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Sample records for intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based stereotactic

  1. Phase I dose-escalation study of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Won; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Ik Jae; Woo, Joong Yeol; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase I trial was conducted to determine feasibility and toxicity of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results Eighteen patients (22 lesions) were enrolled. With no DLT at 52 Gy (13 Gy/fraction), protocol was amended for further escalation to 60 Gy (15 Gy/fraction). Radiologic complete response rate was 88.9%. Two outfield intrahepatic, 2 distant, 4 concurrent local and outfield, and 1 concurrent local, outfield and distant failures (no local failure at dose levels 3–4) occurred. The worst toxicity was grade 3 hematologic in five patients, with no gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1. At median follow-up of 28 months for living patients, 2-year local control, progression-free (PFS), and overall survival rates were 71.3%, 49.4% and 69.3%, respectively. Multi-segmental recurrences prior to SBRT was independent prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.033). Materials and Methods Eligible patients had Child-Pugh's class A or B, unresectable HCC, ≤ 3 lesions, and cumulative tumor diameter ≤ 6 cm. Starting at 36 Gy in four fractions, dose was escalated with 2 Gy/fraction per dose-level. CTCAE v 3.0 ≥ grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and radiation induced liver disease defined dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Conclusions Helical IMRT-based SBRT was tolerable and showed encouraging results. Confirmatory phase II trial is underway. PMID:27213593

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Excellent Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin; Reddy, Chandana; Gajdos, Stephen; Kolar, Matthew; Clouser, Edward; Djemil, Toufik

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams for medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to November 2006, a total of 26 patients with 28 lesions received SBRT using a Novalis/BrainLAB system. Immobilization involved a Bodyfix vacuum cushion. A weighted abdominal belt limited respiratory excursion. Computed tomographic simulation images were acquired at rest, full inhalation, and full exhalation and were merged to generate an internal gross tumor volume (ITV). Dose was prescribed to cover the planning target volume (PTV), defined as PTV = ITV + 3-5 mm set-up margin. Heterogeneity corrections were used. Delivery of 50 Gy in five sequential fractions typically used seven nonopposing, noncoplanar beams. Image-guided target verification was provided by BrainLAB-ExacTrac. Results: Among the 26 patients, the mean age was 74 years (range, 49-88 years). Of the patients, 50% were male and 50% female. The median Karnofsky performance status was 70 (range, 40-100). The median follow-up was 30.9 months (range, 10.4-51.4 months). Tissue diagnosis was contraindicated in seven patients (26.9%). There were 22 T1 (78.6%) and six T2 (21.4%) tumors. The median conformality index was 1.38 (range, 1.12-1.8). The median heterogeneity index was 1.08 (range, 1.04-1.2). One patient (3.6%) developed acute Grade 3 dyspnea and one patient developed late Grade 2 chest wall pain. Actuarial local control and overall survival at 3 years were 94.4% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions: Use of IMRT-based delivery of SBRT using restriction of tumor motion in medically inoperable lung cancer demonstrates excellent local control and favorable survival.

  3. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  4. Optimization of Isocenter Location for Intensity Modulated Stereotactic Treatment of Small Intracranial Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Salter, Bill J. Fuss, Martin; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Papanikolaou, Niko; Hollingshaus, Scott; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of isocenter location on treatment plan quality for intensity-modulated stereotactic treatment of small intracranial lesions. Methods and Materials: For 18 patients previously treated by stereotactic-intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a retrospective virtual planning study was conducted wherein the impact of isocenter location on plan quality was measured. Treatment indications studied included six arteriovenous malformations, six acoustic neuromas, and six intracranial metastases, ranging in volume from 0.71 to 3.21 cm{sup 3} (mean = 2.26 cm{sup 3}), 1.08 to 2.84 cm{sup 3} (mean = 1.73 cm{sup 3}), and 0.19 to 2.30 cm{sup 3} (mean = 0.79 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Variation of isocenter location causes the geometric grid of pencil beams into which the target is segmented for intensity-modulated treatment to be altered. The impact of this pencil-beam-grid redefinition on achievable conformity index was quantified for three collimators (Varian Millennium 120; BrainLab MM3; Nomos binary Mimic) and three treatment planning systems (TPS; Varian Eclipse v6.5; BrainLab BrainScan v5.31; Best-Nomos Corvus v6.2), resulting in the evaluation of 3,446 treatment plans. Results: For all patients, collimator, and TPS combinations studied, a significant variation in plan quality was observed as a function of isocenter and pencil-beam-grid relocation. Optimization of isocenter location resulted in treatment plan conformity variations as large as 109% (min = 15%, mean = 51%, max = 109%). Conclusion: Optimization of isocenter location for IMRT/IMRS treatment of small intracranial lesions in which pencil-beam dimensions are comparable to target dimensions, can result in significant improvements in treatment plan quality.

  5. Optimization of isocenter location for intensity modulated stereotactic treatment of small intracranial targets.

    PubMed

    Salter, Bill J; Fuss, Martin; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Papanikolaou, Niko; Hollingshaus, Scott; Shrieve, Dennis C

    2009-02-01

    To quantify the impact of isocenter location on treatment plan quality for intensity-modulated stereotactic treatment of small intracranial lesions. For 18 patients previously treated by stereotactic-intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a retrospective virtual planning study was conducted wherein the impact of isocenter location on plan quality was measured. Treatment indications studied included six arteriovenous malformations, six acoustic neuromas, and six intracranial metastases, ranging in volume from 0.71 to 3.21 cm(3) (mean = 2.26 cm(3)), 1.08 to 2.84 cm(3) (mean = 1.73 cm(3)), and 0.19 to 2.30 cm(3) (mean = 0.79 cm(3)), respectively. Variation of isocenter location causes the geometric grid of pencil beams into which the target is segmented for intensity-modulated treatment to be altered. The impact of this pencil-beam-grid redefinition on achievable conformity index was quantified for three collimators (Varian Millennium 120; BrainLab MM3; Nomos binary Mimic) and three treatment planning systems (TPS; Varian Eclipse v6.5; BrainLab BrainScan v5.31; Best-Nomos Corvus v6.2), resulting in the evaluation of 3,446 treatment plans. For all patients, collimator, and TPS combinations studied, a significant variation in plan quality was observed as a function of isocenter and pencil-beam-grid relocation. Optimization of isocenter location resulted in treatment plan conformity variations as large as 109% (min = 15%, mean = 51%, max = 109%). Optimization of isocenter location for IMRT/IMRS treatment of small intracranial lesions in which pencil-beam dimensions are comparable to target dimensions, can result in significant improvements in treatment plan quality.

  6. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) for skull-base meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yenice, Kamil M. . E-mail: kyenice@radonc.uchicago.edu; Narayana, Ashwatha; Chang, Jenghwa; Gutin, Philip H.; Amols, Howard I.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits of a micromultileaf collimator ({mu}MLC) -based intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) in skull-base meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with inoperable or recurrent small-volume (1.7-15.5 cc) skull-base meningiomas were treated with IMSRT to 54 Gy in 30 fractions using a {mu}MLC in the dynamic mode. IMSRT plan quality was evaluated in comparison with the conformal stereotactic radiotherapy technique, using the same beam arrangement and static delivery with the {mu}MLC. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and organs at risk. The conformity and uniformity metrics, as well as normal-tissue complication probabilities, were calculated for the two techniques. Follow-up with MRI and clinical examination was performed at regular intervals. Results: With a mean follow-up of 17 months, local control has been achieved in all cases, and no treatment-related toxicities have been noted. For cavernous sinus tumors overlapping with optic apparatus, IMSRT has improved the dose uniformity within the target on average by 8%, which resulted in a reduction of the estimated chiasm normal-tissue complication probability by up to 65%. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiotherapy can be safely delivered to improve the dose distributions in select skull-base meningiomas with an appreciable concomitant dose reduction to involved critical structures. Longer follow-up with a larger patient group is necessary to demonstrate sustained tumor control and low morbidity with IMSRT for small inoperable, recurrent, or subtotally resected meningiomas.

  7. Intensity modulated or fractionated stereotactic reirradiation in patients with recurrent nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report our experience with intensity-modulated or stereotactic reirradiation in patients suffering from recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma Patients and Methods The records of 17 patients with recurrent nasopharygeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated (n = 14) or stereotactic (n = 3) reirradiation in our institution were reviewed. Median age was 53 years and most patients (n = 14) were male. The majority of tumors showed undifferentiated histology (n = 14) and infiltration of intracranial structures (n = 12). Simultaneous systemic therapy was applied in 8 patients. Initial treatment covered the gross tumor volume with a median dose of 66 Gy (50-72 Gy) and the cervical nodal regions with a median dose of 56 Gy (50-60 Gy). Reirradiation was confined to the local relapse region with a median dose of 50.4 Gy (36-64Gy), resulting in a median cumulative dose of 112 Gy (91-134 Gy). The median time interval between initial and subsequent treatment was 52 months (6-132). Results The median follow up for the entire cohort was 20 months and 31 months for survivors (10-84). Five patients (29%) developed isolated local recurrences and three patients (18%) suffered from isolated nodal recurrences. The actuarial 1- and 2-year rates of local/locoregional control were 76%/59% and 69%/52%, respectively. Six patients developed distant metastasis during the follow up period. The median actuarial overall survival for the entire cohort was 23 months, transferring into 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival rates of 82%, 44% and 37%. Univariate subset analyses showed significantly increased overall survival and local control for patients with less advanced rT stage, retreatment doses > 50 Gy, concurrent systemic treatment and complete response. Severe late toxicity (Grad III) attributable to reirradiation occurred in five patients (29%), particularly as hearing loss, alterations of taste/smell, cranial neuropathy, trismus and xerostomia. Conclusion Reirradiation with

  8. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  9. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  10. Frameless single-isocenter intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases.

    PubMed

    Lau, Steven K M; Zhao, Xiao; Carmona, Ruben; Knipprath, Erik; Simpson, Daniel R; Nath, Sameer K; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Hattangadi, Jona A; Chen, Clark C; Murphy, Kevin T

    2014-08-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is well accepted treatment for patients with intracranial metastases, but the role of frameless radiosurgery is not well defined. Here, we describe our clinical experience applying a novel single-isocenter technique to frameless intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMRS) for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases. Between 2006 and 2012, 100 consecutive patients received frameless IMRS for multiple intracranial metastases using a single, centrally-located isocenter. Among these, 29 patients were treated for progressive or recurrent intracranial disease. A total of 465 metastases (median, 4 per patient, range, 2-18) were treated to a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 15-50 Gy). Follow-up including clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) occurred every 3 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 4.3 months (range, 0.2-58.3 months), with 83 patients (83.0%) followed until their death. For the remaining 17 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 9.2 months (range, 2.2-58.3 months). Overall survival at 6 months was 49.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 35.3-63.6%]. Local control at 6 and 12 months was 88.9% (95% CI, 79.1-98.6%) and 81.5% (95% CI, 65.2-97.7%), respectively. Regional failure was observed in 39 patients (39%), and 25 patients (25%) received salvage therapy. Grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicity was observed in 4 patients (4%) and included intracranial hemorrhage, seizure, and radionecrosis. Median total treatment time was 17.2 minutes (range, 2.8-55.3 minutes). Single-isocenter IMRS for multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes comparable to those of conventional radiosurgery techniques.

  11. Frameless single-isocenter intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Steven K. M.; Zhao, Xiao; Carmona, Ruben; Knipprath, Erik; Simpson, Daniel R.; Nath, Sameer K.; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Hattangadi, Jona A.; Chen, Clark C.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is well accepted treatment for patients with intracranial metastases, but the role of frameless radiosurgery is not well defined. Here, we describe our clinical experience applying a novel single-isocenter technique to frameless intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMRS) for simultaneous treatment of multiple intracranial metastases. Methods and materials Between 2006 and 2012, 100 consecutive patients received frameless IMRS for multiple intracranial metastases using a single, centrally-located isocenter. Among these, 29 patients were treated for progressive or recurrent intracranial disease. A total of 465 metastases (median, 4 per patient, range, 2–18) were treated to a median dose of 20 Gy (range, 15–50 Gy). Follow-up including clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) occurred every 3 months. Results Median follow-up for all patients was 4.3 months (range, 0.2–58.3 months), with 83 patients (83.0%) followed until their death. For the remaining 17 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 9.2 months (range, 2.2–58.3 months). Overall survival at 6 months was 49.5% [95% confidence interval (CI), 35.3–63.6%]. Local control at 6 and 12 months was 88.9% (95% CI, 79.1–98.6%) and 81.5% (95% CI, 65.2–97.7%), respectively. Regional failure was observed in 39 patients (39%), and 25 patients (25%) received salvage therapy. Grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicity was observed in 4 patients (4%) and included intracranial hemorrhage, seizure, and radionecrosis. Median total treatment time was 17.2 minutes (range, 2.8–55.3 minutes). Conclusions Single-isocenter IMRS for multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes comparable to those of conventional radiosurgery techniques. PMID:25821723

  12. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  13. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Oehler, Julia; Brachwitz, Tim; Wendt, Thomas G; Banz, Nico; Walther, Mario; Wiezorek, Tilo

    2013-07-24

    Neurocognitive decline observed after radiotherapy (RT) for brain tumors in long time survivors is attributed to radiation exposure of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The potential of sparing capabilities for both structures by optimized intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) is investigated. Brain tumors were irradiated by stereotactic 3D conformal RT or IMSRT using m3 collimator optimized for PTV and for sparing of the conventional OARs (lens, retina, optic nerve, chiasm, cochlea, brain stem and the medulla oblongata). Retrospectively both hippocampi and SVZ were added to the list of OAR and their dose volume histograms were compared to those from two newly generated IMSRT plans using 7 or 14 beamlets (IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14) dedicated for optimized additional sparing of these structures. Conventional OAR constraints were kept constant. Impact of plan complexity and planning target volume (PTV) topography on sparing of both hippocampi and SVZ, conformity index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and quality of coverage (QoC) were analyzed. Limits of agreement were used to compare sparing of stem cell niches with either IMSRT-7 or IMSRT-14. The influence of treatment technique related to the topography ratio between PTV and OARs, realized in group A-D, was assessed by a mixed model. In 47 patients CI (p ≤  0.003) and HI (p  <  0.001) improved by IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14, QoC remained stable (p  ≥  0.50) indicating no compromise in radiotherapy. 90% of normal brain was exposed to a significantly higher dose using IMSRT. IMSRT-7 plans resulted in significantly lower biologically effective doses at all four neural stem cell structures, while contralateral neural stem cells are better spared compared to ipsilateral. A further increase of the number of beamlets (IMSRT-14) did not improve sparing significantly, so IMSRT-7 and IMSRT-14 can be used interchangeable. Patients with tumors contacting neither the subventricular zone nor the

  14. Comparison of intensity-modulated tomotherapy with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Khoo, V S; Oldham, M; Adams, E J; Bedford, J L; Webb, S; Brada, M

    1999-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers the potential to more closely conform dose distributions to the target, and spare organs at risk (OAR). Its clinical value is still being defined. The present study aims to compare IMRT with stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for patients with medium size convex-shaped brain tumors. Five patients planned with SCRT were replanned with the IMRT-tomotherapy method using the Peacock system (Nomos Corporation). The planning target volume (PTV) and relevant OAR were assessed, and compared relative to SCRT plans using dose statistics, dose-volume histograms (DVH), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) stereotactic radiosurgery criteria. The median and mean PTV were 78 cm3 and 85 cm3 respectively (range 62-119 cm3). The differences in PTV doses for the whole group (Peacock-SCRT +/-1 SD) were 2%+/-1.8 (minimum PTV), and 0.1%+/-1.9 (maximum PTV). The PTV homogeneity achieved by Peacock was 12.1%+/-1.7 compared to 13.9%+/-1.3 with SCRT. Using RTOG guidelines, Peacock plans provided acceptable PTV coverage for all 5/5 plans compared to minor coverage deviations in 4/5 SCRT plans; acceptable homogeneity index for both plans (Peacock = 1.1 vs. SCRT = 1.2); and comparable conformity index (1.4 each). As a consequence of the transaxial method of arc delivery, the optic nerves received mean and maximum doses that were 11.1 to 11.6%, and 10.3 to 15.2% higher respectively with Peacock plan. The maximum optic lens, and brainstem dose were 3.1 to 4.8% higher, and 0.6% lower respectively with Peacock plan. However, all doses remained below the tolerance threshold (5 Gy for lens, and 50 Gy for optic nerves) and were clinically acceptable. The Peacock method provided improved PTV coverage, albeit small, in this group of convex tumors. Although the OAR doses were higher using the Peacock plans, all doses remained within the clinically defined threshold and were clinically acceptable. Further improvements may be

  15. Neural stem cell sparing by linac based intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy in intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurocognitive decline observed after radiotherapy (RT) for brain tumors in long time survivors is attributed to radiation exposure of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). The potential of sparing capabilities for both structures by optimized intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy (IMSRT) is investigated. Methods Brain tumors were irradiated by stereotactic 3D conformal RT or IMSRT using m3 collimator optimized for PTV and for sparing of the conventional OARs (lens, retina, optic nerve, chiasm, cochlea, brain stem and the medulla oblongata). Retrospectively both hippocampi and SVZ were added to the list of OAR and their dose volume histograms were compared to those from two newly generated IMSRT plans using 7 or 14 beamlets (IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14) dedicated for optimized additional sparing of these structures. Conventional OAR constraints were kept constant. Impact of plan complexity and planning target volume (PTV) topography on sparing of both hippocampi and SVZ, conformity index (CI), the homogeneity index (HI) and quality of coverage (QoC) were analyzed. Limits of agreement were used to compare sparing of stem cell niches with either IMSRT-7 or IMSRT-14. The influence of treatment technique related to the topography ratio between PTV and OARs, realized in group A-D, was assessed by a mixed model. Results In 47 patients CI (p ≤ 0.003) and HI (p < 0.001) improved by IMSRT-7, IMSRT-14, QoC remained stable (p ≥ 0.50) indicating no compromise in radiotherapy. 90% of normal brain was exposed to a significantly higher dose using IMSRT. IMSRT-7 plans resulted in significantly lower biologically effective doses at all four neural stem cell structures, while contralateral neural stem cells are better spared compared to ipsilateral. A further increase of the number of beamlets (IMSRT-14) did not improve sparing significantly, so IMSRT-7 and IMSRT-14 can be used interchangeable. Patients with tumors contacting neither the

  16. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  17. [Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: evidence-based medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Martin, F; Lapeyre, M

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there have been many technical advances in radiation therapy, such as the spread of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy, and the rise of stereotactic body radiation therapy. By allowing better dose-to-target conformation and thus better organs at risk-sparing, these techniques seem very promising, particularly in the field of head and neck tumors. The present work aims at analyzing the level of evidence and recommendation supporting the use of high-technology radiotherapy in head and neck neoplasms, by reviewing the available literature.

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of compensator intensity modulation-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Y; Nakayama, H; Itonaga, T; Shiraishi, S; Okubo, M; Mikami, R; Sugahara, S; Tokuuye, K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the dosimetry of compensator intensity modulation-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) [non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ncIMRT)], its use was compared with that of three-dimensional conformation-based SBRT, for patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 21 consecutive patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with ncIMRT or SBRT at Tokyo Medical University. To compare the two techniques, ncIMRT and SBRT plans for each patient were generated, where the planning target volume (PTV) coverages were adjusted to be equivalent to each other. The prescribed dose was set as 75 Gy in 30 fractions. PTV coverage, conformity index, conformation number (CN) and homogeneity index (HI) were used to compare the two strategies. There was no statistically significant difference between PTV coverage for the 100%, 95% and 90% dose levels in the SBRT plan and those in the ncIMRT plan. The CN values were 0.53 ± 0.13 in the SBRT plan and 0.72 ± 0.10 in the ncIMRT plan. These values were significantly better than those of the SBRT plan (p < 0.001). The HI in the ncIMRT plan was 1.04 ± 0.03%, which was also significantly better than that of SBRT. The ncIMRT plan provided superior conformity and reduced the doses to the lung for patients with Stage I NSCLC. The delivery technique with compensator intensity modulation-based SBRT was evaluated. Concerning target motion, this is thought to be more robust and safer than SBRT for early-stage NSCLC.

  19. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within {+-}1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient {>=}1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  20. Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors: A Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Andrea; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Mans, Anton; Belderbos, Jose S.; Damen, Eugene M.F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques with a limited number of segments for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: For a random selection of 27 patients eligible for SBRT, coplanar and noncoplanar IMRT and coplanar VMAT (using SmartArc) treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle{sup 3} and compared. In addition, film measurements were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the skin dose for the different treatment techniques. Results: Using VMAT, the delivery times could be reduced to an average of 6.6 min compared with 23.7 min with noncoplanar IMRT. The mean dose to the healthy lung was 4.1 Gy for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and 4.2 Gy for coplanar IMRT. The volume of healthy lung receiving >5 Gy and >20 Gy was 18.0% and 5.4% for VMAT, 18.5% and 5.0% for noncoplanar IMRT, and 19.4% and 5.7% for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The dose conformity at 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose of 54 Gy was 1.13 and 5.17 for VMAT, 1.11 and 4.80 for noncoplanar IMRT and 1.12 and 5.31 for coplanar IMRT, respectively. The measured skin doses were comparable for VMAT and noncoplanar IMRT and slightly greater for coplanar IMRT. Conclusions: Coplanar VMAT for SBRT for early-stage lung cancer achieved plan quality and skin dose levels comparable to those using noncoplanar IMRT and slightly better than those with coplanar IMRT. In addition, the delivery time could be reduced by {<=}70% with VMAT.

  1. Single-isocenter frameless intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery for simultaneous treatment of multiple brain metastases: clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sameer K; Lawson, Joshua D; Simpson, Daniel R; Vanderspek, Lauren; Wang, Jia-Zhu; Alksne, John F; Ciacci, Joseph; Mundt, Arno J; Murphy, Kevin T

    2010-09-01

    To describe our clinical experience using a unique single-isocenter technique for frameless intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IM-SRS) to treat multiple brain metastases. Twenty-six patients with a median of 5 metastases (range, 2-13) underwent optically guided frameless IM-SRS using a single, centrally located isocenter. Median prescription dose was 18 Gy (range, 14-25). Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical examination occurred every 2-4 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 3.3 months (range, 0.2-21.3), with 20 of 26 patients (77%) followed up until their death. For the remaining 6 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 14.6 months (range, 9.3-18.0). Total treatment time ranged from 9.0 to 38.9 minutes (median, 21.0). Actuarial 6- and 12-month overall survivals were 50% (95% confidence interval [C.I.], 31-70%) and 38% (95% C.I., 19-56%), respectively. Actuarial 6- and 12-month local control (LC) rates were 97% (95% C.I., 93-100%) and 83% (95% C.I., 71-96%), respectively. Tumors 1.5 cm (98% vs. 90%, p = 0.008). New intracranial metastatic disease occurring outside of the treatment volume was observed in 7 patients. Grade >or=3 toxicity occurred in 2 patients (8%). Frameless IM-SRS using a single-isocenter approach for treating multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes that compare favorably with those of conventional SRS in a much shorter treatment time (<40 minutes). Given its faster treatment time, this technique is appealing to both patients and personnel in busy clinics. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of density variation on photon dose calculation and its impact on intensity modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Liang, Jian; Stanhope, Carl W; Yan, Di

    2016-10-01

    Inaccurate density information may introduce dose calculation errors when inhomogeneity correction is applied. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of density variation on photon dose calculation accuracy using the convolution/superposition (CS) algorithm with the focus on newer treatment technologies including intensity modulated radiotherapy, volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy, and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Calculations were first performed using simple inhomogeneity phantoms in order to determine clinically relevant tolerance levels for different tissue types. The clinical validity of these tolerance levels was then demonstrated by evaluating their dosimetric impact on clinical treatment plans. The dose difference was examined by comparing the dose-volume histogram statistics and the spatial distribution of dose errors calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In order to gain some insight into this issue for the Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm, the authors also performed additional validation using a MC dose calculation system. For soft tissue and bone, the tolerance levels determined from this study appear to be consistent with the values previously calculated using simpler inhomogeneity correction methods. However, the tolerance level for low density lung tissue has been found to be much smaller than what previous studies had reported. The results from this study also suggest that if density variation is restricted within ±0.02, ±0.03, and ±0.10 g/cm(3) for lung, soft tissue, and bone, respectively, the resulting dose error in target volumes can be limited to <2% for most clinical cases and <3% for more challenging lung SBRT cases. When the same amount of density variation is introduced, MC algorithm yields ∼0.3%-0.9% and ∼0.0%-1.2% smaller dose errors for the target and organs-at-risk as compared to CS. It is important to include lung substitute material into the periodic quality assurance of CT simulators and treatment

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost for Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: The Georgetown University Experience.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Catherine; Kress, Marie-Adele; Cyr, Robyn A; Chen, Leonard N; Yung, Thomas M; Bullock, Elizabeth G; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is emerging as a minimally invasive alternative to brachytherapy to deliver highly conformal, dose--escalated radiation therapy (RT) to the prostate. SBRT alone may not adequately cover the tumor extensions outside the prostate commonly seen in unfavorable prostate cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with high dose rate brachytherapy boost is a proven effective therapy for unfavorable prostate cancer. This study reports on early prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer-specific quality of life (QOL) outcomes in a cohort of unfavorable patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and SBRT boost. Prostate cancer patients treated with SBRT (19.5 Gy in three fractions) followed by fiducial-guided IMRT (45-50.4 Gy) from March 2008 to September 2012 were included in this retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition. Patients completed the expanded prostate cancer index composite (EPIC)-26 at baseline, 1 month after the completion of RT, every 3 months for the first year, then every 6 months for a minimum of 2 years. One hundred eight patients (4 low-, 45 intermediate-, and 59 high-risk) with median age of 74 years completed treatment, with median follow-up of 4.4 years. Sixty-four percent of the patients received androgen deprivation therapy prior to the initiation of RT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 100 and 89.8% for intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. At the initiation of RT, 9 and 5% of men felt their urinary and bowel function was a moderate to big problem, respectively. Mean EPIC urinary and bowel function and bother scores exhibited transient declines, with subsequent return to near baseline. At 2 years posttreatment, 13.7 and 5% of men felt their urinary and bowel function was a moderate to big problem, respectively. At 3-year follow-up, biochemical control

  4. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Central Nervous System and Head and Neck Lesions, Using a Conformal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy System (Peacock™ System)

    PubMed Central

    Ammirati, Mario; Bernardo, Antonio; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Yakoob, Richard; Al-Ghazi, Matthew; Kuo, Jeffrey; Ammirati, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate single-fraction or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of central nervous system (CNS) and head and neck lesions using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a commercially available system (Peacock™, Nomos Corporation, Sewickley, PA). This system allows tomotherapeutic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation, that is, the slice-by-slice treatment of the volume of interest with an intensity-modulated beam, making the delivery of highly conformal radiation to the target possible in both single or multiple fractions mode. During an 18-month period, 43 (21 males and 22 females) patients were treated, using a removable cranial screw-fixation device. Ages ranged from 10 to 77 years (mean, 52.2; median, 53.5). Intra- and extra-axial lesions, including head and neck malignancies and spine metastases, were treated. Clinical target volume ranged from 0.77 to 195 cm3 (mean, 47.8; median, 29.90). The dose distribution was normalized to the maximum and was prescribed, in most cases, at the 80% or 90% isodose line (range, 65 to 96%; median, 85%; mean, 83.4%) and ranged from 14 to 80 Gy (mean, 48; median, 50). The number of fractions ranged from 1 to 40 (mean, 23; median, 25). In all but one patient, 90% of the prescription isodose line covered 100% of the clinical target volume. The heterogeneity index (the ratio between the maximum radiation dose and the prescribed dose) ranged between 1.0 and 1.50, whereas the conformity index (the ratio between the volume encompassed by the prescription isodose line and the clinical target volume) ranged between 1.0 and 4.5. There were no complications related to the radiation treatment. With a median follow-up of 6 months, more than 70% of our patients showed decreased lesion size. Stereotactic IMRT of CNS and head and neck lesions can be delivered safely and accurately. The Peacock system delivers stereotactic radiation in single or multiple fractions and has no volume limitations

  5. Hypofractionated Boost to the Dominant Tumor Region With Intensity Modulated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Sequential Dose Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miralbell, Raymond; Molla, Meritxell; Rouzaud, Michel; Hidalgo, Alberto; Toscas, Jose Ignacio; Lozano, Joan; Sanz, Sergi B.Sc.; Ares, Carmen; Jorcano, Sandra; Linero, Dolors; Escude, Lluis

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, tolerability, and preliminary outcomes in patients with prostate cancer treated according to a hypofractionated dose escalation protocol to boost the dominant tumor-bearing region of the prostate. Methods and Materials: After conventional fractionated external radiotherapy to 64 to 64.4Gy, 50 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer were treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost under stereotactic conditions to a reduced prostate volume to the dominant tumor region. A rectal balloon inflated with 60cc of air was used for internal organ immobilization. Five, 8, and 8 patients were sequentially treated with two fractions of 5, 6, or 7Gy, respectively (normalized total dose in 2Gy/fraction [NTD{sub 2Gy}] < 100Gy, low-dose group), whereas 29 patients received two fractions of 8Gy each (NTD{sub 2Gy} > 100Gy, high-dose group). Androgen deprivation was given to 33 patients. Acute and late toxicities were assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scoring system. Results: Two patients presented with Grade 3 acute urinary toxicity. The 5-year probabilities of {>=}Grade 2 late urinary and late low gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity-free survival were 82.2% {+-} 7.4% and 72.2% {+-} 7.6%, respectively. The incidence and severity of acute or late toxicities were not correlated with low- vs. high-dose groups, pelvic irradiation, age, or treatment with or without androgen deprivation. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (b-DFS) and disease-specific survival were 98% {+-} 1.9% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy hypofractionated boost dose escalation under stereotactic conditions was feasible, and showed excellent outcomes with acceptable long-term toxicity. This approach may well be considered an alternative to high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

  6. Dosimetric comparisons of helical tomotherapy treatment plans and step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery treatment plans in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui . E-mail: chan@coh.org; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Pezner, Richard D.; Chen Yijen; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose conformity, dose homogeneity, and dose gradient in helical tomotherapy treatment plans for stereotactic radiosurgery, and compare results with step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients were selected with a mean tumor size of 14.65 {+-} 11.2 cm{sup 3}. Original step-and-shoot IMRS treatment plans used coplanar fields because of the constraint of the beam stopper. Retrospective step-and-shoot IMRS plans were generated using noncoplanar fields. Helical tomotherapy treatment plans were generated using the tomotherapy planning station. Dose conformity index, dose gradient score index, and homogeneity index were used in plan intercomparisons. Results: Noncoplanar IMRS plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, but not dose homogeneity, compared with coplanar IMRS plans. Tomotherapy plans increased dose conformity and dose gradient, yet increased dose heterogeneity compared with noncoplanar IMRS plans. The average dose conformity index values were 1.53 {+-} 0.38, 1.35 {+-} 0.15, and 1.26 {+-} 0.10 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The average dose homogeneity index values were 1.15 {+-} 0.05, 1.13 {+-} 0.04, and 1.18 {+-} 0.09 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean dose gradient score index values were 1.37 {+-} 19.08, 22.32 {+-} 19.20, and 43.28 {+-} 13.78 in coplanar IMRS, noncoplanar IMRS, and tomotherapy plans, respectively. The mean treatment time in tomotherapy was 42 {+-} 16 min. Conclusions: We were able to achieve better dose conformity and dose gradient in tomotherapy plans compared with step-and-shoot IMRS plans for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery. However, tomotherapy treatment time was significantly larger than that in step-and-shoot IMRS.

