW) and red line ((lambda) equals 647 nm, 100 mW). In a first stage we recorded a trichromatic reflection hologram with a separate reference beam on a single-layer silver-halide panchromatic plate (PFG 03C). After processing, the hologram is put back into the original recording set-up, as in classical experiments on real-time monochromatic holographic interferometry. So we observe interference fringes between the 3 reconstructed waves and the 3 actual waves. The interference fringes of the phenomenon are observed on a screen and recorded by a video camera at 25 frames per second. A color video film of about 3 minutes of duration is presented. Some examples related to phase objects are presented (hot airflow from a candle, airflow from a hand). The actual results show the possibility of using this technique to study, in real time, aerodynamic wakes and mechanical deformation.

  16. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Stephan T.; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike D.; Herr, Waldemar; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    One of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature is the universality of free fall, stating that the force exerted upon an object due to gravity is independent of its constitution. A precise test of this assumption is the comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry. Since the sensitivity of the measurement is proportional to the square of the propagation time in the interferometer, it can be increased by performing the experiments in microgravity. In order to fully utilize the potential of the experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate as the initial state is necessary, because it is characterized by a small initial size and a low expansion velocity. As a step towards the transfer of such a system into space three sounding rocket missions with atom interferometers are currently being prepared. The launch of the first mission, aimed at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in space and an atom interferometer based on it is planned for 2016 from ESRANGE, Sweden. It will be followed by two more missions that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures and dual-species atom interferometry. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under Grant Number DLR 50 1131-37.

  17. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Malka, G; Nicolaï, Ph; Brambrink, E; Santos, J J; Aléonard, M M; Amthor, K; Audebert, P; Breil, J; Claverie, G; Gerbaux, M; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Méot, V; Morel, P; Scheurer, J N; Tarisien, M; Tikhonchuk, V

    2008-02-01

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  18. Fast electron transport and induced heating in solid targets from rear-side interferometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, G.; Aleonard, M. M.; Claverie, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Scheurer, J. N.; Tarisien, M.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Amthor, K.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.

    2008-02-15

    Fast adiabatic plasma heating of a thin solid target irradiated by a high intensity laser has been observed by an optical fast interferometry diagnostic. It is driven by the hot electron current induced by the laser plasma interaction at the front side of the target. Radial and longitudinal temperature profiles are calculated to reproduce the observed rear-side plasma expansion. The main parameters of the suprathermal electrons (number, temperature, and divergence) have been deduced from these observations.

  19. Moving Target Detection with Along-Track SAR Interferometry. A Theoretical Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    1994). Intensity and Phase Statistics of Multilook Polarimetric and Interfer- ometric SAR Imagery. IEEE Trans. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, GRS-32(5... Multilook Polarimetric Signatures. IEEE Trans. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, GRS-32(3), 562-574. 4. Gierull, C.H. (July 2001). Statistics of SAR ...Along-Track SAR Interferometry A Theoretical Analysis Christoph H. Gierull DISTRIBUTION STATEMENTA Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited

  20. Experimental Investigation of Textile Composite Materials Using Moire Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The viability as an efficient aircraft material of advanced textile composites is currently being addressed in the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. One of the expected milestones of the program is to develop standard test methods for these complex material systems. Current test methods for laminated composites may not be optimum for textile composites, since the architecture of the textile induces nonuniform deformation characteristics on the scale of the smallest repeating unit of the architecture. The smallest repeating unit, also called the unit cell, is often larger than the strain gages used for testing of tape composites. As a result, extending laminated composite test practices to textiles can often lead to pronounced scatter in material property measurements. It has been speculated that the fiber architectures produce significant surface strain nonuniformities, however, the magnitudes were not well understood. Moire interferometry, characterized by full-field information, high displacement sensitivity, and high spatial resolution, is well suited to document the surface strain on textile composites. Studies at the NASA Langley Research Center on a variety of textile architectures including 2-D braids and 3-D weaves, has evidenced the merits of using moire interferometry to guide in test method development for textile composites. Moire was used to support tensile testing by validating instrumentation practices and documenting damage mechanisms. It was used to validate shear test methods by mapping the full-field deformation of shear specimens. Moire was used to validate open hole tension experiments to determine the strain concentration and compare then to numeric predictions. It was used for through-the-thickness tensile strength test method development, to verify capabilities for testing of both 2-D and 3-D material systems. For all of these examples, moire interferometry provided vision so that test methods could be developed with less

  1. Importance of Radiation Oncologist Experience Among Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Xu, Beibei; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Mell, Loren K.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Over the past decade, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has replaced conventional radiation techniques in the management of head-and-neck cancers (HNCs). We conducted this population-based study to evaluate the influence of radiation oncologist experience on outcomes in patients with HNC treated with IMRT compared with patients with HNC treated with conventional radiation therapy. Methods We identified radiation providers from Medicare claims of 6,212 Medicare beneficiaries with HNC treated between 2000 and 2009. We analyzed the impact of provider volume on all-cause mortality, HNC mortality, and toxicity end points after treatment with either conventional radiation therapy or IMRT. All analyses were performed by using either multivariable Cox proportional hazards or Fine-Gray regression models controlling for potential confounding variables. Results Among patients treated with conventional radiation, we found no significant relationship between provider volume and patient survival or any toxicity end point. Among patients receiving IMRT, those treated by higher-volume radiation oncologists had improved survival compared with those treated by low-volume providers. The risk of all-cause mortality decreased by 21% for every additional five patients treated per provider per year (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.94). Patients treated with IMRT by higher-volume providers had decreased HNC-specific mortality (subdistribution HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.91) and decreased risk of aspiration pneumonia (subdistribution HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.99). Conclusion Patients receiving IMRT for HNC had improved outcomes when treated by higher-volume providers. These findings will better inform patients and providers when making decisions about treatment, and emphasize the critical importance of high-quality radiation therapy for optimal treatment of HNC. PMID:26729432

  2. [High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU): our experience in the treatment of prostate cancer relapsing after radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Giovanessi, Luca; Peroni, Angelo; Mirabella, Giuseppe; Fugini, Andrea Vismara; Zani, Danilo; Cunico, Sergio Cosciani; Simeone, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment in patients with local prostate cancer recurrence after radiotherapy. From February 2009 to June 2010, 14 patients with prostate cancer recurrence after radiotherapy were selected for HIFU treatment; all patients had a positive TRUS-guided biopsy and the absence of distant metastases was confirmed by computer tomography, PET choline or bone scintigraphy. We classified all patients in 3 groups using D'Amico's classification: 4 patients high risk (PSA >20 ng/ml - 8≤ Gleason Score≤ 10 - clinical stage≥T2c), 8 patients intermediate risk (10 PSAnadir+1.2ng/ml) or after adjuvant therapy introduction. All complications were recorded. Of the 14 patients selected, 12 patients underwent HIFU treatments; 2 patients were excluded because of rectal strictures induced by radiotherapy. At a mean 13 months' follow-up, biochemical success rate was obtained in 1 of the high risk patients and in 5 of the low and intermediate risk patients; 1 man died for a disease not correlated with prostate cancer recurrence. Complications included urinary tract infection, acute urinary retentions, urethral strictures and light stress incontinence. In our experience salvage HIFU is a safe treatment option for local relapse after radiotherapy; its efficacy depends on a careful patient selection.

  3. Adaptive Planning in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancers: Single-Institution Experience and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H.; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Ahn, Andrew I.; Hong, Linda; Scripes, Paola G.; Shen Jin; Lee, Chen-Chiao; Miller, Ekeni; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Anatomic changes and positional variability during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer can lead to clinically significant dosimetric changes. We report our single-institution experience using an adaptive protocol and correlate these changes with anatomic and positional changes during treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head and neck IMRT patients underwent serial computed tomography (CT) scans during their radiation course. After undergoing the planning CT scan, patients underwent planned rescans at 11, 22, and 33 fractions; a total of 89 scans with 129 unique CT plan combinations were thus analyzed. Positional variability and anatomic changes during treatment were correlated with changes in dosimetric parameters to target and avoidance structures between planning CT and subsequent scans. Results: A total of 15/23 patients (65%) benefited from adaptive planning, either due to inadequate dose to gross disease or to increased dose to organs at risk. Significant differences in primary and nodal targets (planning target volume, gross tumor volume, and clinical tumor volume), parotid, and spinal cord dosimetric parameters were noted throughout the treatment. Correlations were established between these dosimetric changes and weight loss, fraction number, multiple skin separations, and change in position of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine. Conclusions: Variations in patient positioning and anatomy changes during IMRT for head and neck cancer can affect dosimetric parameters and have wide-ranging clinical implications. The interplay between random positional variability and gradual anatomic changes requires careful clinical monitoring and frequent use of CT- based image-guided radiation therapy, which should determine variations necessitating new plans.

  4. Estimation of nonclassical independent Gaussian processes by classical interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, László; Filip, Radim

    2017-01-01

    We propose classical interferometry with low-intensity thermal radiation for the estimation of nonclassical independent Gaussian processes in material samples. We generally determine the mean square error of the phase-independent parameters of an unknown Gaussian process, considering a noisy source of radiation the phase of which is not locked to the pump of the process. We verify the sufficiency of passive optical elements in the interferometer, active optical elements do not improve the quality of the estimation. We also prove the robustness of the method against the noise and loss in both interferometric channels and the sample. The proposed method is suitable even for the case when a source of radiation sufficient for homodyne detection is not available. PMID:28051094

  5. Radio interferometry: Techniques for Geodesy. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Progress in the development and application of radio interferometry as a tool for geophysical research is reported and discussed. Among the topics reviewed are: Surveys of is the Seventies, Movements, Terrestrial and Celestial, Degrees Kelvin and Degrees of Phase, the Mark 3 VLBI System, Waves of the Future and other Emissions, and Adherence and Coherence in Networks, and Plans.

  6. Multiple Beam Interferometry in Elementary Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolansky, S.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses a relatively simple technique for demonstrating multiple beam interferometry. The technique can be applied to measuring (1) radii of curvature of lenses, (2) surface finish of glass, and (3) differential phase change on reflection. Microtopographies, modulated fringe systems and opaque objects may also be observed by this technique.…

  7. SAR Interferometry with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, M.; Runge, H.; Boerner, E.; Bamler, R.; Adam, N.; Schättler, B.; Breit, H.; Suchandt, S.

    2004-06-01

    The TerraSAR-X project is a public private partnership between Astrium GmbH and the German Aerospace Center DLR. Astrium will launch the satellite in late 2005 and holds the rights of commercial data exploitation. DLR is currently developing the ground segment and is responsible for the scientific exploitation of the data. Even if the mission goal is not primarily SAR interferometry, TerraSAR-X offers a number of new perspectives to SAR interferometry when compared to ERS and also ENVISAT: a) High resolution of 3 meters and better in stripmap and spotlight mode. b) The option for a burst synchronized ScanSAR mode. c) The high range bandwidth will allow large baselines and the option for highly precise DEM generation. d) X- Band will show new scattering properties. e) High observation frequency due to the short repeat cycle and variable incidence angles. f) An along track interferometric mode. The available products relevant for interferometry are presented and other relevant topics like orbit control and delta-k interferometry are discussed.

  8. Detection of deoxynivalenol using biolayer interferometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biolayer interferometry allows for the real time monitoring of the interactions between molecules without the need for reagents with enzymatic, fluorescent, or radioactive labels. The technology is based upon the changes in interference pattern of light reflected from the surface of an optical fiber...

  9. Astrometric Speckle Interferometry for the Amateur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nils; Argyle, R. W.

    Today's amateur astronomer has access to technology and reference information that one could barely imagine even just a decade ago. The march of technology has made electronics and computers both more sophisticated and cheaper, encouraging the savvy amateur to try an astronomical technique not usually thought of as being in the amateur arsenal, speckle interferometry.

  10. Piston measurement by quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Soazic; Rouyer, Claude; Marre, Gabrielle; Blanchot, Nathalie; Montant, Sébastien; Wattellier, Benoit

    2006-09-01

    We present what is to our knowledge a new method for measuring the relative piston between two independent beams separated by a physical gap, typical of petawatt facilities. The feasibility of this measurement, based on quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry, has been demonstrated experimentally: piston has been measured with accuracy and sensitivity better than 50 nm.

  11. JERS SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Tazio; Wegmüller, Urs; Werner, Charles; Wiesmann, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the potential of L-Band repeat-pass differential SAR interferometry for land subsidence monitoring is evaluated using JERS SAR data. Bologna, Mexico City and the Ruhrgebiet were selected as application sites representing slow to fast deformation velocities. The investigation includes feasibility aspects as the data availability, the temporal decorrelation over different landcover classes and the range of useful spatial baselines, an analysis of the achieved deformation accuracy and considerations on the complementarity to ERS SAR interferometry and levelling surveys. In spite of the rather limited data availability, land subsidence maps could be generated for the three selected application sites. Unlike with ERS C-Band SAR data, JERS L-Band interferometry permitted to retrieve subsidence values also over vegetated areas and forest when using interferograms of less than one year acquisition time interval and short baseline. In addition, the longer L-Band wavelength was found to be superior in the case of large deformation gradients that lead to phase unwrapping problems in C-Band interferometry.

  12. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Stanton, Philip L.; Sweatt, William C.; Crump, Jr., O. B.; Bonzon, Lloyd L.

    1993-09-14

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center experience

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda, Fernando F. de; Puri, Dev R.; Zhung, Joanne; Narayana, Ashwatha; Wolden, Suzanne; Hunt, Margie; Stambuk, Hilda; Pfister, David; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Lee, Nancy Y. . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To review the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's experience in using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and June 2004, 50 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the oropharynx underwent IMRT at our institution. There were 40 men and 10 women with a median age of 56 years (range, 28-78 years). The disease was Stage I in 1 patient (2%), Stage II in 3 patients (6%), Stage III in 7 (14%), and Stage IV in 39 (78%). Forty-eight patients (96%) received definitive treatment, and 2 (4%) were treated in the postoperative adjuvant setting. Concurrent chemotherapy was used in 43 patients (86%). Patients were treated using three different IMRT approaches: 76% dose painting, 18% concomitant boost with IMRT in both am and pm deliveries, and 6% concomitant boost with IMRT only in pm delivery. Regardless of the approach, the average prescription dose to the gross tumor planning target volume was 70 Gy, while the average dose delivered to the subclinical volume was 59.4 Gy in the dose painting group and 54 Gy in the concomitant boost group. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding tubes (PEGs) were placed before the beginning of treatment in 84% of the patients. Acute and late toxicity were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Toxicity was also evaluated using subjective criteria such as the presence of esophageal stricture, and the need for PEG usage. The local progression-free, regional progression-free, and distant metastases-free rates, and overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Three patients had persistent locoregional disease after treatment. The 2-year estimates of local progression-free, regional progression-free, distant metastases-free, and overall survival were 98%, 88%, 84%, and 98%, respectively. The worst acute mucositis experienced was Grade 1

  14. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverburg, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The comparatively low spatial resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scales on which mid- to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths. We have proposed a new high altitude balloon experiment, the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII). High altitude operation makes far-infrared (30- 300micron) observations possible, and BETTII's 8-meter baseline provides unprecedented angular resolution (approx. 0.5 arcsec) in this band. BETTII will use a double-Fourier instrument to simultaneously obtain both spatial and spectral information. The spatially resolved spectroscopy provided by BETTII will address key questions about the nature of disks in young cluster stars and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the groundwork for future space interferometers.

  15. Column CO2 Measurements with Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave Lidar System During the ASCENDS 2014 Summer Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S. A.; Campbell, J. F.; Obland, M. D.; Browell, E. V.; Yang, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of the ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign results of an intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) lidar system operating at 1.57 µm for measurements of column CO2 over a wide variety of geographic regions. The 2007 National Research Council's Decadal Survey of Earth Science and Applications from Space recommended Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term, Tier II, space mission to address global sources, sinks, and transport of atmospheric CO2. As part of the development of a capability for the NASA ASCENDS mission, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Exelis, Inc. have been collaborating to develop, demonstrate and mature the IM-CW lidar approach for measuring atmospheric column CO2 mixing ratios from a space platform using the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar technique with preferential weighting of the CO2 measurements to the mid to lower troposphere. The Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a system developed as a technology demonstrator for the ASCENDS mission, has been used to demonstrate high precision column CO2 retrievals from various aircraft platforms. The MFLL operates using a novel IM-CW IPDA approach to make simultaneous CO2 and O2 column measurements in the 1.57-micron and 1.26-micron spectral regions, respectively, to derive the column-average CO2 dry-air mixing ratios. Measurements from the 2014 summer field experiment focused on advancing CO2 & O2 measurement technologies under day and night conditions in realistic environments, assessing CO2 emissions over large metropolitan areas, observing and evaluating CO2 drawdown and diurnal trends over large agricultural regions, obtaining reflectance data and CO2 & O2 measurements over rough ocean surfaces with high surface wind speeds (~10 m/s), and carrying out CO2 & O2 intercomparisons with OCO-2 and GOSAT over the western United States. Initial results from MFLL for the aforementioned flight campaign

  16. Ultra-sensitive inertial sensors via neutral-atom interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauser, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Upon looking at the various colossal interferometers, etc., discussed at this conference to test gravitational theory, one cannot avoid feeling that easier approaches exist. The use of low velocity, neutral atom matter waves in place of electromagnetic waves in sensitive inertial interferometer configurations is proposed. For applications, spacecraft experiments to sense a drag-free condition, to measure the Lense-Thirring precession, to measure the gravitomagnetic effect and/or the earth's geopotential (depending on altitude), and to detect long period gravitational waves are considered. Also, a terrestrial precision test of the equivalence principle on spin polarized atoms, capable of detecting effects of the 5th force is considered. While the ideas described herein are preliminary, the orders of magnitude are sufficiently tantalizing to warrant further study. Although existing proposed designs may be adequate for some of these experiments, the use of matter-wave interferometry offers reduced complexity and cost, and an absence of cryogenics.

  17. Speckle shearing pattern interferometry to assess mechanical strain in the human mandible jaw bone under physiological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, V.; Vázquez-Vázquez, C.; Gallas, M.; Crespo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) has been used in experiments to measure displacement on the surface of bones undergoing external forces. However in order to asses directly the derivative of the displacements a related technique, Shearography, is used. This technique has been applied in biomechanical experiments although limited to small pieces of bone to determine their elastic properties. In this work we propose the use of Shearing Speckle Interferometry to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of the human mandible under compressive stress, simulating masticatory forces or impacts, in order to analyze the strain distribution on mandibular bone.

  18. Comparison of Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observations in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2015-08-01

    1. In 2013 a suggestion was made by Graham et al. [1] [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 171102 (2013)] of possible GW observations over 10^3 km baselines using strongly forbidden single photon transitions in atoms such as Sr-87. A comparison of the requirements for such a mission with those for laser interferometer missions such as LISA or eLISA with roughly 10^6 km baselines was published in 2014 [Bender, Phys. Rev. D 89, 062004 (2014)]. The comparison will be somewhat updated in this talk.2. Recently, a possible method for gravitational wave observations with atom interferometry over million km scale baselines has been suggested by Hogan and Kasevich [arXiv:1501.06797v1 (2015)]. As an example, they consider observations similar to those discussed in [1], but over a 2*10^6 km baseline. The atomic transitions in the two spacecraft would be driven by separate lasers that are phase locked using 1 W laser power and 30 cm diam. telescopes. Total observation times for individual clouds of 80 to 320 s are assumed, along with 50 concurrent interferometers and a 60 Hz Rabi frequency for the laser pulses.3. After the flight of the LISA Pathfinder mission later this year, it is expected that more intensive work will start on a laser interferometer gravitational wave mission. Probably the most important objective will be the observation of GW signals from the mergers at high redshifts of massive black holes with masses in the range from perhaps 10^4 to 10^7 M_sun. Such signals would give new constraints on the mechanisms for the formation of intermediate mass and larger black holes at early times, and probably contribute to understanding the observed close correlation between the growth of galaxies and of the massive black holes at their centers.

  19. New Developments in Atom Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    interferometers can be applied to a number of experiments in fundamental physics: tests of quantum mechanics such as the Aharonov - Casher effect (6), measurement of...qualitatively new types of experiments involving inertial effects , studies of atomic and molecular properties, tests of basic quantum physics, and may ultimately...laser light as the beam splitters. Atom interferometers will make possible qualitatively new types of experiments involving inertial effects , studies of

  20. Atom Interferometry for Precision Tests of Gravity:. Measurement of G and Test of Newtonian Law at Micrometric Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, A.; Cacciapuoti, L.; de Angelis, M.; Drullinger, R. E.; Ferrari, G.; Lamporesi, G.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2008-09-01

    We describe two experiments where atom interferometry is applied for precision measurements of gravitational effects. In the first, we measure the Newtonian gravitational constant G using an atom interferometry gravity-gradiometer which combines a rubidium fountain, a juggling scheme for fast launch of two atomic clouds, and Raman interferometry. We show that the sensor is able to detect the gravitational field produced by source masses and G is measured with better than 10-2 accuracy. In the second experiment, using ultra-cold strontium atoms in a vertical optical lattice and observing persistent Bloch oscillations for several seconds, we measure gravity acceleration with micrometric spatial resolution. We discuss the prospects for the study of gravitational forces at short distances and show that unexplored regions can be investigated in the search for deviations from Newtonian gravity.

  1. Influence of error sources in speckle interferometry using only two speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Speckle interferometry is an important deformation measurement method for objects with rough surfaces. Recently, a fringe analysis method that uses only one speckle pattern before deformation and one after deformation was proposed. The measurement accuracy of this method is known to depend on experimental conditions. In this paper, the improvement of the measurement accuracy of this method is discussed in comparison with the advanced technologies of off-axis digital holography. It is highly effective to introduce the experiences of the advanced technologies of digital holography to speckle interferometry. However, it should also be considered that both technologies have different purposes. Because digital holography is basically a technology which records images, the influence of the quantity of deformation has never been discussed in digital holography in detail. In this study, the measurement accuracy of speckle interferometry is investigated through a precise comparison of the experimental results from both technologies. It was confirmed that the conditions for digital holography are not always suitable for improving the measurement accuracy of speckle interferometry.

  2. Polarization interferometry for real-time spectroscopic plasmonic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Lauren M.; Mohr, Daniel A.; Johnson, Timothy W.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Lindquist, Nathan C.

    2015-02-01

    We present quantitative, spectroscopic polarization interferometry phase measurements on plasmonic surfaces for sensing applications. By adding a liquid crystal variable wave plate in our beam path, we are able to measure phase shifts due to small refractive index changes on the sensor surface. By scanning in a quick sequence, our technique is extended to demonstrate real-time measurements. While this optical technique is applicable to different sensor geometries--e.g., nanoparticles, nanogratings, or nanoapertures--the plasmonic sensors we use here consist of an ultrasmooth gold layer with buried linear gratings. Using these devices and our phase measurement technique, we calculate a figure of merit that shows improvement over measuring only surface plasmon resonance shifts from a reflected intensity spectrum. To demonstrate the general-purpose versatility of our phase-resolved measurements, we also show numerical simulations with another common device architecture: periodic plasmonic slits. Since our technique inherently measures both the intensity and phase of the reflected or transmitted light simultaneously, quantitative sensor device characterization is possible.We present quantitative, spectroscopic polarization interferometry phase measurements on plasmonic surfaces for sensing applications. By adding a liquid crystal variable wave plate in our beam path, we are able to measure phase shifts due to small refractive index changes on the sensor surface. By scanning in a quick sequence, our technique is extended to demonstrate real-time measurements. While this optical technique is applicable to different sensor geometries--e.g., nanoparticles, nanogratings, or nanoapertures--the plasmonic sensors we use here consist of an ultrasmooth gold layer with buried linear gratings. Using these devices and our phase measurement technique, we calculate a figure of merit that shows improvement over measuring only surface plasmon resonance shifts from a reflected intensity

  3. Relative astrometry of compact flaring structures in Sgr A* with polarimetric very long baseline interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Fish, Vincent L.; Broderick, Avery E.; Wardle, John F. C.; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate that polarimetric interferometry can be used to extract precise spatial information about compact polarized flares of Sgr A*. We show that, for a faint dynamical component, a single interferometric baseline suffices to determine both its polarization and projected displacement from the quiescent intensity centroid. A second baseline enables two-dimensional reconstruction of the displacement, and additional baselines can self-calibrate using the flare, enhancing synthesis imaging of the quiescent emission. We apply this technique to simulated 1.3 mm wavelength observations of a 'hot spot' embedded in a radiatively inefficient accretion disk around Sgr A*. Our results indicate that, even with current sensitivities, polarimetric interferometry with the Event Horizon Telescope can achieve ∼5 μas relative astrometry of compact flaring structures near Sgr A* on timescales of minutes.

  4. Feasibility test of Z{sub eff} imaging using x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru

    2013-11-11

    Elemental imaging using X-ray interferometry has been developed. Since the atomic number (Z) of a single-element sample (effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) for a plural-element sample) corresponds to the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the complex refractive index, an elemental map is calculable with the ratio of an absorption and phase-contrast image. Several metal foils underwent feasibility observations by crystal X-ray interferometry, providing accurate detection of X-ray intensity and phase-shift. The obtained Z{sub eff} image shows that aluminum, iron, nickel, and copper foil were clearly distinguished, and nickel and copper's Z{sub eff} values coincide with ideal Z number within 1%.

  5. Compressive holography reconstruction using phase-shifting interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Chuan; Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Fen; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Quanbing; Wei, Sui

    2015-05-01

    In classical compressive holography (CH), which based on the Gabor holography setup, two nonlinear terms are inherent in the intensity recorded by a 2D detector arrays, the DC term and the squared field term. The DC term (the term at the origin) can be eliminated by filtering the Fourier transform of the interference irradiance measurements using appropriate high-pass filter near the zero frequency. The nonlinearity caused by the squared field term can be neglected and modeled as a error term in the measurement. However, the above assumptions are significantly limited, which yields the degradation of reconstruction quality. In this paper, an novel scheme using phase-shifting method is presented. To accurately recover the complex optical field caused by the propagation of the object, without the influence of the DC term and the squared field term, a very effective method for removing these two terms is introduced. The complex optical field of the 3D object and the complex optical field at the detector plane can be precisely represented by a linear mapping model. The complex optical field at the recorder plane is obtained by phase-shifting interferometry with multiple shots. Then, the corresponded complex optical field at the detector plane can be successfully extracted from multiple captured holograms using conventional four phase-shifting interferometry. From such complex optical field at the record plane, including the amplitude and phase information, the complex optical field of the 3D object can be reconstructed via an optimization procedure. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  6. Develop Prototype Microwave Interferometry Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J. W.; Converse, M. C.; Kane, R. J.

    2016-11-15

    A prototype microwave interferometer was created at NSTec to characterize moving conductive fronts in upcoming experiments. The interferometer is capable of operation in the ~26-40 GHz band, and interrogating fronts with more than 1 W of power.

  7. Kinetic titration series with biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Daniel; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry is a method to analyze protein interactions in real-time. In this study, we illustrate the usefulness to quantitatively analyze high affinity protein ligand interactions employing a kinetic titration series for characterizing the interactions between two pairs of interaction patterns, in particular immunoglobulin G and protein G B1 as well as scFv IC16 and amyloid beta (1-42). Kinetic titration series are commonly used in surface plasmon resonance and involve sequential injections of analyte over a desired concentration range on a single ligand coated sensor chip without waiting for complete dissociation between the injections. We show that applying this method to biolayer interferometry is straightforward and i) circumvents problems in data evaluation caused by unavoidable sensor differences, ii) saves resources and iii) increases throughput if screening a multitude of different analyte/ligand combinations.

  8. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Planetary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Harbeck, D; Lloyd, J

    2005-07-06

    We describe a plan to study the radial velocity of low mass stars and brown dwarfs using a combination of interferometry and multichannel dispersive spectroscopy, Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI). The EDI technology allows implementation of precision velocimetry and spectroscopy on existing moderate-resolution echelle or linear grating spectrograph over their full and simultaneous bandwidth. We intend to add EDI to the new Cornell TripleSpec infrared simultaneous JHK-band spectrograph at the Palomar Observatory 200'' telescope for a science-demonstration program that will allow a unique Doppler-search for planets orbiting low mass faint M, L and T type stars. The throughput advantage of EDI with a moderate resolution spectrograph is critical to achieving the requisite sensitivity for the low luminosity late L and T dwarfs.

  9. Moire interferometry near the theoretical limit.

    PubMed

    Weissman, E M; Post, D

    1982-05-01

    The theoretical upper limit of moire interferometry is approached as the reference grating pitch approaches lambda/2 and its frequency approaches 2/lambda. This work demonstrates the method at 97.6% of the theoretical limit. A virtual reference grating of 4000 lines/mm (101,600 lines/in.) was used in conjunction with a phase type reflection grating of half of that frequency on the specimen. Sensitivity was 0.25 microm/fringe (9.8 microin./fringe). In-plane displacement fringes of excellent definition were obtained throughout the 76 x 51-mm (3 x 2-in.) field of view. They were very closely packed, exhibiting a maximum fringe density of 24 fringes/mm (610 fringes/in.). Effectiveness of moire interferometry near the theoretical limit was proved.

  10. Immersion interferometer for microscopic moire interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Post, D.

    1992-03-01

    The basic sensitivity of moire interferometry has been increased beyond the previously conceived theoretical limit. This is accomplished by creating the virtual reference grating inside a refractive medium instead of air, thus shortening the wavelength of light. Various optical configurations of moire interferometry for operation in a refractive medium are introduced and one of them has been put into current practice. A very compact four-beam immersion interferometer has been developed for microscopic viewing, which produces a basic sensitivity of 4.8 fringes per micron displacement (contour interval of 0.208 micron per fringe order), corresponding to moire with 4800 lines per mm. Its configuration makes it inherently stable and relatively insensitive to environmental disturbances. An optical microscope is employed to obtain high spatial resolution. The method is demonstrated for deformation of a thick graphite/epoxy composite at the 0/90-deg ply interface.

  11. Freeform metrology using subaperture stitching interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supranowitz, Chris; Lormeau, Jean-Pierre; Maloney, Chris; Murphy, Paul; Dumas, Paul

    2016-11-01

    As applications for freeform optics continue to grow, the need for high-precision metrology is becoming more of a necessity. Currently, coordinate measuring machines (CMM) that implement touch probes or optical probes can measure the widest ranges of shapes of freeform optics, but these measurement solutions often lack sufficient lateral resolution and accuracy. Subaperture stitching interferometry (SSI™) extends traditional Fizeau interferometry to provide accurate, high-resolution measurements of flats, spheres, and aspheres, and development is currently on-going to enable measurements of freeform surfaces. We will present recent freeform metrology results, including repeatability and cross-test data. We will also present MRF® polishing results where the stitched data was used as the input "hitmap" to the deterministic polishing process.

  12. Nanoscale optical interferometry with incoherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongfang; Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-02-01

    Optical interferometry has empowered an impressive variety of biosensing and medical imaging techniques. A widely held assumption is that devices based on optical interferometry require coherent light to generate a precise optical signature in response to an analyte. Here we disprove that assumption. By directly embedding light emitters into subwavelength cavities of plasmonic interferometers, we demonstrate coherent generation of surface plasmons even when light with extremely low degrees of spatial and temporal coherence is employed. This surprising finding enables novel sensor designs with cheaper and smaller light sources, and consequently increases accessibility to a variety of analytes, such as biomarkers in physiological fluids, or even airborne nanoparticles. Furthermore, these nanosensors can now be arranged along open detection surfaces, and in dense arrays, accelerating the rate of parallel target screening used in drug discovery, among other high volume and high sensitivity applications.