  7. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  8. Clinical Value of [{sup 11}C]Methionine PET for Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Masayuki; Shinoda, Jun; Aki, Tatsuki; Yonezawa, Shingo; Ito, Takeshi; Asano, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Mikito; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-labeled methionine-positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for stereotactic radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (SRT-IMRT) in metastatic brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-two metastatic brain tumors were examined. All tumors were treated with SRT-IMRT using a helical tomotherapy system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined and drawn on the stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) image, taking into account the respective contributions of MR imaging and MET-PET. Planning target volume (PTV) encompassed the GTV-PET plus a 2-mm margin. SRT-IMRT was performed, keeping the dose for PTV at 25-35 Gy in 5 fractions. The ratio of the mean value of MET uptake to the contralateral normal brain (L/N ratio) was plotted for the PTV prior to SRT-IMRT, at 3 months following SRT-IMRT, and at 6 months following SRT-IMRT. Tumor characteristic changes of MET uptake before and after SRT-IMRT were evaluated quantitatively, comparing them with MRI examination. Results: Mean {+-} SD L/N ratios were 1.95 {+-} 0.83, 1.18 {+-} 0.21, and 1.12 {+-} 0.25 in the pre-SRT-IMRT group, in the 3 months post-SRT-IMRT group, and in the 6 months post-SRT-IMRT group, respectively. Differences in the mean L/N ratio between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 3-month post-SRT-IMRT group and between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 6 month post-SRT-IMRT group were statistically significant, irrespective of MRI examination. Conclusions: We showed examples of metastatic lesions demonstrating significant decreases in MET uptake following SRT-IMRT. MET-PET seems to have a potential role in providing additional information, although MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up after SRT-IMRT. The present study is a preliminary approach, but to more clearly define the impact of PET-based radiosurgical assessment, further experimental and clinical analyses are required.

  9. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal targets using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc: feasibility and clinical preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Bignardi, Mario; Alongi, Filippo; Fogliata, Antonella; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Castiglioni, Simona; Pentimalli, Sara; Tozzi, Angelo; Cozzi, Luca

    2011-05-01

    To report early clinical experience in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered using volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy with RapidArc (RA) in patients with primary or metastatic tumours at abdominal sites. Thirty-seven consecutive patients were treated using RA. Of these, 16 had primary or metastatic liver tumours, nine had pancreatic cancer and 12 a nodal metastasis in the retro-peritoneum. Dose prescription varied from 45 to 75 Gy to the Clinical Target Volume in 3 to 6 fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months (6-22). Early local control and toxicity were investigated and reported. Planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk were met in most cases. Delivery time ranged from 2.8 ± 0.3 to 9.2 ± 2.4 minutes and pre-treatment plan verification resulted in a Gamma Agreement Index from 95.3 ± 3.8 to 98.3 ± 1.7%. At the time of analysis, local control (freedom from progression) at six months, was assessable in 24 of 37 patients and was achieved in 19 patients with a crude rate of 79.2%. Seven patients experienced treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced a mild and transient G1 enteritis and two showed a transient G1 liver damage. Two had late toxicity: one developed chronic enteritis causing G1 diarrhoea and G1 abdominal pain and one suffered at three months a G3 gastric bleeding. No patients experienced G4 acute toxicity. SBRT for abdominal targets delivered by means of RA resulted to be feasible with good early clinical results in terms of local control rate and acute toxicity profile. RA allowed to achieve required target coverage as well as to keep within normal tissue dose/volume constraints.

  10. Three-dimensional conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose planning in stereotactic radiotherapy: Application of standard quality parameters for plan evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Kneschaurek, Peter

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique into clinical practice is becoming routine, but still lacks a generally accepted method for plan evaluation. We present a comparison of the dose distribution of conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy plans with IMRT plans for cranial lesions in stereotactic radiotherapy. The primary aim of this study was to judge the quality of the treatment plans. The next purpose was to assess the usefulness of several quality factors for plan evaluation. Methods and Materials: Five patients, who were treated in our department, were analyzed. Four had meningioma and one had pituitary adenoma. For each case, 10 different plans were created and analyzed: 2 conventional conformal three-dimensional plans and 8 IMRT plans, using the 'step and shoot' delivery method. The first conventional plan was an individually designed beam arrangement and was used for patient treatment. The second plan was a standard plan with the same beam arrangement for all patients. Beam arrangements from the conformal plans were the base for the inversely planned IMRT. To evaluate the plans, the following factors were investigated: minimal and maximal dose to the planning target volume, homogeneity index, coverage index, conformity index, and tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities. These quantities were incorporated into scoring factors and assigned to each plan. Results: The greatest homogeneity was reached in the conformal plans and IMRT plans with high planning target volume priority in the optimization process. This consequently led to a better probability of tumor control. Better protection of organs at risk and thereby lower normal tissue complication probabilities were achieved in the IMRT plans with increased weighting of the organs at risk. Conclusion: These results show the efficiency, as well as some limitations, of the IMRT techniques. The use of different quality factors allowed us

  11. A pilot study of intensity modulated radiation therapy with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost in the treatment of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Slack, Rebecca S; Hanscom, Heather N; Lei, Sue; Suy, Simeng; Park, Hyeon U; Kim, Joy S; Sherer, Benjamin A; Collins, Brian T; Satinsky, Andrew N; Harter, K William; Batipps, Gerald P; Constantinople, Nicholas L; Dejter, Stephen W; Maxted, William C; Regan, James B; Pahira, John J; McGeagh, Kevin G; Jha, Reena C; Dawson, Nancy A; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Clinical data suggest that large radiation fractions are biologically superior to smaller fraction sizes in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated radiosurgery due to its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation and to track and adjust for prostate motion in real-time. We report our early experience using the CyberKnife to deliver a hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Twenty-four patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT and supplemental external radiation therapy plus or minus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Patients were treated with SBRT to a dose of 19.5 Gy in 3 fractions followed by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Quality of life data were collected with American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaires before and after treatment. PSA responses were monitored; acute urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v3. All 24 patients completed the planned treatment with an average follow-up of 9.3 months. For patients who did not receive ADT, the median pre-treatment PSA was 10.6 ng/ml and decreased in all patients to a median of 1.5 ng/ml by 6 months post-treatment. Acute effects associated with treatment included Grade 2 urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity but no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity. AUA and EPIC scores returned to baseline by six months post-treatment. Hypofractionated SBRT combined with IMRT offers radiobiological benefits of a large fraction boost for dose escalation and is a well tolerated treatment option for men with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Early results are encouraging with biochemical response and acceptable toxicity. These data provide a basis for the design of a phase II clinical

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Ford, Eric; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p≤0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at

  13. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D; Bernard, Mark E; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A; Burton, Steven A; Heron, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80-86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7-65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm(3) (range: 14.90-87.38 cm(3)). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97-1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16-1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16-7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7-62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1-9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8-41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI, GD, V5, V10

  14. Treatment Plan Technique and Quality for Single-Isocenter Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Multiple Lung Lesions with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Kimmen; Xu, Karen M.; Lalonde, Ron; Horne, Zachary D.; Bernard, Mark E.; McCoy, Chuck; Clump, David A.; Burton, Steven A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a practical approach to the planning technique and evaluation of plan quality for the multi-lesion, single-isocenter stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of the lung. Eleven patients with two or more lung lesions underwent single-isocenter volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) radiosurgery or IMRS. All plans were normalized to the target maximum dose. For each plan, all targets were treated to the same dose. Plan conformity and dose gradient were maximized with dose-control tuning structures surrounding targets. For comparison, multi-isocenter plans were retrospectively created for four patients. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), and gradient distance (GD) were calculated for each plan. V5, V10, and V20 of the lung and organs at risk (OARs) were collected. Treatment time and total monitor units (MUs) were also recorded. One patient had four lesions and the remainder had two lesions. Six patients received VMAT and five patients received intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). For those treated with VMAT, two patients received 3-arc VMAT and four received 2-arc VMAT. For those treated with IMRS, two patients were treated with 10 and 11 beams, respectively, and the rest received 12 beams. Prescription doses ranged from 30 to 54 Gy in three to five fractions. The median prescribed isodose line was 84% (range: 80–86%). The median maximum dose was 57.1 Gy (range: 35.7–65.1 Gy). The mean combined PTV was 49.57 cm3 (range: 14.90–87.38 cm3). For single-isocenter plans, the median CI was 1.15 (range: 0.97–1.53). The median HI was 1.19 (range: 1.16–1.28). The median GI was 4.60 (range: 4.16–7.37). The median maximum radiation dose (Dmax) to total lung was 55.6 Gy (range: 35.7–62.0 Gy). The median mean radiation dose to the lung (Dmean) was 4.2 Gy (range: 1.1–9.3 Gy). The median lung V5 was 18.7% (range: 3.8–41.3%). There was no significant difference in CI, HI, GI

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  16. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  17. Tumor Control Outcomes Following Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei, Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report tumor local progression-free outcomes following treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2010, a total of 105 lesions from renal cell carcinomas were treated with either SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18–24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) or hypofractionation (3 or 5 fractions) with prescription doses ranging between 20 and 30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–48 months). Results The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year LPFS for those who received high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), low single-dose (< 24 Gy; n = 14), and hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) were 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose versus low single dose, p = 0.001; high single dose versus hypofractionation, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables as significant predictors of improved LPFS: dose of 24 Gy compared with lower dose (p = 0.009), and single dose versus hypofractionation (p = 0.008). Conclusion High-dose SD-IGRT is a non-invasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancers, generally considered radioresistant according to classical radiobiological ranking. PMID:21596489

  18. SU-E-T-394: The Use of Jaw Tracking in Intensity Modulated and Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, K; Wen, N; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Zhao, B; Siddiqui, S; Chetty, I; Ryu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential advantages of jaw tracking for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in spine radiosurgery. Methods: VMAT and IMRT plans were retrospectively generated for ten patients. Six plans for each patient were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system for a Varian Truebeam equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC. Plans were created to study IMRT and VMAT plans with and without jaw tracking, as well as IMRT plans of different flattening filter free (FFF) energies. Plans were prescribed to the 90% isodose line to 16 or 18 Gy in one fraction to cover 95% of the target. Planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index (CI), dose to spinal cord, distance to fall off from the 90% to 50% isodose line (DTF), as well as delivery time were evaluated. Ion chamber and film measurements were performed to verify calculated and measured dose distributions. Results: Jaw tracking decreased the spinal cord dose for both IMRT and VMAT plans, but a larger decrease was seen with the IMRT plans (p=0.004 vs p=0.04). The average D10% for the spinal cord was least for the 6MV FFF IMRT plan with jaw tracking and was greatest for the 10MV FFF plan without jaw tracking. Treatment times between IMRT and VMAT plans with or without jaw tracking were not significantly different. Measured plans showed greater than 98.5% agreement for planar dose gamma analysis (3%/2 mm) and less than 2.5% for point dose analysis compared to calculated plans. Conclusion: Jaw tracking can be used to help decrease spinal cord dose without any change in treatment delivery or calculation accuracy. Lower dose to the spinal cord was achieved using 6 MV beams compared to 10 MV beams, though 10 MV may be justified in some cases to decrease skin dose.

  19. SU-E-T-338: Dosimetric Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in Early Stage Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I; Quinn, K; Seebach, A; Wang, H; Yah, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study evaluates the dosimetric differences using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients previously treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy IMRT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in early stage lung cancer. Methods: We evaluated 9 consecutive medically inoperable lung cancer patients at the start of the SBRT program who were treated with IMRT from November 2010 to October 2011. These patients were treated using 6 MV energy. The 9 cases were then re-planned with VMAT performed with arc therapy using 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) energy with the same organs at risk (OARS) constraints. Data collected for the treatment plans included target coverage, beam on time, dose to OARS and gamma pass rate. Results: Five patients were T1N0 and four patients were T2N0 with all tumors less than 5 cm. The average GTV was 13.02 cm3 (0.83–40.87) and average PTV was 44.65 cm3 (14.06–118.08). The IMRT plans had a mean of 7.2 angles (6–9) and 5.4 minutes (3.6–11.1) per plan. The VMAT plans had a mean of 2.8 arcs (2–3) and 4.0 minutes (2.2–6.0) per plan. VMAT had slightly more target coverage than IMRT with average increase in D95 of 2.68% (1.24–5.73) and D99 of 3.65% (0.88–8.77). VMAT produced lower doses to all OARs. The largest reductions were in maximum doses to the spinal cord with an average reduction of 24.1%, esophagus with an average reduction of 22.1%, and lung with an average reduction in the V20 of 16.3% The mean gamma pass rate was 99.8% (99.2–100) at 3 mm and 3% for VMAT with comparable values for IMRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that using VMAT for SBRT in early stage lung cancer is superior to IMRT in terms of dose coverage, OAR dose and a lower treatment delivery time with a similar gamma pass rate.

  20. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) uses linear ... and after this procedure? What is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and how is it used? Intensity-modulated ...

  2. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  3. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: A comparison between modulated tri-cobalt-60 teletherapy and linear accelerator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Tenn, Stephen; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Sheng, Ke; Low, Daniel A; Kupelian, Patrick A; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using a teletherapy system equipped with 3 rotating (60)Co sources (tri-(60)Co system) and a built-in magnetic resonance imager (MRI). We hypothesized tumor size and location would be predictive of favorable dosimetry with tri-(60)Co SBRT. The primary study population consisted of 11 patients treated with SBRT for malignant hepatic lesions whose linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SBRT plans met all mandatory Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1112 organ-at-risk (OAR) constraints. The secondary study population included 5 additional patients whose plans did not meet the mandatory constraints. Patients received 36 to 60 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Tri-(60)Co system SBRT plans were planned with ViewRay system software. All patients in the primary study population had tri-(60)Co SBRT plans that passed all RTOG constraints, with similar planning target volume coverage and OAR doses to LINAC plans. Mean liver doses and V10Gy to the liver, although easily meeting RTOG 1112 guidelines, were significantly higher with tri-(60)Co plans. When the 5 additional patients were included in a univariate analysis, the tri-(60)Co SBRT plans were still equally able to pass RTOG constraints, although they did have inferior ability to pass more stringent liver and kidney constraints (P < .05). A multivariate analysis found the ability of a tri-(60)Co SBRT plan to meet these constraints depended on lesion location and size. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions (as defined by distance from the aorta, chest wall, liver dome, and relative lesion volume) were significantly more likely to have tri-(60)Co plans that spared the liver and kidney as well as LINAC plans did (P < .05). It is dosimetrically feasible to perform liver SBRT with a tri-(60)Co system with a built-in MRI. Patients with smaller or more peripheral lesions are more likely to have optimal liver

  4. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  5. Lossless intensity modulation in integrated photonics.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Sunil; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-02-13

    We present a dynamical analysis of lossless intensity modulation in two different ring resonator geometries. In both geometries, we demonstrate modulation schemes that result in a symmetrical output with an infinite on/off ratio. The systems behave as lossless intensity modulators where the time-averaged output optical power is equal to the time-averaged input optical power.

  6. Introduction to passive electron intensity modulation.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L; Chambers, Erin L; Erhart, Kevin

    2017-09-06

    This work introduces a new technology for electron intensity modulation, which uses small area island blocks within the collimating aperture and small area island apertures in the collimating insert. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering, electrons contribute dose under island blocks and lateral to island apertures. By selecting appropriate lateral positions and diameters of a set of island blocks and island apertures, for example, a hexagonal grid with variable diameter circular island blocks, intensity modulated beams can be produced for appropriate air gaps between the intensity modulator (position of collimating insert) and the patient. Such a passive radiotherapy intensity modulator for electrons (PRIME) is analogous to using physical attenuators (metal compensators) for intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT). For hexagonal spacing, the relationship between block (aperture) separation (r) and diameter (d) and the local intensity reduction factor (IRF) is discussed. The PRIME principle is illustrated using pencil beam calculations for select beam geometries in water with half beams modulated by 70%-95% and for one head and neck field of a patient treated with bolus electron conformal therapy. Proof of principle is further illustrated by showing agreement between measurement and calculation for a prototype PRIME. Potential utilization of PRIME for bolus electron conformal therapy, segmented-field electron conformal therapy, modulated electron radiation therapy, and variable surface geometries is discussed. Further research and development of technology for the various applications is discussed. In summary, this paper introduces a practical, new technology for electron intensity modulation in the clinic, demonstrates proof of principle, discusses potential clinical applications, and suggests areas of further research and development. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American

  7. Neutron Measurements for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, Nisy E.

    2000-04-21

    The beam-on time for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is increased significantly compared with conventional radiotherapy treatments. Further, the presence of beam modulation devices may potentially affect neutron production. Therefore, neutron measurements were performed for 15 MV photon beams on a Varian Clinac accelerator to determine the impact of IMRT on neutron dose equivalent to the patient.

  8. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques.Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets.Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  9. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. Methods: A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0–255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Results: Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage

  10. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Celis, M.; Lárraga, J.

    2004-09-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields.

  11. Virtual micro-intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Siochi, R A

    2000-11-01

    Virtual micro-intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMIMRT) combines a 10 x 5 mm2 intensity map with a 5 x 10 mm2 intensity map, delivered at orthogonal collimator settings. The superposition of these component maps (CM) yields a 5 x 5 mm2 virtual micro-intensity map (VMIM) that can be delivered with a 1 cm leaf width MLC. A pair of CMs with optimal delivery efficiency and quality must be chosen, since a given VMIM can be delivered using several different pairs. This is possible since, for each group of four VMIM cells that can be covered by an MLC leaf in either collimator orientation, the minimum intensity can be delivered from either collimator setting. By varying the proportions of the minimum values that go into each CM, one can simultaneously minimize the number of potential junction effects and the number of segments required to deliver the VMIM. The minimization is achieved by reducing high leaf direction gradients in the CMs. Several pseudoclinical and random VMIMs were studied to determine the applicability of this new technique. A nine level boost map was also studied to investigate dosimetric and spatial resolution issues. Finally, clinical issues for this technique are discussed.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, Jonathan A.; Murphy, James D.; Minn, Ann Yuriko; Chung, Melody; Fisher, George A.; Ford, James M.; Kunz, Pamela; Norton, Jeffrey A.; Visser, Brendan C.; Poultsides, George A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report the outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with IMRT between 2003 and 2008. Of these 47 patients, 29 were treated adjuvantly and 18 definitively. All received concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. The treatment plans were optimized such that 95% of the planning target volume received the prescription dose. The median delivered dose for the adjuvant and definitive patients was 50.4 and 54.0 Gy, respectively. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 63.9 years. For adjuvant patients, the 1- and 2-year overall survival rate was 79% and 40%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year recurrence-free survival rate was 58% and 17%, respectively. The local-regional control rate at 1 and 2 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. For definitive patients, the 1-year overall survival, recurrence-free survival, and local-regional control rate was 24%, 16%, and 64%, respectively. Four patients developed Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity (9%) and four developed Grade 3 late toxicity (9%). Conclusions: Survival for patients with pancreatic cancer remains poor. A small percentage of adjuvant patients have durable disease control, and with improved therapies, this proportion will increase. Systemic therapy offers the greatest opportunity. The present results have demonstrated that IMRT is well tolerated. Compared with those who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in previously reported prospective clinical trials, patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma treated with IMRT in our series had improved acute toxicity.

  13. Tomotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soisson, Emilie T.

    Currently, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a linear accelerator equipped with circular collimators and a floor stand is used for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) delivery. In the interest of providing a more efficient delivery option for patients with multiple brain metastases, a Tomotherapy-based radiosurgery program was developed to serve as an intensity modulated compliment to our existing delivery method. The unique advantage of Tomotherapy over other radiotherapy delivery units is the on board megavoltage CT that can be used for both stereotactic localization and treatment planning. As such, a workflow was designed in which the planning image is acquired on the treatment unit itself and, instead using a patient-frame based coordinate system for stereotactic localization, volumetric imaging is used to precisely locate the target at the time of treatment. Localization and delivery accuracy was found to be comparable to conventional approaches and well within stated tolerances. A Tomotherapy-specific treatment planning technique was also developed using the Tomotherapy treatment planning system that reliably produces plans that achieve both conformal target coverage and sufficiently steep dose falloff into surrounding normal brain. Tomotherapy plans have been compared to conventional circular collimator based plans for both the treatment of brain metastases and arteriovenous malformations in terms of both target conformity and dose to normal brain. To determine the effect of plan differences on patient outcome, clinical data was used to predict the resulting risk of treatment induced symptomatic brain necrosis for both conventional and Tomotherapy based plans. Overall, it was determined that plans generated using the described planning technique are acceptable for radiosurgery. In addition, delivery time for complex cases is comparable to or improved over conventional isocentric approaches. Finally, this work explores the impact of future product

  14. Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the

  15. Current monitors for intensity modulated beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Mark; Hamilton, Brett

    1995-05-01

    A beam intensity modulation system (BIMPS), that works in conjunction with the beam splitting system to allow beams of different intensities to be sequentially delivered to two different areas, has already been in use for many years. The operators could not, however, tune the cyclotrons with the BIMPS in operation using the existing beam instrumentation systems in the cyclotron beamlines which consisted mostly of non-electron-suppressed stops. Since the BIMPS duty factor (e.g. as low as 1/100 when operating with a 100 μs high intensity (HI) pulse at 10 Hz) usually exceed the ratio of the HI to LOW beam intensities (varying in the range from 10 to 100), the stops would, to first order, merely read out the LOW beam intensity. Thus there existed no way to monitor the HI beam intensity and transmission efficiency unless operating continuously in the HI beam mode. To allow BIMPS operation at all times, a new system of intercepting and nonintercepting beam current monitors have been added to the cyclotron beamlines. The system consists of electron suppressed stops and nonintercepting beam pickups with high output bandwidth of (10 kHz) signal processors to allow accurate sampling of the short duration HI beam pulses. The electronics for the stops are straightforward; there are, however, important technical trade-off in the design of the nonintercepting system design. The amplifier input voltage noise and relatively low coupling impedance of the nonintercepting pickups cause the minimum detectable HI current to decrease with the square root of the HI beam pulse length; as the pulse length is shortened, the system timing constraints also become more critical. Although the BIMPS is capable of providing beam pulse durations as short at 10 μs, the minimum pulse length for operation was chosen to be 100 μs. The electronics have time constants of 200 μs allowing measurement accuracies of better than a percent. Since the most rapid modulation frequency used for filling the

  16. Volumetric Arc Intensity-Modulated Therapy for Spine Body Radiotherapy: Comparison With Static Intensity-Modulated Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Thongphiew, Danthai; Yin Fangfang

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: This clinical study evaluates the feasibility of using volumetric arc-modulated treatment (VMAT) for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to achieve highly conformal dose distributions that spare adjacent organs at risk (OAR) with reduced treatment time. Methods and Materials: Ten spine SBRT patients were studied retrospectively. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and VMAT plans were generated using either one or two arcs. Planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage, OAR dose sparing, and normal tissue integral dose were measured and compared. Differences in treatment delivery were also analyzed. Results: The PTV DVHs were comparable between VMAT and IMRT plans in the shoulder (D{sub 99%}-D{sub 90%}), slope (D{sub 90%}-D{sub 10%}), and tail (D{sub 10%}-D{sub 1%}) regions. Only VMAT{sub 2arc} had a better conformity index than IMRT (1.09 vs. 1.15, p = 0.007). For cord sparing, IMRT was the best, and VMAT{sub 1arc} was the worst. Use of IMRT achieved greater than 10% more D{sub 1%} sparing for six of 10 cases and 7% to 15% more D{sub 10%} sparing over the VAMT{sub 1arc}. The differences between IMRT and VAMT{sub 2arc} were smaller and statistically nonsignificant at all dose levels. The differences were also small and statistically nonsignificant for other OAR sparing. The mean monitor units (MUs) were 8711, 7730, and 6317 for IMRT, VMAT{sub 1arc}, and VMAT{sub 2arc} plans, respectively, with a 26% reduction from IMRT to VMAT{sub 2arc}. The mean treatment time was 15.86, 8.56, and 7.88 min for IMRT, VMAT{sub 1arc,} and VMAT{sub 2arc}. The difference in integral dose was statistically nonsignificant. Conclusions: Although VMAT provided comparable PTV coverage for spine SBRT, 1arc showed significantly worse spinal cord sparing compared with IMRT, whereas 2arc was comparable to IMRT. Treatment efficiency is substantially improved with the VMAT.

  17. Feasibility of an online adaptive replanning method for cranial frameless intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Juan Francisco; San José, Sol; Garrido, LLuís; Puertas, Enrique; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2013-10-01

    To introduce an approach for online adaptive replanning (i.e., dose-guided radiosurgery) in frameless stereotactic radiosurgery, when a 6-dimensional (6D) robotic couch is not available in the linear accelerator (linac). Cranial radiosurgical treatments are planned in our department using intensity-modulated technique. Patients are immobilized using thermoplastic mask. A cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan is acquired after the initial laser-based patient setup (CBCT{sub setup}). The online adaptive replanning procedure we propose consists of a 6D registration-based mapping of the reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, followed by a reoptimization of the beam fluences (“6D plan”) to achieve similar dosage as originally was intended, while the patient is lying in the linac couch and the original beam arrangement is kept. The goodness of the online adaptive method proposed was retrospectively analyzed for 16 patients with 35 targets treated with CBCT-based frameless intensity modulated technique. Simulation of reference plan onto actual CBCT{sub setup}, according to the 4 degrees of freedom, supported by linac couch was also generated for each case (4D plan). Target coverage (D99%) and conformity index values of 6D and 4D plans were compared with the corresponding values of the reference plans. Although the 4D-based approach does not always assure the target coverage (D99% between 72% and 103%), the proposed online adaptive method gave a perfect coverage in all cases analyzed as well as a similar conformity index value as was planned. Dose-guided radiosurgery approach is effective to assure the dose coverage and conformity of an intracranial target volume, avoiding resetting the patient inside the mask in a “trial and error” way so as to remove the pitch and roll errors when a robotic table is not available.

  18. Leaf sequencing and dosimetric verification in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agazaryan, Nzhde

    Although sophisticated means to calculate and deliver intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have been developed by many groups, methods to verify the delivery, as well as definitions of acceptability of a treatment in terms of these measurements are the most problematic at this stage of advancement of IMRT. Present intensity modulated radiotherapy systems fail to account for many dosimetric characteristics of the delivery system. In this dissertation, a dosimetrically based leaf sequencing algorithm is developed and implemented for multileaf collimated intensity modulated radiotherapy. The dosimetric considerations are investigated and are shown to significantly improve the outcome in terms of an agreement between desired and delivered radiation dose distributions. Subsequently, a system for determining the desirability of a produced intensity modulated radiotherapy plan in terms of deliverability of calculated profiles with the use of a multileaf collimator is developed. Three deliverability scoring indices are defined to evaluate the deliverability of the profiles. Gradient Index (GI) is a measure of the complexity of the profile in terms of gradients. Baseline Index (BI) is the fraction of the profile that is planned to get lower than the minimum level of transmission radiation. Cumulative Monitor Unit Index (CMUI) is the ratio of the cumulative monitor units (CMU) required for obtaining the desired profile to an average dose level in the profile. The dosimetric investigations of the deliverability scoring indices are presented, showing a clear correlation between scoring indices and dosimetric accuracy. Finally, materials and methods are developed for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy. Dosimetric verification starts from investigations of the developed leaf sequencing algorithm, then extends to dosimetric verification in terms of deliverability, and lastly, dosimetric verification of complete clinical IMRT plans is performed.

  19. Clinical implementation of intensity-modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Shepard, David M; Cao, Daliang

    2011-01-01

    Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a rotational approach to radiation therapy delivered on a conventional linear accelerator using a conventional multileaf collimator. There are 2 key advantages of IMAT. First, the rotational nature of the delivery provides great flexibility in shaping each dose distribution. As a result, IMAT can provide dosimetric advantages relative to fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The second advantage is the highly efficient nature of the delivery. For centers with an active IMRT program, the clinical implementation of IMAT should be relatively straightforward. For clinical implementation of IMAT, it is important to fully characterize the accuracy of the dose model used, and the performance of the quality assurance equipment.

  20. New techniques in hadrontherapy: intensity modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Cella, L; Lomax, A; Miralbell, R

    2001-01-01

    Inverse planning and intensity modulated (IM) X-ray beam treatment techniques can achieve significant improvements in dose distributions comparable to those obtained with forward planned proton beams. However, intensity modulation can also be applied to proton beams and further optimization in dose distribution can reasonably be expected. A comparative planning exercise between IM X-rays and IM proton beams was carried out on two different tumor cases: a pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma and a prostate cancer. Both IM X-rays and IM protons achieved equally homogenous coverage of the target volume in the two tumor sites. Predicted NTCPs were equally low for both treatment techniques. Nevertheless, a reduced low-to-medium dose to the organs at risk and a lesser integral non-target mean dose for IM protons in the two cases favored the use of IM proton beams.

  1. Performance analysis of the ultra-linear optical intensity modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Dingel, Benjamin

    2006-10-01

    The linear optical intensity modulator is a key component in any broadband optical access-based analog fiber-optic link systems such as sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) systems, ultra-dense CATV, Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) communications, and other platform access systems. Previously, we have proposed a super-linear optical modulator, having SFDR = 130 -140 dB-Hz 2/3, based on a unique combination of phase-modulator (PM) and a weak ring resonator (RR) modulator within a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). We presented some of its unique features. In this paper, we characterize further this ultra-linear optical intensity modulator, analyze its RF performance and provide method for parameter optimization. Other excellent features of this modulator design such as high manufacturing tolerance, effect of link insertion loss, adaptive characteristic and device simplicity are also discussed.

  2. Wavefront sensing by means of binary intensity modulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Ping; Ao, Mingwu; Dong, Lizhi; Xu, Bing

    2014-12-10

    We propose a kind of wavefront sensing technique by means of binary intensity modulation. A digital micromirror device operates as a binary intensity modulator and a pinhole works as a binary-aberration-mode filter. Through modulating intensity distribution of incident light, light emitting from the pinhole is capable of containing information on binary aberration coefficients. With the amount of light acquired by a single detector, the coefficients of binary aberration modes for reconstructing incident wavefront can be calculated. Differing from the conventional wavefront sensing technique, this method turns the complex two-dimensional wavefront sensing into simple total-light-intensity detection. The simulation experiment has validated the feasibility of the theoretical model.

  3. Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory

    1986-01-01

    Intensity modulation sensors are classified by the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength, or time domains. To implement the time-domain referencing, different types of fiber-optic loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

  4. Time domain referencing in intensity modulation fiber optic sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, G.

    1986-01-01

    Intensity modulation sensors are classified depending on the way in which the reference and signal channels are separated: in space, wavelength (frequency), or time domains. To implement the time domain referencing different types of fiber optic (FO) loops have been used. A pulse of short duration sent into the loop results in a series of pulses of different amplitudes. The information about the measured parameter is retrieved from the relative amplitudes of pulses in the same train.

  5. Arc binary intensity modulated radiation therapy (AB IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    The state of the art Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy (IMRT) has been one of the most significant breakthroughs in the cancer treatment in the past 30 years. There are two types of IMRT systems. The first system is the binary-based tomotherapy, represented by the Peacock (Nomos Corp) and Tomo unit (TomoTherapy Inc.), adopting specific binary collimator leafs to deliver intensity modulated radiation fields in a serial or helical fashion. The other uses the conventional dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver intensity modulated fields through a number of gantry positions. The proposed Arc Binary IMRT attempts to deliver Tomo-like IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC and combines the advantages of the two types of IMRT techniques: (1) maximizing the number of pencil beams for better dose optimization, (2) enabling conventional linear accelerator with dynamic MLC to deliver Tomo-like IMRT. In order to deliver IMRT with conventional dynamic MLC in a binary fashion, the slice-by-slice treatment with limited slice thickness has been proposed in the thesis to accommodate the limited MLC traveling speed. Instead of moving the patient to subsequent treatment slices, the proposed method offsets MLC to carry out the whole treatment, slice by slice sequentially, thus avoid patient position error. By denoting one arc pencil beam set as a gene, genetic algorithm (GA) is used as the searching engine for the dose optimization process. The selection of GA parameters is a crucial step and has been studied in depth so that the optimization process will converge with reasonable speed. Several hypothetical and clinical cases have been tested with the proposed IMRT method. The comparison of the dose distribution with other commercially available IMRT systems demonstrates the clear advantage of the new method. The proposed Arc Binary Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy is not only theoretically sound but practically feasible. The implementation of this method would expand the

  6. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  7. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  8. Metadevice for intensity modulation with sub-wavelength spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Plum, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Effectively continuous control over propagation of a beam of light requires light modulation with pixelation that is smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we propose a spatial intensity modulator with sub-wavelength resolution in one dimension. The metadevice combines recent advances in reconfigurable nanomembrane metamaterials and coherent all-optical control of metasurfaces. It uses nanomechanical actuation of metasurface absorber strips placed near a mirror in order to control their interaction with light from perfect absorption to negligible loss, promising a path towards dynamic diffraction and focusing of light as well as holography without unwanted diffraction artefacts. PMID:27857221

  9. Smartphone-based portable intensity modulated force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Lucas H.; Schiefer, Elberth M.; Paterno, Aleksander S.; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José L.

    2015-09-01

    This work proposes a low-cost force sensor, based on intensity modulation in an optical fibre. The transducer element is composed of a knot in a single mode fibre embedded to a silicone adhesive cuboid, and can be easily fabricated. A simple sensing scheme is devised by using a visible light source and a CCD camera of a smartphone, allowing implementation costs to be reduced. Experimental results have shown that the sensor presents a linear response and a standard uncertainty of 1:07N within the dynamical range from 0 to 30 N.

  10. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  11. Intensity-modulated arc therapy: principles, technologies and clinical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cedric X.; Tang, Grace

    2011-03-01

    Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) was proposed by Yu (1995 Phys. Med. Biol. 40 1435-49) as an alternative to tomotherapy. Over more than a decade, much progress has been made. The advantages and limitations of the IMAT technique have also been better understood. In recent years, single-arc forms of IMAT have emerged and become commercially adopted. The leading example is the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a single-arc form of IMAT that delivers apertures of varying weights with a single-arc rotation that uses dose-rate variation of the treatment machine. With commercial implementation of VMAT, wide clinical adoption has quickly taken root. However, there remains a lack of general understanding for the planning of such arc treatments, as well as what delivery limitations and compromises are made. Commercial promotion and competition add further confusion for the end users. It is therefore necessary to provide a summary of this technology and some guidelines on its clinical implementation. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the works from the radiotherapy community that led to wide clinical adoption, and point out the issues that still remain, providing some perspective on its further developments. Because there has been vast experience in IMRT using multiple intensity-modulated fields, comparisons between IMAT and IMRT are also made in the review within the areas of planning, delivery and quality assurance.

  12. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    , beamlet weight, the number of delivered beamlets, and the number of delivery angles. These methods are evaluated via treatment planning studies including left-sided whole breast irradiation, lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance. Improvements in efficiency and efficacy relative to traditional proton therapy and intensity modulated photon radiation therapy are discussed.

  13. Comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy and intensity modulated proton therapy for selective subvolume boosting: a phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, R T; Barbee, D L; Mackie, T R; Jeraj, R

    2009-01-01

    Selective subvolume boosting can theoretically improve tumour control probability while maintaining normal tissue complication probabilities similar to those of uniform dose distributions. In this work the abilities of intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to deliver boosts to multiple subvolumes of varying size and proximities are compared in a thorough phantom study. IMXT plans were created using the step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) methods. IMPT plans were created with the spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT) methods. IMPT-DGT is a generalization of the distal edge tracking method designed to reduce the number of proton beam spots required to deliver non-uniform dose distributions relative to IMPT-SS. The IMPT methods were delivered over both 180° and 360° arcs. The IMXT-SAS and IMPT-SS methods least and most optimally satisfied the non-uniform dose prescriptions, respectively. The IMPT delivery methods reduced normal tissue integral dose by a factor of about two relative to the IMXT delivery methods, regardless of the delivery arc. The IMPT-DGT method reduced the number of proton beam spots by a factor of about three relative to the IMPT-SS method. PMID:17921573

  14. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pollom, Erqi L; Qian, Yushen; Durkee, Ben Y; von Eyben, Rie; Maxim, Peter G; Shultz, David B; Gensheimer, Michael; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2016-11-01

    Alternative treatment regimens are needed for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who cannot receive definitive treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, surgery, or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). We report survival, patterns of failure and toxicity outcomes for patients with NSCLC who were not eligible for surgical resection, concurrent chemoradiotherapy, or SABR and underwent hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to evaluate the progression-free and overall survival. Competing risk analysis was used to evaluate in-field, locoregional, and distant failure. A total of 42 patients treated to 52.5 to 60 Gy in 15 fractions were included. Most of the patients had metastatic or recurrent disease (64%) and a relatively large, centrally located tumor burden (74%). The median follow-up period was 13 months (interquartile range, 6-18 months). All patients received the total prescribed dose. The median survival was 15.1 months. The overall and progression-free survival rates at 1 year were 63% and 22.5%, respectively. The pattern of failure was predominantly distant, with only 2% of patients experiencing isolated in-field recurrence. The cumulative incidence of in-field failure at 6 and 12 months was 2.5% (95% confidence interval, 0.4%-15.6%) and 16.1% (95% confidence interval, 7.5%-34.7%), respectively. The risk of esophageal toxicity was associated with the esophageal mean dose, maximal point dose, and dose to the 5 cm(3) volume. The risk of pneumonitis was associated with the lung mean dose and volume receiving 18 Gy. Hypofractionated IMRT without concurrent chemotherapy provides favorable rates of local control and survival for well-selected patients with NSCLC who cannot tolerate standard definitive therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Realization of Sector Beam Intensity Modulation for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Pilot Treatment Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lijun; Mason, Erica; Sneed, Penny K.; McDermott, Michael; Polishchuk, Alexei; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the clinical feasibility and potential benefits of sector beam intensity modulation (SBIM) specific to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: SBIM is based on modulating the confocal beam intensities from individual sectors surrounding an isocenter in a nearly 2π geometry. This is in contrast to conventional GKSRS delivery, in which the beam intensities from each sector are restricted to be either 0% or 100% and must be identical for any given isocenter. We developed a SBIM solution based on available clinical planning tools, and we tested it on a cohort of 12 clinical cases as a proof of concept study. The SBIM treatment plans were compared with the original clinically delivered treatment plans to determine dosimetric differences. The goal was to investigate whether SBIM would improve the dose conformity for these treatment plans without prohibitively lengthening the treatment time. Results: A SBIM technique was developed. On average, SBIM improved the Paddick conformity index (PCI) versus the clinically delivered plans (clinical plan PCI = 0.68 ± 0.11 vs SBIM plan PCI = 0.74 ± 0.10, P=.002; 2-tailed paired t test). The SBIM plans also resulted in nearly identical target volume coverage (mean, 97 ± 2%), total beam-on times (clinical plan 58.4 ± 38.9 minutes vs SBIM 63.5 ± 44.7 minutes, P=.057), and gradient indices (clinical plan 3.03 ± 0.27 vs SBIM 3.06 ± 0.29, P=.44) versus the original clinical plans. Conclusion: The SBIM method is clinically feasible with potential dosimetric gains when compared with conventional GKSRS.

  16. [Dosimetric verification of the intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhai; Gao, Yang

    2010-05-01

    To research the method of dosimetric verification of the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The IMRT treatment plans were designed by Eclipse TPS and were implemented in Varian ClinacIX LA with 6MV X-ray. The absolute point doses were measured using a PTW 0.6 cc ion chamber with UNIDOS E dosimeter and the planes dose distributions were measured using PTW 2D-Array ion chamber in the phantom. The error between the measured dose and calculated dose in the interesting points was less than 3%. The points passed ratio was more than 90% in gamma analysis method (3 mm 13%) about the plane dose distribution verification. The method of dosimetric verification of IMRT is reliable and efficient in the implementation.

  17. Vertical-cavity saturable-absorber intensity modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guina, M.; Vainionpää, A.; Harkonen, A.; Orsila, L.; Lyytikäinen, J.; Okhotnikov, O. G.

    2003-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a reflection-type optical modulator, with surface-normal architecture, that exploits the optical saturation of absorption in semiconductor quantum wells. The modulation section of the modulator, which is composed of quantum wells placed within a Fabry-Perot cavity, is optically controlled by an intensity-modulated beam generated by an in-plane laser integrated monolithically on the same wafer and grown in a single epitaxial step. The modulation section and the in-plane laser share the same medium; therefore, efficient coupling between the control beam and the signal beam is achieved. The device was successfully used for active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser.

  18. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zi-Yang; Tang, Zi-Sheng; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Yun-Tao; Ma, Rui; Liu, Zheng; Huang, Zheng-Wei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n = 13) and CRT (n = 12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96 ± 7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98 ± 10.45%) (P < 0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that IMRT is more conducive to maintaining the relative stability of the oral ecosystem than CRT.

  19. Palliative intensity modulated radiation therapy for symptomatic adrenal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mod, H; Patel, V

    2013-05-01

    Metastasis to the adrenal glands is quite common; especially from melanomas, breast, lung, renal and gastro-intestinal tumours. The most common tumour found in the adrenals in post mortem series is a metastatic tumour; incidence ranging from 13 to 27%. The diagnosis of adrenal metastasis is now more common and easier due to staging and subsequent follow up with Computed tomography /Magnetic resonance imaging and or positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging studies. Most of the times these metastatic lesions are clinically occult and those that do have clinical symptoms complain of pain, nausea, vomiting and early satiety. We irradiated a patient of non small cell lung cancer with adrenal metastasis with palliative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and achieved a good response in terms of pain relief, stable disease and no side effects of the treatment.

  20. Validation of intensity modulation on a commercial treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Martin, E; Hachem, A; Marcié, S; Hérault, J; Costa, A; Bensadoun, R J; Lagrange, J L

    2003-05-01

    For two years now, a study on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been in progress at the Antoine Lacassagne Hospital Center for Cancer Therapy (in Nice) in collaboration with the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis. The kind of intensity modulation that was used is the "step and shoot" technique in which the modulated beam is created both by adding andjoining elementary fields. Before carrying out clinical tests, several problems regarding the production of modulated beams has to be mastered. The current developments of our study enable us to dosimetrically produce (in water phantom and in the PMMA phantom) complexmodulated whose segmentation was calculated by one commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Nevertheless, we showed and studied some critical discrepancies between standard clinical calculations and the calculations using field segmentation. We showed that with nonoptimal conditions of segmentation the discrepancies, which are due to the type of algorithm used, could bring about significant errors inside the field of up to 10% of maximum dose. Another point of our study is the quantification and resolution of differences between measurements and calculations due to the internal segmentation of calculated modulated fields and their realization on Linac. Once again, in none optimal conditions of segmentation and inside the field we obtained discrepancies up to 20% of maximum dose between calculations using field segmentation and measurements. That was mainly due to the tongue and groove effect and penumbra phenomena. This study allows us to show that the discrepancies between segmentation calculations and standard clinical calculations should be solved by the use of penumbra models during segmentation calculations. We will introduce both the study and its near-future perspectives.

  1. Commissioning of Peacock System for intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Saw, C B; Ayyangar, K M; Thompson, R B; Zhen, W; Enke, C A

    2001-01-01

    The Peacock System was introduced to perform tomographic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Commissioning of the Peacock System included the alignment of the multileaf intensity-modulating collimator (MIMiC) to the beam axis, the alignment of the RTA device for immobilization, and checking the integrity of the CRANE for indexing the treatment couch. In addition, the secondary jaw settings, couch step size, and transmission through the leaves were determined. The dosimetric data required for the CORVUS planning system were divided into linear accelerator-specific and MIMiC-specific. The linear accelerator-specific dosimetric data were relative output in air, relative output in phantom, percent depth dose for a range of field sizes, and diagonal dose profiles for a large field size. The MIMiC-specific dosimetric data were the in-plane and cross-plane dose profiles of a small and a large field size to derive the penumbra fit. For each treatment unit, the Beam Utility software requires the data be entered into the CORVUS planning system in modular forms. These modules were treatment unit information, angle definition, configuration, gantry and couch angles range, dosimetry, results, and verification plans. After the appropriate machine data were entered, CORVUS created a dose model. The dose model was used to create known simple dose distribution for evaluation using the verification tools of the CORVUS. The planned doses for phantoms were confirmed using an ion chamber for point dose measurement and film for relative dose measurement. The planning system calibration factor was initially set at 1.0 and will be changed after data on clinical cases are acquired. The treatment unit was released for clinical use after the approval icon was checked in the verification plans module.

  2. Comparison of simple and complex liver intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mark T; Purdie, Thomas G; Eccles, Cynthia L; Sharpe, Michael B; Dawson, Laura A

    2010-11-30

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may allow improvement in plan quality for treatment of liver cancer, however increasing radiation modulation complexity can lead to increased uncertainties and requirements for quality assurance. This study assesses whether target coverage and normal tissue avoidance can be maintained in liver cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans by systematically reducing the complexity of the delivered fluence. An optimal baseline six fraction individualized IMRT plan for 27 patients with 45 liver cancers was developed which provided a median minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the planning target volume (PTV) of 38.3 Gy (range, 25.9-59.5 Gy), in 6 fractions, while maintaining liver toxicity risk <5% and maximum luminal gastrointestinal structure doses of 30 Gy. The number of segments was systematically reduced until normal tissue constraints were exceeded while maintaining equivalent dose coverage to 95% of PTV (PTVD95). Radiotherapy doses were compared between the plans. Reduction in the number of segments was achieved for all 27 plans from a median of 48 segments (range 34-52) to 19 segments (range 6-30), without exceeding normal tissue dose objectives and maintaining equivalent PTVD95 and similar PTV Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD(-20)) IMRT plans with fewer segments had significantly less monitor units (mean, 1892 reduced to 1695, p = 0.012), but also reduced dose conformity (mean, RTOG Conformity Index 1.42 increased to 1.53 p = 0.001). Tumour coverage and normal tissue objectives were maintained with simplified liver IMRT, at the expense of reduced conformity.

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastases.

    PubMed

    Tree, Alison C; Khoo, Vincent S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ahmed, Merina; Dearnaley, David P; Hawkins, Maria A; Huddart, Robert A; Nutting, Christopher M; Ostler, Peter J; van As, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    The management of metastatic solid tumours has historically focused on systemic treatment given with palliative intent. However, radical surgical treatment of oligometastases is now common practice in some settings. The development of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), building on improvements in delivery achieved by intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy, now allows delivery of ablative doses of radiation to extracranial sites. Many non-randomised studies have shown that SBRT for oligometastases is safe and effective, with local control rates of about 80%. Importantly, these studies also suggest that the natural history of the disease is changing, with 2-5 year progression-free survival of about 20%. Although complete cure might be possible in a few patients with oligometastases, the aim of SBRT in this setting is to achieve local control and delay progression, and thereby also postpone the need for further treatment. We review published work showing that SBRT offers durable local control and the potential for progression-free survival in non-liver, non-lung oligometastatic disease at a range of sites. However, to test whether SBRT really does improve progression-free survival, randomised trials will be essential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prone breast intensity modulated radiation therapy: 5-year results.

    PubMed

    Osa, Etin-Osa O; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D; Formenti, Silvia C

    2014-07-15

    To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm(3), mean 19.65 cm(3). In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm(3), mean 1.59 cm(3). There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and fractionation approach to standard 6-week radiation therapy with a

  5. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  6. Segmentation and leaf sequencing for intensity modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwish, Adam; Oliver, Mike; Craig, Jeff; Chen, Jeff; Bauman, Glenn; Fisher, Barbara; Wong, Eugene

    2007-05-15

    A common method in generating intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans consists of a three step process: an optimized fluence intensity map (IM) for each beam is generated via inverse planning, this IM is then segmented into discrete levels, and finally, the segmented map is translated into a set of MLC apertures via a leaf sequencing algorithm. To date, limited work has been done on this approach as it pertains to intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT), specifically in regards to the latter two steps. There are two determining factors that separate IMAT segmentation and leaf sequencing from their IMRT equivalents: (1) the intrinsic 3D nature of the intensity maps (standard 2D maps plus the angular component), and (2) that the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) constraints be met using a minimum number of arcs. In this work, we illustrate a technique to create an IMAT plan that replicates Tomotherapy deliveries by applying IMAT specific segmentation and leaf-sequencing algorithms to Tomotherapy output sinograms. We propose and compare two alternative segmentation techniques, a clustering method, and a bottom-up segmentation method (BUS). We also introduce a novel IMAT leaf-sequencing algorithm that explicitly takes leaf movement constraints into consideration. These algorithms were tested with 51 angular projections of the output leaf-open sinograms generated on the Hi-ART II treatment planning system (Tomotherapy Inc.). We present two geometric phantoms and 2 clinical scenarios as sample test cases. In each case 12 IMAT plans were created, ranging from 2 to 7 intensity levels. Half were generated using the BUS segmentation and half with the clustering method. We report on the number of arcs produced as well as differences between Tomotherapy output sinograms and segmented IMAT intensity maps. For each case one plan for each segmentation method is chosen for full Monte Carlo dose calculation (NumeriX LLC) and dose volume histograms (DVH) are calculated

  7. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Senthi, Sashendra; Gill, Suki S.; Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim; Rolfo, Aldo; Thomas, Jessica; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Bowden, Patrick; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}, respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V{sub 95%}, PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V{sub 95%} was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3-93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90-2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p < .0001). The planning system independently influenced homogeneity (p = .038) and conformity (p = .021). The treatment date independently influenced the PTV V{sub 95%} only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures

  8. Benchmarking dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Senthi, Sashendra; Gill, Suki S; Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim; Rolfo, Aldo; Thomas, Jessica; Duchesne, Gillian M; Hamilton, Christopher H; Joon, Daryl Lim; Bowden, Patrick; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-02-01

    To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V(95%) and V(100%), respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V(95%), PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V(95%) was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3-93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90-2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p < .0001). The planning system independently influenced homogeneity (p = .038) and conformity (p = .021). The treatment date independently influenced the PTV V(95%) only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Our study has benchmarked measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity for the treatment of prostate

  9. Pitfalls in normalization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg . E-mail: greg.williams@hci.utah.edu; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning often involves complex combinations of beam energies, treatment fields, and beam modifying devices. Even when a plan is devised that meets many treatment-planning objectives, limitations in the planner's ability to further adjust beam characteristics may require the radiation dose prescription to be normalized to an isodose level that best covers the target volume. While these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, they also result in adjustment of the dose delivered to the normal tissues and must be carefully evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning allows combinations of complex dose patterns, in order to achieve the desired treatment planning goals. These dose patterns are created by defining a set of treatment planning objectives and then allowing the treatment planning computer to create intensity patterns, through the use of moving multileaf collimation that will meet the requested goals. Often, when an IMRT treatment plan is created that meets many of the treatment planning goals but falls short of volume coverage requirements, the planner is tempted to apply normalization principles similar to those utilized with 3D treatment planning. Again, these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, but unlike 3D planning situations, may result in avoidable delivery of additional doses to the normal tissues. The focus of this study is to evaluate the effect of application of normalization for IMRT planning using multiple patient situations. Recommendations would favor re-optimization over normalization in most planning situations.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Childhood Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Thomas M.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of failure after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized intracranial ependymoma. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2005, 22 children with pathologically proven, localized, intracranial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant IMRT. Of the patients, 12 (55%) had an infratentorial tumor and 14 (64%) had anaplastic histology. Five patients had a subtotal resection (STR), as evidenced by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical target volume encompassed the tumor bed and any residual disease plus margin (median dose 54 Gy). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 39.8 months. Results: The 3-year overall survival rate was 87% {+-} 9%. The 3-year local control rate was 68% {+-} 12%. There were six local recurrences, all in the high-dose region of the treatment field. Median time to recurrence was 21.7 months. Of the 5 STR patients, 4 experienced recurrence and 3 died. Patients with a gross total resection had significantly better local control (p = 0.024) and overall survival (p = 0.008) than those with an STR. At last follow-up, no patient had developed visual loss, brain necrosis, myelitis, or a second malignancy. Conclusions: Treatment with IMRT provides local control and survival rates comparable with those in historic publications using larger treatment volumes. All failures were within the high-dose region, suggesting that IMRT does not diminish local control. The degree of surgical resection was shown to be significant for local control and survival.

  11. Signal restoration in intensity-modulated optical OFDM access systems.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny

    2011-11-15

    It is well known that deliberate signal clipping in an intensity-modulated (IM) laser transmitter helps to overcome the optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system performance limitation that is related to the signal high peak-to-average power ratio. The amplitude of a clipped OFDM signal has to be optimized in order to minimize the optical power that is required to achieve a specified system performance. However, the signal clipping introduces nonlinear distortion (so-called clipping noise) and leads to a system performance penalty. In this Letter, the performance of the IM optical OFDM system with digital baseband clipping distortion in the transmitter and clipping noise compensation by means of signal restoration in the digital signal processing unit of the system receiver is analytically evaluated. It is demonstrated that the system bit-error ratio can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude, from 10(-3) to 3.5×10(-5), by applying only the first iteration of the signal restoration algorithm proposed in this Letter. The results of the analytical analysis are verified with brute-force numerical simulations based on direct error counting.

  12. Monte Carlo dose verification for intensity-modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Allen; Ma, Lijun; Naqvi, Shahid; Shih, Rompin; Yu, Cedric

    2001-09-01

    Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), a technique which combines beam rotation and dynamic multileaf collimation, has been implemented in our clinic. Dosimetric errors can be created by the inability of the planning system to accurately account for the effects of tissue inhomogeneities and physical characteristics of the multileaf collimator (MLC). The objective of this study is to explore the use of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for IMAT dose verification. The BEAM/DOSXYZ Monte Carlo system was implemented to perform dose verification for the IMAT treatment. The implementation includes the simulation of the linac head/MLC (Elekta SL20), the conversion of patient CT images and beam arrangement for 3D dose calculation, the calculation of gantry rotation and leaf motion by a series of static beams and the development of software to automate the entire MC process. The MC calculations were verified by measurements for conventional beam settings. The agreement was within 2%. The IMAT dose distributions generated by a commercial forward planning system (RenderPlan, Elekta) were compared with those calculated by the MC package. For the cases studied, discrepancies of over 10% were found between the MC and the RenderPlan dose calculations. These discrepancies were due in part to the inaccurate dose calculation of the RenderPlan system. The computation time for the IMAT MC calculation was in the range of 20-80 min on 15 Pentium-III computers. The MC method was also useful in verifying the beam apertures used in the IMAT treatments.

  13. Regularization of inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Calvetti, Daniela; Sohn, Jason W; Kinsella, Timothy J

    2005-02-01

    The performance of a variational regularization technique to improve robustness of inverse treatment planning for intensity modulated radiotherapy is analyzed and tested. Inverse treatment planning is based on the numerical solutions to the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill-posed. Therefore, a fundamental problem with inverse treatment planning is that it may exhibit instabilities manifested in nonphysical oscillations in the beam intensity functions. To control the instabilities, we consider a variational regularization technique which can be applied for the methods which minimize a quadratic objective function. In this technique, the quadratic objective function is modified by adding of a stabilizing functional that allows for arbitrary order regularization. An optimal form of stabilizing functional is selected which allows for both regularization and good approximation of beam intensity functions. The regularized optimization algorithm is shown, by comparison for a typical case of a head-and-neck cancer treatment, to be significantly more accurate and robust than the standard approach, particularly for the smaller beamlet sizes.

  14. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cedric X; Amies, Christopher J; Svatos, Michelle

    2008-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced form of external beam radiation therapy. IMRT offers an additional dimension of freedom as compared with field shaping in three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy because the radiation intensities within a radiation field can be varied according to the preferences of locations within a given beam direction from which the radiation is directed to the tumor. This added freedom allows the treatment planning system to better shape the radiation doses to conform to the target volume while sparing surrounding normal structures. The resulting dosimetric advantage has shown to translate into clinical advantages of improving local and regional tumor control. It also offers a valuable mechanism for dose escalation to tumors while simultaneously reducing radiation toxicities to the surrounding normal tissue and sensitive structures. In less than a decade, IMRT has become common practice in radiation oncology. Looking forward, the authors wonder if IMRT has matured to such a point that the room for further improvement has diminished and so it is pertinent to ask what the future will hold for IMRT. This article attempts to look from the perspective of the current state of the technology to predict the immediate trends and the future directions. This article will (1) review the clinical experience of IMRT; (2) review what we learned in IMRT planning; (3) review different treatment delivery techniques; and finally, (4) predict the areas of advancements in the years to come.

  15. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Sävert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N.; Kaluza, Malte C.; Norreys, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the nonlinear nature of the process. Here, we present a method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry. This process can also be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and postprocessing techniques. This adds a powerful tool for research in various fields in engineering and physics for both techniques.

  16. Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Chen, Nicholas; Sävert, Alexander; Trines, Raoul; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N; Kaluza, Malte C; Norreys, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Shadowgraphy is a technique widely used to diagnose objects or systems in various fields in physics and engineering. In shadowgraphy, an optical beam is deflected by the object and then the intensity modulation is captured on a screen placed some distance away. However, retrieving quantitative information from the shadowgrams themselves is a challenging task because of the nonlinear nature of the process. Here, we present a method to retrieve quantitative information from shadowgrams, based on computational geometry. This process can also be applied to proton radiography for electric and magnetic field diagnosis in high-energy-density plasmas and has been benchmarked using a toroidal magnetic field as the object, among others. It is shown that the method can accurately retrieve quantitative parameters with error bars less than 10%, even when caustics are present. The method is also shown to be robust enough to process real experimental results with simple pre- and postprocessing techniques. This adds a powerful tool for research in various fields in engineering and physics for both techniques.

  17. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  18. Robust PET-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Bissonnette, J. P.; Purdie, T.; Chan, T. C. Y.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Functional image guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy has the potential to improve cancer treatment quality by basing treatment parameters such as heterogeneous dose distributions information derived from imaging. However, such heterogeneous dose distributions are subject to imaging uncertainty. In this paper, the authors develop a robust optimization model to design plans that are desensitized to imaging uncertainty. Methods: Starting from the pretreatment fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans, the authors use the raw voxel standard uptake values (SUVs) as input into a series of intermediate functions to transform the SUV into a desired dose. The calculated desired doses were used as an input into a robust optimization model to generate beamlet intensities. For each voxel, the authors assume that the true SUV cannot be observed but instead resides in an interval centered on the nominal (i.e., observed) SUV. Then the authors evaluated the nominal and robust solutions through a simulation study. The simulation considered the effect of the true SUV being different from the nominal SUV on the quality of the treatment plan. Treatment plans were compared on the metrics of objective function value and tumor control probability (TCP). Results: Computational results demonstrate the potential for improvements in tumor control probability and deviation from the desired dose distribution compared to a nonrobust model while maintaining acceptable tissue dose. Conclusions: Robust optimization can help design treatment plans that are more stable in the presence of image value uncertainties.