  13. Nanoscale optical interferometry with incoherent light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongfang; Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Optical interferometry has empowered an impressive variety of biosensing and medical imaging techniques. A widely held assumption is that devices based on optical interferometry require coherent light to generate a precise optical signature in response to an analyte. Here we disprove that assumption. By directly embedding light emitters into subwavelength cavities of plasmonic interferometers, we demonstrate coherent generation of surface plasmons even when light with extremely low degrees of spatial and temporal coherence is employed. This surprising finding enables novel sensor designs with cheaper and smaller light sources, and consequently increases accessibility to a variety of analytes, such as biomarkers in physiological fluids, or even airborne nanoparticles. Furthermore, these nanosensors can now be arranged along open detection surfaces, and in dense arrays, accelerating the rate of parallel target screening used in drug discovery, among other high volume and high sensitivity applications. PMID:26880171

  14. Thermal Strain Analysis using Moire Interferometry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    virtual reference grating of 2400 lines/mm. A four-beam interferometer illustrated if Pig. 3 was used to obtain the U (horizontal) and V (vertical...fields. The basic relationships of moire interferometry are given in the figure. The out-of-plane W displacement field was recorded using a Twyman -Green... Interferometer [2), illustrated in Fig. 4. The 0 order reflection from the specimen grating comprised the information beam; this interfered with a

  15. Interferometry theory for the block 2 processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is the interferometry theory for the Block 2 processor, including a high-level functional description and a discussion of data structure. The analysis covers the major processing steps: cross-correlation, fringe counter-rotation, transformation to the frequency domain, phase calibration, bandwidth synthesis, and extraction of the observables of amplitude, phase, phase rate, and delay. Also included are analyses for fractional bitshift correction, station clock error, ionosphere correction, and effective frequencies for the observables.

  16. The Lindley paradox in optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Camillo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The so-called Lindley paradox is a counterintuitive statistical effect where the Bayesian and frequentist approaches to hypothesis testing give radically different answers, depending on the choice of the prior distribution. In this paper we address the occurrence of the Lindley paradox in optical interferometry and discuss its implications for high-precision measurements. In particular, we focus on phase estimation by Mach-Zehnder interferometers and show how to mitigate the conflict between the two approaches by using suitable priors.

  17. Defect Depth Measurement Using White Light Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Don; Starr, Stan

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the White Light Interferometry project are the following: (1) Demonstrate a small hand-held instrument capable of performing inspections of identified defects on Orbiter outer pane window surfaces. (2) Build and field-test a prototype device using miniaturized optical components. (3) Modify the instrument based on field testing and begin the conversion of the unit to become a certified shop-aid.

  18. Generalised receiver functions and seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetti, Erica; Curtis, Andrew

    2012-04-01

    Classical seismological receiver functions are correlational or deconvolutional combinations of vertical and horizontal component seismometer recordings of earthquake waves that focus information on near-receiver subsurface Earth structure and properties. We show that seismic interferometry can be thought of as a generalisation of receiver functions analysis to cases where recordings at pairs of receivers are considered simultaneously, and where either the same or different component recordings are combined. Further, seismic interferometry uses any of deconvolution, convolution and cross-correlation, and energy from either impulsive or random noise sources. We show both how receiver functions can logically be extended to a new, convolutional form, and that the now little-used correlational form of receiver functions contains more intuitive information than previously realised. Seismic interferometry has provided other extraordinary extensions to seismologists' arsenal. Passive noise recordings can be converted into seismograms from virtual (imagined) earthquakes that in turn can be used to image the real Earth. Active sources (e.g., earthquakes or man-made sources) can be redatumed into new, virtual sources elsewhere, or can be converted into virtual sensors (seismometers) that record seismograms from other real earthquakes, man-made sources or noise sources that occur either in the future or in the past. And the ability to construct virtual sources and sensors at desired times and locations (rather than having to wait for earthquake sources that occur at uncontrollable locations) promises more repeatable monitoring of changes in Earth subsurface properties over time. Indeed, so-called coda wave interferometry offers unprecedented accuracy in detecting such changes. Finally, existing theoretical extensions to other regimes such as electromagnetic, electrokinetic and diffusive energy propagation may lead to future revolutions in other domains of science.

  19. [Central venous catheterization--experiences in neonatal intensive medicine based on scanning electron microscopy study of Silastic catheters].

    PubMed

    Kerstan, J; Lenz, W; el-Hamid, S

    1985-01-01

    This article deals with the use of 56 silastic-catheters in the intensive care of premature and new-born with mean weights of 1550 g according to the Shaw-method. The clinical use with regard to early and late complications was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy of 11 catheters. The results were compared with the complications associated with PVC-catheters. The silastic-catheters has the following advantages: over a longer period it does not lose its mechanical properties, it is athrombogenic and has only few complications regarding infection and thrombosis. Local reactions cannot, however be eliminated. We can extend the use of silastic-catheters by giving blood, drugs and by taking blood samples, by this way intensive care of the new-born is less stressful.

  20. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques have been applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large-scale wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used in the study of two-dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Company DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The excellent agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real-time interferometric data in large-scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the Ames 2 ft x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real-time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results revealed the details of the jet interaction with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  1. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Optical interferometry techniques were applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used to study 2 dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Co. DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real time interferometric data in large scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results reveals the details of the jet interacting with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  2. Holographic interferometry for security and forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambadiyil, Sajan; R. C., Sreelekshmi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Prabhu, Radhakrishna

    2016-10-01

    Security holograms having unique 3D images are one of the tools for enhancing the security for product and personnel authentication and anti-counterfeiting. Apart from the high technology that is required, the uniqueness of a 3D object presents a significant additional threshold for the counterfeiting of such security holograms. But, due to the development of 3D printing technology, the hurdles are disabled and allow the chances of counterfeiting. In order to overcome this, holographic interferometry is effectively utilized and the object is recorded twice before and after the state of random object change. At the time of reconstruction, two signal waves generated simultaneously interfere each other, resulting in a fringe modulation. This fringe modulation in 3D image hologram with respect to the random object change is exploited to generate a rigid and unique anticounterfeit feature. Though holographic interferometry techniques are being widely used for the non-destructive evaluation, the applicability of this technology for the security and forensic activity is less exploited. This paper describes our efforts to introduce holographic interferometry in 3D image holograms for security and forensic applications.

  3. Optical interferometry in fluid dynamics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1987-05-01

    Optical interferometry techniques were applied to the investigation of transonic airfoil flow fields in large wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used to study 2 dimensional symmetric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Co. DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quantitative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and compared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real time interferometric data in large scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the 2 x 2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results reveals the details of the jet interacting with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  4. Optical Interferometry In Fluid Dynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. J.

    1985-06-01

    Optical interferometry techniques have been applied to the investiga-tion of transonic airfoil flow fields in large-scale wind tunnels. Holographic interferometry techniques were used in the study of two-dimensional sym-metric NACA 64A010 and Douglas Aircraft Company DSMA671 supercritical airfoil performance in the NASA Ames 2 ft X2 ft transonic wind tunnel. Quan-titative data obtained from the interferograms were compared to the surface pressure data. The excellent agreement obtained verified the accuracy of the flow visualization and demonstrated the potential for acquiring quantitative scalar results. Measurements of the inviscid flow speed and the boundary layer and wake velocity profiles were extracted from the interferograms and com-pared to laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. These results were also in good agreement. A method for acquiring real-time interferometric data in large-scale facilities was developed. This method, based on the point diffraction interferometer, was successfully tested in the Ames 2 ft X2 ft transonic wind tunnel. The holographic and real-time interferometry methods were applied to the investigations of circulation control airfoils utilizing the Coanda effect. These results revealed the details of the jet interaction with the trailing edge boundary layer and the other parameters affecting the lift augmentation.

  5. Comparing Laser Interferometry and Atom Interferometry Approaches to Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Thorpe, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Thoroughly studied classic space-based gravitational-wave missions concepts such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) are based on laser-interferometry techniques. Ongoing developments in atom-interferometry techniques have spurred recently proposed alternative mission concepts. These different approaches can be understood on a common footing. We present an comparative analysis of how each type of instrument responds to some of the noise sources which may limiting gravitational-wave mission concepts. Sensitivity to laser frequency instability is essentially the same for either approach. Spacecraft acceleration reference stability sensitivities are different, allowing smaller spacecraft separations in the atom interferometry approach, but acceleration noise requirements are nonetheless similar. Each approach has distinct additional measurement noise issues.

  6. Multiwavelength electronic speckle pattern interferometry for surface shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Eduardo A.; Lino, Antonio C. L.

    2007-05-01

    Profilometry by electronic speckle pattern interferometry with multimode diode lasers is both theoretically and experimentally studied. The multiwavelength character of the laser emission provides speckled images covered with interference fringes corresponding to the surface relief in single-exposure processes. For fringe pattern evaluation, variations of the phase-stepping technique are investigated for phase mapping as a function of the number of laser modes. Expressions for two, three, and four modes in four and eight stepping are presented, and the performances of those techniques are compared in the experiments through the surface shaping of a flat bar. The surface analysis of a peach points out the possibility of applying the technique in the quality control of food production and agricultural research.

  7. Bounding quantum-gravity-inspired decoherence using atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minář, Jiří; Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Hypothetical models have been proposed in which explicit collapse mechanisms prevent the superposition principle from holding at large scales. In particular, the model introduced by Ellis et al. [J. Ellis et al., Phys. Lett. B 221, 113 (1989), 10.1016/0370-2693(89)91482-2] suggests that quantum gravity might be responsible for the collapse of the wave function of massive objects in spatial superpositions. We consider here a recent experiment reporting on interferometry with atoms delocalized over half a meter for a time scale of 1 s [T. Kovachy et al., Nature (London) 528, 530 (2015), 10.1038/nature16155] and show that the corresponding data strongly bound quantum-gravity-induced decoherence and rule it out in the parameter regime considered originally.

  8. Ultracold atom interferometry with pulses of variable duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivannikov, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    We offer interferometry models for thermal ensembles with one-body losses and the phenomenological inclusion of perturbations covering most of the thermal atom experiments. A possible extension to the many-body case is briefly discussed. The Ramsey pulses are assumed to have variable durations and the detuning during the pulses is distinguished from the detuning during evolution. Consequently, the pulses are not restricted to resonant operation and give more flexibility to optimize the interferometer to particular experimental conditions. On this basis another model is devised in which the contrast loss due to the unequal one-body population decays is canceled by the application of a nonstandard splitting pulse. For the importance of its practical implications, an analogous spin-echo model is also provided. The developed models are suitable for the analysis of atomic clocks and a broad range of sensing applications; they are particularly useful for trapped-atom interferometers.

  9. Advances and applications of electronic speckle pattern interferometry /ESPI/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokberg, O. J.

    1980-05-01

    The principle of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is explained by means of comparison with conventional holography. Because ESPI image recording and reconstruction are performed by videotechniques, laboratory experiments may be studied through real-time presentations of readily interpretable vibration patterns on a large TV screen, with a new image being formed every 1/25 sec. These properties, combined with the high sensitivity, noncontact, and nondestructive properties of the method, make ESPI a measuring tool uniquely suited for studies of extremely unstable objects. Among examples of applications covered are: the testing of sonar transducers in both air and water, the analysis of loudspeakers, studies of the behavior of piezoelectric transducers, the classification of turbine blade resonances, and the observation of the human eardrum.

  10. A self-tuning phase-shifting algorithm for interferometry.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Julio C; Servin, Manuel; Quiroga, Juan A

    2010-02-01

    In Phase Stepping Interferometry (PSI) an interferogram sequence having a known, and constant phase shift between the interferograms is required. Here we take the case where this constant phase shift is unknown and the only assumption is that the interferograms do have a temporal carrier. To recover the modulating phase from the interferograms, we propose a self-tuning phase-shifting algorithm. Our algorithm estimates the temporal frequency first, and then this knowledge is used to estimate the interesting modulating phase. There are several well known iterative schemes published before, but our approach has the unique advantage of being very fast. Our new temporal carrier, and phase estimator is capable of obtaining a very good approximation of their temporal carrier in a single iteration. Numerical experiments are given to show the performance of this simple yet powerful self-tuning phase shifting algorithm.

  11. Fast white-light interferometry with Hilbert transform evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavliček, Pavel; Mikeska, Erik

    2016-12-01

    White-light interferometry is an established method for the measurement of the shape of objects. Unlike to the classical interferometry, white-light interferometry can measure the shape of objects with rough surface. A major disadvantage of white-light interferometry is the low scanning speed and thus the long measurement time. This disadvantage can be overcome by a strong undersampling and Hilbert transform evaluation. We propose a system that measures the shape of objects with rough surface with the scanning speed of more than 100 μm/s with the standard frame rate of 25 fps. The measurement uncertainty is comparable with that obtained with standard design.

  12. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  13. Proposed rocket experiments to measure the profile and intensity of the solar He1584A resonance line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity and profile of the helium resonance line at 584 A from the entire disc of the sun was investigated using a rocket-borne helium-filled spectrometer and a curve of growth technique. The line profile was found to be accurately represented by a Gaussian profile with full width at half maximum of 122 plus or minus 10m A while the integrated intensity was measured to be (2.6 plus or minus 1.3) x 10 to the 9th power/photons sec sq cm at solar levels of F sub 10.7 = 90.8 x 10 to the minus 22th power/sq m H sub z and R sub z = 27. The measured linewidth is in good agreement with previous spectrographic measurement but the integrated intensity is larger than most previous photoelectric measurements. However, the derived line center flux of (2.0 plus or minus 1.0) x 10 to the 10th power/photons sec sq cm A is in good agreement with values inferred from airglow measurements.

  14. Stokes parameters and polarization contrasts in Young's interference experiment.

    PubMed

    Setälä, Tero; Tervo, Jani; Friberg, Ari T

    2006-07-15

    We derive a spectral interference law that governs the behavior of the four Stokes parameters in Young's two-pinhole experiment with a random electromagnetic beam. In addition to the visibility of intensity fringes, we introduce three new contrast parameters that describe the interference-induced changes in the field's state of partial polarization. The polarization modulation depends on the electric field correlations at the pinholes and is closely related to the two-point Stokes parameters. The results are expected to be particularly useful in polarization interferometry and electromagnetic coherence theory. The formalism is demonstrated with specific examples.

  15. Characterizing transverse coherence of an ultra-intense focused X-ray free-electron laser by an extended Young's experiment.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Shinohara, Yuya; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of transverse coherence is one of the most critical themes for advanced X-ray sources and their applications in many fields of science. However, for hard X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources there is very little knowledge available on their transverse coherence characteristics, despite their extreme importance. This is because the unique characteristics of the sources, such as the ultra-intense nature of XFEL radiation and the shot-by-shot fluctuations in the intensity distribution, make it difficult to apply conventional techniques. Here, an extended Young's interference experiment using a stream of bimodal gold particles is shown to achieve a direct measurement of the modulus of the complex degree of coherence of XFEL pulses. The use of interference patterns from two differently sized particles enables analysis of the transverse coherence on a single-shot basis without a priori knowledge of the instantaneous intensity ratio at the particles. For a focused X-ray spot as small as 1.8 µm (horizontal) × 1.3 µm (vertical) with an ultrahigh intensity that exceeds 10(18) W cm(-2) from the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA), the coherence lengths were estimated to be 1.7 ± 0.2 µm (horizontal) and 1.3 ± 0.1 µm (vertical). The ratios between the coherence lengths and the focused beam sizes are almost the same in the horizontal and vertical directions, indicating that the transverse coherence properties of unfocused XFEL pulses are isotropic. The experiment presented here enables measurements free from radiation damage and will be readily applicable to the analysis of the transverse coherence of ultra-intense nanometre-sized focused XFEL beams.

  16. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry with microbolometer arrays at 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenrijt, Jean-Francois; Georges, Marc P.

    2010-09-20

    Electronic speckle pattern interferometry and digital holographic interferometry are investigated at long infrared wavelengths. Using such wavelengths allows one to extend the measurement range and decrease the sensitivity of the techniques to external perturbations. We discuss the behavior of reflection by the object surfaces due to the long wavelength. We have developed different experimental configurations associating a CO2 laser emitting at 10.6{mu}m and microbolometer arrays. Phase-shifting in-plane and out-of-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and lensless digital holographic interferometry are demonstrated on rotation measurements of a solid object.