  19. Multibeam tomotherapy: A new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, Nils; Mueller, Reinhold G.

    2007-10-15

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of {+-}36 deg. . Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of 'step and shoot' MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as 'multibeam tomotherapy.' Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The 'Multifocal MLC-positioning' algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  20. Multibeam tomotherapy: a new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Nils; Müller, Reinhold G

    2007-10-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of +/- 36 degrees. Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of "step and shoot" MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as "multibeam tomotherapy." Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The "Multifocal MLC-positioning" algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage, better

  1. Survey of resident education in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, Renuka; Oh, Julia L; Roeske, John C; Mundt, Arno J

    2005-06-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been gaining increasing popularity among practicing physicians in the U.S., but the extent to which radiation oncology residents are taught the principles of this technology and are trained to use IMRT remains unknown. In this paper, we assessed the current level of resident education in IMRT in the United States. Chief residents at all 77 accredited radiation oncology programs were sent a 13-question survey addressing formal didactics and hands-on experience in IMRT. The survey assessed the frequency, subject, and format of IMRT didactics. Questions also addressed the number of IMRT patients and anatomical sites treated, resident involvement in the IMRT process, and the intent of IMRT use. Finally, residents were asked for their opinions on their IMRT education. Sixty-one surveys (79%) were completed. Overall, forty-three respondents (71%) reported receiving formal IMRT didactics, with nearly one-third reporting extensive didactics (> or = 3 lectures/seminars et cetera per year). The most common didactic formats were lectures (95%) and journal clubs (63%), most commonly supervised by physicists (98%). Involvement by physicians and radiobiologists were reported by 63% and 7% of respondents, respectively. Overall, 87% of respondents had hands-on IMRT training, with nearly one-half having treated > 25 patients. The most common sites treated were head and neck (94%) and prostate (81%). Involvement in all aspects of the IMRT process was common, particularly target and tissue delineation (98%) and plan evaluation (93%). Most respondents (79%) with hands-on experience reported receiving formal didactics. However, nearly one-third received no or only minimal formal didactics. The percentage of respondents desiring increased IMRT didactics and hands-on experience were 70% and 47%, respectively. Our results suggest that the great majority of radiation oncology residents in the United States are currently exposed to didactics

  2. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lymphoma involving the mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Toner, Sean; Hunt, Margie; Wu, Elisa J.; Yahalom, Joachim . E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, potential advantage, and indications for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving excessively large mediastinal disease volumes or requiring repeat RT. Methods and materials: Sixteen patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 11) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 5) undergoing primary radiotherapy or repeat RT delivered via an IMRT plan were studied. The indications for using an IMRT plan were previous mediastinal RT (n = 5) or extremely large mediastinal treatment volumes (n 11). For each patient, IMRT, conventional parallel-opposed (AP-PA), and three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) plans were designed using 6-MV X-rays to deliver doses ranging from 18 to 45 Gy (median, 36 Gy). The plans were compared with regard to dose-volume parameters. The IMRT/AP-PA and IMRT/3D-CRT ratios were calculated for each parameter. Results: For all patients, the mean lung dose was reduced using IMRT, on average, by 12% compared with AP-PA and 14% compared with 3D-CRT. The planning target volume coverage was also improved using IMRT compared with AP-PA but was not different from the planning target volume coverage obtained with 3D-CRT. Conclusion: In selected patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the mediastinum, IMRT provides improved planning target volume coverage and reduces pulmonary toxicity parameters. It is feasible for RT of large treatment volumes and allows repeat RT of relapsed disease without exceeding cord tolerance. Additional follow-up is necessary to determine whether improvements in dose delivery affect long-term morbidity and disease control.

  4. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  5. Uncertainty Estimation in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Absolute Dosimetry Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Doblado, Francisco . E-mail: paco@us.es; Hartmann, Guenther H.; Pena, Javier; Capote, Roberto; Paiusco, Marta; Rhein, Bernhard; Leal, Antonio; Lagares, Juan Ignacio

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) represents an important method for improving RT. The IMRT relative dosimetry checks are well established; however, open questions remain in reference dosimetry with ionization chambers (ICs). The main problem is the departure of the measurement conditions from the reference ones; thus, additional uncertainty is introduced into the dose determination. The goal of this study was to assess this effect systematically. Methods and Materials: Monte Carlo calculations and dosimetric measurements with five different detectors were performed for a number of representative IMRT cases, covering both step-and-shoot and dynamic delivery. Results: Using ICs with volumes of about 0.125 cm{sup 3} or less, good agreement was observed among the detectors in most of the situations studied. These results also agreed well with the Monte Carlo-calculated nonreference correction factors (c factors). Additionally, we found a general correlation between the IC position relative to a segment and the derived correction factor c, which can be used to estimate the expected overall uncertainty of the treatment. Conclusion: The increase of the reference dose relative standard uncertainty measured with ICs introduced by nonreference conditions when verifying an entire IMRT plan is about 1-1.5%, provided that appropriate small-volume chambers are used. The overall standard uncertainty of the measured IMRT dose amounts to about 2.3%, including the 0.5% of reproducibility and 1.5% of uncertainty associated with the beam calibration factor. Solid state detectors and large-volume chambers are not well suited to IMRT verification dosimetry because of the greater uncertainties. An action level of 5% is appropriate for IMRT verification. Greater discrepancies should lead to a review of the dosimetric procedure, including visual inspection of treatment segments and energy fluence.

  6. SU-E-T-409: Intensity Modulated Robotic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B; Jin, L; Li, J; Chen, L; Ma, C; Fan, J; Zhang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: As compared with the IRIS-based models, the MLC-based CyberKnife system allows more efficient treatment delivery due to its improved coverage of large lesions and intensity modulation. The treatment delivery efficiency is mainly determined by the number of selected nodes. This study aimed to demonstrate that relatively small sets of optimally selected nodes could produce high-quality plans. Methods: The full body path of the CyberKnife system consists of 110 nodes, from which we selected various sets for 4 prostate cancer cases using our in-house beamselection software. With the selected nodes we generated IMRT plans using our in-house beamlet-based inverse-planning optimization program. We also produced IMRT plans using the MultiPlan treatment planning system (version 5.0) for the same cases. Furthermore, the nodes selected by MultiPlan were used to produce plans with our own optimization software so that we could compare the quality of the selected sets of nodes. Results: Our beam-selection program selected one node-set for each case, with the number of nodes ranging from 23 to 34. The IMRT plans based on the selected nodes and our in-house optimization program showed adequate target coverage, with favorable critical structure sparing for the cases investigated. Compared with the plans using the nodes selected by MultiPlan, the plans generated with our selected beams provided superior rectum/bladder sparing for 75% of the cases. The plans produced by MultiPlan with various numbers of nodes also suggested that the plan quality was not compromised significantly when the number of nodes was reduced. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that with beamletbased planning optimization, one could produce high-quality plans with an optimal set of nodes for MLC-based robotic radiotherapy. Furthermore, our beam-selection strategy could help further improve critical structure sparing.

  7. Prospective Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles . E-mail: charles.leonard@usoncology.com; Carter, Dennis; Kercher, Jane; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Cornish, Patricia C.; Hunter, Kari C.; Kondrat, Janis

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and acute toxicities of an accelerated, partial breast, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and August 2005, 55 patients with Stage I breast cancer and initial follow-up were enrolled at four facilities on a HealthONE and Western institutional review board-approved accelerated partial breast IMRT protocol. All patients were treated in 10 equal fractions delivered twice daily within 5 consecutive days. The first 7 patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 48 patients were treated to 38.5 Gy. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 10 months (range, <1-19) and after diagnosis was 11.5 months (range, 2-21). No local or distant recurrences developed. The T stage distribution was as follows: T1a in 11 patients, T1b in 24, and T1c in 20. The median tumor size was 9 mm (range, 1-20 mm). Breast cosmesis was judged by the patient as poor by 2, good by 12, and excellent by 40 (1 patient was legally blind) and by the physician as poor for 1, good for 10, and excellent for 44 patients. Breast pain, as judged by patient, was none in 34, mild in 19, moderate in 2, and severe in 0 patients. There was a single report of telangiectasia but no incidents of significant edema. Compared with historic controls for whom three-dimensional treatment planning techniques were used, IMRT provided similar dose delivery to the target while reducing the volume of normal breast included in the 100%, 75%, and 50% isodose lines. Conclusion: This initial report prospectively explored the feasibility of accelerated partial breast IMRT. After short-term follow-up, the dose delivery and clinical outcomes were very acceptable. We believe this regimen deserves additional investigation under institutional review board guidance.

  8. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. Methods From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field "box" pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. Results The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). Conclusion IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate. PMID:21679408

  9. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martin; Wong, Adrian; Fuller, Clifton D.; Salter, Bill J.; Fuss, Cristina; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To present the techniques and preliminary outcomes of ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for pancreatic cancer. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of 41 patients treated between November 2000 and March 2005 with IG-IMRT to mean total doses of 55 Gy (range, 45–64 Gy). We analyzed the clinical feasibility of IG-IMRT, dosimetric parameters, and outcomes, including acute gastrointestinal toxicity (RTOG grading). Survival was assessed for adenocarcinoma (n = 35) and other histologies. Results Mean daily image-guidance corrective shifts were 4.8 ± 4.3 mm, 7.5 ± 7.2 mm, and 4.6 ± 5.9 mm along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively (mean 3D correction vector, 11.7 ± 8.4 mm). Acute upper gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 22 patients (53.7%), grade 2 in 16 patients (39%), and grade 3 in 3 patients (7.3%). Lower gastrointestinal toxicity was grade 0–1 in 32 patients (78%), grade 2 in 7 patients (17.1%), and grade 4 in 2 patients (4.9%). Treatment was stopped early in 4 patients following administration of 30 to 54 Gy. Median survival for adenocarcinoma histology was 10.3 months (18.6 months in patients alive at analysis; n = 8) with actuarial 1- and 2-year survivals of 38% and 25%, respectively. Conclusion Daily image-guidance during delivery of IMRT for pancreatic carcinoma is clinically feasible. The data presented support the conclusion that safety margin reduction and moderate dose escalation afforded by implementation of these new radiotherapy technologies yields preliminary outcomes at least comparable with published survival data. PMID:19262697

  10. 3D treatment planning and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image-based treatment planning and new delivery technologies have spurred the implementation of external beam radiation therapy techniques, in which the high-dose region is conformed much more closely to the target volume than previously possible, thus reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose. This form of external beam irradiation is referred to as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). 3DCRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation oncology process; it represents a radical change in practice, particularly for the radiation oncologist. Defining target volumes and organs at risk in 3D by drawing contours on CT images on a slice-by-slice basis, as opposed to drawing beam portals on a simulator radiograph, can be challenging, because radiation oncologists are generally not well trained in cross-sectional imaging. Currently, the 3DCRT approach will increase the time and effort required by physicians inexperienced with 3D treatment planning. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more advanced form of 3DCRT, but there is considerable developmental work remaining. The instrumentation and methods used for IMRT quality assurance procedures and testing are not well established. Computer optimization cost functions are too simplistic, and thus time-consuming. Subjective plan evaluation by the radiation oncologist is still the norm. In addition, many fundamental questions regarding IMRT remain unanswered. For example, the radiobiophysical consequences of altered time-dose-fraction are unknown. Also, the fact that there is much greater dose heterogeneity for both the target and normal critical structures with IMRT compared to traditional irradiation techniques challenges current radiation oncology planning principles. However, this new process of planning and treatment delivery shows significant potential for improving the therapeutic ratio. In addition, while inefficient today, these systems, when fully developed

  11. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  12. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer.

  13. Quantification of beam complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Weiliang Cho, Sang Hyun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Excessive complexity in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans increases the dose uncertainty, prolongs the treatment time, and increases the susceptibility to changes in patient or target geometry. To date, the tools for quantitative assessment of IMRT beam complexity are still lacking. In this study, The authors have sought to develop metrics to characterize different aspects of beam complexity and investigate the beam complexity for IMRT plans of different disease sites. Methods: The authors evaluated the beam complexity scores for 65 step-and-shoot IMRT plans from three sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine) and 26 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for the prostate. On the basis of the beam apertures and monitor unit weights of all segments, the authors calculated the mean aperture area, extent of aperture shape irregularity, and degree of beam modulation for each beam. Then the beam complexity values were averaged to obtain the complexity metrics of the IMRT plans. The authors studied the correlation between the beam complexity metrics and the quality assurance (QA) results. Finally, the effects of treatment planning parameters on beam complexity were studied. Results: The beam complexity scores were not uniform among the prostate IMRT beams from different gantry angles. The lateral beams had larger monitor units and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior-posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest aperture irregularity, beam modulation, and normalized monitor units; the head and neck IMRT plans had large beam irregularity and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic radiation therapy plans often had small beam apertures, which may have been associated with the relatively large discrepancies between planned and QA measured doses. There were weak correlations between the beam complexity scores and the measured dose errors. The prostate VMAT beams showed

  14. An immobilization system for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siyong; Akpati, Hilary C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray R; Amdur, Robert J; Palta, Jatinder R

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an immobilization treatment system used for claustrophobic patients in head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Instead of the thermoplastic facemask, the Vac Fix (S & S Par Scientific, Odense, Denmark) mold is used for immobilization of claustrophobic patients at the University of Florida in head-and-neck IMRT. The immobilization procedure combines the use of commercial stereotactic infrared (IR) ExacTrac camera system (BrainLAB, Inc., Westchester, IL) for patient setup and monitoring. The Vac Fix mold is placed on the headrest and folded up as needed to provide support before the mold is hardened. For the camera system, a frame referred to as a "tattoo-free immobilization accessory" is fabricated, on which the IR markers can be placed. A patient-specific dental impression is made with the bite tray. The movement of the markers, connected through the dental impression of the patient, accurately represents the overall patient motion. Patient movement is continuously monitored and repositioning is performed whenever patient movement exceeds the predefined tolerance limit. Monitored patient movements are recorded at a certain frequency. Recorded data are analyzed and compared with those of patients immobilized with the thermoplastic facemask plus the camera system that is the standard immobilization system in our clinic. For three patients treated with the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system, on average, the histogram-based uncertainties, U(95)(5), U(95)(20), and mean displacement, R(mean) (mm) were 1.03, 1.08, and 0.60, respectively. These values are close to those obtained with the mask plus the camera system. The Vac Fix mold plus the camera system often requires more beam interruptions because of repositioning than the mask plus the camera system (on average, the Vac Fix mold plus the camera system required repositioning 7.7 times and the mask plus the camera system required repositioning 1.8 times during 20

  15. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement ± 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 ± 3.0 mm, 0.5 ± 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 ± 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within

  16. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  17. SU-E-T-504: Intensity-Modulated Radiosurgery Treatments Derived by Optimizing Delivery of Sphere Packing Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Hermansen, M; Bova, F; John, T St.; Velasco, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To minimize the number of monitor units required to deliver a sphere packing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plan by eliminating overlaps of individual beam projections. Methods An algorithm was written in C{sup ++} to calculate SRS treatment doses using sphere packing. Three fixed beams were used to approximate each arc in a typical SRS treatment plan. For cases involving multiple isocenters, at each gantry and table angle position beams directed to individual spheres overlap to produce regions of high dose, resulting in intensity modulated beams. These high dose regions were dampened by post-processing of the combined beam profile. The post-process dampening involves removing the excess overlapping fluence from all but the highest contributing beam. The dampened beam profiles at each table and gantry angle position were then summed to produce the new total dose distribution. Results Delivery times for even the most complex multiple sphere plans can be reduced to consistent times of about 20 to 30 minutes. The total MUs required to deliver the plan can also be reduced by as much as 85% of the original plan’s MUs. Conclusion Regions of high dose are removed. Dampening overlapping radiation fluence can produce the new beam profiles that have more uniform dose distributions using less MUs. This results in a treatment that requires significantly fewer intensity values than traditional IMRT or VAMT planning.

  18. Volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy vs conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter; Chan, Kit Chi; Cheng, Ka Wai; Chan, Ka Yiu; Chau, Ming Chun

    2013-01-01

    Dosimetric comparisons between RapidArc (RA) and conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) were performed to address differences in dose coverage of the target, sparing of organs-at-risk (OARs), delivery of monitor units (MUs) and time, to assess whether the RA technique was more beneficial for treatment of NPC. Eight NPC patients (Stages I–IV), who had completed RA treatment, were selected for this study. Computed tomography data sets were re-planned using 7-fields fixed beam IMRT. Quantitative measurements of dose-endpoint values on the dose-volume histograms were carried out for evaluation of: (i) dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%); (ii) degree of conformity (CI95%); (iii) tumor control probability (TCP); (iv) doses to OARs; (v) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP); (vi) treatment time; and (vii) MUs. RA plans achieved better dose conformity and TCP in planning target volumes (PTVs). Target dose homogeneity was not as high as for IMRT plans. Doses to tempero-mandibular joints, clavicles, parotid glands and posterior neck, and their NTCPs were significantly lower in RA plans (P < 0.05). Mean doses to the brainstem and spinal cord were slightly lower in IMRT plans. RA plans allowed for a mean reduction in MUs by 78% (P = 0.006), and a four-fold reduction in treatment delivery times, relative to IMRT plans. RA plans showed superior, or comparable, target coverage and dose conformity in PTVs, but at the expense of inferior dose homogeneity. RA plans also achieved significant improvements in dose reduction to OARs and healthy tissue sparing. A significant reduction in treatment delivery time for RA treatment technique was also noted. PMID:23188186

  19. Prioritized efficiency optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Birgit S; Wilkens, Jan J

    2016-12-07

    A high dosimetric quality and short treatment time are major goals in radiotherapy planning. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans obtain dose distributions of great conformity but often result in long delivery times which are typically not incorporated into the optimization process. We present an algorithm to optimize delivery efficiency of IMPT plans while maintaining plan quality, and study the potential trade-offs of these interdependent objectives. The algorithm is based on prioritized optimization, a stepwise approach to implemented objectives. First the quality of the plan is optimized. The second step of the prioritized efficiency optimization (PrEfOpt) routine offers four alternatives for reducing delivery time: minimization of the total spot weight sum (A), maximization of the lowest spot intensity of each energy layer (B), elimination of low-weighted spots (C) or energy layers (D). The trade-off between dosimetric quality (step I) and treatment time (step II) is controlled during the optimization by option-dependent parameters. PrEfOpt was applied to a clinical patient case, and plans for different trade-offs were calculated. Delivery times were simulated for two virtual facilities with constant and variable proton current, i.e. independent and dependent on the optimized spot weight distributions. Delivery times decreased without major degradation of plan quality; absolute time reductions varied with the applied method and facility type. Minimizing the total spot weight sum (A) reduced times by 28% for a similar plan quality at a constant current (changes of minimum dose in the target  <1%). For a variable proton current, eliminating low-weighted spots (C) led to remarkably faster delivery (16%). The implementation of an efficiency-optimization step into the optimization process can yield reduced delivery times with similar plan qualities. A potential clinical application of PrEfOpt is the generation of multiple plans with different trade

  20. Prioritized efficiency optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Birgit S.; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2016-12-01

    A high dosimetric quality and short treatment time are major goals in radiotherapy planning. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans obtain dose distributions of great conformity but often result in long delivery times which are typically not incorporated into the optimization process. We present an algorithm to optimize delivery efficiency of IMPT plans while maintaining plan quality, and study the potential trade-offs of these interdependent objectives. The algorithm is based on prioritized optimization, a stepwise approach to implemented objectives. First the quality of the plan is optimized. The second step of the prioritized efficiency optimization (PrEfOpt) routine offers four alternatives for reducing delivery time: minimization of the total spot weight sum (A), maximization of the lowest spot intensity of each energy layer (B), elimination of low-weighted spots (C) or energy layers (D). The trade-off between dosimetric quality (step I) and treatment time (step II) is controlled during the optimization by option-dependent parameters. PrEfOpt was applied to a clinical patient case, and plans for different trade-offs were calculated. Delivery times were simulated for two virtual facilities with constant and variable proton current, i.e. independent and dependent on the optimized spot weight distributions. Delivery times decreased without major degradation of plan quality; absolute time reductions varied with the applied method and facility type. Minimizing the total spot weight sum (A) reduced times by 28% for a similar plan quality at a constant current (changes of minimum dose in the target  <1%). For a variable proton current, eliminating low-weighted spots (C) led to remarkably faster delivery (16%). The implementation of an efficiency-optimization step into the optimization process can yield reduced delivery times with similar plan qualities. A potential clinical application of PrEfOpt is the generation of multiple plans with different trade

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B. . E-mail: jani@rover.uchicago.edu

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range (<10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan; however, the IMRT plan irradiated a smaller liver volume within the higher dose region (>10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits

  2. Pleural Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Laser, Benjamin; Krug, Lee M.; Yorke, Ellen; Sima, Camelia S.; Flores, Raja; Rusch, Valerie

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors. The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy

  3. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M.; Dempsey, James F.

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using 60Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered 60Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy 60Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H&N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and 60Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant 60Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H&N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical 60Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant 60Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and 60Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable target coverage

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... pg=stereotactic . Accessed July 22, 2016. Read More Acoustic neuroma Brain tumor - primary - adults Cerebral arteriovenous malformation ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Arteriovenous Malformations Brain Tumors Childhood Brain Tumors ...

  5. Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanyi, James A.; He, Tongming; Summers, Paige A.; Mburu, Ruth G.; Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization

  6. [Stereotactic radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Aristu, J J; Ciérvide, R; Guridi, J; Moreno, M; Arbea, L; Azcona, J D; Ramos, L I; Zubieta, J L

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a form of external radiotherapy that employs a system of three dimensional coordinates independent of the patient for the precise localisation of the lesion. It also has the characteristic that the radiation beams are conformed and precise, and converge on the lesion, making it possible to administer very high doses of radiotherapy without increasing the radiation to healthy adjacent organs or structures. When the procedure is carried out in one treatment session it is termed radiosurgery, and when administered over several sessions it is termed stereotactic radiotherapy. Special systems of fixing or immobilising the patient (guides or stereotactic frames) are required together with radiotherapy devices capable of generating conformed beams (lineal accelerator, gammaknife, cyberknife, tomotherapy, cyclotrons). Modern stereotactic radiotherapy employs intra-tumoural radio-opaque frames or CAT image systems included in the irradiation device, which make possible a precise localisation of mobile lesions in each treatment session. Besides, technological advances make it possible to coordinate the lesion's movements in breathing with the radiotherapy unit (gating and tracking) for maximum tightening of margins and excluding a greater volume of healthy tissue. Radiosurgery is mainly indicated in benign or malign cerebral lesions less than 3-4 centimetres (arteriovenous malformations, neurinomas, meningiomas, cerebral metastases) and stereotactic radiotherapy is basically administered in tumours of extracraneal localisation that require high conforming and precision, such as inoperable early lung cancer and hepatic metastasis.

  7. [Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: ethics and methodology].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Miroir, J; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is the standard technique for the radiation treatment of head and neck cancers. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy reduces side effects (xerostomia, dysphagia, fibrosis, etc.) and improves the results for cancer localizations with highly complex shapes such as the cavum or nasal cavity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is also a costly technique that necessitates a numerous staff, highly trained, with regular practice. If this technique cannot be available (understaffing, overwork, etc.) the choice between entrusting the patient to a colleague and treating the patient with a less sophisticated technique such as 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy depends on different objective and ethical criteria.

  8. [Study and simulation of the intensity modulation-Fourier transform spectropolarimeter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-quan; Xiangli, Bin; Huang, Min; Hu, Liang; Jing, Juan-juan

    2011-07-01

    Intensity modulation-Fourier transform spectropolarimetry (IMFTSP) is a novel technology that combines the intensity modulation spectropolarimetry and Fourier transform spectroscopy. The IMFTSP can obtain full Stokes spectropolarimetric parameters simultaneously, and maintains the throughput (Jacquinot) and multiplex (Fellgett) advantages. Yet aside from this, the IMFTSP has the advantage of reducing the complexity of data processing. The data collecting and spectropolarimetric parameters reconstruction processes were analyzed theoretically in this paper, the theoretical formulas are presented, and a whole process mathematical simulation for the IMFTSP system is introduced. The theory analysis and simulation results proved the feasibility of the IMFTSP.

  9. Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Thomas H. . E-mail: thomas.wagner@orhs.org; Meeks, Sanford L.; Bova, Frank J.; Friedman, William A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Tome, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed.

  10. Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0435 TITLE: Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by...Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0435 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  11. Image-guided stereotactic spine radiosurgery on a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Zhu; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  12. Image-Guided Stereotactic Spine Radiosurgery on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno; Sandhu, Ajay; Murphy, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery for spinal metastasis consists of a high radiation dose delivered to the tumor in 1 to 5 fractions. Due to the high radiation dose in a single or fewer treatments, the precision of tumor localization and dose delivery is of great concern. Many groups have published their experiences of spinal radiosurgery with the use of CyberKnife System (Accuray Inc.). In this study, we report in detail our approach to stereotactic spine radiosurgery (SSRS) using a conventional linear accelerator (Varian Trilogy), utilizing the features of kilovolt on-board imaging (kV-OBI) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for image guidance. We present our experience in various aspects of the SSRS procedure, including patient simulation and immobilization, intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) planning and beam selection, portal dosimetry for patient planning quality assurance (QA), and the use of image guidance in tumor localization prior to and during treatment delivery.

  13. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-02: Optimizing Orientations of Hundreds of Intensity-Modulated Beams to Treat Multiple Brain Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L; Dong, P; Larson, D; Keeling, V; Hossain, S; Ahmad, S; Sahgal, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new modulated beam orientation optimization (MBOO) approach maximizing treatment planning quality for the state-of-the-art flattening filter free (FFF) beam that has enabled rapid treatments of multiple brain targets. Methods: MBOO selects and optimizes a large number of intensity-modulated beams (400 or more) from all accessible beam angles surrounding a patient’s skull. The optimization algorithm was implemented on a standalone system that interfaced with the 3D Dicom images and structure sets. A standard published data set that consisted of 1 to 12 metastatic brain tumor combinations was selected for MBOO planning. The planning results from various coplanar and non-coplanar configurations via MBOO were then compared with the results obtained from a clinical volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery system (Truebeam RapidArc, Varian Oncology). Results: When planning a few number of targets (n<4), MBOO produced results equivalent to non-coplanar multi-arc VMAT planning in terms of target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. For example, the 12-Gy and 4-Gy normal brain volumes for the 3-target plans differed by less than 1 mL ( 3.0 mLvs 3.8 mL; and 35.2 mL vs 36.3 mL, respectively) for MBOO versus VMAT. However, when planning a larger number of targets (n≥4), MBOO significantly reduced the dose to the normal brain as compared to VMAT, though the target volume coverage was equivalent. For example, the 12-Gy and 4-Gy normal brain volumes for the 12-target plans were 10.8 mL vs. 18.0 mL and 217.9 mL vs. 390.0 mL, respectively for the non-coplanar MBOO versus the non-coplanar VMAT treatment plans, yielding a reduction in volume of more than 60% for the case. Conclusion: MBOO is a unique approach for maximizing normal tissue sparing when treating a large number (n≥4) of brain tumors with FFF linear accelerators. Dr Ma and Dr Sahgal are currently on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery. Dr Sahgal has

  14. Efficiency gains for spinal radiosurgery using multicriteria optimization intensity modulated radiation therapy guided volumetric modulated arc therapy planning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huixiao; Winey, Brian A; Daartz, Juliane; Oh, Kevin S; Shin, John H; Gierga, David P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate plan quality and delivery efficiency gains of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a multicriteria optimization-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (MCO-IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery of spinal metastases. MCO-IMRT plans (RayStation V2.5; RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden) of 10 spinal radiosurgery cases using 7-9 beams were developed for clinical delivery, and patients were replanned using VMAT with partial arcs. The prescribed dose was 18 Gy, and target coverage was maximized such that the maximum dose to the planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) of the spinal cord was 10 or 12 Gy. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints from the clinically acceptable MCO-IMRT plans were utilized for VMAT optimization. Plan quality and delivery efficiency with and without collimator rotation for MCO-IMRT and VMAT were compared and analyzed based upon DVH, planning target volume coverage, homogeneity index, conformity number, cord PRV sparing, total monitor units (MU), and delivery time. The VMAT plans were capable of matching most DVH constraints from the MCO-IMRT plans. The ranges of MU were 4808-7193 for MCO-IMRT without collimator rotation, 3509-5907 for MCO-IMRT with collimator rotation, 4444-7309 for VMAT without collimator rotation, and 3277-5643 for VMAT with collimator of 90 degrees. The MU for the VMAT plans were similar to their corresponding MCO-IMRT plans, depending upon the complexity of the target and PRV geometries, but had a larger range. The delivery times of the MCO-IMRT and VMAT plans, both with collimator rotation, were 18.3 ± 2.5 minutes and 14.2 ± 2.0 minutes, respectively (P < .05). The MCO-IMRT and VMAT can create clinically acceptable plans for spinal radiosurgery. The MU for MCO-IMRT and VMAT can be reduced significantly by utilizing a collimator rotation following the orientation of the spinal cord. Plan quality for VMAT is similar to MCO-IMRT, with similar MU for both modalities. Delivery times can be reduced

  15. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    EATING DISORDERS (EDS) ARE A GROUP OF SEVERELY IMPAIRED EATING BEHAVIORS, WHICH INCLUDE THREE SUBGROUPS: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future.