  17. Measuring the Dispersion in Laser Cavity Mirrors using White-Light Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    interferometry. This information was used to analyze dispersion in the laser cavity. The goal was to create negative GDD, a condition for soliton-like...high repetition rate and high power. Their motivation was to create an all-solid-state alternative to the large Ti:Sapphire laser [5]. All-solid...experience a delay [14]. This causes the delay of the longer wavelengths needed to create negative GDD. It counters the effect of the crystal and

  18. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) earth physics. [application to radio astronomy and interferometric earth surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the Michelson/Pease stellar interferometer are discussed. An analog of the interferometer using radio waves is described. The use of a conventional hard-wired interferometer with very long base line interferometry (VLBI) is analyzed. Mathematical models are developed to analyze the VLBI techniques. A summary of VLBI geodetic experiments is tabulated. The concept and application of the astronomical radio interferometric earth surveys (ARIES) are reported. A schematic diagram of ARIES implementation is provided.

  19. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Applied to Polar Motion, Relativity and Geodesy. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.

    1978-01-01

    The causes and effects of diurnal polar motion are described. An algorithm is developed for modeling the effects on very long baseline interferometry observables. Five years of radio-frequency very long baseline interferometry data from stations in Massachusetts, California, and Sweden are analyzed for diurnal polar motion. It is found that the effect is larger than predicted by McClure. Corrections to the standard nutation series caused by the deformability of the earth have a significant effect on the estimated diurnal polar motion scaling factor and the post-fit residual scatter. Simulations of high precision very long baseline interferometry experiments taking into account both measurement uncertainty and modeled errors are described.

  20. First Experiences in Intensity Modulated Radiation Surgery at the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery: A Dosimetric Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José M.; Celis-López, Miguel A.

    2003-09-01

    The National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery in Mexico City has acquired a Novalis® shaped beam radiosurgery unit. The institute is pioneer in the use of new technologies for neuroscience. The Novalis® unit allows the use of conformal beam radiosurgery/therapy and the more advanced modality of conformal therapy: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). In the present work we present the first cases of treatments that use the IMRT technique and show its ability to protect organs at risk, such as brainstem and optical vias.

  1. Impact of tillage intensity on carbon and nitrogen pools in surface and subsurface soils of three long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Michael; Piegholdt, Christiane; Andruschkewitsch, Rouven; Linsler, Deborah; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Ludwig, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Management options such as the intensity of tillage are known to influence amount and turnover of soil organic matter. However, less information is available about the influence of the tillage intensity on individual soil organic matter pools of different turnover dynamics analyzed for surface and subsurface soils. We took surface (0-5 cm) and subsurface (5-25 cm) soil samples from no tillage (NT), reduced tillage (RT), and conventional tillage (CT) systems of three long-term field experiments in Germany. The labile, intermediate and stable C and N pool sizes were determined based on the combined application of a decomposition experiment and a physical-chemical separation procedure. For the surface soils, we found higher stocks of the labile C and N pool under NT and RT compared to CT. In case of a change from conventional to no-tillage systems, our results indicate an increase of labile C and N pools for the analyzed agricultural surface soils from 8 to 18% of the organic C and from 10% to 21% of the total N after 19 to 21 years. This timespan should be taken into consideration within the evaluation of potential benefits from an increase in labile OM for nutrient supply and productivity especially within the development of more sustainably managed agro-ecosystems. The reverse effect was observed for the labile C pool in subsurface soils where an increase from 6 to 10% of the organic C with increasing tillage intensity was observed. Such increase might contribute to an improved nutrient supply in subsurface soils under intensive tillage systems. The intermediate C and N pools in the surface and the subsurface soils are with 76 to 84% of the organic C and with 75 to 83% of the total N quantitatively much more important for the OM dynamics than the stable or labile pools. However, only for the surface soils were the stocks of the intermediate N and C pools distinctly larger for NT than for CT. The stocks of the stable C and N pools were not affected by the tillage

  2. On the role of scattering and reverberation in seismic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, Lapo; Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Campillo, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The ensemble-averaged ambient wave field observed on Earth is approximately diffuse, and it is precisely this property that makes ambient-noise interferometry valid within approximation. How close is ambient noise to being exactly diffuse? What features of the Earth (coupling between oceans and solid Earth, scattering by crustal heterogeneities...) contribute to its randomness and complexity? It is necessary to understand the roles of scattering and reverberation, to determine the range of applicability of seismic interferometry. Studies of cross-correlation of late coda in earthquake data, conducted mostly by the Grenoble group, emphasize the contributions of scattering in the interferometric reconstruction of Green functions. Yet, other authors like R. Snieder and co-workers point to the limitations that the presence of a complex (scattering) structure introduces: they have noted, in particular, that although direct surface waves are accurately extracted by interferometry, examples of the reconstruction of scattered waves are still lacking. We analyze the cross-correlations of diffuse flexural waves, generated by an air nozzle shooting compressed air on a 1-square-meter aluminum plate, and recorded by two accelerometers on the plate. Flexural waves are dispersive, thus reproducing one of the main characteristics of surface waves observed on Earth. The aluminum plate is pierced by 500 randomly distributed holes (6mm in diameter) that give rise to scattering. Seismic noise is known to be largely generated by the coupling between atmosphere and solid Earth, and the air-nozzle approach can be seen as a way to reproduce this phenomenon as realistically as possible in a laboratory. We find ensemble-averaged cross-correlations of the so generated diffuse flexural wave field to be strongly symmetric with respect to (causal and anti-causal) time, beyond the direct flexural-wave arrivals; this indicates that the Green function is correctly reconstructed, including

  3. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies.

  4. SAINT-MS1: protein-protein interaction scoring using label-free intensity data in affinity purification-mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungwon; Glatter, Timo; Gstaiger, Mathias; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2012-04-06

    We present a statistical method SAINT-MS1 for scoring protein-protein interactions based on the label-free MS1 intensity data from affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. The method is an extension of Significance Analysis of INTeractome (SAINT), a model-based method previously developed for spectral count data. We reformulated the statistical model for log-transformed intensity data, including adequate treatment of missing observations, that is, interactions identified in some but not all replicate purifications. We demonstrate the performance of SAINT-MS1 using two recently published data sets: a small LTQ-Orbitrap data set with three replicate purifications of single human bait protein and control purifications and a larger drosophila data set targeting insulin receptor/target of rapamycin signaling pathway generated using an LTQ-FT instrument. Using the drosophila data set, we also compare and discuss the performance of SAINT analysis based on spectral count and MS1 intensity data in terms of the recovery of orthologous and literature-curated interactions. Given rapid advances in high mass accuracy instrumentation and intensity-based label-free quantification software, we expect that SAINT-MS1 will become a useful tool allowing improved detection of protein interactions in label-free AP-MS data, especially in the low abundance range.

  5. SAINT-MS1: protein-protein interaction scoring using label-free intensity data in affinity purification – mass spectrometry experiments

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungwon; Glatter, Timo; Gstaiger, Mathias; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical method SAINT-MS1 for scoring protein-protein interactions based on the label-free MS1 intensity data from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments. The method is an extension of Significance Analysis of INTeractome (SAINT), a model-based method previously developed for spectral count data. We reformulated the statistical model for the log-transformed intensity data, including adequate treatment of missing observations, i.e. interactions whose quantitative data are inconsistent over replicate purifications. We demonstrate the performance of SAINT-MS1 using two recently published datasets: a small LTQ-Orbitrap dataset with three replicate purifications of single human bait protein and control purifications, and a larger drosophila dataset targeting insulin receptor/target of rapamycin signaling pathway generated using an LTQ-FT instrument. Using the drosophila dataset, we also compare and discuss the performance of SAINT analysis based on spectral count and MS1 intensity data in terms of the recovery of orthologous and literature-curated interactions. Given rapid advances in high mass accuracy instrumentation and intensity-based label-free quantification software, we expect that SAINT-MS1 will become a useful tool allowing improved detection of protein interactions in label-free AP-MS data, especially in the low abundance range. PMID:22352807

  6. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  7. Development of Phase Detection Schemes Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif A.; Arsad, Norhana; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a novel optical sensing technique with a unique ability to monitor molecular binding in real-time for biological and chemical sensor applications. Interferometry is an excellent tool for accurate measurement of SPR changes, the measurement and comparison is made for the sensitivity, dynamic range and resolution of the different analytes using interferometry techniques. SPR interferometry can also employ phase detection in addition to the amplitude of the reflected light wave, and the phase changes more rapidly compared with other approaches, i.e., intensity, angle and wavelength. Therefore, the SPR phase interferometer offers the advantages of spatial phase resolution and high sensitivity. This work discusses the advancements in interferometric SPR methods to measure the phase shifts due to refractive index changes. The main application areas of SPR sensors are demonstrated, i.e., the Fabry-Perot interferometer, Michelson interferometer and Mach-Zehnder interferometer, with different configurations. The three interferometers are discussed in detail, and solutions are suggested to enhance the performance parameters that will aid in future biological and chemical sensors. PMID:25171117

  8. Label free detection of optogenetically stimulated cellular activity by low coherence interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Batabyal, Subrata; Dave, Digant P.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Detecting cellular activity in sub-millisecond timescale and micrometer resolution without using invasive means has been a long standing goal in the study of cellular networks. Here, we have employed phase sensitive low coherence interferometry for detecting optogenetically stimulated activity of cells. Nanoscale changes in optical path length (due to change in refractive index and changes in cell thickness) occur when cells are activated, which we aim to detect by phase sensitive low coherence interferometry. A low coherence interferometry and patch-clamp electrophysiology systems were integrated with an inverted fluorescence microscope. Blue laser beam was coupled to the electrophysiology-interferometric detection system for optogenetic stimulation. The phase-sensitive measurements were carried out on Channelrhodopsin-2 sensitized cells (identified by YFP fluorescence) as well as control cells in reflection mode for different intensities and exposures of optogenetic stimulation beam. This method offers good temporal and spatial resolution without using exogenous labeling. Results of studies on all optical stimulation and detection of cellular activity will be presented. Interpretation of the optical activity signals will be discussed in context with changes in cell physiology during stimulation. We will also discuss the potential sources of various artifacts in optical/electrical detection of cellular activity during optical stimulation.

  9. Two-dimensional thermal simulations of aluminum and carbon ion strippers for experiments at SPIRAL2 using the highest beam intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Kim, V.; Lamour, E.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Piriz, A. R.; Rozet, J. P.; Stöhlker, Th.; Sultanov, V.; Vernhet, D.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report on two-dimensional numerical simulations of heating of a rotating, wheel shaped target impacted by the full intensity of the ion beam that will be delivered by the SPIRAL2 facility at Caen, France. The purpose of this work is to study heating of solid targets that will be used to strip the fast ions of SPIRAL2 to the required high charge state for the FISIC (Fast Ion-Slow Ion Collision) experiments. Strippers of aluminum with different emissivities and of carbon are exposed to high beam current of different ion species as oxygen, neon and argon. These studies show that carbon, due to its much higher sublimation temperature and much higher emissivity, is more favorable compared to aluminum. For the highest beam intensities, an aluminum stripper does not survive. However, problem of the induced thermal stresses and long term material fatigue needs to be investigated before a final conclusion can be drawn.

  10. Experience with a Simplified Computer Based Intensive Care Monitoring System in the Management of Acutely Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, H. Roger; Rutherford, Harold G.; Smith, Louis L.; Briggs, Burton A.; Neilsen, Ivan R.; Rau, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The need exists for a simplified and ecomonical computer based monitoring system for critically ill surgical patients. Such a system would enjoy widespread use in surgical intensive care units in regional, as well as larger community hospitals. We have assembled such a system which provides digital readout of the usual physiologic parameters, and also provide computer storage of accumulated data for review and evaluation of patient care. The computer provides graphic and digital display and digital printout for subsequent inclusion in the patient records. Most frequent indications for this system include the development of acute respiratory insufficiency or acute circulatory failure due to invasive sepsis and/or severe arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Information most beneficial in patient care included measurement of cardiac output;alveolar arterial oxygen gradient. ImagesFigure 1Figure 5Figure 9Figure 11

  11. Patient safety certification in a Department of Intensive Care Medicine: our experience with standard UNE 179003:2013.

    PubMed

    Merino, P; Bustamante, E; Campillo-Artero, C; Bartual, E; Tuero, G; Marí, J

    2014-01-01

    Systematic and structured methods must be used to ensure that healthcare risks are effectively managed. Spanish standard UNE 179003:2013 provides healthcare organizations with a framework and a systematic protocol for managing patient safety from a clinical and organizational perspective. Furthermore, it is useful in securing an efficient balance among health risk, health outcomes and costs. The UNE 179003:2013 certifies that a clinical service complies with rules and operating procedures aimed at reducing the incidence of adverse events. It also requires mandatory continuous improvement, given that the standard entails frequent monitoring of the risk management system through periodic audits. The aims of this paper are to describe the UNE 179003:2013 certification process in an Intensive Care Unit, propose a risk management program for critical patients, and offer some recommendations regarding its implementation.

  12. rFRET: A comprehensive, Matlab-based program for analyzing intensity-based ratiometric microscopic FRET experiments.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Szöllősi, János

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) remains one of the most widely used methods for assessing protein clustering and conformation. Although it is a method with solid physical foundations, many applications of FRET fall short of providing quantitative results due to inappropriate calibration and controls. This shortcoming is especially valid for microscopy where currently available tools have limited or no capability at all to display parameter distributions or to perform gating. Since users of multiparameter flow cytometry usually apply these tools, the absence of these features in applications developed for microscopic FRET analysis is a significant limitation. Therefore, we developed a graphical user interface-controlled Matlab application for the evaluation of ratiometric, intensity-based microscopic FRET measurements. The program can calculate all the necessary overspill and spectroscopic correction factors and the FRET efficiency and it displays the results on histograms and dot plots. Gating on plots and mask images can be used to limit the calculation to certain parts of the image. It is an important feature of the program that the calculated parameters can be determined by regression methods, maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and from summed intensities in addition to pixel-by-pixel evaluation. The confidence interval of calculated parameters can be estimated using parameter simulations if the approximate average number of detected photons is known. The program is not only user-friendly, but it provides rich output, it gives the user freedom to choose from different calculation modes and it gives insight into the reliability and distribution of the calculated parameters. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. The Failure Patterns of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-University of Iowa Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min . E-mail: min-yao@uiowa.edu; Chang, Kristi; Funk, Gerry F.; Lu Heming; Tan Huaming; Wacha, Judith C; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Buatti, John M.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Determine the failure patterns of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and July 2005, 55 patients with oral cavity SCC were treated with IMRT for curative intent. Forty-nine received postoperative IMRT, 5 definitive IMRT, and 1 neoadjuvant. Three target volumes were defined (clinical target CTV1, CTV2, and CTV3). The failure patterns were determined by coregistration or comparison of the treatment planning computed tomography to the images obtained at the time of recurrence. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 17.1 months (range, 0.27-59.3 months). The median follow-up for living patients was 23.9 months (range, 9.3-59.3 months). Nine patients had locoregional failures: 4 local failures only, 2 regional failures only, and 3 had both local and regional failures. Five patients failed distantly; of these, 3 also had locoregional failures. The 2-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant disease-free survival was 68%, 74%, 85%, 82%, and 89%, respectively. The median time from treatment completion to locoregional recurrence was 4.1 months (range, 3.0-12.1 months). Except for 1 patient who failed in contralateral lower neck outside the radiation field, all failed in areas that had received a high dose of radiation. The locoregional control is strongly correlated with extracapsular extension. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated RT is effective for oral cavity SCC. Most failures are in-field failures. Further clinical studies are necessary to improve the outcomes of patients with high-risk features, particularly for those with extracapsular extension.

  14. Atom Interferometry for Fundamental Physics and Gravity Measurements in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-cooled atoms are used as freefall test masses. The gravitational acceleration on atoms is measured by atom-wave interferometry. The fundamental concept behind atom interferometry is the quantum mechanical particle-wave duality. One can exploit the wave-like nature of atoms to construct an atom interferometer based on matter waves analogous to laser interferometers.