  16. Stereotactic surgery for eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bomin; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a group of severely impaired eating behaviors, which include three subgroups: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and ED not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The precise mechanism of EDs is still unclear and the disorders cause remarkable agony for the patients and their families. Although there are many available treatment methods for EDs today, such as family therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, psychotherapy, and so on, almost half of the patients are refractory to all current medical treatment and never fully recover. For treatment-refractory EDs, stereotactic surgery may be an alternative therapy. This review discusses the history of stereotactic surgery, the modern procedures, and the mostly used targets of stereotactic surgery in EDs. In spite of the limited application of stereotactic surgery in ED nowadays, stereotactic lesion and deep brain stimulation (DBS) are promising treatments with the development of modern functional imaging techniques and the increasing understanding of its mechanism in the future. PMID:23682343

  17. A comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy to intensity modulated proton therapy for the delivery of non-uniform dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Ryan

    2007-12-01

    The distribution of biological characteristics such as clonogen density, proliferation, and hypoxia throughout tumors is generally non-uniform, therefore it follows that the optimal dose prescriptions should also be non-uniform and tumor-specific. Advances in intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) technology have made the delivery of custom-made non-uniform dose distributions possible in practice. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has the potential to deliver non-uniform dose distributions as well, while significantly reducing normal tissue and organ at risk dose relative to IMXT. In this work, a specialized treatment planning system was developed for the purpose of optimizing and comparing biologically based IMXT and IMPT plans. The IMXT systems of step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) and the IMPT systems of intensity modulated spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT), were simulated. A thorough phantom study was conducted in which several subvolumes, which were contained within a base tumor region, were boosted or avoided with IMXT and IMPT. Different boosting situations were simulated by varying the size, proximity, and the doses prescribed to the subvolumes, and the size of the phantom. IMXT and IMPT were also compared for a whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) case, in which a brain metastasis was simultaneously boosted and the hippocampus was avoided. Finally, IMXT and IMPT dose distributions were compared for the case of non-uniform dose prescription in a head and neck cancer patient that was based on PET imaging with the Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (Cu-ATSM) hypoxia marker. The non-uniform dose distributions within the tumor region were comparable for IMXT and IMPT. IMPT, however, was capable of delivering the same non-uniform dose distributions within a tumor using a 180° arc as for a full 360° rotation, which resulted in the reduction of normal tissue integral dose by a factor of

  18. [Clinical implementation of dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Weirong; Xu, Shouping; Du Lei; Xie, Chuanbin; Ma, Lin

    2012-09-01

    To implement dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy. Dose reconstruction was implemented on adaptive helical tomotherapy with the online megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging from a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer. The differences of isodose line between actual and planned deposition were analysis in 3D distribution, on which the hot spot and cold spot were lined. The dose delivered to these areas was modulated in later fractions to keep the planned requirement. The differences between actual and planned isodose line were shown on the image visually. The modulation to the hot spot and cold spot in later fraction corrected the incorrectly delivered dose to achieve the requirement of primary plan. The dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy can be implemented in adaptive helical tomotherapy.

  19. Filter Bank Multicarrier (FBMC) for long-reach intensity modulated optical access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saljoghei, Arsalan; Gutiérrez, Fernando A.; Perry, Philip; Barry, Liam P.

    2017-04-01

    Filter Bank Multi Carrier (FBMC) is a modulation scheme which has recently attracted significant interest in both wireless and optical communications. The interest in optical communications arises due to FBMC's capability to operate without a Cyclic Prefix (CP) and its high resilience to synchronisation errors. However, the operation of FBMC in optical access networks has not been extensively studied either in downstream or upstream. In this work we use experimental work to investigate the operation of FBMC in intensity modulated Passive Optical Networks (PONs) employing direct detection in conjunction with both direct and external modulation schemes. The data rates and propagation lengths employed here vary from 8.4 to 14.8 Gb/s and 0-75 km. The results suggest that by using FBMC it is possible to accomplish CP-Less transmission up to 75 km of SSMF in passive links using cost effective intensity modulation and detection schemes.

  20. Quantitative wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas measurements: elimination of laser intensity modulation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup Lal; Johnstone, Walter

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) has established itself as a very powerful technique for the detection of gases in field applications such as industrial process control. Recent calibration-free techniques have made field measurements more robust. However, in many situations, the significant levels of laser intensity modulation gives rise to background signals that either limit detection sensitivity or distort the target signals, thereby making it difficult to extract useful information. This paper outlines the recent trends in calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and focuses on the elimination of the undesirable effects of both linear as well as nonlinear intensity modulation. The approach is generic and should be useful with newer types of lasers that have shown significantly nonlinear power-current characteristics.

  1. Scintillation effect on intensity modulated laser communication systems—a laboratory demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, W. O.; Ghassemlooy, Z.; Lee, C. G.; Boucouvalas, A. C.

    2010-06-01

    This paper shows the impact of atmospheric turbulence-induced fading on the symbol decision position in the on-off keying (OOK) and the binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulated (SIM) laser communication link. Weak turbulence is simulated in the laboratory using a chamber equipped with heating elements and fans. We have shown that in atmospheric turbulence, it is advantageous to employ modulation schemes such as pulse time and subcarrier intensity modulations that do not directly impress data on the optical irradiance as is the case with the OOK. For the OOK-modulated laser communication system, atmospheric turbulence imposes complexity on the symbol decision subsystem and by extension places a limit on the achievable bit error rate (BER) performance.

  2. Coherent BOTDA sensor with intensity modulated local light and IQ demodulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zonglei; Yan, Lianshan; Shao, Liyang; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2015-06-15

    Coherent Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing system with intensity modulated local (IML) light and fast IQ demodulation is proposed and demonstrated. IML light instead of phase modulated local (PML) light is utilized to reduce the coherent and multiple sidebands induced noises. A spatial resolution of 3-m and ± 1.8°C temperature accuracy at the far end of the fiber are obtained over 40-km sensing distance.

  3. Simplified polarization demultiplexing based on Stokes vector analysis for intensity-modulation direct-detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinyu; Yan, Lianshan; Chen, Zhiyu; Yi, Anlin; Pan, Yan; Jiang, Lin; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin

    2016-10-01

    A simple and effective polarization demultiplexing method is proposed based on the improved Stokes vector analysis and digital signal processor algorithm for the intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems. Such a scheme could significantly simplify optical receivers with low system cost. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method and show that only 1- and 1.7-dB power penalties are measured for 10- and 25-km transmissions compared to back-to-back case.

  4. Value of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Stage IV Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To review outcome and toxicity of Stage IVa and IVb head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with concomitant chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) according to a hybrid fractionation schedule. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 42 patients with Stage IV head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma were irradiated according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily), followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily), to a total dose of 72 Gy. Chemotherapy (cisplatinum, 100mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 55), treated according to the same schedule, but without intensity modulation. Results: Locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival were 81% and 56% after 2 years, respectively. In comparison with the previous cohort, no significant differences were observed regarding either LRC (66%, p = 0.38) or overall survival (73%, p = 0.29). No Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of late Grade 2 or 3 xerostomia (52.9% vs. 90.2%, p < 0.001). No difference was observed regarding late Grade 2 or 3 dysphagia (p = 0.66). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated chemoradiotherapy does not compromise LRC and significantly reduces late toxicity, especially regarding xerostomia.

  5. Hybrid intensity-modulation-to-phase-remodulation optical wavelength reuse transport system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Hung; Tseng, Meng-Chun; Tseng, Cheng-Han

    2015-12-01

    A hybrid intensity-modulation (IM)-to-phase-remodulation optical wavelength reuse transport system is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. Based on the transport system, an optical carrier can be intensity-modulated with an orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) signal and then phase-remodulated with a radio frequency (RF) signal prior to communicating its destination through a span of single mode fiber. The OFDM signal at the receiver end can be directly detected using a photodetector (PD), and the phase-modulated RF signal can be detected by another PD after being converted back to intensity-modulation format by a semiconductor laser. In this study, the working window of the semiconductor laser-composed phase-modulation-format-to-IM-format converter is not fixed. The converter can be flexibly adjusted to align with the wavelength of the employed optical carrier. Experimental results prove that both OFDM and RF signals can be clearly detected with an error-free transmission. Evident interference is not found between both signals at the receiver end.

  6. Possibilities for intensity-modulated brachytherapy: technical limitations on the use of non-isotropic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.

    2002-07-01

    An investigation was undertaken into possible dose conformity advantages and technical limitations of utilizing radially asymmetric internally applied radiation sources for intensity-modulated brachytherapy (IMBT). A feasible form of a source for IMBT would be a linear source with a high-intensity angular region, with some fractional transmission through the remainder of the source, which inhibits the resolution achievable in intensity modulation. Indexed rotation of the source about its axis would provide radial intensity modulation, which could compensate for variations in the spatial relationship between the source position and location of the target edge. Two treatment situations were simulated - one two-dimensional and one three-dimensional - both utilizing a single source (single catheter). The optimal intensity distribution of the source was determined by simulated annealing optimization using a conformality-based objective. The parameters in the optimization included the angular size of the source high-intensity region, and the fractional transmission through the low-intensity part of the source. Results indicate that limitations in source design suggest an optimal high-intensity resolution of approximately π/4 to π/8. The advantages of IMBT are rapidly reduced when fractional transmission through the low-intensity side of the source is increased.

  7. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  8. Two-tone intensity-modulated optical stimulus for self-referencing microwave characterization of high-speed photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Zhang, Shangjian; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Rongguo; Zhang, Zhiyao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The two-tone intensity modulated optical stimulus is proposed and demonstrated for measuring the high-frequency response of photodetectors. The method provides a narrow linewidth and wide bandwidth optical stimulus based on the two-tone modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical intensity modulator, and achieves the self-referenced measurement of photodetectors without the need for correcting the power variation of optical stimulus. Moreover, the two-tone intensity modulation method allows bias-independent measurement with doubled measuring frequency range. In the experiment, the consistency between our method and the conventional methods verifies the simple but accurate measurement.

  9. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  10. SU-E-T-503: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Versus Intensity Modulated X-Ray Therapy (IMRT) for Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Dosimetric Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H; Zhao, L; Prabhu, K; Rana, S; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose This study compares the dosimetric parameters in treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma between intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and intensity modulated x-ray radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied four patients treated at our institution. All patients were simulated supine with 4D-CT using a GE light speed simulator with a maximum slice thickness of 3mm. The average CT and an internal target volume to account for respiration motion were used for planning. Both IMRT and IMPT plans were created using Elekta’s CMSXiO treatment planning system (TPS). The prescription dose was 58.05 CGE in 15 fractions. The IMRT plans had five beams with combination of co-planar and non-co-planar. The IMPT plans had 2 to 3 beams. Dose comparison was performed based on the averaged results of the four patients. Results The mean dose and V95% to PTV were 58.24CGE, 98.57% for IMPT, versus 57.34CGE and 96.68% for IMRT, respectively. The V10, V20, V30 and mean dose of the normal liver for IMPT were 23.10%, 18.61%, 13.75% and 9.78 CGE; and 47.19%, 37.55%, 22.73% and 17.12CGE for IMRT. The spinal cord didn’t receive any dose in IMPT technique, but received a maximum of 18.77CGE for IMRT. The IMPT gave lower maximum dose to the stomach as compared to IMRT (19.26 vs 26.35CGE). V14 for left and right kidney was 0% and 2.32% for IMPT and 3.89% and 29.54% for IMRT. The mean dose, V35, V40 and V45 for small bowl were similar in both techniques, 0.74CGE, 6.27cc, 4.85cc and 3.53 cc for IMPT, 3.47CGE, 9.73cc, 7.61cc 5.35cc for IMRT. Conclusion Based on this study, IMPT plans gave less dose to the critical structures such as normal liver, kidney, stomach and spinal cord as compared to IMRT plans, potentially leading to less toxicity and providing better quality of life for patients.

  11. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Boehling, Nicholas S.; Grosshans, David R.; Bluett, Jaques B.; Palmer, Matthew T.; Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  12. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator's intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the HN

  13. Bridging the gap between IMRT and VMAT: Dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative radiation therapy (RT) planning and delivery scheme with optimal angular beam sampling and intrabeam modulation for improved dose distribution while maintaining high delivery efficiency. Methods: In the proposed approach, coined as dense angularly sampled and sparse intensity modulated RT (DASSIM-RT), a large number of beam angles are used to increase the angular sampling, leading to potentially more conformal dose distributions as compared to conventional IMRT. At the same time, intensity modulation of the incident beams is simplified to eliminate the dispensable segments, compensating the increase in delivery time caused by the increased number of beams and facilitating the plan delivery. In a sense, the proposed approach shifts and transforms, in an optimal fashion, some of the beam segments in conventional IMRT to the added beams. For newly available digital accelerators, the DASSIM-RT delivery can be made very efficient by concatenating the beams so that they can be delivered sequentially without operator’s intervention. Different from VMAT, the level of intensity modulation in DASSIS-RT is field specific and optimized to meet the need of each beam direction. Three clinical cases (a head and neck (HN) case, a pancreas case, and a lung case) are used to evaluate the proposed RT scheme. DASSIM-RT, VMAT, and conventional IMRT plans are compared quantitatively in terms of the conformality index (CI) and delivery efficiency. Results: Plan quality improves generally with the number and intensity modulation of the incident beams. For a fixed number of beams or fixed level of intensity modulation, the improvement saturates after the intensity modulation or number of beams reaches to a certain level. An interplay between the two variables is observed and the saturation point depends on the values of both variables. For all the cases studied here, the CI of DASSIM-RT with 15 beams and 5 intensity levels (0.90, 0.79, and 0.84 for the

  14. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  15. Safety and efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the management of spermatic cord sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cerda, T; Martin, É; Truc, G; Créhange, G; Maingon, P

    2017-02-01

    Spermatic cord sarcoma is a rare disease, which management remains controversial due to the lack of guidelines. The standard therapeutic approach is surgical: wide soft-tissue resection with radical inguinal orchidectomy, The diagnosis is made during the analysis of the specimen. The high rate of local recurrence indicates adjuvant radiotherapy of the tumor bed. The aim of this series is to determine the efficacy and safety of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for spermatic cord sarcomas. Our series included five consecutive cases of spermatic cord sarcoma treated between 2011 and 2014. The indications for radiotherapy were: R1 status after initial surgery, R1 status after wide en bloc resection and orchiectomy, high French federation of cancer centers (FNCLCC) grade, tumor size over 5cm, tumor resection during surgery. Median age at diagnosis was 66years (range 46-84years). Median follow-up was 18months (range 6-28months). Four patients had repeat surgery after incomplete removal. All surgeries were orchidectomy with primary ligation of testicular vessels. One patient did not have an in sano margin after the second surgical procedure. The median tumor size was 60mm (range 30-150mm). No recurrence was observed during the follow-up. No grade 4 toxicities were reported and the most frequent acute toxicity was dermatitis. No recurrence was reported after adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The treatment is feasible and well tolerated and seems to provide encouraging results regarding locoregional control of the disease. Dynamic or rotational intensity-modulated radiotherapy is now recommended to decrease acute toxicities while improving the efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimization of intensity-modulated very high energy (50-250 MeV) electron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeboah, C.; Sandison, G. A.; Moskvin, V.

    2002-04-01

    This work evaluates the potential of very high energy (50-250 MeV) electron beams for dose conformation and identifies those variables that influence optimized dose distributions for this modality. Intensity-modulated plans for a prostate cancer model were optimized as a function of the importance factors, beam energy and number of energy bins, number of beams, and the beam orientations. A trial-and-error-derived constellation of importance factors for target and sensitive structures to achieve good conformal dose distributions was 500, 50, 10 and 1 for the target, rectum, bladder and normal tissues respectively. Electron energies greater than 100 MeV were found to be desirable for intensity-modulated very high energy electron therapy (VHEET) of prostate cancer. Plans generated for lower energy beams had relatively poor conformal dose distributions about the target region and delivered high doses to sensitive structures. Fixed angle beam treatments utilizing a large number of fields in the range 9-21 provided acceptable plans. Using more than 21 beams at fixed gantry angles had an insignificant effect on target coverage, but resulted in an increased dose to sensitive structures and an increased normal tissue integral dose. Minor improvements in VHEET plans utilizing a `small' number (=<9) of beams may be achieved if, in addition to intensity modulation, energy modulation is implemented using a small number (=<3) of beam energies separated by 50 to 100 MeV. Rotation therapy provided better target dose homogeneity but unfortunately resulted in increased rectal dose, bladder dose and normal tissue integral dose relative to the 21-field fixed angle treatment plan. Modulation of the beam energy for rotation therapy had no beneficial consequences on the optimized dose distributions. Lastly, selection of beam orientations influenced the optimized treatment plan even when a large number of beams (approximately 15) were employed.

  17. Clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Hasselle, Michael D; Rose, Brent S; Kochanski, Joel D; Nath, Sameer K; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A technique of intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) for spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fang-Fang; Ryu, Samuel; Ajlouni, Munther; Zhu, Jingeng; Yan, Hui; Guan, Harrison; Faber, Kathleen; Rock, Jack; Abdalhak, Muwaffak; Rogers, Lisa; Rosenblum, Mark; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-12-01

    This study is to demonstrate the feasibility of spinal radiosurgery using an image-guided intensity-modulated radiosurgical (IMRS) procedure. A dedicated Novalis shaped beam surgery unit equipped with a built-in micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC) with a single 6 MV photon beam was used. Each patient was simulated in the supine position using an AcQsim CT simulator with infrared sensitive markers for localization. A variety of different treatment plans were developed, but the most common plan was the use of seven coplanar intensity-modulated beams to minimize radiation to critical organs such as the spinal cord and kidneys. An automatic localization device based on infrared and video cameras was used to guide the initial patient setup. Two keV x-ray imaging systems were used to identify potential deviations from the planned isocenter. A total of 25 patients with spinal tumors have been treated using this procedure with a single prescription dose ranging from 6 to 12 Gy. The final verification images indicated that the average isocenter deviation from the planned isocenter was within 2 mm. The phantom verification of isocenter doses indicated that the average deviation of measured isocenter doses from the planned isocenter doses for all patients treated with intensity-modulated beams was less than 2%. Film dose measurement in a phantom study demonstrated good agreement of above 50% isodose lines between the planned and measured results. Preliminary experience shows that precision delivery of high dose radiation could be administered to the planned target volume while the dose to the critical organs is kept within tolerable limits.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselle, Michael D.; Rose, Brent S.; Kochanski, Joel D.; Nath, Sameer K.; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. Results: The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques.

  20. Comparison Between Hybrid Direct Aperture Optimized Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Forward Planning Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Descovich, Martina; Fowble, Barbara; Bevan, Alison; Schechter, Naomi; Park, Catherine; Xia Ping

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the planning efficiency and dosimetric characteristics of hybrid direct aperture optimized (hDAO) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with forward planning (FP)-IMRT for whole breast irradiation with two tangential beams. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients with left-sided breast cancer, categorized with three different breast volumes, were selected for this study. All patients were treated with FP plans to 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The hDAO plans were created by combining two open fields with eight segments in two tangential beam directions and were inversely optimized. Results: The FP and hDAO plans achieved similar breast coverage and sparing of critical organs. The volume of breast receiving 105% of the prescription dose was significantly smaller in the hDAO than in the FP plans: 25% vs. 63% (p = .008) for small, 22% vs. 57% (p = .005) for medium, and 28% vs. 53% (p = .005) for large breasts. Furthermore, the tumor cavity coverage was slightly better in the hDAO plans (92.4% vs. 90.9%). Conclusion: Compared with FP-IMRT, hDAO-IMRT provided dosimetric advantages, significantly reducing the size of the hot spot and slightly improving the coverage of the tumor cavity. In addition, hDAO-IMRT required less planning time and was less dependent on the planner's ability.

  1. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) using fixed beams or an ion gantry for the treatment of patients with skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the potential improvement in treatment planning for patients with skull base meningioma using IMRT compared to carbon ion or proton beams with and without a gantry. Methods Five patients originally treated with photon IMRT were selected for the study. Ion beams were chosen using a horizontal beam or an ion gantry. Intensity controlled raster scanning and the intensity modulated particle therapy mode were used for plan optimization. The evaluation included analysis of dose-volume histograms of the target volumes and organs at risk. Results In comparison with carbon and proton beams only with horizontal beams, carbon ion treatment plans could spare the OARs more and concentrated on the target volumes more than proton and photon IMRT treatment plans. Using only a horizontal fixed beam, satisfactory plans could be achieved for skull base tumors. Conclusion The results of the case studies showed that using IMPT has the potential to overcome the lack of a gantry for skull base tumors. Carbon ion plans offered slightly better dose distributions than proton plans, but the differences were not clinically significant with established dose prescription concepts. PMID:22439607

  2. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) / Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT): Benefit to Irish patients and Irish Healthcare Economy.

    PubMed

    Cagney, D N; Armstrong, J G

    2017-01-11

    Cancer incidence across Europe is projected to rise rapidly over the next decade. This rising cancer incidence is mirrored by increasing use of and indications for stereotactic radiation. This paper seeks to summarize the exponential increase in indications for stereotactic radiotherapy as well as the evolving economic advantages of stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  4. NOTE: Verification of intensity modulated profiles using a pixel segmented liquid-filled linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, J.; Roselló, J. V.; Sánchez-Doblado, F.; Gómez, F.

    2006-06-01

    A liquid isooctane (C8H18) filled ionization chamber linear array developed for radiotherapy quality assurance, consisting of 128 pixels (each of them with a 1.7 mm pitch), has been used to acquire profiles of several intensity modulated fields. The results were compared with film measurements using the γ test. The comparisons show a very good matching, even in high gradient dose regions. The volume-averaging effect of the pixels is negligible and the spatial resolution is enough to verify these regions. However, some mismatches between the detectors have been found in regions where low-energy scattered photons significantly contribute to the total dose. These differences are not very important (in fact, the measurements of both detectors are in agreement using the γ test with tolerances of 3% and 3 mm in most of those regions), and may be associated with the film energy dependence. In addition, the linear array repeatability (0.27% one standard deviation) is much better than the film one (~3%). The good repeatability, small pixel size and high spatial resolution make the detector ideal for the real time profile verification of high gradient beam profiles like those present in intensity modulated radiation therapy and radiosurgery.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  6. A compact linac for intensity modulated proton therapy based on a dielectric wall accelerator.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, G J; Mackie, T R; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y-J; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Reckwerdt, P J; Schmidt, R; Pearson, D; Flynn, R W; Matthews, D; Purdy, J

    2008-06-01

    A novel compact CT-guided intensity modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) system is described. The system is being designed to deliver fast IMPT so that larger target volumes and motion management can be accomplished. The system will be ideal for large and complex target volumes in young patients. The basis of the design is the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) system being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The DWA uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. High electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The IMPT planning system will optimize delivery characteristics. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. Feasibility tests of an optimization system for selecting the position, energy, intensity and spot size for a collection of spots comprising the treatment are underway. A prototype is being designed and concept designs of the envelope and environmental needs of the unit are beginning. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  8. Electrical PMD equalization methods for intensity modulated optical polarization multiplex transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelz, Daniel; Pohl, Felix; Meissner, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Polarization mode dispersion is the limiting factor in todays large capacity photonic network systems since it causes intersymbol interference especially at high data rates. When polarization multiplex is employed to increase spectral efficiency, the distortions caused by polarization mode dispersion get even stronger due to the additional polarization crosstalk. Employing coherent detection these mitigations can be fully compensated with linear filters, since coherent detection delivers amplitude, phase and polarization information of the electrical field. As a drawback we have to take into account a high complexity of the receiver, causing high overall cost. At the other hand we have direct detection systems where the receiver complexity can be kept low. Furthermore maximum likelihood sequence estimation detection has been successfully demonstrated for standard direct detection systems. In a first step an advanced maximum likelihood sequence estimation detector, which is able to work in an intensity modulated polarization multiplex direct detection system, is developed. The performance of the detector is assessed by simulations and it is shown that it is capable to significantly reduce system outages. The method then is compared with a least mean squares based equalizer which is employed to compensate for signal distortions in an intensity modulated polarization multiplex coherent detection transmission system.

  9. Evaluation of Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiosurgery for Lung Cancer under Condition of Respiratory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki; Song, Ju-Young

    2016-01-01

    The dose of a real tumor target volume and surrounding organs at risk (OARs) under the effect of respiratory motion was calculated for a lung tumor plan, based on the target volume covering the whole tumor motion range for intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). Two types of IMRS plans based on simulated respiratory motion were designed using humanoid and dynamic phantoms. Delivery quality assurance (DQA) was performed using ArcCHECK and MapCHECK2 for several moving conditions of the tumor and the real dose inside the humanoid phantom was evaluated using the 3DVH program. This evaluated dose in the tumor target and OAR using the 3DVH program was higher than the calculated dose in the plan, and a greater difference was seen for the RapidArc treatment than for the standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with fixed gantry angle beams. The results of this study show that for IMRS plans based on target volume, including the whole tumor motion range, tighter constraints of the OAR should be considered in the optimization process. The method devised in this study can be applied effectively to analyze the dose distribution in the real volume of tumor target and OARs in IMRT plans targeting the whole tumor motion range. PMID:27648949

  10. PDM-16QAM vector signal generation and detection based on intensity modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple method to generate and detect high speed polarization-division-multiplexing 16-ary quadrature-amplitude-modulation (PDM-16QAM) vector signal enabled by Mach-Zehnder modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. Due to the adoption of OCS intensity modulation, carrier beating can be avoided at the receiver, and thus polarization de-multiplexing can be implemented by digital-signal-processing-based (DSP-based) cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization instead of a polarization tracking system. The change of both amplitude and phase information due to the adoption of OCS modulation can be equalized by DSP-based amplitude and phase precoding at the transmitter. Up to 64-Gb/s PDM-16QAM vector signal is generated and detected after 2-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) or 20-km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) transmission with a bit-error-ratio (BER) less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  11. [Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Ronan; Métellus, Philippe; Mornex, Françoise; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases management is still controversial even though many trials are trying to define the respective roles of neurosurgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, single-dose stereotactic radiotherapy and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. In this article, we review data from trials that examine the role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the management of brain metastases.

  12. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14-18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1-102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50-60%. The PTV coverage was 95-99% for Novalis and 94-98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11-1.61 and 1.04-1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1-3.62 and 2.3-3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72-7.97 and 2.54-3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important.

  13. Simulational study of a dosimetric comparison between a Gamma Knife treatment plan and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan for skull base tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Komori, Masataka; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hashizume, Chisa; Uchiyama, Yukio; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is performed with a linear accelerator-based system such as Novalis. Recently, Gamma Knife Perfexion (PFX) featured the Extend system with relocatable fixation devices available for SRT. In this study, the dosimetric results of these two modalities were compared from the viewpoint of conformity, heterogeneity and gradient in target covering. A total of 14 patients with skull base tumors were treated with Novalis intensity-modulated (IM)-SRT. Treatment was planned on an iPlan workstation. Five- to seven-beam IM-SRT was performed in 14–18 fractions with a fraction dose of 2.5 or 3 Gy. With these patients' data, additional treatment planning was simulated using a GammaPlan workstation for PFX-SRT. Reference CT images with planning structure contour sets on iPlan, including the planning target volume (PTV, 1.1–102.2 ml) and organs at risk, were exported to GammaPlan in DICOM-RT format. Dosimetric results for Novalis IM-SRT and PFX-SRT were evaluated in the same prescription doses. The isocenter number of PFX was between 12 and 50 at the isodose contour of 50–60%. The PTV coverage was 95–99% for Novalis and 94–98% for PFX. The conformity index (CI) was 1.11–1.61 and 1.04–1.15, the homogeneity index (HI) was 1.1–3.62 and 2.3–3.25, and the gradient index (GI) was 3.72–7.97 and 2.54–3.39 for Novalis and PFX, respectively. PTV coverage by Novalis and PFX was almost equivalent. PFX was superior in CI and GI, and Novalis was better in HI. Better conformality would be achieved by PFX, when the homogeneity inside tumors is less important. PMID:24351459

  14. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Lymph Node Metastasized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried; Jacobs, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; De Meerleer, Gert

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the planning results and acute toxicity after hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and androgen deprivation for lymph node metastasized (Stage N1) prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 patients with Stage T1-T4N1M0 prostate cancer were treated with intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy and 3 years of androgen deprivation as primary treatment. The clinical target volume (CTV{sub p}) was the prostate and seminal vesicles. Elective lymph node areas ({sub e}) were delineated and expanded by 2 mm to create the CTV{sub e}. The planning target volumes (PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e}) were created using a three-dimensional expansion of the CTV{sub p} and CTV{sub e}, respectively, of 7 mm. A median dose of 69.3 Gy and 50 Gy was prescribed to the PTV{sub p} and PTV{sub e} respectively, to be delivered in 25 fractions. Upper and lower gastrointestinal toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity and radiotherapy-induced lower intestinal toxicity scoring system. Genitourinary toxicity was scored using a combined Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, LENT-SOMA (late effects normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic), and Common Toxicity Criteria toxicity scoring system. Results: The median follow-up time was 3 months. The mean prescription dose to the CTV{sub p} and PTV{sub p} was 70.4 Gy and 68.6 Gy, respectively. The minimal dose to the CTV{sub e} and PTV{sub e} was 49.0 Gy and 47.0 Gy, respectively. No acute Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity occurred. Fourteen patients developed acute Grade 2 lower gastrointestinal toxicity. Acute Grade 3 and 2 genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 and 14 patients, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hypofractionated intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy as primary therapy for N1 prostate cancer is feasible with low toxicity.

  15. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Akira; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  16. Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Quon, Harvey; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian; Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicities of patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer treated using a concomitant hypofractionated, intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study of patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8-10. A dose of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) was delivered to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost, to a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy/fraction) in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scores were used to assess the acute and late toxicities, respectively. Biochemical failure was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 97 patients were treated and followed up for a median of 39 months, with 88% having a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The maximal toxicity scores were recorded. The grade of acute gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 4%, 1 in 59%, and 2 in 37%. The grade of acute urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 8%, 1 in 50%, 2 in 39%, and 3 in 4%. The grade of late gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 54%, 1 in 40%, and 2 in 7%. No Grade 3 or greater late gastrointestinal toxicities developed. The grade of late urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 82%, 1 in 9%, 2 in 5%, 3 in 3%, and 4 in 1% (1 patient). All severe toxicities (Grade 3 or greater) had resolved at the last follow-up visit. The 4-year biochemical disease-free survival rate was 90.5%. Conclusions: A hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost delivering 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks combined with pelvic nodal radiotherapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated, with low rates

  17. Strategies for improved accuracy and efficiency with advanced intensity modulated radiation therapy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerly, David C.

    2009-11-01

    The development of advanced intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques has led to significant improvements in our ability to treat complicated target volumes with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. These techniques however, come at the cost of increased complexity; which translates into increased sensitivity of the optimized treatment plans to inaccuracies in the planning and delivery processes, and can also result in longer treatment times. The aim of this work is investigate various strategies designed to improve the accuracy and efficiency of two advanced forms of IMRT: helical tomotherapy and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Helical tomotherapy is form of X-ray IMRT that uses a compact linear accelerator mounted on a CT ring gantry to rotationally deliver intensity modulated fan-beams of radiation to a patient for treatment. Failure to select judicious values for certain planning parameters can result in plans with long treatment times that are difficult for the machine to accurately deliver. This situation was observed for a series of patients scheduled for treatment at the University of Wisconsin. Treatment planning methods designed to avoid these difficulties have been investigated and are discussed. While the vast majority of IMRT treatments are performed using mega-voltage X-rays, there has recently been a great deal of interest in the use of IMPT for a variety of clinical indications. Current methods of IMPT are limited in their applicability however, due to restrictions imposed by the current delivery paradigm. An alternative method for IMPT delivery using a fan-beam geometry has been examined. Another challenge with IMPT pertains to the accuracy of proton dose calculations in the presence of complex tissue heterogeneities. Monte Carlo methods provide the most accurate means of dose calculation; however, the computational requirements of current radiation transport codes makes Monte Carlo methods

  18. Dose to Larynx Predicts for Swallowing Complications After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caglar, Hale B.; Tishler, Roy B.; Burke, Elaine; Li Yi; Goguen, Laura; Norris, Carl M.; Allen, Aaron M.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate early swallowing after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and determine factors correlating with aspiration and/or stricture. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy between September 2004 and August 2006 at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital were evaluated with institutional review board approval. Patients underwent swallowing evaluation after completion of therapy; including video swallow studies. The clinical- and treatment-related variables were examined for correlation with aspiration or strictures, as well as doses to the larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and cervical esophagus. The correlation was assessed with logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients were evaluated. Their median age was 55 years, and 79 (82%) were men. The primary site of cancer was the oropharynx in 43, hypopharynx/larynx in 17, oral cavity in 13, nasopharynx in 11, maxillary sinus in 2, and unknown primary in 10. Of the 96 patients, 85% underwent definitive RT and 15% postoperative RT. Also, 28 patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy, 59 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 patients underwent RT alone. The median follow-up was 10 months. Of the 96 patients, 31 (32%) had clinically significant aspiration and 36 (37%) developed a stricture. The radiation dose-volume metrics, including the volume of the larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively) and volume of the inferior constrictor receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively) were significantly associated with both aspiration and stricture. The mean larynx dose correlated with aspiration (p = 0.003). Smoking history was the only clinical factor to correlate with stricture (p = 0.05) but not aspiration. Conclusion: Aspiration and stricture are common side effects after

  19. Apparatus-dependent dosimetric differences in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun; Cozzi, Luca; Chang, Eric; Shiu, Almon; Letourneau, Daniel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Fogliata, Antonella; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Hyde, Derek; Laperriere, Normand J; Shrieve, Dennis C; Larson, David A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study apparatus-dependent dose distribution differences specific to spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment planning. This multi-institutional study was performed evaluating an image-guided robotic radiosurgery system (CK), intensity modulated protons (IMP), multileaf collimator (MLC) fixed-field IMRT with 5 mm (11 field), 4 mm (9 field), and 2.5 mm (8- and 9-field) leaf widths and intensity modulated volumetric arc therapy (IMVAT) with a 2.5 mm MLC. Treatment plans were systematically developed for targets consisting of one, two and three consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (VBs) with the esophagus and spinal cord contoured as the organs at risk. It was found that all modalities achieved acceptable treatment planning constraints. However, following normalization fixed field IMRT with a 2.5 mm MLC, IMVAT and IMP systems yielded the smallest ratio of maximum dose divided by the prescription dose (MD/PD) for one-, two- and three-VB PTVs (ranging from 1.1-1.16). The 2.5 mm MLC 9-field IMRT, IMVAT and CK plans resulted in the least dose to 0.1 cc volumes of spinal cord and esophagus. CK plans had the greatest degree of target dose inhomogeneity. As the level of complexity increased with an increasing number of vertebral bodies, distinct apparatus features such as the use of a high number of beams and a finer leaf size MLC were favored. Our study quantified apparatus-dependent dose-distribution differences specific to spine SBRT given strict, but realistic, constraints and highlights the need to benchmark physical dose distributions for multi-institutional clinical trials.

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Minesh

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the most aggressive of all human cancers. GBM tumors are highly infiltrative and relatively resistant to conventional therapies. Aggressive management of GBM using a combination of surgical resection, followed by fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy has been shown to improve overall survival; however, GBM tumors recur in the majority of patients and the disease is most often fatal. There is a need to develop new treatment regimens and technological innovations to improve the overall survival of GBM patients. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for the treatment of GBM has been explored and is controversial. SRS utilizes highly precise radiation techniques to allow dose escalation and delivery of ablative radiation doses to the tumor while minimizing dose to the adjacent normal structures. In some studies, SRS with concurrent chemotherapy has shown improved local control with acceptable toxicities in select GBM patients. However, because GBM is a highly infiltrative disease, skeptics argue that local therapies, such as SRS, do not improve overall survival. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding SRS in both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM, to describe SRS techniques, potential eligible SRS candidates, and treatment-related toxicities. In addition, this article will propose promising areas for future research for SRS in the treatment of GBM. PMID:26848407

  1. Intensity-modulated arc therapy to improve radiation dose delivery in the treatment of abdominal neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gains, Jennifer E; Stacey, Christopher; Rosenberg, Ivan; Mandeville, Henry C; Chang, Yen-Ch'ing; D'Souza, Derek; Moroz, Veronica; Wheatley, Keith; Gaze, Mark N

    2013-03-01

    The standard European radiotherapy technique for children with neuroblastoma is a conventional parallel opposed pair. This frequently results in compromise on planning target volume coverage to stay within normal tissue tolerances. This study investigates the use of an intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) technique to improve dose distribution and allow better protocol compliance. Among 20 previously treated patients, ten had received the full prescribed dose with conventional planning (protocol compliant) and ten had a compromise on planning target volume coverage (protocol noncompliant). All patients were replanned with IMAT. Dosimetric parameters of the conventional radiotherapy and IMAT were compared. The dose received by 98% of the planning target volume, homogeneity and conformity indices were all improved with IMAT (p < 0.001). IMAT would have enabled delivery of the full protocol dose in eight out of ten protocol-noncompliant patients. IMAT may improve outcomes through improved protocol compliance and better dose distributions.

  2. Tunable nonuniform sampling method for fast calculation and intensity modulation in 3D dynamic holographic display.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao; Liu, Juan; Jia, Jia; Li, Xin; Han, Jian; Hu, Bin; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-08-01

    Heavy computational load of computer-generated hologram (CGH) and imprecise intensity modulation of 3D images are crucial problems in dynamic holographic display. The nonuniform sampling method is proposed to speed up CGH generation and precisely modulate the reconstructed intensities of phase-only CGH. The proposed method can eliminate the redundant information properly, where 70% reduction in the storage amount can be reached when it is combined with the novel lookup table method. Multigrayscale modulation of reconstructed 3D images can be achieved successfully. Numerical simulations and optical experiments are performed, and both are in good agreement. It is believed that the proposed method can be used in 3D dynamic holographic display.

  3. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck cancers - an overview.

    PubMed

    Nutting, C M

    2012-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective in head and neck cancers. Following RT, dryness and dysphagia are the 2 major sequelae which alter the quality of life (QOL) significantly in these patients. There is randomized evidence that Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) effectively spares the parotid glands. IMRT has been attempted in all head and neck subsites with encouraging results (discussed below). Role of IMRT in swallowing structure (constrictor muscles) sparing is less clear.Further improvement in results may be possible by using functional imaging at the time of RT planning and by image guidance/verification at the time of treatment delivery. The following text discusses these issues in detail. Head and neck cancer, IMRT.

  4. Simple tool for prediction of parotid gland sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gensheimer, Michael F.; Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Cain, David; Quang, Tony S.

    2015-10-01

    Sparing one or both parotid glands is a key goal when planning head and neck cancer radiation treatment. If the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps one or both parotid glands substantially, it may not be possible to achieve adequate gland sparing. This finding results in physicians revising their PTV contours after an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan has been run and reduces workflow efficiency. We devised a simple formula for predicting mean parotid gland dose from the overlap of the parotid gland and isotropically expanded PTV contours. We tested the tool using 44 patients from 2 institutions and found agreement between predicted and actual parotid gland doses (mean absolute error = 5.3 Gy). This simple method could increase treatment planning efficiency by improving the chance that the first plan presented to the physician will have optimal parotid gland sparing.

  5. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  6. Balancing control and simplicity: A variable aggregation method in intensity modulated radiation therapy planning*

    PubMed Central

    Süss, Philipp; Küfer, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    It is commonly believed that not all degrees of freedom are needed to produce good solutions for the treatment planning problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, typical methods to exploit this fact either increase the complexity of the optimization problem or are heuristic in nature. In this work we introduce a technique based on adaptively refining variable clusters to successively attain better treatment plans. The approach creates approximate solutions based on smaller models that may come arbitrarily close to the optimal solution. Although the method is illustrated using a specific treatment planning model, the components constituting the variable clustering and the adaptive refinement are independent of the particular optimization problem. PMID:19255600

  7. [Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Dose constraint for salivary gland and mandible].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lizée, T; Bensadoun, R-J; Boisselier, P; Racadot, S; Thariat, J; Graff, P

    2016-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the gold standard for head and neck irradiation. It allows better protection to the organs at risk such as salivary glands and mandible, and can reduce the frequency of xerostomia, trismus and osteoradionecrosis. At the time of treatment planning, the mean dose to a single parotid gland should be kept below 26Gy, the mean dose to a single submandibular gland below 39Gy, the mean dose to the mandible below 60 to 65Gy and the D2% to a single temporomandibular joint below 65Gy. These dose constraints could be further improved with data extracted from cohorts of patients receiving IMRT exclusively. The dose administered to the target volumes should not be lessened to spare the salivary glands or mandible.

  8. Improvement of flatness of optical frequency comb based on nonlinear effect of intensity modulator.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yujie; Zhang, Hongming; Yao, Minyu

    2011-07-15

    Optical frequency comb (OFC) generated using cascaded intensity and phase modulators was experimentally demonstrated. Very flat OFC can be achieved by cascading intensity and phase modulators driven directly by sinusoidal waveform, where chirped fiber Bragg grating or specially tailored radio frequency waveforms are not required. It is found that the spectral flatness of OFC is related to direct current (DC) bias of intensity modulator and the optimum ratio of DC bias to half-wave voltage is 0.35. In the experiment, 15 comb lines within 1 dB spectral power variation are obtained at 10 GHz microwave frequency. The experimental results agree well with the simulation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. Whole Pelvic Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hymel, Rockne; Jones, Guy C.; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has long played a major role in the treatment of gynecological malignancies. There is increasing interest in the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and its application to treat gynecological malignancies. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art use of IMRT for gynecological malignancies and report how it is being used alone as well as in combination with chemotherapy in both the adjuvant and definitive settings. Based on dosimetric and clinical evidence, IMRT can reduce gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematological toxicities compared with 3D conformal radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. We discuss how these attributes of IMRT may lead to improvements in disease outcomes by allowing for dose escalation of radiation therapy, intensification of chemotherapy, and limiting toxicity-related treatment breaks. Currently accruing trials investigating pelvic IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancers are discussed. PMID:25600840

  10. MIMO Free-Space Optical Communication Employing Subcarrier Intensity Modulation in Atmospheric Turbulence Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Popoola, Wasiu O.; Ahmadi, Vahid; Leitgeb, Erich

    In this paper, we analyse the error performance of transmitter/receiver array free-space optical (FSO) communication system employing binary phase shift keying (BPSK) subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) in clear but turbulent atmospheric channel. Subcarrier modulation is employed to eliminate the need for adaptive threshold detector. Direct detection is employed at the receiver and each subcarrier is subsequently demodulated coherently. The effect of irradiance fading is mitigated with an array of lasers and photodetectors. The received signals are linearly combined using the optimal maximum ratio combining (MRC), the equal gain combining (EGC) and the selection combining (SelC). The bit error rate (BER) equations are derived considering additive white Gaussian noise and log normal intensity fluctuations. This work is part of the EU COST actions and EU projects.

  11. Thyroid storm after intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Roberto; Blakey, Marc D; Murphy, Patrick B; Cryar, A Keith; Cmelak, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    A 43-year-old man with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the base of tongue was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within 20 days post-treatment, the patient developed clinical symptoms highly suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Two and one half months after completion of therapy, the patient developed severe thyrotoxicosis, which, in retrospect, appears to have met the criteria for thyroid storm. This case history illustrates a previously unreported, life-threatening complication of external-beam radiation that should be considered in patients receiving IMRT therapy involving the thyroid. Diagnosis of the patient's hyperthyroidism and probable thyroid storm was difficult to recognize because of the significant overlap between the signs and symptoms of severe thyrotoxicosis and the expected toxicities of his cancer therapy.

  12. Implementation of intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer in a private radiotherapy service in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Poitevin-Chacón, María Adela; Reséndiz González, Gabriel; Alvarado Zermeño, Adriana; Flores Castro, Jesús Manuel; Flores Balcázar, Christian Haydée; Rosales Pérez, Samuel; Pérez Pastenes, Miguel Angel; Rodríguez Laguna, Alejandro; Vázquez Fernández, Patricio; Calvo Fernández, Alejandro; Bastida Ventura, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows physicians to deliver higher conformal doses to the tumour, while avoiding adjacent structures. As a result the probability of tumour control is higher and toxicity may be reduced. However, implementation of IMRT is highly complex and requires a rigorous quality assurance (QA) program both before and during treatment. The present article describes the process of implementing IMRT for localized prostate cancer in a radiation therapy department. In our experience, IMRT implementation requires careful planning due to the need to simultaneously implement specialized software, multifaceted QA programs, and training of the multidisciplinary team. Establishing standardized protocols and ensuring close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team is challenging but essential. PMID:25535587

  13. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, Robert J. Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-10-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction.

  14. Phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion for sensitive FBG sensor interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, Javier; Barrera, David; Madrigal, Javier; Sales, Salvador

    2017-04-01

    An interrogation technique based on phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion due to FBG filtering is presented. A 10 GHz tone is used to phase modulate an optical carrier located at the Bragg wavelength of a given FBG. The modulation index is set to a small value to keep Bessel identities close to 0 in order to avoid higher harmonics. Changes of the Bragg wavelength cause a power change in the photodetected 10 GHz tone. A remarkable linear sensitivity of 1 dB/pm for a shift up to 10 pm of the Bragg wavelength is demonstrated through experimental measurements. The range with linear sensitivity can be enlarged sweeping the source wavelength. This proves that the presented interrogation technique is able to interrogate FBGs with a resolution far below 1 pm and no need of extra postprocessing.

  15. Experimental demonstration of light sensor-based visible light communications using time shift light intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-hyeon; Chung, Yeon-ho

    2016-09-01

    An experimental light sensor-based indoor visible light communication (VLC) is presented. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) primarily used for illumination are employed to transmit wireless optical data over a short distance, while a smartphone's light sensor is used to receive the data. The light sensor in a smartphone is originally installed to function as a power saving method by adjusting the brightness of the smartphone screen. We propose an efficient and easy-to-use short range VLC based on this light sensor. To compensate for the inherent low sampling rate of the light sensor and also to avoid LED (transmitter) flickering, we propose time shift light intensity modulation. To verify the proposed light sensor VLC, experiments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the data can reliably be transmitted over the VLC link between the LEDs and the smartphone light sensor.

  16. Intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy for the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Santanam, Lakshmi; He, Tony; Yudelev, Mark; Forman, Jeffrey D; Orton, Colin G; Heuvel, Frank Vanden; Maughan, Richard L; Burmeister, Jay

    2007-08-01

    This study investigates the enhanced conformality of neutron dose distributions obtainable through the application of intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) to the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. An in-house algorithm was used to optimize individual segments for IMNRT generated using an organ-at-risk (OAR) avoidance approach. A number of beam orientation schemes were investigated in an attempt to approach an optimum solution. The IMNRT plans were created retrospectively for 5 patients previously treated for prostate adenocarcinoma using fast neutron therapy (FNT), and a comparison of these plans is presented. Dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed and plans were evaluated based on percentage volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 95%, 80%, and 50% (V(95), V(80), V(50)) of the prescription dose, and on V(60) for both the femoral heads and GM(muscle) group. Plans were normalized such that the IMNRT DVHs for prostate and seminal vesicles were nearly identical to those for conventional FNT plans. Use of IMNRT provided reductions in rectum V(95) and V(80) of 10% (2-27%) and 13% (5-28%), respectively, and reductions in bladder V(95) and V(80) of 12% (3-26%) and 4% (7-10%), respectively. The average decrease in V(60) for the femoral heads was 4.5% (1-18%), with no significant change in V(60) for the GM(muscle) group. This study provides the first analysis of the application of intensity modulation to neutron radiotherapy. The IMNRT technique provides a substantial reduction in normal tissue dose in the treatment of prostate cancer. This reduction should result in a significant clinical advantage for this and other treatment sites.

  17. MIMO FSO communication using subcarrier intensity modulation over double generalized gamma fading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiang; Yao, Mingwu; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence-induced fading is known to have a serious detrimental effect on the performance of free-space optical (FSO) communication. The involvement of multiple lasers and photodetectors in FSO systems offers an effective way to overcome fading. Very recently, a new generic fading model, called double-generalized gamma (double GG), is developed for accurately describing irradiance fading over a wide range of turbulence conditions. Therefore, for a general and exact study of the multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) FSO system, the double GG fading model is adopted in this paper. We investigate the MIMO FSO systems using subcarrier intensity modulation. Two typical transmit diversity schemes, repetition code (RC) and orthogonal space-time block code (OSTBC), are considered. We first propose a new power series expression for the probability density function of the double GG fading. Then we derive the average error rate expressions for both schemes in terms of double power series. The truncated forms of the derived power series enable the rapid and accurate numerical computation of the error rates. Furthermore, we present the asymptotic error rate analyses at high electrical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for both schemes. Closed-form diversity order and coding gain for both schemes are also obtained. Our numerical results, verified by simulation, confirm that RC outperforms OSTBC for MIMO FSO systems with subcarrier intensity modulation in double GG fading. The asymptotic coding gain of the RC scheme over the OSTBC scheme is analytically quantified for varying degrees of the fading strength.

  18. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Hong, Linda; Brennan, Murray F.; Della-Biancia, Cesar; Singer, Samuel

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary results on using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as an adjuvant treatment in primary soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremity. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and March 2005, 31 adult patients with primary STS of the extremity were treated with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. Tumor size was >10 cm in 74% of patients and grade was high in 77%. Preoperative IMRT was given to 7 patients (50 Gy) and postoperative IMRT (median dose, 63 Gy) was given to 24 patients. Complete gross resection including periosteal stripping or bone resection was required in 10, and neurolysis or nerve resection in 20. The margins were positive or within 1 mm in 17. Complications from surgery and radiation therapy (RT) were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grading system. Results: Median follow-up time was 23 months. Grade 1 RT dermatitis developed in 71% of patients, Grade 2 in 16%, and Grade 3 in 10%. Infectious wound complications developed in 13% and noninfectious complications in 10%. Two patients (6.4%) developed fractures. Grade 1 neuropathy developed in 28% of patients and Grade 2 in 5%. The rates of Grade 1 and 2 joint stiffness were each 19%. Grade 1 edema was observed in 19% of patients and Grade 2 in 13%. The 2-year local control, distant control, and overall survival were 95%, 65%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity modulated RT appears to provide excellent local control in a difficult group of high-risk patients. The morbidity profile is also favorable, but longer follow-up is needed to confirm the results from this study.

  19. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  20. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (APBI-IMRT) plan was designed for each patient. The prescription dose was 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 3.4 Gy per fraction, twice a day, in intervals of more than 6 hours. Results Of the 38 patients, six patients did not meet the planning criteria. The remaining 32 patients received APBI-IMRT with a mean target volume conformity index of 0.67 and a dose homogeneity index of 1.06. The median follow-up time was 53 months and no local recurrence or distant metastasis was detected. The most common acute toxicities observed within 3 months after radiotherapy were erythema, breast edema, pigmentation, and pain in the irradiated location, among which 43.8%, 12.5%, 31.3%, and 28.1% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. The most common late toxicities occurring after 3 months until the end of the follow-up period were breast edema, pigmentation, pain in the irradiated location, and subcutaneous fibrosis, among which 6.2%, 28.1%, 21.9%, and 37.5% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. Thirty-one patients (96.8%) had fine or excellent cosmetic outcomes, and only one patient had a poor cosmetic outcome. Conclusion It is feasible for Chinese females to receive APBI-IMRT after breast conserving surgery. The radiotherapeutic toxicity is acceptable, and both the initial efficacy and cosmetic outcomes are good. PMID:25320624

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Community Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Seung, Steven Bae, Joseph; Solhjem, Matthew; Bader, Stephen; Gannett, David; Hansen, Eric K.; Louie, Jeannie; Underhill, Kelly Cha Christine

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the community setting for the treatment of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and April 2007, 69 patients with histologically confirmed cancer of the nasopharynx and oropharynx underwent IMRT in our practice. The primary sites included nasopharynx (11), base of tongue (18), and tonsil (40). The disease stage distribution was as follows: 2 Stage I, 11 Stage II, 16 Stage III, and 40 Stage IV. All were treated with a simultaneous integrated boost IMRT technique. The median prescribed doses were 70 Gy to the planning target volume, 59.4 Gy to the high-risk subclinical volume, and 54 Gy to the low-risk subclinical volume. Forty-five patients (65%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria. Progression-free and overall survival rates were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results: Median duration of follow-up was 18 months. The estimated 2-year local control, regional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 98%, 100%, 98%, and 90%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were dermatitis (32 Grade 1, 32 Grade 2, 5 Grade 3), mucositis (8 Grade 1, 33 Grade 2, 28 Grade 3), and xerostomia (0 Grade 1, 29 Grade 2, 40 Grade 3). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the community setting can be accomplished safely and effectively. Systematic internal review systems are recommended for quality control until sufficient experience develops.

  2. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal cancer: radiation dosage constraint at the anterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, Henk W D; de Jong, Jos M A; Granzier, Marlies E P G; Nieman, Fred H; de Baat, Cees; Stoelinga, Paul J W

    2009-06-01

    Because the survival of endosseous implants in irradiated bone is lower than in non-irradiated bone, particularly if the irradiation dose exceeds 50Gy, a study was carried out to assess the irradiation dose in the anterior mandible, when intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used. The hypothesis was that adequate IMRT planning in oropharyngeal cancer patients is allowing sufficiently low anterior mandibular bone radiation dosages to safely insert endosseous implants. Ten randomly selected patients with oropharyngeal cancer, primarily treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), were included in this study. First, at five determined positions distributed over the anterior mandible, the appropriate radiation dosages were calculated according to the originally arranged fractionated radiation schedule. Second, for each patient an adjusted fractionated radiation schedule was established with an extra dose constraint which allowed a lower dose in the mandible taking into account that the anterior mandible needs protection against radiation-induced osteoradionecrosis. The goal for the adjusted fractionated radiation schedule was similar as that of the original fractionated radiation schedule, including a desired tumour target dosage of 70Gy and maximum mean local dosages for organs at risk. The data revealed a considerable and statistically significant, irradiation dose reduction in the anterior mandible without compromising the other constraints. As a result of this study it is strongly advised to maximize dose constraint to the anterior mandible when planning irradiation for oropharyngeal cancer patients, using IMRT. This would greatly facilitate successful implant treatment for this group of patients. The fractionated radiation schedules used, should also be used for the planning of the best implant positions by integrating them in the implant planning software.

  4. Leaf position error during conformal dynamic arc and intensity modulated arc treatments.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, C R; Spencer, K M; Alhakeem, R; Oliver, A L

    2001-01-01

    Conformal dynamic arc (CD-ARC) and intensity modulated arc treatments (IMAT) are both treatment modalities where the multileaf collimator (MLC) can change leaf position dynamically during gantry rotation. These treatment techniques can be used to generate complex isodose distributions, similar to those used in fix-gantry intensity modulation. However, a beam-hold delay cannot be used during CD-ARC or IMAT treatments to reduce spatial error. Consequently, a certain amount of leaf position error will have to be accepted in order to make the treatment deliverable. Measurements of leaf position accuracy were taken with leaf velocities ranging from 0.3 to 3.0 cm/s. The average and maximum leaf position errors were measured, and a least-squares linear regression analysis was performed on the measured data to determine the MLC velocity error coefficient. The average position errors range from 0.03 to 0.21 cm, with the largest deviations occurring at the maximum achievable leaf velocity (3.0 cm/s). The measured MLC velocity error coefficient was 0.0674 s for a collimator rotation of 0 degrees and 0.0681 s for a collimator rotation of 90 degrees. The distribution in leaf position error between the 0 degrees and 90 degrees collimator rotations was within statistical uncertainty. A simple formula was developed based on these results for estimating the velocity-dependent dosimetric error. Using this technique, a dosimetric error index for plan evaluation can be calculated from the treatment time and the dynamic MLC leaf controller file.

  5. MAGIC-type polymer gel for three-dimensional dosimetry: intensity-modulated radiation therapy verification.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Helen; Karlsson, Anna; Bäck, Sven A J; Olsson, Lars E; Haraldsson, Pia; Engström, Per; Nyström, Håkan

    2003-06-01

    A new type of polymer gel dosimeter, which responds well to absorbed dose even when manufactured in the presence of normal levels of oxygen, was recently described by Fong et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 46, 3105-3113 (2001)] and referred to by the acronym MAGIC. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using this new type of gel for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification. Gel manufacturing was carried out in room atmosphere under normal levels of oxygen. IMRT inverse treatment planning was performed using the Helios software. The gel was irradiated using a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic multileaf collimator, and intensity modulation was achieved using sliding window technique. The response to absorbed dose was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Measured and calculated dose distributions were compared with regard to in-plane isodoses and dose volume histograms. In addition, the spatial and dosimetric accuracy was evaluated using the gamma formalism. Good agreement between calculated and measured data was obtained. In the isocenter plane, the 70% and 90% isodoses acquired using the different methods are mostly within 2 mm, with up to 3 mm disagreement at isolated points. For the planning target volume (PTV), the calculated mean relative dose was 96.8 +/- 2.5% (1 SD) and the measured relative mean dose was 98.6 +/- 2.2%. Corresponding data for an organ at risk was 34.4 +/- 0.9% and 32.7 +/- 0.7%, respectively. The gamma criterion (3 mm spatial/3% dose deviation) was fulfilled for 94% of the pixels in the target region. Discrepancies were found in hot spots the upper and lower parts of the PTV, where the measured dose was up to 11% higher than calculated. This was attributed to sub optimal scatter kernels used in the treatment planning system dose calculations. Our results indicate great potential for IMRT verification using MAGIC-type polymer gel.

  6. Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Increases Estimated Clinical Benefit in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Lisanne V.; Steenbakkers, Roel J. H. M.; ten Haken, Bennie; van der Laan, Hans Paul; van ‘t Veld, Aart A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical benefit of robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (minimax IMPT) with current photon Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and PTV-based IMPT for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. The clinical benefit is quantified in terms of both Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) and target coverage in the case of setup and range errors. Methods and Materials For 10 HNC patients, PTV-based IMRT (7 fields), minimax and PTV-based IMPT (2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 fields) plans were tested on robustness. Robust optimized plans differed from PTV-based plans in that they target the CTV and penalize possible error scenarios, instead of using the static isotropic CTV-PTV margin. Perturbed dose distributions of all plans were acquired by simulating in total 8060 setup (±3.5 mm) and range error (±3%) combinations. NTCP models for xerostomia and dysphagia were used to predict the clinical benefit of IMPT versus IMRT. Results The robustness criterion was met in the IMRT and minimax IMPT plans in all error scenarios, but this was only the case in 1 of 40 PTV-based IMPT plans. Seven (out of 10) patients had relatively large NTCP reductions in minimax IMPT plans compared to IMRT. For these patients, xerostomia and dysphagia NTCP values were reduced by 17.0% (95% CI; 13.0–21.1) and 8.1% (95% CI; 4.9–11.2) on average with minimax IMPT. Increasing the number of fields did not contribute to plan robustness, but improved organ sparing. Conclusions The estimated clinical benefit in terms of NTCP of robust optimized (minimax) IMPT is greater than that of IMRT and PTV-based IMPT in HNC patients. Furthermore, the target coverage of minimax IMPT plans in the presence of errors was comparable to IMRT plans. PMID:27030987

  7. Fast intensity-modulated arc therapy based on 2-step beam segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark; Sauer, Otto A.; Richter, Anne; Flentje, Michael

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Single or few arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is intended to be a time saving irradiation method, potentially replacing classical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of different IMAT methods with the potential of fast delivery, which also has the possibility of adapting to the daily shape of the target volume. Methods: A planning study was performed. Novel double and triple IMAT techniques based on the geometrical analysis of the target organ at risk geometry (2-step IMAT) were evaluated. They were compared to step and shoot IMRT reference plans generated using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). Volumetric arc (VMAT) plans from commercial preclinical software (SMARTARC) were used as an additional benchmark to classify the quality of the novel techniques. Four cases with concave planning target volumes (PTV) with one dominating organ at risk (OAR), viz., the PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO Quasimodo phantom, breast/lung, spine metastasis/spinal cord, and prostate/rectum, were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV) and other parameters representing the plan quality were studied. Results: The novel 2-step IMAT techniques with geometry based segment definition were as good as or better than DMPO and were superior to the SMARTARC VMAT techniques. For the spine metastasis, the quality measured by the COV differed only by 3%, whereas the COV of the 2-step IMAT for the other three cases decreased by a factor of 1.4-2.4 with respect to the reference plans. Conclusions: Rotational techniques based on geometrical analysis of the optimization problem (2-step IMAT) provide similar or better plan quality than DMPO or the research version of SMARTARC VMAT variants. The results justify pursuing the goal of fast IMAT adaptation based on 2-step IMAT techniques.

  8. Testbed measurements of subcarrier OQPSK versus digital OOK laser intensity modulation at 266 to 1244 Mbps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Robert T.