  15. Feasibility of satellite interferometry for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalapillai, S.; Ruck, G. T.; Mourad, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using a satellite borne interferometry system for surveillance, navigation, and traffic control applications was investigated. The evaluation was comprised of: (1) a two part systems analysis (software and hardware); (2) a survey of competitive navigation systems (both experimental and planned); (3) a comparison of their characteristics and capabilities with those of an interferometry system; and (4) a limited survey of potential users to determine the variety of possible applications for the interferometry system and the requirements which it would have to meet. Five candidate or "strawman" interferometry systems for various applications with various capabilities were configured (on a preliminary basis) and were evaluated. It is concluded that interferometry in conjunction with a geostationary satellite has an inherent ability to provide both a means for navigation/position location and communication. It offers a very high potential for meeting a large number of user applications and requirements for navigation and related functions.

  16. TIDs over Tucuman by GPS radio interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Victor

    This paper presents some results investigating the new possibilities of radio interferometry of Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) that are based on exploiting standard measurements of transionospheric radio signal characteristics and coordinate-time measurements using dual-frequency multichannel receivers of the Global Positioning System (GPS). We consider some methods of reconstructing TID characteristics, which were used in classical radio interferometry and can be useful when processing GPS data. Let us consider an interferometer that consist of three receivers, installed at vertexes of triangle on Tucuman (26°49' 00" S ;65°13' 00" W) with sides oriented to the north and east. A Statistical Angle-of-arrival and Doppler Method for GPS radio interferometry is proposed for determining the characteristics of the TIDs dynamics by measuring variations of GPS phase derivatives with respect to time and spatial coordinates. These data are used to calculate corresponding values of the velocity vector, in view of a correction for satellite motions based on the current information available regarding the angular coordinates of the satellites. Our findings show that : a) We learnt that Gravity Waves (GW) can be measured with a system of 3 closely located GPS receivers, b) It is possible to detect the angle of arrival, velocity, and period of the GWs, c) Attention has to be paid to cases when there are TEC depletions as they can be mistaken by GWs, d) To avoid a false detection is possible to use a spectral analysis that will help us differentiate between perturbations that are moving with different velocities.

  17. Report on ''European Radio Interferometry School 2015''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, R.; Richards, A.

    2016-03-01

    The sixth European Interferometry School (ERIS2015) was held at ESO for the first time. As usual the school was aimed at graduate students and early-career postdocs, but this year the emphasis was on enhanced wide-bandwidth interferometers covering metre to submillimetre wavebands. More than 100 participants attended ERIS2015. The topics of the school are briefly described here. They covered a wide range, from an introduction to radio interferometric techniques through packages for data reduction and analysis to hands-on workshop sessions and proposal writing.

  18. Damage Detection Using Holography and Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews classical approaches to damage detection using laser holography and interferometry. The paper then details the modern uses of electronic holography and neural-net-processed characteristic patterns to detect structural damage. The design of the neural networks and the preparation of the training sets are discussed. The use of a technique to optimize the training sets, called folding, is explained. Then a training procedure is detailed that uses the holography-measured vibration modes of the undamaged structures to impart damage-detection sensitivity to the neural networks. The inspections of an optical strain gauge mounting plate and an International Space Station cold plate are presented as examples.

  19. Painless Access to Interferometry Images Comes Closer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, A. M. S.; Diamond, P. J.; Garrington, S. T.; Holloway, A. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Winstanley, N.; Harrison, P. A.; Walton, N. A.; Gonzales-Solares, E.; Rixon, G. T.; Venturi, T.; Reynolds, C.

    2006-07-01

    Ready-made radio interferometry archive images usually only cover a few percent of the potential field of view in the visibility data. The next generation of instruments will achieve orders of magnitude increases in sensitivity, giving many detectable sources in any one observation. The most economical (and user-friendly) solution is to provide images or other data products on-demand at the chosen positions and resolutions. This can be driven remotely using a Virtual Observatory interface. Radio observatories are also providing software to automate most stages of data processing and form the basis of tools for specialist users. Recording and supplying metadata is vital to these processes.

  20. Fabry-Perot interferometry for microplasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, H.; Mase, A.

    2006-10-15

    A new method for determining the electron density of a thin plasma by means of Fabry-Perot interferometry is proposed. The interferometer consists of two plasma layers and dielectric material surrounded by two plasma layers. The transmittance of electromagnetic waves across the interferometer is calculated, and Fabry-Perot resonances are demonstrated. It is shown that the electron density can be determined from the measurement of the Fabry-Perot resonance frequencies. This method can also be applied to the measurement of conduction electron density in semiconductor films.

  1. Space Interferometry Mission: Measuring the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, James; Dallas, Saterios; Laskin, Robert; Unwin, Stephen; Yu, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will be the NASA Origins Program's first space based long baseline interferometric observatory. SIM will use a 10 m Michelson stellar interferometer to provide 4 microarcsecond precision absolute position measurements of stars down to 20th magnitude over its 5 yr. mission lifetime. SIM will also provide technology demonstrations of synthesis imaging and interferometric nulling. This paper describes the what, why and how of the SIM mission, including an overall mission and system description, science objectives, general description of how SIM makes its measurements, description of the design concepts now under consideration, operations concept, and supporting technology program.

  2. Fiber optic phase stepping system for interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, Carolyn R.; Beheim, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    A closed loop phase control system using an all-fiber optical configuration has been developed for use in phase-stepping interferometry. This system drives the relative phase of two interfering beams through a sequence of pi/2 rad increments so that the initial relative phase of these beams can be determined. This phase-stepping system uses optical fibers to provide spatially uniform phase steps from a flexible, easily aligned optical configuration. In addition, this system uses phase feedback to eliminate phase modulator errors and to compensate for phase drifts caused by environmental disturbances.

  3. Speckle Interferometry at Lowell's Discovery Channel Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard; Horch, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    The high-spatial-resolution technique of speckle interferometry has been in use at Lowell Observatory's Discovery Channel Telescope since 2014 with the Dual-channel Stellar Speckle Imager (DSSI; Horch et al. 2009) as a visiting instrument. Using its standard bandpasses of 692 and 880nm, we have used highly efficient DSSI instrument to inspect over a thousand stellar systems over the course of 2014 (Horch et al. 2015). We have also demonstrated the usefulness of the DSSI@DCT system for resolved observations of high-altitude (>1,000 miles) man-made satellites in highly non-sidereal rate orbits.

  4. Absolute group refractive index measurement of air by dispersive interferometry using frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Yang, L J; Zhang, H Y; Li, Y; Wei, H Y

    2015-12-28

    The absolute group refractive index of air at 1563 nm is measured by dispersive interferometry, and a combined uncertainty of 1.2 × 10(-8) is achieved. The group refractive index of air is calculated from the dispersive interferograms of the two beams passing through the inner and outer regions of a vacuum cell by fast-Fourier-transform. Experimental results show that the discrepancies between our method and modified Edlén equation are less than 3.43 × 10(-8) and 4.4 × 10(-8) for short-term and long-term experiments, respectively. The interferogram update rate is 15 ms, which makes it suitable for application of real-time monitoring. Furthermore, it is promising to improve the measurement uncertainty to 3.0 × 10(-9) by changing the material of the vacuum cell and measuring its length more accurately through optical interferometry.

  5. High dose chemoradiation for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas using intensity modulated external beam radiotherapy: a single tertiary care centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shaesta; Kalyani, Nikhil; Chaudhari, Suresh; Dharia, Tejas; Shetty, Nitin; Chopra, Supriya; Goel, Mahesh; Kulkarni, Suyash; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2017-01-01

    Background We present results of patients diagnosed with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas treated with high dose radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods From Aug 2005 to Dec 2012, 68 consecutive patients were treated. Fifty patients (group 1) presenting to us with obstructive jaundice were planned for endobiliary brachytherapy (EBBT 14 Gy) followed external beam radiotherapy (EBRT 45 Gy). Twenty-two patients (group 2) who had previously undergone biliary drainage underwent EBRT (57 Gy). All patients received injection Gemcitabine 300 mg/m2/weekly along with EBRT. Results Twenty-nine patients in group 1 and 22 patients in group 2 completed the treatment. Twenty-six (55%) patients achieved complete radiological response, 16 (64%) belonging to group 1 and 8 (44%) of group 2 (P=0.05). The median overall survival (MOS) was 17.5 and 16 months for group 1 and 2 respectively (P=0.07). The 1- and 2-year survival was 63%, and 18% for group I and 61% and 22% for group II respectively. The MOS was 5 months and 1 year survival was 14% for patients receiving EBBT only. MOS was significantly better after complete response (P=0.001). Conclusions Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) modulated high dose radiotherapy used either alone or with brachytherapy demonstrates potential to prolonged overall survival in unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:28280622

  6. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  7. EARLY STAGE RESPONSES OF INTENSIVE CARE UNITS DURING MAJOR DISASTERS: FROM THE EXPERIENCES OF THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE

    PubMed Central

    SHIMADA, JIRO; TASE, CHOICHIRO; TSUKADA, YASUHIKO; HASEGAWA, ARIFUMI; IIDA, HIROSHI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study investigated the role of intensive care units (ICU) during disasters, including the responses of our ICU following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Our ICU comprises 8 beds for postoperative inpatients and those with rapidly deteriorating conditions; 20 beds in an emergency unit for critically ill patients; and 17 beds for neonates. It is important to secure empty beds when a major disaster occurs, as was the case after the Great Hanshin Earthquake, due to the resulting large numbers of trauma patients. Therefore, each ICU section cooperated to ensure sufficient space for admissions following the Great East Japan Earthquake. However, unlike the Great Hanshin Earthquake, securing beds was ultimately unnecessary due to the nature of the recent disaster, which also consisted of a subsequent tsunami and nuclear accident. Therefore, air quality monitoring was required on this occasion due to the risk of environmental radioactive pollution from the nuclear disaster causing problems with artificial respiration management involving atmospheric air. The variability in damage arising during different disasters thus requires a flexible response from ICUs that handle seriously ill patients. PMID:25946909

  8. Outcome of Recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Who Require Intensive Care Unit Support: A Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Becerra, Samantha; Labastida-Mercado, Nancy; Rosales-Padrón, Jaime; García-Chavez, Jessica; Soto-Vega, Elena; Rivadeneyra-Espinoza, Liliana; León-Peña, Andres A; Fernández-Lara, Danitza; Dominguez-Cid, Monica; Anthon-Méndez, Javier; Arizpe-Bravo, Daniel; Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a patient who has been grafted with hematopoietic stem cells is a serious event, but the role of the ICU in this setting remains controversial. Data were analyzed from patients who underwent autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla, México, between May 1993 and October 2014. In total, 339 patients were grafted: 150 autografts and 189 allografts; 68 of the grafted patients (20%) were admitted to the ICU after transplantation: 27% of the allografted and 11% of the autografted patients (p = 0.2). Two of 17 autografted patients (12%) and 5 of 51 allografted patients (10%) survived. All patients who required insertion of an endotracheal tube died, whereas 7 of 11 patients without invasive mechanical ventilation survived (p = 0.001). Only 10% of the grafted patients survived their stay in the ICU; this figure is lower than those reported from other centers and may reflect several facts, varying from the quality of the ICU support to ICU admission criteria to the initial management of all the grafts in an outpatient setting, which could somehow delay the arrival of patients to the hospital.

  9. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-05-09

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06-0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock.

  10. Sevoflurane in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac surgery patients. Our experience in intensive care unit with sevoflurane sedation.

    PubMed

    Orriach, Jose Luis Guerrero; Aliaga, M Ramirez; Ortega, Manuel Galan; Navarro, Manuel Rubio; Arce, Isabel Navarro; Mañas, Jose Cruz

    2013-01-01

    Recently, many studies have shown a decrease in myocardial damage in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery where the anesthetic agent used was sevoflurane compared with propofol. The basis for this protective effect of the myocardium occurs through the mechanisms of preconditioning and postconditioning of halogenated agents. Both relate to the benefit of prior or subsequent administration of the drug (halogenated anesthetic agent) to the harmful stimulus for myocardial cells. The two mechanisms have similar effector mechanisms. The intraoperative administration of sevoflurane is common in anesthetic practice, but the continuation of the administration in the first postoperative hours is made possible by the AnaConDa ® device (ACD; Sedana Medical AB, Uppsala, Sweden) designed for halogenated sedation of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). This device has proven useful to facilitate the treatment of pathological conditions. The object of our review is to determine if there are beneficial effects to extending exposure to halogenated agents in the immediate post-operative period . In the post-operative phase, the pathological myocardium is in a reperfusion process in the coronary microcirculation and expression of certain receptors and chemical mediators can reduce potential injury secondary to reperfusion of previously hibernating and/or stunned tissue.

  11. IONOSPHERIC POWER-SPECTRUM TOMOGRAPHY IN RADIO INTERFEROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2010-08-01

    A tomographic method is described to quantify the three-dimensional power spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations based on radio-interferometric observations by a two-dimensional planar array. The method is valid for the first-order Born approximation and might be applicable in correcting observed visibilities for phase variations due to the imprint of the full three-dimensional ionosphere. It is shown that the ionospheric electron-density distribution is not the primary structure to model in interferometry, but rather its autocorrelation function or equivalently its power spectrum. An exact mathematical expression is derived that provides the three-dimensional power spectrum of the ionospheric electron-density fluctuations directly from a rescaled scattered intensity field and an incident intensity field convolved with a complex unit phasor that depends on the w-term and is defined on the full sky pupil plane. In the limit of a small field of view, the method reduces to the single phase-screen approximation. Tomographic self-calibration can become important in high-dynamic range observations at low radio frequencies with wide-field antenna interferometers because a three-dimensional ionosphere causes a spatially varying convolution of the sky, whereas a single phase screen results in a spatially invariant convolution. A thick ionosphere can therefore not be approximated by a single phase screen without introducing errors in the calibration process. By applying a Radon projection and the Fourier projection-slice theorem, it is shown that the phase-screen approach in three dimensions is identical to the tomographic method. Finally, we suggest that residual speckle can cause a diffuse intensity halo around sources due to uncorrectable ionospheric phase fluctuations in the short integrations, which could pose a fundamental limit on the dynamic range in long-integration images.

  12. Optical properties assessment for liquid phantoms using fiber based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-03-01

    Fiber based frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry (FMLSI) is developed for optical properties studies of liquid phantoms, made of Intralipid®. By employing optical frequency modulation on a tunable diode laser, the power spectrum of the heterodyne-detected intensity fluctuations through the dynamic turbid medium is a combination of the time-of-flight distribution and the Doppler power spectrum due to the movement of the scattering particles. The reduced scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and Brownian diffusion constant are retrieved by employing nonlinear fitting to the power spectrum based on diffusion theory.

  13. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.J. )

    1990-06-20

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal to noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes. Key words: holography, lasers, neodymium, heterodyning, Interferometry.

  14. Detection and measurement of small vibrations using electronic speckle pattern interferometry.

    PubMed

    Høgmoen, K; Løkberg, O J

    1977-07-01

    We describe a new method for real-time detection and measurement of small vibrations, based on phase modulation in time-average electronic speckle pattern interferometry. The modulation frequency is shifted relative to the vibration frequency, which makes the intensity of the reconstructed image vary at the difference frequency. The amplitude detection limits are about 20 A by visual observation and 0.1 A by photoelectric measurement using a lockin technique. No auxiliary system for fringe stabilization is required. At higher amplitude levels we can study the deformation of the object in slow motion. Measurements on different objects, including human ear preparation, are presented.

  15. Manipulation of Micro Scale Particles in an Optical Trap Using Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibel, Robin

    2002-01-01

    This research shows that micro particles can be manipulated via interferometric patterns superimposed on an optical tweezers beam. Interferometry allows the manipulation of intensity distributions, and thus, force distributions on a trapped particle. To demonstrate the feasibility of such manipulation, 458 nm light, from an argon-ion laser, was injected into a Mach Zender interferometer. One mirror in the interferometer was oscillated with a piezoelectric phase modulator. The light from the interferometer was then injected into a microscope to trap a 9.75 micron polystyrene sphere. By varying the phase modulation, the sphere was made to oscillate in a controlled fashion.