    1995-04-01

    We report here on measurements made on a lasercom crosslink hardware testbed built on internal MITRE funds. Laser diodes rated at 150 mwatts were characterized to be flat to 100 MHz, rolling off 5 dB at 500 MHz. A microstrip laser driver with equalizer was implemented to provide flat, highly linear frequency response for analog modulation out to 550 MHz. Microstrip and hybrid versions of APD receivers were also fabricated with flat, linear response to 700 MHz (typically -3 dB at 850 - 1000 MHz), suitable for datarates up to 1.25 Gbps. The optical crosslink testbed with equalized driver, laser, and APD receiver exhibits +/- 0.25 dB flatness, +/- 2.5 degrees phase linearity deviation, and +/- 0.25 (eta) sec group delay variation over the full bandwidth for 650 Mbps. This testbed was evaluated with two modulation approaches: analog laser intensity modulation using an OQPSK subcarrier scheme, and baseband digital NRZ OOK laser intensity modulation, at datarates from 266 to 1244 Mbps. The QPSK subcarrier hardware characterization includes the high speed modem/demodulator and a pair of frequency converters. The digital NRZ hardware characterization includes the clock recovery and amplitude/timing decision circuit. Both the subcarrier QPSK and the digital OOK tests used the same laser and equalized laser driver, the same modulated laser power with 95% intensity modulatino depth, and the same APD receiver for these tests. As such, the comparison between these modulation schemes is an even-handed comparison of the end-to-end performance. Results and conclusions are presented.

  9. A comparison of three optimization algorithms for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pflugfelder, Daniel; Wilkens, Jan J; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    In intensity modulated treatment techniques, the modulation of each treatment field is obtained using an optimization algorithm. Multiple optimization algorithms have been proposed in the literature, e.g. steepest descent, conjugate gradient, quasi-Newton methods to name a few. The standard optimization algorithm in our in-house inverse planning tool KonRad is a quasi-Newton algorithm. Although this algorithm yields good results, it also has some drawbacks. Thus we implemented an improved optimization algorithm based on the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) routine. In this paper the improved optimization algorithm is described. To compare the two algorithms, several treatment plans are optimized using both algorithms. This included photon (IMRT) as well as proton (IMPT) intensity modulated therapy treatment plans. To present the results in a larger context the widely used conjugate gradient algorithm was also included into this comparison. On average, the improved optimization algorithm was six times faster to reach the same objective function value. However, it resulted not only in an acceleration of the optimization. Due to the faster convergence, the improved optimization algorithm usually terminates the optimization process at a lower objective function value. The average of the observed improvement in the objective function value was 37%. This improvement is clearly visible in the corresponding dose-volume-histograms. The benefit of the improved optimization algorithm is particularly pronounced in proton therapy plans. The conjugate gradient algorithm ranked in between the other two algorithms with an average speedup factor of two and an average improvement of the objective function value of 30%.

  10. Genetic algorithm based deliverable segments optimization for static intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjie; Yao, Jonathan; Yao, Dezhong

    2003-10-21

    The static delivery technique (also called step-and-shoot technique) has been widely used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) because of the simple delivery and easy quality assurance. Conventional static IMRT consists of two steps: first to calculate the intensity-modulated beam profiles using an inverse planning algorithm, and then to translate these profiles into a series of uniform segments using a leaf-sequencing tool. In order to simplify the procedure and shorten the treatment time of the static mode, an efficient technique, called genetic algorithm based deliverable segments optimization (GADSO), is developed in our work, which combines these two steps into one. Taking the pre-defined beams and the total number of segments per treatment as input, the number of segments for each beam, the segment shapes and weights are determined automatically. A group of interim modulated beam profiles quickly calculated using a conjugate gradient (CG) method are used to determine the segment number for each beam and to initialize segment shapes. A modified genetic algorithm based on a two-dimensional binary coding scheme is used to optimize the segment shapes, and a CG method is used to optimize the segment weights. The physical characters of a multileaf collimator, such as the leaves interdigitation limitation and leaves maximum over-travel distance, are incorporated into the optimization. The algorithm is applied to some examples and the results demonstrate that GADSO is able to produce highly conformal dose distributions using 20-30 deliverable segments per treatment within a clinically acceptable computation time.

  11. Patterns of Failure and Toxicity after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Jonathan G.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of 100 consecutive patients treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (64%), nasopharynx (16%), hypopharynx (14%), and larynx (6%). Most patients were treated with a concomitant boost schedule to 72 Gy. Of the 100 patients, 54 (54%) received adjuvant chemotherapy, mostly concurrent cisplatin. The dosimetry plans for patients with either locoregional failure or Grade 4-5 complications were reviewed and fused over the computed tomography images corresponding with the location of the event. Marginal failures were defined as those that occurred at a region of high-dose falloff, where conventional fields would have provided better coverage. Results: The median follow-up of living patients was 3.1 years (range, 1-5.2 years). The 3-year rate of local control, locoregional control, freedom from relapse, cause-specific survival, and overall survival for all patients was 89%, 87%, 72%, 78%, and 71%, respectively. The 3-year rate of freedom from relapse, cause-specific survival, and overall survival for the 64 oropharynx patients was 86%, 92%, and 84%, respectively. Of the 10 local failures, 2 occurred at the margin of the high-dose planning target volume. Both regional failures occurred within the planning target volume. No locoregional failures occurred outside the planning target volume. Of the 100 patients, 8 and 5 had Grade 4 and 5 complications from treatment, respectively. All patients with Grade 5 complications had received adjuvant chemotherapy. No attempt was made to discriminate between the complications from IMRT and other aspects of the patients' treatment. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy did not compromise the outcome compared with what we have achieved with conventional techniques. The 2 cases of recurrence in the high-dose gradient region highlight the

  12. Empowering Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Through Physics and Technology: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Radhe; Das, Indra J; Ling, Clifton C

    2017-10-01

    Considering the clinical potential of protons attributable to their physical characteristics, interest in proton therapy has increased greatly in this century, as has the number of proton therapy installations. Until recently, passively scattered proton therapy was used almost entirely. Notably, the overall clinical results to date have not shown a convincing benefit of protons over photons. A rapid transition is now occurring with the implementation of the most advanced form of proton therapy, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). IMPT is superior to passively scattered proton therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetrically. However, numerous limitations exist in the present IMPT methods. In particular, compared with IMRT, IMPT is highly vulnerable to various uncertainties. In this overview we identify three major areas of current limitations of IMPT: treatment planning, treatment delivery, and motion management, and discuss current and future efforts for improvement. For treatment planning, we need to reduce uncertainties in proton range and in computed dose distributions, improve robust planning and optimization, enhance adaptive treatment planning and delivery, and consider how to exploit the variability in the relative biological effectiveness of protons for clinical benefit. The quality of proton therapy also depends on the characteristics of the IMPT delivery systems and image guidance. Efforts are needed to optimize the beamlet spot size for both improved dose conformality and faster delivery. For the latter, faster energy switching time and increased dose rate are also needed. Real-time in-room volumetric imaging for guiding IMPT is in its early stages with cone beam computed tomography (CT) and CT-on-rails, and continued improvements are anticipated. In addition, imaging of the proton beams themselves, using, for instance, prompt γ emissions, is being developed to determine the proton range and to reduce range uncertainty

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, protons, and the risk of second cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Eric J. . E-mail: ejh1@columbia.edu

    2006-05-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows dose to be concentrated in the tumor volume while sparing normal tissues. However, the downside to IMRT is the potential to increase the number of radiation-induced second cancers. The reasons for this potential are more monitor units and, therefore, a larger total-body dose because of leakage radiation and, because IMRT involves more fields, a bigger volume of normal tissue is exposed to lower radiation doses. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy may double the incidence of solid cancers in long-term survivors. This outcome may be acceptable in older patients if balanced by an improvement in local tumor control and reduced acute toxicity. On the other hand, the incidence of second cancers is much higher in children, so that doubling it may not be acceptable. IMRT represents a special case for children for three reasons. First, children are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than are adults. Second, radiation scattered from the treatment volume is more important in the small body of the child. Third, the question of genetic susceptibility arises because many childhood cancers involve a germline mutation. The levels of leakage radiation in current Linacs are not inevitable. Leakage can be reduced but at substantial cost. An alternative strategy is to replace X-rays with protons. However, this change is only an advantage if the proton machine employs a pencil scanning beam. Many proton facilities use passive modulation to produce a field of sufficient size, but the use of a scattering foil produces neutrons, which results in an effective dose to the patient higher than that characteristic of IMRT. The benefit of protons is only achieved if a scanning beam is used in which the doses are 10 times lower than with IMRT.

  14. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha . E-mail: narayana@mskcc.org; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.

  15. Cetuximab or nimotuzumab plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus cisplatin plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage II-IVb nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    You, Rui; Sun, Rui; Hua, Yi-Jun; Li, Chao-Feng; Li, Ji-Bin; Zou, Xiong; Yang, Qi; Liu, You-Ping; Zhang, Yi-Nuan; Yu, Tao; Cao, Jing-Yu; Zhang, Meng-Xia; Jiang, Rou; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Guo, Ling; Cao, Ka-Jia; Lin, Ai-Hua; Qian, Chao-Nan; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun; Chen, Ming-Yuan

    2017-09-15

    To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) versus cetuximab (CTX) and nimotuzumab (NTZ) for Stage II-IVb Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC). A total of 1,837 patients with stage II-IVb NPC who received IMRT plus CTX or NTZ, or CDDP between January 2009 and December 2013 were included in the current analysis. Using propensity scores to adjust for potential prognostic factors, a well-balanced cohort of 715 patients was created by matching each patient who underwent IMRT plus concomitant NTZ/CTX with four patients who underwent IMRT plus concomitant CDDP (1:4). Efficacy and safety were compared between the CTX/NTZ and CDDP groups of this well-balanced cohort. Furthermore, we conducted multivariate analysis and subgroup analysis based on all the 1,837 eligible cases. There was no significant difference between CTX/NTZ group and CDDP group in terms of DFS (3-year, 86.7% vs. 86.2%, p > 0.05), LRRFS (96.2% vs. 96.3%, p > 0.05), DMFS (91.1% vs. 92.3%, p > 0.05) and OS (91.7% vs. 91.9%, p > 0.05). Subgroup analysis demonstrated a significant interaction effect between patients with IMRT plus CTX/NTZ and N3 node stage on LRRFS with the highest risk of loco-regional relapse (HR 8.85, p = 0.001). Significantly increased hematologic toxicities, gastrointestinal reactions were observed in the CDDP group (p < 0.05). Patients of 3.4-4.7% experienced severe hematologic toxicities during the treatment with concomitant CTX and NTZ. Increased rate of CTX related-skin reaction and mucositis was observed in the CTX group. CTX/NTZ used concurrently with IMRT may be comparable to those of the standard CDDP-IMRT combination for maximizing survival for patients with stage II-IVb NPC. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Characteristics and performance of an intensity-modulated optically pumped magnetometer in comparison to the classical M(x) magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Volkmar; Ijsselsteijn, Rob; Scholtes, Theo; Woetzel, Stefan; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-06-18

    We compare the performance of two methods for the synchronization of the atomic spins in optically pumped magnetometers: intensity modulation of the pump light and the classical M(x) method using B(1) field modulation. Both techniques use the same set-up and measure the resulting features of the light after passing a micro-fabricated Cs cell. The intensity-modulated pumping shows several advantages: better noise-limited magnetic field sensitivity, misalignment between pumping and spin synchronization is excluded, and magnetometer arrays without any cross-talk can be easily set up.

  17. Multiple-wavelength operation of electroabsorption intensity modulator array fabricated using the one-step quantum well intermixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. L.; Lim, H. S.; Lam, Y. L.; Chan, Y. C.; Ooi, B. S.; Aimez, V.; Beauvais, J.; Beerens, J.

    2002-09-01

    Multiple-wavelength selective channel electroabsorption intensity modulators have been fabricated on a single InGaAs/InGaAsP chip using a one-step quantum well intermixing process. This technique was demonstrated for tailoring the intensity modulator operating wavelength by incorporating low-energy (360 keV) phosphorus ions implantation induced disordering process with gray-mask lithography technology. A modulation depth of -15 dB has been measured from these devices with a voltage swing of -4.5 V.

  18. P13.25A RADIOBIOLOGICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN THE INVERSE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY AND THE FIELD IN FIELD INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, A.; Dirican, B.; Kara, E.

    2014-01-01

    For critical structures the use of maximum or mean dose limits in the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization is not very meaningful. The dose-volume limits and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) which is defined as the uniform dose that would lead to the same effect as the given non-uniform dose in as particular organ are combined to analyze the volume effect. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is a predictor of radiobiological effect for organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the NTCP is based on the DVH which is generated by the treatment planning system after calculation of the 3D dose distribution. Uniform EUD irradiation of an OAR results in the same NTCP as the original non-homogeneous distribution. The NTCP equation is therefore represented as a function of EUD. The inverse equation expresses EUD as a function of NTCP. Expressing NTCP in terms of EUD represents a step toward simplifying the conceptual framework for modeling probability of expected complications. The aim of this study is to compare radiobiological effects between the fif IMRT and inverse IMRT for treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM) using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Five representative patients treated with definitive radiation using IMRT at our clinic in the last two year were selected for treatment planning study. Criteria for inclusion were glioblastoma . The normal tissues (Organ at Risk, OaR) contoured included brain-stem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, right-left cohclea and whole brain. Brain was defined as total brain tissue minus the PTV. Two different radiation therapy techniques; inverse IMRT and FiF IMRT treatment plans were optimised with the prescription dose 60 Gy/30 fractions. All those calculations and IMRT optimizations were performed using the Prowess Panther DAQ TPS with 6 MV,Siemens Artiste, MLC with 160 leaves and evaluated by using EUD and NTCP models. In the present study, target dose

  19. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L.

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the `goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of `good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For all the model cases investigated

  20. Dosimetric studies of cadmium free alloy used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Punia, Rajesh; Tyagi, Atul; Singh, Mann P.

    2017-10-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate dosimetric properties of cadmium free alloy which is used in compensator based intensity modulated radiotherapy (cIMRT). A mixture of lead, bismuth and tin was used to prepare the alloy whose melting point is 90-95 °C. Slabs of different thicknesses ranging from 0.71 cm to 6.14 cm were prepared. Density of alloy was measured by Archimedes' principle using water. For six megavolt (6 MV) photon beam energy transmission, linear effective attenuation coefficient (μeff), tissue phantom ratio (TPR1020), beam hardening, surface dose (Ds), percentage depth dose (PDD) and effect of scatter has been measured and analyzed for different field sizes and different thickness of compensator. Effect of extended source to detector distance (SDD) on transmissions and μeff was measured. The density of alloy was found to be 9.5456 g/cm3. At SDD of 100 cm, μeff was observed 0.4253 cm-1 for a field size of 10×10 cm 2. Calculated TPR1020 was found to be within 3% of experimental TPR1020 . It was found to be increasing with increasing thickness of compensator. Ds was found to decrease with thickness of compensator and increase with wider collimator opening due to increased scattered dose. Compensator slabs of 1 cm, 1.98 cm and 4.16 cm decreased surface dose by 4.2%, 6.1% and 9.5% respectively for a field size of 10×10 cm2 at 100 cm SDD. For small field size of 3×3 cm2 and 5×5 cm2 PDDs are increased from 3.0% to 5.5% of open beam PDDs as compensator thickness increased from 1 cm to 6.14 cm at a depth of 10 cm in water while variation in PDD is insignificant in for larger field sizes 10×10 cm2 to 20×20 cm2. A high degree of intensity modulation is essential in cIMRT and it can be achieved with this compensator material. Dosimetric properties analyzed in this study establish this alloy as a reliable, reusable, optimally dense and cost effective compensator material.

  1. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Nehrir, A. R.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 MeasurementsJoel F. Campbell1, Bing Lin1, Michael D. Obland1, Zhaoyan Liu1, Susan Kooi2, Tai-Fang Fan2, Amin R. Nehrir1, Byron Meadows1, Edward V. Browell31NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 2SSAI, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 3STARSS-II Affiliate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 AbstractGlobal and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America project are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the ASCENDS and ACT-America science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new sub-meter hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. These techniques are used in a new data processing

  2. Fatal pneumonitis associated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. . E-mail: aallen@lroc.harvard.edu; Czerminska, Maria; Jaenne, Pasi A.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Bueno, Raphael; Harris, Jay R.; Court, Laurence; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the initial experience at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant therapy after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The medical records of patients treated with IMRT after EPP and adjuvant chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. IMRT was given to a dose of 54 Gy to the clinical target volume in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Treatment was delivered with a dynamic multileaf collimator using a sliding window technique. Eleven of 13 patients received heated intraoperative cisplatin chemotherapy (225 mg/m{sup 2}). Two patients received neoadjuvant intravenous cisplatin/pemetrexed, and 10 patients received adjuvant cisplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy after EPP but before radiation therapy. All patients received at least 2 cycles of intravenous chemotherapy. The contralateral lung was limited to a V20 (volume of lung receiving 20 Gy or more) of 20% and a mean lung dose (MLD) of 15 Gy. All patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for staging, and any FDG-avid areas in the hemithorax were given a simultaneous boost of radiotherapy to 60 Gy. Statistical comparisons were done using two-sided t test. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with IMRT from December 2004 to September 2005. Six patients developed fatal pneumonitis after treatment. The median time from completion of IMRT to the onset of radiation pneumonitis was 30 days (range 5-57 days). Thirty percent of patients (4 of 13) developed acute Grade 3 nausea and vomiting. One patient developed acute Grade 3 thrombocytopenia. The median V20, MLD, and V5 (volume of lung receiving 5 Gy or more) for the patients who developed pneumonitis was 17.6% (range, 15.3-22.3%), 15.2 Gy (range, 13.3-17 Gy), and 98.6% (range, 81-100%), respectively, as compared with 10.9% (range, 5.5-24.7%) (p = 0.08), 12.9 Gy (range, 8.7-16.9 Gy) (p = 0.07), and 90% (range

  3. Whole-Field Simultaneous Integrated-Boost Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Frank C.S.; Ng, Alice W.Y.; Lee, Victor H.F.; Lui, Collin M.M.; Yuen, K.-K.; Sze, W.-K.; Leung, T.-W.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the outcomes of our patients with newly diagnosed nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a whole-field simultaneous integrated-boost technique. Methods and Materials: A total of 175 patients treated with WF-SIB between mid-2004 and 2005 were eligible for study inclusion. The distribution of disease by stage was Stage IA in 10.9%, Stage IIA in 2.3%, Stage IIB in 21.7%, Stage III in 41.1%, Stage IVA in 14.9%, and Stage IVB in 9.1%. Of the 175 patients, 2 (1.2%), 10 (5.7%), and 163 (93.1%) had World Health Organization type I, II, and III histologic features, respectively. We prescribed 70 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy delivered in 33 fractions within 6.5 weeks at the periphery of three planning target volumes (PTV; PTV70, PTV60, and PTV54, respectively). Of the 175 patients, 46 with early T-stage disease received a brachytherapy boost, and 127 with advanced local or regional disease received chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 34 months. The overall 3-year local failure-free survival, regional failure-free survival, distant failure-free survival, and overall survival rate was 93.6%, 93.3%, 86.6%, and 87.2%, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed Stage N2-N3 disease (p = .029) and PTV (p = .024) to be independent factors predicting a greater risk of distant failure and poor overall survival, respectively. Grade 3 acute mucositis/pharyngitis occurred in 23.4% of patients, and Stage T4 disease was the only significant predictor of mucositis/pharyngitis (p = .021). Conclusion: Whole-field simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a dose >70 Gy achieved excellent locoregional control, without an excess incidence of severe, acute mucositis/pharyngitis, in the present study. Strategies for using such highly conformal treatment for patients with a large tumor and late N-stage disease are potential areas of investigation for future studies.

  4. Effect of spine hardware on small spinal stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Yang, James N.; Li, Xiaoqiang; Tailor, Ramesh; Vassilliev, Oleg; Brown, Paul; Rhines, Laurence; Chang, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modeling of a 6 MV photon beam was used to study the dose perturbation from a titanium rod 5 mm in diameter in various small fields range from 2 × 2 to 5 × 5 cm2. The results showed that the rod increased the dose to water by ˜6% at the water-rod interface because of electron backscattering and decreased the dose by ˜7% in the shadow of the rod because of photon attenuation. The Pinnacle3 treatment planning system calculations matched the MC results at the depths more than 1 cm past the rod when the correct titanium density of 4.5 g cm-3 was used, but significantly underestimated the backscattering dose at the water-rod interface. A CT-density table with a top density of 1.82 g cm-3 (cortical bone) is a practical way to reduce the dosimetric error from the artifacts by preventing high density assignment to them, but can underestimates the attenuation by the titanium rod by 6%. However, when multi-beam with intensity modulation is used in actual patient spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment, the dosimetric effect of assigning 4.5 instead of 1.82 g cm-3 to titanium implants is complicated. It ranged from minimal effect to 2% dose difference affecting 15% target volume in the study. When hardware is in the beam path, density override to the titanium hardware is recommended.

  5. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Nagai, Aiko; Hayashi, Naoki

    2010-06-01

    Craniopharyngioma has benign histological character. However, because of proximity to optic pathways, pituitary gland, and hypothalamus, it may cause severe and permanent damage to such critical structures and can even be life threatening. Total surgical resection is often difficult. This study aims to evaluate treatment results of Novalis stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for craniopharyngioma adjacent to optic pathways. Ten patients (six men, four women) with craniopharyngioma and median age of 56.5 years (range 10-74 years) were treated by SRT using Novalis from July 2006 through March 2009. Median volume of tumor was 7.9 ml (range 1.1-21 ml). Three-dimensional noncoplanar five- or seven-beam SRT or coplanar five-beam SRT with intensity modulation was performed. Total dose of 30-39 Gy in 10-15 fractions (median 33 Gy) was delivered to the target. Ten patients were followed up for 9-36 months (median 25.5 months). Response rate was 80% (8/10), and control rate was 100%. Improvement of neurological symptoms was observed in five patients. No serious complications due to SRT were found. SRT for craniopharyngioma may be a safe and effective treatment. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine long-term tumor control or late complications.

  6. Micro-optoelectromechanical systems accelerometer based on intensity modulation using a one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Sheikhaleh, Arash; Abedi, Kambiz; Jafari, Kian; Gholamzadeh, Reza

    2016-11-10

    In this paper, we propose what we believe is a novel sensitive micro-optoelectromechanical systems (MOEMS) accelerometer based on intensity modulation by using a one-dimensional photonic crystal. The optical sensing system of the proposed structure includes an air-dielectric multilayer photonic bandgap material, a laser diode (LD) light source, a typical photodiode (1550 nm) and a set of integrated optical waveguides. The proposed sensor provides several advantages, such as a relatively wide measurement range, good linearity in the whole measurement range, integration capability, negligible cross-axis sensitivity, high reliability, and low air-damping coefficient, which results in a wider frequency bandwidth for a fixed resonance frequency. Simulation results show that the functional characteristics of the sensor are as follows: a mechanical sensitivity of 119.21 nm/g, a linear measurement range of ±38g and a resonance frequency of 1444 Hz. Thanks to the above-mentioned characteristics, the proposed MOEMS accelerometer is suitable for a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from consumer electronics to aerospace and inertial navigation.

  7. Dose verification in intensity modulation radiation therapy: a fractal dimension characteristics study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ming; Kuo, Chung-Ming; Chen, Ching-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    This study describes how to identify the coincidence of desired planning isodose curves with film experimental results by using a mathematical fractal dimension characteristic method to avoid the errors caused by visual inspection in the intensity modulation radiation therapy (IMRT). The isodose curves of the films delivered by linear accelerator according to Plato treatment planning system were acquired using Osiris software to aim directly at a single interested dose curve for fractal characteristic analysis. The results were compared with the corresponding planning desired isodose curves for fractal dimension analysis in order to determine the acceptable confidence level between the planning and the measurement. The film measured isodose curves and computer planning curves were deemed identical in dose distribution if their fractal dimensions are within some criteria which suggested that the fractal dimension is a unique fingerprint of a curve in checking the planning and film measurement results. The dose measured results of the film were presumed to be the same if their fractal dimension was within 1%. This quantitative rather than qualitative comparison done by fractal dimension numerical analysis helps to decrease the quality assurance errors in IMRT dosimetry verification.

  8. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea treated with PET-CT based intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Rath, Goura K; Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod K; Subramani, V

    2008-07-01

    Primary tumors of the trachea are rare and are usually malignant in adults and benign in children. Adenoid cystic carcinoma, which is of salivary gland origin, account for about one thirds of adult primary tracheal tumors. A 49-year-old gentleman presented to us after undergoing a pneumonectomy elsewhere. Computed tomography scan of the thorax at our hospital showed a residual disease in the primary site, size of which was same as that in the preoperative scan. Because there was a compromised respiratory reserve due to pneumonectomy we decided to keep the radiation dose to the remaining lung as low as possible. We treated him by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) directed intensity modulated radiation therapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 Fractions over 6 weeks on a linear accelerator. PET helped in exact localization of the target on the planning CT. He tolerated the treatment very well. PET-CT done 1 year posttreatment showed no residual disease. Presently he is disease free with good pulmonary reserve.

  9. Can Intensity-Modulated-Radiotherapy Reduce Toxicity in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Julie; Nuyts, Sandra

    2017-10-06

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a modern radiotherapy technique that was implemented in the mid-1990s. It allows closer shaping of dose, to target volumes, thereby sparing organs at risk (OARs). Before the IMRT-era, two-dimensional radiotherapy (2DRT) and later three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were the techniques of choice, but this robust way of irradiating caused more normal tissue to receive a higher dose. Radiation of cancers in the head and neck region is complex because of close proximity to critical normal tissue and the large target volumes that need to be treated at high doses. IMRT offers an elegant solution compared with 3DCRT and surgery because it allows organ preservation and improved function preservation. In this manuscript, we review the rationales for IMRT, with an emphasis on toxicity outcomes compared with 3DCRT. We performed a review of the literature and looked at the most important randomised controlled trials comparing IMRT with 3DCRT. We conclude that IMRT is safe in regard to disease outcome, and that it allows better sparing of normal tissue, thereby causing less toxicity, resulting in a smaller impact on quality of life compared with conventional radiotherapy in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Bucci, M. Kara; El-Sayed, Ivan; Xia Ping; Kaplan, Michael J.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 36 patients with malignancies of the sinonasal region were treated with IMRT. Thirty-two patients (89%) were treated in the postoperative setting after gross total resection. Treatment plans were designed to provide a dose of 70 Gy to 95% or more of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and 60 Gy to 95% or more of the clinical tumor volume (CTV) while sparing neighboring critical structures including the optic chiasm, optic nerves, eyes, and brainstem. The primary sites were: 13 ethmoid sinus, 10 maxillary sinus, 7 nasal cavity, and 6 other. Histology was: 12 squamous cell, 7 esthesioneuroblastoma, 5 adenoid cystic, 5 undifferentiated, 5 adenocarcinoma, and 2 other. Median follow-up was 51 months among surviving patients (range, 9-82 months). Results: The 2-year and 5-year estimates of local control were 62% and 58%, respectively. One patient developed isolated distant metastasis, and none developed isolated regional failure. The 5-year rates of disease-free and overall survival were 55% and 45%, respectively. The incidence of ocular toxicity was minimal with no patients reporting decreased vision. Late complications included xerophthalmia (1 patient), lacrimal stenosis (1 patient), and cataract (1 patient). Conclusion: Although IMRT for malignancies of the sinonasal region does not appear to lead to significant improvements in disease control, the low incidence of complications is encouraging.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R. Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity.

  12. Optimization of collimator parameters to reduce rectal dose in intensity-modulated prostate treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chapek, Julie . E-mail: Julie.chapek@hci.utah.edu; Tobler, Matt; Toy, Beau J.; Lee, Christopher M.; Leavitt, Dennis D.

    2005-01-01

    The inability to avoid rectal wall irradiation has been a limiting factor in prostate cancer treatment planning. Treatment planners must not only consider the maximum dose that the rectum receives throughout a course of treatment, but also the dose that any volume of the rectum receives. As treatment planning techniques have evolved and prescription doses have escalated, limitations of rectal dose have remained an area of focus. External pelvic immobilization devices have been incorporated to aid in daily reproducibility and lessen concern for daily patient motion. Internal immobilization devices (such as the intrarectal balloon) and visualization techniques (including daily ultrasound or placement of fiducial markers) have been utilized to reduce the uncertainty of intrafractional prostate positional variation, thus allowing for minimization of treatment volumes. Despite these efforts, prostate volumes continue to abut portions of the rectum, and the necessary volume expansions continue to include portions of the anterior rectal wall within high-dose regions. The addition of collimator parameter optimization (both collimator angle and primary jaw settings) to intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows greater rectal sparing compared to the use of IMRT alone. We use multiple patient examples to illustrate the positive effects seen when utilizing collimator parameter optimization in conjunction with IMRT to further reduce rectal doses.

  13. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper.

  14. Extrapleural pneumonectomy, photodynamic therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Du, Kevin L; Both, Stefan; Friedberg, Joseph S; Rengan, Ramesh; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has recently been proposed for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Here, we describe our experience with a multimodality approach for the treatment of mesothelioma, incorporating extrapleural pneumonectomy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy and postoperative hemithoracic IMRT. From 2004-2007, we treated 11 MPM patients with hemithoracic IMRT, 7 of whom had undergone porfimer sodium-mediated PDT as an intraoperative adjuvant to surgical debulking. The median radiation dose to the planning treatment volume (PTV) ranged from 45.4-54.5 Gy. For the contralateral lung, V20 ranged from 1.4-28.5%, V5 from 42-100% and MLD from 6.8-16.5 Gy. In our series, 1 patient experienced respiratory failure secondary to radiation pneumonitis that did not require mechanical ventilation. Multimodality therapy combining surgery with increased doses of radiation using IMRT, and newer treatment modalities such as PDT , appears safe. Future prospective analysis will be needed to demonstrate efficacy of this approach in the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. Efforts to reduce lung toxicity and improve dose delivery are needed and provide the promise of improved local control and quality of life in a carefully chosen multidisciplinary approach.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy with gamma analysis: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbas, Ugur; Okutan, Murat; Demir, Bayram; Koksal, Canan

    2015-07-01

    Dosimetry of the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is very important because of the complex dose distributions. Diode arrays are the most common and practical measurement tools for clinical usage for IMRT. Phantom selection is critical for QA process. IMRT treatment plans are recalculated for the phantom irradiation in QA. Phantoms are made in different geometrical shapes to measure the doses of different types of irradiation techniques. Comparison of measured and calculated dose distributions for IMRT can be made by using gamma analysis. In this study, 10 head-and-neck IMRT QA plans were created with Varian Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system. Water equivalent RW3-slab phantoms, Octavius-2 phantom and PTW Seven29 2D-array were used for QA measurements. Gantry, collimator and couch positions set to 00 and QA plans were delivered to RW3 and Octavius phantoms. Then the positions set to original angles and QA plans irradiated again. Measured and calculated fluence maps were evaluated with gamma analysis for different DD and DTA criteria. The effect of different set-up conditions for RW3 and Octavius phantoms in QA plan delivery evaluated by gamma analysis. Results of gamma analysis show that using RW3-slab phantoms with setting parameters to 00 is more appropriate for IMRT QA.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy to bilateral lower limb extremities concurrently: a planning case study

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Emma Miles, Wesley; Fenton, Paul; Frantzis, Jim

    2014-09-15

    Non-melanomatous skin cancers represent 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Australia with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) being the most common. A previously healthy 71-year-old woman presented with widespread and tender superficial skin cancers on the lower bilateral limbs. External beam radiation therapy through the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was employed as the treatment modality of choice as this technique provides conformal dose distribution to a three-dimensional treatment volume while reducing toxicity to surrounding tissues. The patient was prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with 1.0 cm bolus over the ventral surface of each limb. The beam arrangement consisted of six treatment fields that avoided entry and exit through the contralateral limb. The treatment plans met the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) guidelines and produced highly conformal dosimetric results. Skin toxicity was measured against the National Cancer Institute: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI: CTCAE) version 3. A well-tolerated treatment was delivered with excellent results given the initial extent of the disease. This case study has demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of IMRT for skin cancers as an alternative to surgery and traditional superficial radiation therapy, utilising a complex PTV of the extremities for patients with similar presentations.