  16. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  17. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Hugo; Despres, Philippe; Fortin, Bernard; Filion, Edith; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Ayad, Tarek; Christopoulos, Apostolos; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness and rate of complications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2005 and November 2008, 25 patients with an unknown primary cancer underwent IMRT, with a median radiation dose of 70 Gy. The bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa were included in the target volume. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma, except for 1 patient who had adenosquamous differentiation. They were all treated with curative intent. Of the 25 included patients, 20 were men and 5 were women, with a median age of 54 years. Of these patients, 3 had Stage III, 18 had Stage IVa, and 4 had Stage IVb. Of the 25 patients, 18 (72%) received platinum-based chemotherapy in a combined-modality setting. Neck dissection was reserved for residual disease after definitive IMRT. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were all 100% at 3 years. No occurrence of primary cancer was observed during the follow-up period. The reported rates of xerostomia reduced with the interval from the completion of treatment. Nine patients (36%) reported Grade 2 or greater xerostomia at 6 months, and only 2 (8%) of them reported the same grade of salivary function toxicity after 24 months of follow-up. Conclusion: In our institution, IMRT for unknown primary cancer has provided good overall and disease-free survival in all the patients with an acceptable rate of complications. IMRT allowed us to address the bilateral neck and ipsilateral putative pharyngeal mucosa with minimal late salivary function toxicity. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT for more advanced disease led to good clinical results with reasonable toxicities.

  18. Coronary risk reduction through intensive community-based lifestyle intervention: the Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) experience.

    PubMed

    Diehl, H A

    1998-11-26

    Vigorous cholesterol lowering with diet, drugs, or a combination has been shown to slow, arrest, or even reverse atherosclerosis. Residential lifestyle intervention programs have successfully lowered serum cholesterol levels and other coronary risk factors, but they have the disadvantages of high cost and difficulty with long-term adherence. Community-based risk-reduction programs have the potential to effect change at low cost and improve long-term adherence. To assess the effectiveness of, and to develop a model for, such programs, the community-based Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) was developed in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In the intensive (30-day, 40-hour), hospital-based educational program, participants are encouraged to exercise 30 minutes a day and to embrace a largely unrefined plant-food-centered diet that is high in complex carbohydrates and fiber; very low in fat, animal protein, sugar, and salt; and virtually free of cholesterol. A total of 304 enrollees in the first program were at elevated risk of coronary artery and related diseases: 70% were > or =10% above their ideal weight, 14% had diabetes, 47% had hypertension, and 32% had a history of coronary artery disease. Of the enrollees, 288 "graduated" from the program (123 men, 165 women; mean age was 55+/-11 years). Various markers of disease risk, including serum blood lipids and fasting blood glucose concentrations, were measured before and after the program. At 4 weeks, overall improvements in the participants' laboratory test results, blood pressures, weights, and body mass indexes were highly significant (p <0.001). Triglyceride levels decreased significantly (p <0.05) in participants who had elevated triglyceride levels (>200 mg/dL in men, 200-299 mg/dL in women).

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Pelvic Lymph Nodes in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Planning Procedures and Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Muren, Ludvig Paul Wasbo, Ellen; Helle, Svein Inge; Hysing, Liv Bolstad; Karlsdottir, Asa; Odland, Odd Harald; Valen, Harald; Ekerold, Randi; Johannessen, Dag Clement

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: We present planning and early clinical outcomes of a study of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 43 patients initially treated with an IMRT plan delivering 50 Gy to the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes, followed by a conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plan delivering 20 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, were studied. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data for the added plans were compared with dose-volume histogram data for the sum of two CRT plans for 15 cases. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system, was recorded weekly throughout treatment as well as 3 to 18 months after treatment and are presented. Results: Treatment with IMRT both reduced normal tissue doses and increased the minimum target doses. Intestine volumes receiving more than 40 and 50 Gy were significantly reduced (e.g., at 50 Gy, from 81 to 19 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.026), as were bladder volumes above 40, 50, and 60 Gy, rectum volumes above 30, 50, and 60 Gy, and hip joint muscle volumes above 20, 30, and 40 Gy. During treatment, Grade 2 GI toxicity was reported by 12 of 43 patients (28%), and Grade 2 to 4 GU toxicity was also observed among 12 patients (28%). With 6 to 18 months of follow-up, 2 patients (5%) experienced Grade 2 GI effects and 7 patients (16%) experienced Grade 2 GU effects. Conclusions: Use of IMRT for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer reduces normal tissue doses, improves target coverage, and has a promising toxicity profile.

  20. Potentials of polarimetric SAR interferometry for agriculture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.; Ballester-Berman, J. David

    2009-04-01

    This paper is aimed to define the main specifications and system requirements of a future spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with polarimetric and interferometric capabilities, to be applied in agriculture monitoring. Firstly, a previous discussion concerning the applications of remote sensing to agriculture and the requirements demanded by end users is introduced. Then, a review of polarimetric SAR and interferometric SAR techniques employed in agriculture is performed in order to explore and justify the potential contributions to crop parameter retrieval of polarimetric SAR interferometry (PolInSAR). The current status of the research about PolInSAR when applied to the retrieval of biophysical parameters of agricultural crops is also addressed, covering recent advances in theoretical modeling aspects (both direct and inverse models), the validation carried out so far with indoor data, and complementary information provided by other different but related experiments. From this experience, we describe some system specifications that will be important for the success of this technique. Among them it is emphasized the need of baselines larger than usual, medium-high frequency band, and a mandatory single-pass mode for overcoming temporal decorrelation. Finally, a set of future experiments is also proposed for additional testing and confirmation of observations made so far regarding minimum baseline requirements, temporal evolution of observables and modeling issues, among others.

  1. Spaceborne radar interferometry for coastal DEM construction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hong, S.-H.; Lee, C.-W.; Won, J.-S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhiming

    2005-01-01

    Topographic features in coastal regions including tidal flats change more significantly than landmass, and are characterized by extremely low slopes. High precision DEMs are required to monitor dynamic changes in coastal topography. It is difficult to obtain coherent interferometric SAR pairs especially over tidal flats mainly because of variation of tidal conditions. Here we focus on i) coherence of multi-pass ERS SAR interferometric pairs and ii) DEM construction from ERS-ENVISAT pairs. Coherences of multi-pass ERS interferograms were good enough to construct DEM under favorable tidal conditions. Coherence in sand dominant area was generally higher than that in muddy surface. The coarse grained coastal areas are favorable for multi-pass interferometry. Utilization of ERS-ENVISAT interferometric pairs is taken a growing interest. We carried out investigation using a cross-interferometric pair with a normal baseline of about 1.3 km, a 30 minutes temporal separation and the height sensitivity of about 6 meters. Preliminary results of ERS-ENVISAT interferometry were not successful due to baseline and unfavorable scattering conditions. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  2. Deflectometry challenges interferometry: the competition gets tougher!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Christian; Olesch, Evelyn; Krobot, Roman; Häusler, Gerd

    2012-09-01

    Deflectometric methods that are capable of providing full-field topography data for specular freeform surfaces have been around for more than a decade. They have proven successful in various fields of application, such as the measurement of progressive power eyeglasses, painted car body panels, or windshields. However, up to now deflectometry has not been considered as a viable competitor to interferometry, especially for the qualification of optical components. The reason is that, despite the unparalleled local sensitivity provided by deflectometric methods, the global height accuracy attainable with this measurement technique used to be limited to several microns over a field of 100 mm. Moreover, spurious reflections at the rear surface of transparent objects could easily mess up the measured signal completely. Due to new calibration and evaluation procedures, this situation has changed lately. We will give a comparative assessment of the strengths and - now partly revised - weaknesses of both measurement principles from the current perspective. By presenting recent developments and measurement examples from different applications, we will show that deflectometry is now heading to become a serious competitor to interferometry.

  3. An Impact Study of the Design of Exergaming Parameters on Body Intensity from Objective and Gameplay-Based Player Experience Perspectives, Based on Balance Training Exergame

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Kinect-based exergames allow players to undertake physical exercise in an interactive manner with visual stimulation. Previous studies focused on investigating physical fitness based on calories or heart rate to ascertain the effectiveness of exergames. However, designing an exergame for specific training purposes, with intensity levels suited to the needs and skills of the players, requires the investigation of motion performance to study player experience. This study investigates how parameters of a Kinect-based exergame, combined with balance training exercises, influence the balance control ability and intensity level the player can tolerate, by analyzing both objective and gameplay-based player experience, and taking enjoyment and difficulty levels into account. The exergame tested required participants to maintain their balance standing on one leg within a posture frame (PF) while a force plate evaluated the player's balance control ability in both static and dynamic gaming modes. The number of collisions with the PF depended on the frame's travel time for static PFs, and the leg-raising rate and angle for dynamic PFs. In terms of center of pressure (COP) metrics, significant impacts were caused by the frame's travel time on MDIST-AP for static PFs, and the leg-raising rate on MDIST-ML and TOTEX for dynamic PFs. The best static PF balance control performance was observed with a larger frame offset by a travel time of 2 seconds, and the worst performance with a smaller frame and a travel time of 1 second. The best dynamic PF performance was with a leg-raising rate of 1 second at a 45-degree angle, while the worst performance was with a rate of 2 seconds at a 90-degree angle. The results demonstrated that different evaluation methods for player experience could result in different findings, making it harder to study the design of those exergames with training purposes based on player experience. PMID:23922716

  4. Cleistanthus collinus poisoning: experience at a medical intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital in south India

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Alladi; Naik, G. Sivaram; Harikrishna, J.; Kumar, D. Prabath; Rao, M.H.; Sarma, K.V.S.; Guntupalli, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Ingestion of Cleistanthus collinus causes hypokalemia and cardiac arrhythmias leading to mortality in most cases. We undertook this retrospective study to evaluate the clinical presentation and predictors of outcome in critically ill patients admitted with C. collinus poisoning. Methods: The case records of 56 patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a tertiary care teaching hospital in south India (2000-2014) with C. collinus poisoning were retrospectively analysed. Results: The mean age of patients was 36.7±13.3 yr; there were 30 males. Salient clinical manifestations included hypokalemia (58%), neutrophilic leucocytosis (48.2%), acute kidney injury (AKI) (42.9%), acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation (AcRFMv) (32.1%), shock (21.4%); cardiac arrhythmias and neuromuscular weakness (19.6% each); 21 patients (37.5%) had adverse outcome. Longer time-lapsed from consumption to reaching emergency room [median (interquartile range)] (hours) [49 (22-97) vs. 28 (7-56), P=0.038]; higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score at presentation [14 (8.25-14.75) vs. 2 (0-6) P<0.001]; and presence of the following [odds ratio (95% confidence intervals)] at initial presentation: shock [37.40 (4.29-325.98), P=0.001]; AcRFMv [26.67 (5.86-121.39), P<0.001]; elevated alanine aminotransferase [5.71 (1.30-25.03), P=0.021]; metabolic acidosis [5.48 (1.68-17.89), P=0.005]; acute kidney injury (AKI) [5 (1.55-16.06), P=0.007]; hyponatremia [4.67 (1.25-17.44), P=0.022]; and neutrophilic leucocytosis [3.80 (1.02-14.21), P=0.047] predicted death. A significant (P<0.001) increasing trend in mortality was observed with increasing International Program on Chemical Safety Poisoning Severity Score (IPCS-CSS) grade. Interpretation & conclusions: C. collinus is a lethal poison associated with high mortality for which there is no specific antidote. Careful search and meticulous monitoring of the

  5. An Experimental Study of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound on Pig's Pancreas and the Early Clinical Experience on Pancreatic Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, LiuLin; Huang, XiaoBo; Yao, SongSen; Yu, JinSheng; Hwang, JooHa; Fei, XingBo; Yu, QiuHong; Xue, WeiCheng; Zheng, ZhuYing; Wang, XiaoFeng

    2007-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of in vivo pig pancreases, and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of HIFU in the clinical treatment of pancreatic cancer in humans. Methods: HIFU was performed in 12 domestic pig pancreases in vivo with varying acoustic energies. The safety of HIFU treatments was assessed by necropsy. The pathology and microstructure of the treated pancreases were evaluated using standard histology and transmission electron microscopy. Following the animal studies 62 patients with advanced pancreas cancer were treated with 250 - 420 W of acoustic power. There were 3 patients with stage II, 23 patients with stage III, and 36 patients with stage IV disease. Results: In animal studies, precise regions of coagulation necrosis were identified on pathology in 8 specimens that were treated with 420 W or 645 W acoustic power. Treatment effects were unable to be identified in 4 specimens treated with 300˜340 W acoustic power; however, damages to the cells microstructure and apoptosis were identified on electron microscopy. Damage to the stomach and colon were seen in some animals treated with 645 W. In the clinical treatments in humans the following were seen: local tumor control: complete response (CR) 0%, partial response (PR) 17.7%, no change (NC) 54.8%, progressive disease (PD) 27.5%. Pain relief was achieved in 87.1% of patients. The median survival for stage II and III patients was 11.2 months and median survival for stage IV patients was 5.6 months. The total median survival was 8.6 months. The survival rate at 1 year was as follows: stage II and III 42.3%, stage IV 5.6%. The survival rate at 2 years was as follows: stage II and III 15.4%, stage IV 0%. There were no severe complications or adverse events related to HIFU therapy seen in any of the patients treated. Conclusions: This study supports the feasibility of HIFU in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. The clinical

  6. Twelve years' experience with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using sonablate™ devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Muyura; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0, biopsy proven, localized prostate cancer, with a serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of <30 ng/ml, any Gleason score were included. All patients underwent HIFU using the Sonablate™ (S) device and were required to have a minimal follow-up of 2 years after the last HIFU session to be included in this analysis. Four different generation HIFU devices, S200, S500, S500 version 4 and S500 TCM, have been used for this study. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir+2ng/ml). Seven hundred and fifty-three men with prostate cancer were included. The patients were divided into two groups: in the Former group, 421 patients were treated with S200 and 500 from 1990 to 2005; in the Latter group, 332 patients were treated with S500 ver. 4 and TCM from 2005 to 2009. The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in the Former and Latter groups were 68 and 67 years, 11.3 and 9.7 ng/ml, 6.2 and 6.6, 167 and 101 min, and 49 and 38 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (BDFR) in the groups at 5 years was, respectively, 67% and 53%, and was 50% at 10 years in the Former group (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Former group at 5 and 10 years were 68% and 65%, 52% and 48%, and 43% and 40%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Latter group at 5 years were 83%, 76%, and 42% (p<0.0001). The negative prostate biopsy rate in the Former and Latter groups was 81% and 93%, respectively. Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 45%, 38%, and 24% of patients at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years after HIFU. The results after long-term follow-up have indicated that HIFU is an efficient and safe treatment for patients with

  7. Applications of atom interferometry - from ground to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Atom interferometry is utilized for the measurement of rotations [1], accelerations [2] and for tests of fundamental physics [3]. In these devices, three laser light pulses separated by a free evolution time coherently manipulate the matter waves which resembles the Mach-Zehnder geometry in optics. Atom gravimeters demonstrated an accuracy of few microgal [2,4], and atom gradiometers showed a noise floor of 30 E Hz^{-1/2} [5]. Further enhancements of atom interferometers are anticipated by the integration of novel source concepts providing ultracold atoms, extending the free fall time of the atoms, and enhanced techniques for coherent manipulation. Sources providing Bose-Einstein condensates recently demontrated a flux compatible with precision experiments [6]. All of these aspects are studied in the transportable quantum gravimeter QG-1 and the very long baseline atom interferometry teststand in Hannover [7] with the goal of surpassing the microgal regime. Going beyond ground based setups, the QUANTUS collaboration exploits the unique features of a microgravity environment in drop tower experiments [8] and in a sounding rocket mission. The payloads are compact and robust atom optics experiments based on atom chips [6], enabling technology for transportable sensors on ground as a byproduct. More prominently, they are pathfinders for proposed satellite missions as tests of the universality of free fall [9] and gradiometry based on atom interferometers [10]. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM1552-1557 (QUANTUS-IV-Fallturm) and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the SFB 1128 geo-Q. [1] PRL 114 063002 2015 [2] Nature 400 849 1999 [3] PRL 112 203002 2014 [4] NJP 13 065026 2011 [5] PRA 65 033608 2002 [6] NJP 17 065001 2015 [7] NJP 17 035011 2015 [8] PRL 110 093602 2013 [9

  8. Effects of an intensive middle school science experience on the attitude toward science, self-esteem, career goal orientation, and science achievement of eighth-grade female students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Tammy Kay

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of a year long intensive extracurricular middle school science experience on the self-esteem, career goal orientation, and attitude toward science of eighth grade female students using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Sixteen self-selected eighth grade female students participated in extracurricular science experiences such as camping, rock climbing, specimen collecting and hiking, as well as meeting and interacting with female science role models. Data was collected using pre- and posttest methods using the Children's Attitude Toward Science Survey, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, and the Self-Directed Search (SDS) Career Explorer. End of year science course grades were examined for seventh and eighth grades and compared to first semester high school grades. Qualitative data was in the form of: (1) focus group interviews conducted prior to field experiences, at the end of all field experiences, and at the end of the first semester of high school, and (2) journal entries from throughout the project. Qualitative data was examined for changes in student perceptions of science as a discipline, self as scientist, women in science, and social comparison of self in science.

  9. Phase-Shifting Liquid Crystal Point-Diffraction Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    2000-01-01

    , the limited spatial resolution and the methods required for data reduction suggest that a more useful instrument needs to be developed. The category of interferometers known as common path interferometers can eliminate much of the vibration sensitivity associated with traditional interferometry as described above. In these devices, division of the amplitude of the wavefront following the test section produces the reference beam. Examples of these instruments include shearing and point diffraction interferometers. In the latter case, shown schematically, a lens focuses light passing through the test section onto a small diffracting object. Such objects are typically either a circle of material on a high quality glass plate or a small sphere in a glass cell. The size of the focused spot is several times larger than the object so that the light not intercepted by the diffracting object forms the test beam while the diffracted light generates a spherical reference beam. While this configuration is mechanically stable, phase shifting one beam with respect to the other is difficult due to the common path. Phase shifting enables extremely accurate measurements of the phase of the interferogram using only gray scale intensity measurements and is the de facto standard of industry. Mercer and Creath 2 demonstrated phase shifting in a point diffraction interferometer using a spherical spacer in a liquid crystal cell as the diffracting object. By changing the voltage across the cell, they were able to shift the phase of the undiffracted beam relative to the reference beam generated by diffraction from the sphere. While they applied this technology to fluid measurements, the device shifted phase so slowly that it was not useful for studying transient phenomena. We have identified several technical problems that precluded operation of the device at video frame rates and intend to solve them to produce a phase-shifting liquid crystal point-diffraction interferometer operating at

  10. Intensity Mapping of the History of Stellar Emission with the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Alicia E.; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha R.; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Lee, Dae Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Tsumurai, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the near-infrared Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) anisotropy find excess spatial power above the level predicted by known galaxy populations at large angular scales. These anisotropies trace spatial variations in integrated photon production, so measurements of EBL surface brightness fluctuations provide a complete census of the emission from stars summed over cosmic history. As a result, EBL fluctuations contain contributions from objects forming during the Epoch of Reionization (EOR), from the integrated galactic light (IGL), and faint, extended components such as intra-halo light (IHL) from stars tidally stripped from galaxies during merger events. Additional measurements with greater sensitivity, spectral range, and spectral resolution are required to disentangle these contributions.The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2) is an instrument optimized for the measurement of near-infrared EBL anisotropies. As the Earth's atmosphere generates time-varying near-infrared emission, CIBER-2 is launched on a sounding rocket from which it will carry out multiwavelength imaging in six spectral bands that span the visible to near-infrared. The 2.4 square degree images allow CIBER-2 to produce measurements of EBL fluctuations with high fidelity on large angular scales. The Lyman break feature from EOR sources provides a unique spectral feature which can be used to disentangle the high from the low redshift contributions to the anisotropy signal. Measurement in six independent wavebands allows detailed cross-correlation studies to constrain the source of the excess fluctuations at large angular scales. We provide an overview of the CIBER-2 instrument and explain CIBER-2 spectral feature identification and cross-correlation study methodologies.

  11. Vibration analysis by digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinchen, Wolfgang; Yang, Lian Xiang; Kupfer, Gerhard; Maeckel, Peter; Thiemich, Anderas

    1997-09-01

    Digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry is described as a robust measuring method due to its simple optical setup and the insensitivity against ambient noise. It has been sued in industry for nondestructive testing and strain measuring. This paper explores the possibilities for vibration analysis using digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry. The measuring device performing both time- average and stroboscopic methods is described. The time average digital speckle patten shearing interferometry in conjunction with the stroboscopic technique is suited well for both qualitative and quantitative vibration analyses. The determination of dynamic deformation and strain fields form the phase map of shearogram is demonstrated, and some preliminary results are shown.

  12. An overview of VHF lightning observations by digital interferometry from ISS/JEM-GLIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Ishida, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Yuji; Yoshida, Kazuya; Hobara, Yasuhide; Sano, Takuki; Abe, Takumi; Kawasaki, Zen-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The Global Lightning and sprIte MeasurementS (GLIMS) mission has been conducted at the Exposed Facility of Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station for more than 30 months. This paper focuses on an electromagnetic (EM) payload of JEM-GLIMS mission, the very high frequency (VHF) broadband digital InTerFerometer (VITF). The JEM-GLIMS mission is designed to conduct comprehensive observations with both EM and optical payloads for lightning activities and related transient luminous events. Its nominal operation continued from November 2012 to December 2014. The extended operation followed for eight months. Through the operation period, the VITF collected more than two million VHF EM waveforms in almost 18,700 datasets. The number of VITF observations synchronized with optical signal is 8049. Active VHF radiations are detected in about 70 % of optical observations without obvious regional or seasonal dependency. Estimations of the EM direction-of-arrival (DOA) are attempted using the broadband digital interferometry. Some results agree with the optical observations, even though DOA estimation is problematic because of a very short antenna baseline and multiple pulses over a short time period, namely burst-type EM waveforms. The world's first lightning observations by means of space-borne VHF interferometry are achieved in this mission. This paper summarizes VITF instruments, the recorded VHF EM signals, and the results of DOA estimations by means of digital interferometry as a preliminary report after termination of the mission.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Comparison of phase recovery methods in spiral speckle pattern interferometry correlation fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadnjal, Ana Laura; Etchepareborda, Pablo; Bianchetti, Arturo; Veiras, Francisco E.; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2016-05-01

    Spiral interferometry can be used as a solution to the problem of sign ambiguity presented in the conventional speckle pattern interferometric technique when the optical phase needs to be reconstructed from a single closed fringe system. Depressions and elevations of the topography corresponding to the object deformation are distinguished by the direction of rotation of the local spiral fringe pattern. In this work, we implement and compare several methods for optical phase reconstruction by analyzing a single image composed of spiral speckle pattern interferometry correlation fringes. The implemented methods are based on contour line demodulation, center line demodulation, Spiral Phase Quadrature Transform and the 2D Riesz transform with multivector structure. Contour line and center line demodulation approaches are exclusively dedicated to images containing a fringe system with spiral structure. The others are based on the 2D Riesz transform, these being well known approaches in conventional interferometry. We examine simulated experiments and analyze some of the emerging drawbacks for solving the phase reconstruction problem by using different mean values of speckle size and background noise levels. We also discuss several numerical procedures that may well improve the efficiency and robustness of the presented numerical implementations. The performance of the implemented demodulation methods is evaluated by using a universal image quality index and therefore a quantitative comparison is also presented.

  14. Systematic comparison between line integrated densities measured with interferometry and polarimetry at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Brombin, M.; Zilli, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Boboc, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2009-06-15

    A systematic comparison between the line integrated electron density derived from interferometry and polarimetry at JET has been carried out. For the first time the reliability of the measurements of the Cotton-Mouton effect has been analyzed for a wide range of main plasma parameters and the possibility to evaluate the electron density directly from polarimetric data has been studied. The purpose of this work is to recover the interferometric data with the density derived from the measured Cotton-Mouton effect, when the fringe jump phenomena occur. The results show that the difference between the line integrated electron density from interferometry and polarimetry is with one fringe (1.143x10{sup 19} m{sup -2}) for more than 90% of the cases. It is possible to consider polarimetry as a satisfactory alternative method to interferometry to measure the electron density and it could be used to recover interferometric signal when a fringe jumps occurs, preventing difficulties for the real-time control of many experiments at the JET machine.

  15. Tomographic reconstruction of three-dimensional density fields using laser speckle photography and laser interferometry projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Hanseo

    The reconstruction accuracies of Fourier convolution (FC) and algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) are examined for laser speckle photography and laser interferometry. Computer synthesized phantoms are used to calculate asymmetric density fields for limited cases of 5 and 3 projections. To simulate experimental uncertainties, random noise levels are imposed on projected data before they are used for reconstruction. Experiments are also performed for a speckle photography system, a Mach- Zehnder interferometer, and an oxygen analyzer for a half-blocked nozzle and a two-hole nozzle to measure asymmetric helium density fields. Reconstructed density fields are calculated by the FC and the ART from projected data of the speckle photography and the interferometry. The reconstructed fields are compared with the results of the directly measured data using oxygen analyzer. The non-algebraic ART requires a modification for its use for laser speckle photography. Both the ART and the FC have been used for both non- algebraic speckle photography and algebraic interferometry. The present ART method shows a significant improvement in the reconstruction accuracy over the existing Fourier convolution (FC) method.

  16. Phase shifting interferometry from two normalized interferograms with random tilt phase-shift.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengwei; Wu, Yongqian; Wu, Fan

    2015-07-27

    We propose a novel phase shifting interferometry from two normalized interferograms with random tilt phase-shift. The determination of tilt phase-shift is performed by extracting the tilted phase-shift plane from the phase difference of two normalized interferograms, and with the calculated tilt phase-shift value the phase distribution can be retrieved from the two normalized frames. By analyzing the distribution of phase difference and utilizing special points fitting method, the tilted phase-shift plane is extracted in three different cases, which relate to different magnitudes of tilts. Proposed method has been applied to simulations and experiments successfully and the satisfactory results manifest that proposed method is of high accuracy and high speed compared with the three step iterative method. Additionally, both open and closed fringe can be analyzed with proposed method. What's more, it cannot only eliminate the small tilt-shift error caused by slight vibration in phase-shifting interferometry, but also detect the large tilt phase-shift in phase-tilting interferometry. Thus, it will relaxes the requirements on the accuracy of phase shifter, and the costly phase shifter may even be useless by applying proposed method in high amplitude vibrated circumstance to achieve high-precision analysis.

  17. A low cost method for hard x-ray grating interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang; Lei, Yaohu; Liu, Xin; Huang, Jianheng; Zhao, Zhigang; Guo, Jinchuan; Li, Ji; Niu, Hanben

    2016-12-01

    Grating interferometry is advantageous over conventional x-ray absorption imaging because it enables the detection of samples constituted by low atomic number elements (low-Z materials). Therefore, it has a potential application in biological science and medical diagnostics. The grating interferometry has some critical optics components such as absorption gratings which are conventionally manufactured by the lithography, electroplating, and molding (LIGA) technique and employing gold as the absorbent material in it. However, great challenge lies in its implementations for practical applications because of the cost and difficulty to achieve high aspect ratio absorbing grating devices. In this paper, we present a low-cost approach that involves using the micro-casting technique with bismuth (Bi) as the absorber in source grating and as well as filling cesium iodide thallium(CsI:Tl) in a periodically structured scintillator. No costly facilities as synchrotron radiation are required and cheap material is used in our approach. Our experiment using these components shows high quality complementary images can be obtained with contrast of absorption, phase and visibility. This alternative method conquers the limitation of costly grating devices for a long time and stands an important step towards the further practical application of grating interferometry.

  18. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  19. Generalized interferometry - I: theory for interstation correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Stehly, Laurent; Ermert, Laura; Boehm, Christian

    2017-02-01

    We develop a general theory for interferometry by correlation that (i) properly accounts for heterogeneously distributed sources of continuous or transient nature, (ii) fully incorporates any type of linear and nonlinear processing, such as one-bit normalization, spectral whitening and phase-weighted stacking, (iii) operates for any type of medium, including 3-D elastic, heterogeneous and attenuating media, (iv) enables the exploitation of complete correlation waveforms, including seemingly unphysical arrivals, and (v) unifies the earthquake-based two-station method and ambient noise correlations. Our central theme is not to equate interferometry with Green function retrieval, and to extract information directly from processed interstation correlations, regardless of their relation to the Green function. We demonstrate that processing transforms the actual wavefield sources and actual wave propagation physics into effective sources and effective wave propagation. This transformation is uniquely determined by the processing applied to the observed data, and can be easily computed. The effective forward model, that links effective sources and propagation to synthetic interstation correlations, may not be perfect. A forward modelling error, induced by processing, describes the extent to which processed correlations can actually be interpreted as proper correlations, that is, as resulting from some effective source and some effective wave propagation. The magnitude of the forward modelling error is controlled by the processing scheme and the temporal variability of the sources. Applying adjoint techniques to the effective forward model, we derive finite-frequency Fréchet kernels for the sources of the wavefield and Earth structure, that should be inverted jointly. The structure kernels depend on the sources of the wavefield and the processing scheme applied to the raw data. Therefore, both must be taken into account correctly in order to make accurate inferences on

  20. A coherent fiber link for very long baseline interferometry.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Frittelli, Matteo; Levi, Filippo; Mura, Alberto; Zucco, Massimo; Ambrosini, Roberto; Bortolotti, Claudio; Perini, Federico; Roma, Mauro; Calonico, Davide

    2015-11-01

    We realize a coherent fiber link for application in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) for radio astronomy and geodesy. A 550-km optical fiber connects the Italian National Metrological Institute (INRIM) to a radio telescope in Italy and is used for the primary Cs fountain clock stability and accuracy dissemination. We use an ultrastable laser frequency- referenced to the primary standard as a transfer oscillator; at the radio telescope, an RF signal is generated from the laser by using an optical frequency comb. This scheme now provides the traceability of the local maser to the SI second, realized by the Cs fountain at the 1.7 × 10(-16) accuracy. The fiber link never limits the experiment and is robust enough to sustain radio astronomical campaigns. This experiment opens the possibility of replacing the local hydrogen masers at the VLBI sites with optically-synthesized RF signals. This could improve VLBI resolution by providing more accurate and stable frequency references and, in perspective, by enabling common- clock VLBI based on a network of telescopes connected by fiber links.

  1. Noninvasive fluid flow measurements in microfluidic channels with backscatter interferometry.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Dotson, Stephen; Wood, Scott; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2004-11-01

    The ability to measure fluid velocity within picoliter volumes or on-chip noninvasively, is important toward fully realizing the potential of microfluidics and micrototal analysis systems, particularly in applications such as micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or in metering mixing where the flow rate must be quantified. Additionally, these measurements need to be performed directly on moving fluids in a noninvasive fashion. We presented here the proof of principle experiments showing nonintrusive fluid flow measurements can be accomplished on-chip using a pump and probe configuration with backscattering interferometry. The on-chip interferometric backscatter detector (OCIBD) is based on a fiber-coupled HeNe laser that illuminates a portion of an isotropically etched 40 microm radius channel and a position sensitive transducer to measure fringe pattern shifts. An infrared laser with a mechanical shutter is used to heat a section of a flowing volume and the resulting refractive index (RI) change is detected with the OCIBD downstream as a time-dependent RI perturbation. Fluid velocity is quantified as changes in the phase difference between the shutter signal and the OCIBD detected signal in the Fourier domain. The experiments are performed in the range of 3-6 microL/h with 3sigma detection limits determined to be 0.127 nL/s. Additionally, the RI response of the system is calibrated using temperature changes as well as glycerol solutions.

  2. Shell deformation studies using holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmerter, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The buckling of shallow spherical shells under pressure has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental papers. Experimental data above the theoretical buckling load of Huang have given rise to speculation that shallow shell theory may not adequately predict the stability of nonsymmetric modes in higher-rise shells which are normally classified as shallow by the Reissner criterion. This article considers holographic interferometry as a noncontact, high-resolution method of measuring prebuckling deformations. Prebuckling deformations of a lambda = 9, h/b = 0.038 shell are Fourier-analyzed. Buckling is found to occur in an N = 5 mode as predicted by Huang's theory. The N = 4 mode was unusually stable, suggesting that even at this low value of h/b, stabilizing effects may be at work.

  3. Pulsed-Source Interferometry in Acoustic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill; Gutierrez, Roman; Tang, Tony K.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of pulsed-source interferometry and acoustic diffraction has been proposed for use in imaging subsurface microscopic defects and other features in such diverse objects as integrated-circuit chips, specimens of materials, and mechanical parts. A specimen to be inspected by this technique would be mounted with its bottom side in contact with an acoustic transducer driven by a continuous-wave acoustic signal at a suitable frequency, which could be as low as a megahertz or as high as a few hundred gigahertz. The top side of the specimen would be coupled to an object that would have a flat (when not vibrating) top surface and that would serve as the acoustical analog of an optical medium (in effect, an acoustical "optic").

  4. Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Precision Radial Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D J; Muterspaugh, M W; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Herter, T; Feuerstein, W M; Muirhead, P; Wishnow, E

    2007-03-27

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic spectral comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. The moire pattern shifts in phase in response to a Doppler shift. Moire patterns are broader than the underlying spectral features and more easily survive spectrograph blurring and common distortions. Thus, the EDI technique allows lower resolution spectrographs having relaxed optical tolerances (and therefore higher throughput) to return high precision velocity measurements, which otherwise would be imprecise for the spectrograph alone.

  5. Very high speed cw digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Carlos; de La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2006-10-01

    It is reported for the first time the use of a very high speed camera in digital holographic interferometry with an out of plane sensitivity setup. The image plane holograms of a spherical latex balloon illuminated by a cw laser were acquired at a rate of 4000 frames per second, representing a time spacing between holograms of 250 microseconds, for 512 × 512 pixels at 8 bits resolution. Two types of tests were accomplished for a proof of principle of the technique, one with no constrains on the object which meant random movements due to non controlled environmental air currents, and the other with specific controlled conditions on the object. Results presented correspond to a random sample of sequential digital holograms, chosen from a 1 second exposure, individually Fourier processed in order to perform the usual comparison by subtraction between consecutive pairs thus obtaining the phase map of the object out of plane displacement, shown as a movie.

  6. Sagnac Interferometry with a Single Atomic Clock.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R; Hush, M R; Bishop, T; Lesanovsky, I; Fernholz, T

    2015-10-16

    The Sagnac effect enables interferometric measurements of rotation with high precision. Using matter waves instead of light promises resolution enhancement by orders of magnitude that scales with particle mass. So far, the paradigm for matter wave Sagnac interferometry relies on de Broglie waves and thus on free propagation of atoms either in free fall or within waveguides. However, the Sagnac effect can be expressed as a proper time difference experienced by two observers moving in opposite directions along closed paths and has indeed been measured with atomic clocks flown around Earth. Inspired by this, we investigate an interferometer comprised of a single atomic clock. The Sagnac effect manifests as a phase shift between trapped atoms in different internal states after transportation along closed paths in opposite directions, without any free propagation. With analytic models, we quantify limitations of the scheme arising from atomic dynamics and finite temperature. Furthermore, we suggest an implementation with previously demonstrated technology.

  7. Moire Interferometry For Deformation And Strain Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Daniel

    1985-08-01

    Recent advances in high sensitivity moire interferometry are described. In-plane displacement fields are shown for very challenging problem areas: adhesive joints in tension and in bending, flexure of quasi-isotropic composite laminates, and fatigue cracks in aluminum. Reference gratings with 2400 lines/mm (60,960 //in.) were used, providing a sensitivity of 0.417 Am/fringe order (16.4 Ain./fringe order). Excellent fringe contrast was obtained in all cases, even for gradients of 64 fringes/mm (1600 fringes/in.). A four-beam optical system to produce two orthogonal virtual reference gratings was employed. The question of unknown relative displacements in two-body problems was answered by use of a soft bridge between the bodies to provide a continuous path for the fringe count.

  8. Moiré interferometry with white light.

    PubMed

    Post, D

    1979-12-15

    While high-sensitivity moiré interferometry requires monochromatic light, an auxiliary compensator grating removes the requirement. Experimental verification utilized white light for moiré interference of sensitivity 0.833 microm/fringe. Configurations readily amenable to compensation include moiré fringe multiplication by even factors and the minimum-deviation arrangement. Chromatic compensation is effective with virtual reference gratings as well as real reference gratings; in both cases the moiré interference system becomes achromatic. Compensation provides the special quality of nearly zero phase difference-an actual range of +/-pi-between interfering beams. Potential applications include use of electrical spark light sources for high-sensitivity dynamic moiré photography.

  9. Moire Interferometry for Deformation and Strain Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Daniel

    1984-12-01

    Recent advances in high sensitivity moire interferometry are described. In-plane displacement fields are shown for very challenging problem areas: adhesive joints in tension and in bending; flexure of quasi-isotropic composite laminates; and fatigue cracks in aluminum. Reference gratings with 2400 lines/mm (60,960 l/in.) were used, providing a sensitivity of 0.417 μm/fringe order (16.4 μin./fringe order). Excellent fringe contrast was obtained in all cases, even for gradients of 64 fringes/mm (1600 fringes/in.). A 4-beam optical system to produce two orthogonal virtual reference gratings was employed. The question of unknown relative displacements in two-body problems was answered by use of a soft bridge between the bodies to provide a continuous path for the fringe count.

  10. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include "tritter" and "quarter" as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics.

  11. Quantum interferometry with three-dimensional geometry

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Nicolò; Aparo, Lorenzo; Vitelli, Chiara; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Quantum interferometry uses quantum resources to improve phase estimation with respect to classical methods. Here we propose and theoretically investigate a new quantum interferometric scheme based on three-dimensional waveguide devices. These can be implemented by femtosecond laser waveguide writing, recently adopted for quantum applications. In particular, multiarm interferometers include “tritter” and “quarter” as basic elements, corresponding to the generalization of a beam splitter to a 3- and 4-port splitter, respectively. By injecting Fock states in the input ports of such interferometers, fringe patterns characterized by nonclassical visibilities are expected. This enables outperforming the quantum Fisher information obtained with classical fields in phase estimation. We also discuss the possibility of achieving the simultaneous estimation of more than one optical phase. This approach is expected to open new perspectives to quantum enhanced sensing and metrology performed in integrated photonics. PMID:23181189

  12. Endoscopic low coherence interferometry in upper airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacrétaz, Yves; Boss, Daniel; Lang, Florian; Depeursinge, Christian

    2009-07-01

    We introduce Endoscopic Low Coherence Interferometry to obtain topology of upper airways through commonly used rigid endoscopes. Quantitative dimensioning of upper airways pathologies is crucial to provide maximum health recovery chances, for example in order to choose the correct stent to treat endoluminal obstructing pathologies. Our device is fully compatible with procedures used in day-to-day examinations and can potentially be brought to bedside. Besides this, the approach described here can be almost straightforwardly adapted to other endoscopy-related field of interest, such as gastroscopy and arthroscopy. The principle of the method is first exposed, then filtering procedure used to extract the depth information is described. Finally, demonstration of the method ability to operate on biological samples is assessed through measurements on ex-vivo pork bronchi.

  13. Real-time color holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desse, Jean-Michel; Albe, Felix; Tribillon, Jean-Louis

    2002-09-01

    A new optical technique based on real-time color holographic interferometry has been developed for analyzing unsteady aerodynamic wakes in fluid mechanics or for measuring displacements and deformations in solid mechanics. The technique's feasibility is demonstrated here. It uses three coherent wavelengths produced simultaneously by a cw laser (mixed argon and krypton). Holograms are recorded on single-layer panchromatic silver halide (Slavich PFG 03C) plates. Results show the optical setup can be adjusted to obtain a uniform background color. The interference fringe pattern visualized is large and colored and exhibits a single central white fringe, which makes the zero order of the interferogram easy to identify. An application in a subsonic wind tunnel is presented, in which the unsteady wake past a cylinder is recorded at high rate.

  14. Real-time color holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Desse, Jean-Michel; Albe, Félix; Tribillon, Jean-Louis

    2002-09-01

    A new optical technique based on real-time color holographic interferometry has been developed for analyzing unsteady aerodynamic wakes in fluid mechanics or for measuring displacements and deformations in solid mechanics. The technique's feasibility is demonstrated here. It uses three coherent wavelengths produced simultaneously by a cw laser (mixed argon and krypton). Holograms are recorded on single-layer panchromatic silver halide (Slavich PFG 03C) plates. Results show the optical setup can be adjusted to obtain a uniform background color. The interference fringe pattern visualized is large and colored and exhibits a single central white fringe, which makes the zero order of the interferogram easy to identify. An application in a subsonic wind tunnel is presented, in which the unsteady wake past a cylinder is recorded at high rate.

  15. Polarization Effects Aboard the Space Interferometry Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Jason; Young, Martin; Dubovitsky, Serge; Dorsky, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    For precision displacement measurements, laser metrology is currently one of the most accurate measurements. Often, the measurement is located some distance away from the laser source, and as a result, stringent requirements are placed on the laser delivery system with respect to the state of polarization. Such is the case with the fiber distribution assembly (FDA) that is slated to fly aboard the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) next decade. This system utilizes a concatenated array of couplers, polarizers and lengthy runs of polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber to distribute linearly-polarized light from a single laser to fourteen different optical metrology measurement points throughout the spacecraft. Optical power fluctuations at the point of measurement can be traced back to the polarization extinction ration (PER) of the concatenated components, in conjunction with the rate of change in phase difference of the light along the slow and fast axes of the PM fiber.

  16. Whole Abdominopelvic Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy in the Palliative Treatment of Chemotherapy-Resistant Ovarian Cancer With Bulky Peritoneal Disease: A Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    De Meerleer, Gert; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Ost, Piet; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Makar, Amin; Speleers, Bruno; Van Belle, Simon; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our experience with whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy (WAPRT) using intensity-modulated arc therapy in the palliative treatment of chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer with bulky peritoneal disease. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and April 2008, 13 patients were treated with WAPRT using intensity-modulated arc therapy. We prescribed a dose of 33 Gy to be delivered in 22 fractions of 1.5 Gy to the abdomen and pelvis. All patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III or IV ovarian cancer at the initial diagnosis. At referral, the median age was 61 years, and the patients had been heavily pretreated with surgery and chemotherapy. All patients had symptoms from their disease, including gastrointestinal obstruction or subobstruction in 6, minor gastrointestinal symptoms in 2, pain in 4, ascites in 1, and vaginal bleeding in 2. A complete symptom or biochemical response required complete resolution of the patient's symptoms or cancer antigen-125 level. A partial response required {>=}50% resolution of these parameters. The actuarial survival was calculated from the start of radiotherapy. Results: The median overall survival was 21 weeks, with a 6-month overall survival rate of 45%. The 9 patients who completed treatment obtained a complete symptom response, except for ascites (partial response). The median and mean response duration (all symptoms grouped) was 24 and 37 weeks, respectively. Of the 6 patients presenting with obstruction or subobstruction, 4 obtained a complete symptom response (median duration, 16 weeks). Conclusion: WAPRT delivered using intensity-modulated arc therapy offers important palliation in the case of peritoneal metastatic ovarian cancer. WAPRT resolved intestinal obstruction for a substantial period.

  17. Photochemical production and loss rates of ozone at Sable Island, Nova Scotia during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993 summer intensive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duderstadt, K. A.; Carroll, M. A.; Sillman, S.; Wang, T.; Albercook, G. M.; Feng, L.; Parrish, D. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Forbes, G.

    1998-06-01

    Three weeks of summertime surface-based chemical and meteorological observations at Sable Island, Nova Scotia during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993 summer intensive are used to study instantaneous photochemical production and loss rates of ozone by means of a numerical photochemical model. Results are most sensitive to the averaging scheme of data used to constrain the model and the ambient variability of the measurements. Model simulations driven by a time series of 5 min averaged data, most representative of the chemistry at the site, yield an average net photochemical ozone production of 3.6 ppbv/d. Estimates of net ozone production designed to filter out local sources, by using 1000-1400 LT median values of observations to drive the model and by excluding short-lived hydrocarbons, give values ranging from 1 to 4 ppbv/d. These positive values of net ozone production within the marine boundary layer over Sable Island demonstrate the impact of polluted continental plumes on the background photochemistry of the region during the intensive. The dominant ambient variables controlling photochemical production and loss rates of ozone at the site during the measurement campaign appear to be levels of nitrogen oxides, ozone, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and solar intensity determined by cloud cover. The model partitioning of nitrogen oxides agrees for the most part with measurements, lending credence to calculated photochemical production and loss rates of ozone as well as inferred levels of peroxy radicals not measured at the site. Discrepancies, however, often occur during episodes of intermittent cloud cover, fog, and rain, suggesting the influence of cloud processes on air masses reaching the site.

  18. Moire Interferometry With Chromatic 1Ight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnek, Robert

    1986-12-01

    Experimental observations and measurements are essential sources of information for the correct development of mathematical models of real materials. Moire interferometry offers high sensitivity in full-field measurements of the in-plane displacements on the surface of a specimen. Although it is a powerful method in experimental stress analysis, it has some shortcomings. One is that existing systems require highly coherent light. The only sufficient source of light for this application is a long cavity laser, which is relatively expensive and at best quite cumbersome. Another shortcoming is that measurements must be performed in a vibration-free environment, such as that found on a holographic table. These requirements limit the use of existing moire interferometers to a holographic laboratory. In this publication a modified concept of compensation is developed that permits the use of a chromatic source of light in a compact moire system. The compensator provides order in the angles of incident light for every separate wavelength, so that the virtual reference gratings created by each wavelength in a continuous spectrum are identical in frequency and spatial position. The result is a virtual reference grating that behaves exactly like one created in coherent light. With this development the use of a laser diode, which is a noncoherent light source of tiny dimensions, becomes practical. The special configuration of the optics that create the virtual grating allows its synchronization with the specimen grating and leads to the design of an interferometer that is relatively insensitive to the vibrations found in a mechanical testing laboratory. Sensitivity to relative motion is analyzed theoretically. This development provides the opportunity to apply moire interferometry to solid mechanics problems that cannot be studied in an optics laboratory. Experimental verification of the optical concepts is provided.

  19. Difference Holographic Interferometry Of Light-Bulbs At Direct Transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyimesi, F.; Fuzessy, Z.

    1990-04-01

    Difference holographic interferometry makes the direct interferometric comparison of two objects possible by using holographic illuminations. In the present paper the case of phase objects is investigated at direct transillumination.

  20. Determination of thin hydrodynamic lubricating film thickness using dichromatic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Wong, P L; Guo, F; Liu, H C

    2014-09-10

    This paper introduces the application of dichromatic interferometry for the study of hydrodynamic lubrication. In conventional methods, two beams with different colors are projected consecutively on a static object. By contrast, the current method deals with hydrodynamic lubricated contacts under running conditions and two lasers with different colors are projected simultaneously to form interference images. Dichromatic interferometry incorporates the advantages of monochromatic and chromatic interferometry, which are widely used in lubrication research. This new approach was evaluated statically and dynamically by measuring the inclination of static wedge films and the thickness of the hydrodynamic lubricating film under running conditions, respectively. Results show that dichromatic interferometry can facilitate real-time determination of lubricating film thickness and is well suited for the study of transient or dynamic lubricating problems.