  17. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  18. [Vestibular disorders and nausea during head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Berta, É; Righini, C A; Chamorey, E; Villa, J; Atallah, I; Reyt, É; Coffre, A; Schmerber, S

    2016-06-01

    We studied whether there is a relationship between nausea and vestibular disorders in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. We performed a prospective single-centre study that enrolled 31 patients. A videonystagmography was carried out before and within 15 days after radiation therapy for each patient. Nausea was assessed at baseline, every week, and at the post-radiotherapy videonystagmography visit. Twenty-six patients had benefited from a complete interpretable videonystagmography. For 14 of these patients vestibular damage was diagnosed post-radiotherapy. During irradiation, six patients felt nauseous, but without dizziness. In univariate analysis, we found a relationship statistically significant between the average dose received by the vestibules and vestibular disorder videonystagmography (P=0.001, odds ratio [OR]: 1.08 [1.025-.138]), but there was no relationship between vestibular disorder videonystagmography and nausea (P=0.701). Irradiation of the vestibular system during IMRT does not seem to explain the nausea. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy: the importance of clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) became a standard technique despite its drawbacks of volume delineation, planning, robustness of delivery, challenging quality assurance, and cost as compared with non-IMRT. The theoretic advantages of IMRT dose distributions are generally accepted, but the clinical advantages remain debatable because of the lack of clinical assessment of the effort that is required to overshadow the disadvantages. Rational IMRT use requires a positive advantage/drawback balance. Only 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 3 in the breast and 2 in the head and neck, which compare IMRT with non-IMRT (2-dimensional technique in four fifths of the trials), have been published (as of March 2011), and all had toxicity as the primary endpoint. More than 50 clinical trials compared results of IMRT-treated patients with a non-IMRT group, mostly historical controls. RCTs systematically showed a lower toxicity in IMRT-treated patients, and the non-RCTs confirmed these findings. Toxicity reduction, counterbalancing the drawbacks of IMRT, was convincing for breast and head and neck IMRT. For other tumor sites, the arguments favoring IMRT are weaker because of the inability to control bias outside the randomized setting. For anticancer efficacy endpoints, like survival, disease-specific survival, or locoregional control, the balance between advantages and drawbacks is fraught with uncertainties because of the absence of robust clinical data.

  20. Effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus two-dimensional conventional radiotherapy alone in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Pu-Yun; Shi, Dingbo; Sun, Rui; Zhu, Yu-Jia; Xiao, Yao; Zhang, Lu-Ning; Zhang, Xu-Hui; Chen, Ze-Ying; Lan, Xiao-Wen; Tang, Jie; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Ma, Jun; Deng, Wuguo; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Albeit intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is currently the recommended radiation technique in treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma, the effect of IMRT versus two-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (2DCRT) alone is still contradictory. Results In the original unmatched cohort of 1198 patients, IMRT obtained comparable 5-year overall survival (OS) (91.3% vs 87.1%, P = 0.120), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS) (92.3% vs 90.4%, P = 0.221) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (92.9% vs 92.1%, P = 0.901) to 2DCRT. In the propensity-matched cohort of 604 patients, no significant survival differences were observed between the two arms (5-year OS 90.9% vs 90.5%, P = 0.655; LRFS 92.5% vs 92.4%, P = 0.866; DMFS 92.5% vs 92.9%, P = 0.384). In multivariate analysis, IMRT did not significantly lower the risk of death, locoregional relapse or distant metastasis, irrespective of tumor stage. Methods Overall, 1198 patients who underwent IMRT (316 patients) or 2DCRT (882 patients) without any chemotherapy was retrospectively analyzed. Patients in both arms were matched at equal ratio using propensity-score matching method. OS, LRFS and DMFS were assessed with Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test and Cox regression. Conclusions In this propensity-matched study, IMRT showed no survival advantage over 2DCRT alone in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:27058901

  1. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-04

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency.

  2. Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-The National Cancer Centre Singapore Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tham, Ivan Weng-Keong; Hee, Siew Wan; Yeo, Richard Ming-Chert; Salleh, Patemah; Lee, James; Tan, Terence Wee-Kiat; Fong, Kam Weng; Chua, Eu Tiong; Wee, Joseph Tien-Seng

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and acute toxicity of our early experience with treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: A review was conducted on case records of 195 patients with histologically proven, nonmetastatic NPC treated with IMRT between 2002 and 2005. MRI of the head and neck was fused with CT simulation images. All plans had target volumes at three dose levels, with a prescribed dose of 70 Gy to the gross disease, in 2.0-2.12 Gy/fraction over 33-35 fractions. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was offered to Stage III/IV patients. Results: Median patient age was 52 years, and 69% were male. Median follow-up was 36.5 months. One hundred and twenty-three patients had Stage III/IV disease (63%); 50 (26%) had T4 disease. One hundred and eighty-eight (96%) had complete response; 7 (4%) had partial response. Of the complete responders, 10 (5.3%) had local recurrence, giving a 3-year local recurrence-free survival estimate of 93.1% and a 3-year disease-free survival of 82.1%. Fifty-one patients (26%) had at least one Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Results from our series are comparable to those reported by other centers. Acute toxicity is common. Local failure or persistent disease, especially in patients with bulky T4 disease, are issues that must be addressed in future trials.

  3. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788). The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2) and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3) were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential. PMID:20470428

  5. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: Electromechanical design and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Blosser, E.; Brandon, J.; Horste, T.; Forman, J. D.

    2006-09-15

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30x30 cm{sup 2}. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 deg. and 60 deg. automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area.

  6. An open-loop RFOG based on harmonic division technique to suppress LD's intensity modulation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Wang, Zeyu; Mao, Jianmin; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-11-01

    A harmonic division technique is proposed for an open-loop resonator fiber optic gyro (RFOG) to suppress semiconductor laser diode's (LD's) intensity modulation noise. The theoretical study indicates the RFOG with this technique is immune to the intensity noise. The simulation and experimental results show this technique would lead to a diminished linear region, which still could be acceptable for an RFOG applied to low rotation rate detection. The tests for the gyro output signal are carried out with/without noise suppressing methods, including the harmonic division technique and previously proposed signal compensation technique. With the harmonic division technique at the rotation rate of 10 deg/s, the stability of gyro output signal is improved from 1.07 deg/s to 0.0361 deg/s, whose noise suppressing ratio is more than 3 times as that of the signal compensation technique. And especially, a 3.12 deg/s signal jump is significantly removed with the harmonic division technique; in contrast, a residual 0.36 deg/s signal jump still exists with the signal compensation technique. It is concluded the harmonic division technique does work in intensity noise suppressing under dynamic condition, and it is superior to the signal compensation technique.

  7. Theoretical investigation of the capture effect in intensity-modulation direct-detection microwave photonic links.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyyed Esmail; Banai, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the capture effect concept in microwave photonic links (MWPLs) for the first time to our knowledge. The capture effect or the small-signal suppression is the change in the amplitude ratio of the two signals between input and output of the intensity-modulation direct-detection (IMDD) MWPLs. An analytical explanation of the performance of external IMDD MWPLs due to the effects of nonlinearity combined with sum of several input sinusoidal signals is given. We have investigated the suppression of a weaker signal in these links. General analytic expression for the small-signal suppression is derived using a nonlinear analytical approach. We show that the small-signal suppression is quite dependent on the input back-off, the power ratio of input signals, and on the number of input sinusoidal signals. The theoretical maximum possible signal suppression was found to be 6 dB. This analytical asymptotic value is verified by numerical results. We show the influence of the capture effect of the nonlinear MWPL on the optoelectronic oscillator operation that is verified by experimental data in the literature that has already been published.

  8. An intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection intersatellite microwave photonic link using polarization direction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Yongjun; Han, Lei; Zhao, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A simple approach for high loss intersatellite microwave photonic link with intensity modulation and coherent balanced detection is proposed. In the transmitter, the double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) modulated optical signal and optical carrier (OC) are combined by employing a polarization combiner to chose and control the signals polarization directions, while in the receiver, they are selected respectively by using a polarization splitter for they have orthogonal polarization directions. The separated DSB-SC signal and OC put into balanced detectors and the coherent detection is realized without a local oscillator (LO). At the output, the fundamental signal is augmented and the third-order distortion is suppressed for the DSB-SC modulation, the second-order distortion is removed for the balanced detection and the noise is reduced for the polarization direction control. The signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) can be optimized by adjusting the power of OC and modulation index. The simulation results show that, a SNDR higher than 30 dB can be obtained for the proposed method, which is in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiosurgery with rapidarc for multiple brain metastases and comparison with static approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu; Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2012-04-01

    Rotational RapidArc (RA) and static intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) have been used for brain radiosurgery. This study compares the 2 techniques from beam delivery parameters and dosimetry aspects for multiple brain metastases. Twelve patients with 2-12 brain lesions treated with IMRS were replanned using RA. For each patient, an optimal 2-arc RA plan from several trials was chosen for comparison with IMRS. Homogeneity, conformity, and gradient indexes have been calculated. The mean dose to normal brain and maximal dose to other critical organs were evaluated. It was found that monitor unit (MU) reduction by RA is more pronounced for cases with larger number of brain lesions. The MU-ratio of RA and IMRS is reduced from 104% to 39% when lesions increase from 2 to 12. The dose homogeneities are comparable in both techniques and the conformity and gradient indexes and critical organ doses are higher in RA. Treatment time is greatly reduced by RA in intracranial radiosurgery, because RA uses fewer MUs, fewer beams, and fewer couch angles.

  10. A novel linear programming approach to fluence map optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, H Edwin; Ahuja, Ravindra K; Dempsey, James F; Kumar, Arvind; Li, Jonathan G

    2003-11-07

    We present a novel linear programming (LP) based approach for efficiently solving the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence-map optimization (FMO) problem to global optimality. Our model overcomes the apparent limitations of a linear-programming approach by approximating any convex objective function by a piecewise linear convex function. This approach allows us to retain the flexibility offered by general convex objective functions, while allowing us to formulate the FMO problem as a LP problem. In addition, a novel type of partial-volume constraint that bounds the tail averages of the differential dose-volume histograms of structures is imposed while retaining linearity as an alternative approach to improve dose homogeneity in the target volumes, and to attempt to spare as many critical structures as possible. The goal of this work is to develop a very rapid global optimization approach that finds high quality dose distributions. Implementation of this model has demonstrated excellent results. We found globally optimal solutions for eight 7-beam head-and-neck cases in less than 3 min of computational time on a single processor personal computer without the use of partial-volume constraints. Adding such constraints increased the running times by a factor of 2-3, but improved the sparing of critical structures. All cases demonstrated excellent target coverage (> 95%), target homogeneity (< 10% overdosing and < 7% underdosing) and organ sparing using at least one of the two models.

  11. Combining segment generation with direct step-and-shoot optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Fredrik

    2008-09-15

    A method for generating a sequence of intensity-modulated radiation therapy step-and-shoot plans with increasing number of segments is presented. The objectives are to generate high-quality plans with few, large and regular segments, and to make the planning process more intuitive. The proposed method combines segment generation with direct step-and-shoot optimization, where leaf positions and segment weights are optimized simultaneously. The segment generation is based on a column generation approach. The method is evaluated on a test suite consisting of five head-and-neck cases and five prostate cases, planned for delivery with an Elekta SLi accelerator. The adjustment of segment shapes by direct step-and-shoot optimization improves the plan quality compared to using fixed segment shapes. The improvement in plan quality when adding segments is larger for plans with few segments. Eventually, adding more segments contributes very little to the plan quality, but increases the plan complexity. Thus, the method provides a tool for controlling the number of segments and, indirectly, the delivery time. This can support the planner in finding a sound trade-off between plan quality and treatment complexity.

  12. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Bremner, Fion; Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya; Short, Susan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  13. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  14. Feasibility of atlas-based active bone marrow sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Noticewala, Sonal S; Williamson, Casey W; Shen, Hanjie; Sirak, Igor; Tarnawski, Rafal; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Hoh, Carl K; Moore, Kevin L; Mell, Loren K

    2017-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that atlas-based active bone marrow (ABM)-sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) yields similar dosimetric results compared to custom ABM-sparing IMRT for cervical cancer patients. We sampled 62 cervical cancer patients with pre-treatment FDG-PET/CT in training (n=32) or test (n=30) sets. ABM was defined as the subvolume of the pelvic bone marrow (PBM) with standardized uptake value (SUV) above the mean on the average FDG-PET image (ABMAtlas) vs. the individual's PET (ABMCustom). Both were deformed to the planning CT. Overlap between the two subvolumes was measured using the Dice coefficient. Three IMRT plans designed to spare PBM, ABMAtlas, or ABMCustom were compared for 30 test patients. Dosimetric parameters were used to evaluate plan quality. ABMAtlas and ABMCustom volumes were not significantly different (p=0.90), with a mean Dice coefficient of 0.75, indicating good agreement. Compared to IMRT plans designed to spare PBM and ABMCustom, ABMAtlas-sparing IMRT plans achieved excellent target coverage and normal tissue sparing, without reducing dose to ABMCustom (mean ABMCustom dose 29.4Gy vs. 27.1Gyvs. 26.9Gy, respectively; p=0.10); however, PTV coverage and bowel sparing were slightly reduced. Atlas-based ABM sparing IMRT is clinically feasible and may obviate the need for customized ABM-sparing as a strategy to reduce hematologic toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Pablo P; Eley, John G; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy induces pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    EL-SAGHIRE, HOUSSEIN; VANDEVOORDE, CHARLOT; OST, PIET; MONSIEURS, PIETER; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; DE MEERLEER, GERT; BAATOUT, SARAH; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the modern conformal radiotherapies that is widely used within the context of cancer patient treatment. It uses multiple radiation beams targeted to the tumor, however, large volumes of the body receive low doses of irradiation. Using γ-H2AX and global genome expression analysis, we studied the biological responses induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in prostate cancer patients following IMRT. By means of different bioinformatics analyses, we report that IMRT induced an inflammatory response via the induction of viral, adaptive, and innate immune signaling. In response to growth factors and immune-stimulatory signaling, positive regulation in the progression of cell cycle and DNA replication were induced. This denotes pro-inflammatory and pro-survival responses. Furthermore, double strand DNA breaks were induced in every patient 30 min after the treatment and remaining DNA repair and damage signaling continued after 18–24 h. Nine genes belonging to inflammatory responses (TLR3, SH2D1A and IL18), cell cycle progression (ORC4, SMC2 and CCDC99) and DNA damage and repair (RAD17, SMC6 and MRE11A) were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This study emphasizes that the risk assessment of health effects from the out-of-field low doses during IMRT should be of concern, as these may increase the risk of secondary cancers and/or systemic inflammation. PMID:24435511

  17. A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton and Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy for Pediatric Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Adams, Judith; Krejcarek, Stephanie J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: We compared tumor and normal tissue dosimetry of proton radiation therapy with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for pediatric parameningeal rhabdomyosarcomas (PRMS). Methods and Materials: To quantify dosimetric differences between contemporary proton and photon treatment for pediatric PRMS, proton beam plans were compared with IMRT plans. Ten patients treated with proton radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital had IMRT plans generated. To facilitate dosimetric comparisons, clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant. Plans were optimized for target volume coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Proton and IMRT plans provided acceptable and comparable target volume coverage, with at least 99% of the CTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. Improved dose conformality provided by proton therapy resulted in significant sparing of all examined normal tissues except for ipsilateral cochlea and mastoid; ipsilateral parotid gland sparing was of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.05). More profound sparing of contralateral structures by protons resulted in greater dose asymmetry between ipsilateral and contralateral retina, optic nerves, cochlea, and mastoids; dose asymmetry between ipsilateral and contralateral parotids was of borderline statistical significance (p = 0.05). Conclusions: For pediatric PRMS, superior normal tissue sparing is achieved with proton radiation therapy compared with IMRT. Because of enhanced conformality, proton plans also demonstrate greater normal tissue dose distribution asymmetry. Longitudinal studies assessing the impact of proton radiotherapy and IMRT on normal tissue function and growth symmetry are necessary to define the clinical consequences of these differences.

  18. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK's interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  19. Radiochromic film based transit dosimetry for verification of dose delivery with intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Lee, Kiho; Shin, Dongho; Kyung Lim, Young; Byeong Lee, Se; Yoon, Myonggeun; Son, Jaeman; Yong Park, Sung

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the transit dose based patient specific quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for verification of the accuracy of dose delivered to the patient. Methods: Five IMRT plans were selected and utilized to irradiate a homogeneous plastic water phantom and an inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The transit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film and was compared with the computed dose map on the same plane using a gamma index with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit. Results: While the average gamma index for comparisons of dose distributions was less than one for 98.9% of all pixels from the transit dose with the homogeneous phantom, the passing rate was reduced to 95.0% for the transit dose with the inhomogeneous phantom. Transit doses due to a 5 mm setup error may cause up to a 50% failure rate of the gamma index. Conclusions: Transit dose based IMRT QA may be superior to the traditional QA method since the former can show whether the inhomogeneity correction algorithm from TPS is accurate. In addition, transit dose based IMRT QA can be used to verify the accuracy of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment by revealing significant increases in the failure rate of the gamma index resulting from errors in patient positioning during treatment.

  20. Impact of machines on plan quality: volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Clemente, S; Cozzolino, M; Oliviero, C; Fiorentino, A; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of different machines on plan quality using both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. Eight patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were selected at random. Plans were computed for IMRT and VMAT Smart Arc, using Pinnacle TPS for an Elekta (IMRT-E, VMAT-E) and Varian linac (IMRT-V, VMAT-V). A three-dose level prescription was used to deliver 70, 63 and 58.1 Gy to regions of macroscopic, microscopic high- and low-risk disease, respectively. All doses were given in 35 fractions. Comparisons were performed on dose-volume histogram data, monitor units (MU), and delivery time. VMAT-E plans resulted slightly MU efficient (-24 % p < 0.05) compared to VMAT-V while IMRT-V shortened delivery time (-19 % p < 0.05) compared to IMRT-E. All the delivery techniques resulted in equivalent target coverage in terms of D(98) % and D(2) %. For VMAT technique, a significant improvement of 7 % in homogeneity index (HI) for PTV58.1 was observed for Varian machine. A slight improvement in OARs sparing was observed with Elekta machine both for IMRT and VMAT techniques. Similar plan quality was observed for Elekta and Varian linacs, significant differences were observed in delivery efficiency, as MU number and delivery times, in favor of Elekta and Varian, respectively.

  1. The Accuracy of Inhomogeneity Corrections in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning in Philips Pinnacle System

    SciTech Connect

    Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick D.

    2011-10-01

    The degree of accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections in a treatment planning system is dependent on the algorithm used by the system. The choice of field size, however, could have an effect on the calculation accuracy as well. There have been several evaluation studies on the accuracy of inhomogeneity corrections used by different algorithms. Most of these studies, however, focus on evaluating the dose in phantom using simplified geometry and open/static fields. This work focuses on evaluating the degree of dose accuracy in calculations involving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields incident on a phantom containing both lung- and bone-equivalent heterogeneities using 6 and 10 MV beams. IMRT treatment plans were generated using the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system and delivered to a phantom containing 55 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) locations within the lung and bone and near the lung and bone interfaces with solid water. The TLD readings were compared with the dose predicted by the planning system. We find satisfactory agreement between planned and delivered doses, with an overall absolute average difference between measurement and calculation of 1.2% for the 6 MV and 3.1% for the 10 MV beam with larger variations observed near the interfaces and in areas of high-dose gradient. The results presented here demonstrate that the convolution algorithm used in the Pinnacle treatment planning system produces accurate results in IMRT plans calculated and delivered to inhomogeneous media, even in regions that potentially lack electronic equilibrium.

  2. Intelligence-guided beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2016-10-01

    An intelligence guided approach based on fuzzy inference system (FIS) was proposed to automate beam angle optimization in treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The model of FIS is built on inference rules in describing the relationship between dose quality of IMRT plan and irradiated region of anatomical structure. Dose quality of IMRT plan is quantified by the difference between calculated and constraint doses of the anatomical structures in an IMRT plan. Irradiated region of anatomical structure is characterized by the metric, covered region of interest, which is the region of an anatomical structure under radiation field while beam's eye-view is conform to target volume. Initially, an IMRT plan is created with a single beam. The dose difference is calculated for the input of FIS and the output of FIS is obtained with processing of fuzzy inference. Later, a set of candidate beams is generated for replacing the current beam. This process continues until no candidate beams is found. Then the next beam is added to the IMRT plan and optimized in the same way as the previous beam. The new beam keeps adding to the IMRT plan until the allowed beam number is reached. Two spinal cases were investigated in this study. The preliminary results show that dose quality of IMRT plans achieved by this approach is better than those achieved by the default approach with equally spaced beam setting. It is effective to find the optimal beam combination of IMRT plan with the intelligence-guided approach.

  3. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  4. Selective robust optimization: A new intensity-modulated proton therapy optimization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Niemela, Perttu; Siljamaki, Sami; Vanderstraeten, Reynald; Liao, Li; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Zhu, X. Ronald; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a new robust optimization strategy for intensity-modulated proton therapy as an important step in translating robust proton treatment planning from research to clinical applications. Methods: In selective robust optimization, a worst-case-based robust optimization algorithm is extended, and terms of the objective function are selectively computed from either the worst-case dose or the nominal dose. Two lung cancer cases and one head and neck cancer case were used to demonstrate the practical significance of the proposed robust planning strategy. The lung cancer cases had minimal tumor motion less than 5 mm, and, for the demonstration of the methodology, are assumed to be static. Results: Selective robust optimization achieved robust clinical target volume (CTV) coverage and at the same time increased nominal planning target volume coverage to 95.8%, compared to the 84.6% coverage achieved with CTV-based robust optimization in one of the lung cases. In the other lung case, the maximum dose in selective robust optimization was lowered from a dose of 131.3% in the CTV-based robust optimization to 113.6%. Selective robust optimization provided robust CTV coverage in the head and neck case, and at the same time improved controls over isodose distribution so that clinical requirements may be readily met. Conclusions: Selective robust optimization may provide the flexibility and capability necessary for meeting various clinical requirements in addition to achieving the required plan robustness in practical proton treatment planning settings.

  5. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, J. L.; Webb, S.

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans.

  6. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-21

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans.

  7. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Condron, Cathie; Ingle, Mike; Christensen, Phil A.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Ross, Randy

    2011-06-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  8. Fusion of microwave and optical images through intensity modulation by SAR textural features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiazzi, Bruno; Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea; Nencini, Filippo

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a novel multisensor image fusion algorithm, which extends pan-sharpening of multispectral (MS) data through intensity modulation to the integration of MS and SAR imagery. The method relies on SAR texture, extracted by ratioing a map of a SAR feature to its lowpass approximation. SAR texture is used to modulate the generalized intensity (GI) of the MS image, which is given by a linear transform extending Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS) transform to an arbitrary number of bands. Before modulation, the GI is enhanced by injection of highpass details extracted from the available Pan image by means of the "à-trous" wavelet decomposition. The texture-modulated pan-sharpened GI replaces the GI calculated from the resampled original MS data; then the inverse transform is applied to obtain the fusion product. Experimental results are presented on Landsat-7/ETM+ and ERS-2 images of an urban area. The results demonstrate accurate spectral preservation on vegetated regions, bare soil, and also on textured areas (buildings and road network) where SAR texture information enhances the fusion product, which can be usefully applied for both visual analysis and classification purposes.

  9. On Linear Infeasibility Arising in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Inverse Planning.

    PubMed

    Censor, Yair; Ben-Israel, Adi; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M

    2008-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) gives rise to systems of linear inequalities, representing the effects of radiation on the irradiated body. These systems are often infeasible, in which case one settles for an approximate solution, such as an {α, β}-relaxation, meaning that no more than α percent of the inequalities are violated by no more than β percent. For real-world IMRT problems, there is a feasible {α, β}-relaxation for sufficiently large α, β > 0, however large values of these parameters may be unacceptable medically.The {α, β}-relaxation problem is combinatorial, and for given values of the parameters can be solved exactly by Mixed Integer Programming (MIP), but this may be impractical because of problem size, and the need for repeated solutions as the treatment progresses.As a practical alternative to the MIP approach we present a heuristic non-combinatorial method for finding an approximate relaxation. The method solves a Linear Program (LP) for each pair of values of the parameters {α, β} and progresses through successively increasing values until an acceptable solution is found, or is determined non-existent. The method is fast and reliable, since it consists of solving a sequence of LP's.

  10. Comparative planning evaluation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for complex lung cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Yartsev, Slav; Chen, Jeff; Yu, Edward; Kron, Tomas; Rodrigues, George; Coad, Terry; Trenka, Kristina; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; Dyk, Jake Van

    2006-02-01

    Lung cancer treatment can be one of the most challenging fields in radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to compare different modalities of radiation delivery based on a balanced scoring scheme for target coverage and normal tissue avoidance. Treatment plans were developed for 15 patients with stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer using 3D conformal technique and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Elective nodal irradiation was included for all cases to create the most challenging scenarios with large target volumes. A 2 cm margin was used around the gross tumour volume (GTV) to generate PTV2 and 1cm margin around elective nodes for PTV1 resulting in PTV1 volumes larger than 1000 cm(3) in 13 of the 15 patients. 3D conformal and IMRT plans were generated on a commercial treatment planning system (TheraPlan Plus, Nucletron) with various combinations of beam energies and gantry angles. A 'dose quality factor' (DQF) was introduced to correlate the plan quality with patient specific parameters. A good correlation was found between the quality of the plans and the overlap between PTV1 and lungs. The patient feature factor (PFF), which is a product of several pertinent characteristics, was introduced to facilitate the choice of a particular technique for a particular patient. This approach may allow the evaluation of different treatment options prior to actual planning, subject to validation in larger prospective data sets.

  11. Improved planning time and plan quality through multicriteria optimization for intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Craft, David L; Hong, Theodore S; Shih, Helen A; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IMPROVED PLANNING TIME AND PLAN QUALITY THROUGH MULTICRITERIA OPTIMIZATION FOR INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error–based IMRT planning approach. PMID:21300448

  13. Intensity modulated perioperative HDR brachytherapy for recurrent and/or advanced head and neck metastases.

    PubMed

    Teudt, Ingo U; Kovàcs, György; Ritter, Matthias; Melchert, Corinna; Soror, Tamer; Wollenberg, Barbara; Meyer, Jens E

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent neck metastases following surgery and full dose adjuvant radiotherapy of squamous cell head and neck cancer remain a clinical challenge. After revision neck dissection and chemotherapy re-irradiation dosage is often limited and survival prognosis deteriorates. Here, adjuvant high-dose rate intensity modulated perioperative brachytherapy (HDR IMBT) offers a second full radiation dose with a limited volume of normal tissue radiation in the neck. In this retrospective study patients were identified who underwent revision surgery and perioperative HDR IMBT for recurrent neck metastases. Survival rates were estimated and the scarce literature on interstitial brachytherapy of the neck was reviewed. From 2006 to 2014, nine patients were treated for recurrent or palliative neck metastases using salvage surgery and HDR IMBT. Eight patients received previous surgery and external beam radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Two and five year overall survival was calculated to be 78 and 67 %, respectively. HDR IMBT is a salvage treatment option for selected cases in the neck following surgical revision or last-line treatment strategies. In the literature and this small cohort radiation toxicity and the risk of "carotid blow-out" seemed to be low.

  14. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduces xerostomia compared with conventional radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Braam, Petra M. . E-mail: P.M.Braam@umcutrecht.nl; Terhaard, Chris H.J. M.D.; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a severe complication after radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer, as the salivary glands are in close proximity with the primary tumor. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers theoretical advantages for normal tissue sparing. A Phase II study was conducted to determine the value of IMRT for salivary output preservation compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 56 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively evaluated. Of these, 30 patients were treated with IMRT and 26 with CRT. Stimulated parotid salivary flow was measured before, 6 weeks, and 6 months after treatment. A complication was defined as a stimulated parotid flow rate <25% of the preradiotherapy flow rate. Results: The mean dose to the parotid glands was 48.1 Gy (SD 14 Gy) for CRT and 33.7 Gy (SD 10 Gy) for IMRT (p < 0.005). The mean parotid flow ratio 6 weeks and 6 months after treatment was respectively 41% and 64% for IMRT and respectively 11% and 18% for CRT. As a result, 6 weeks after treatment, the number of parotid flow complications was significantly lower after IMRT (55%) than after CRT (87%) (p = 0.002). The number of complications 6 months after treatment was 56% for IMRT and 81% for CRT (p = 0.04). Conclusions: IMRT significantly reduces the number of parotid flow complications for patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  15. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, Homayon; Cho, Paul S.; Phillips, Mark H.; Giansiracusa, Robert S.; Axen, David

    2003-05-01

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of σ = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least σ = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of +/-0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations.

  16. Risk of secondary cancers from scattered radiation during intensity-modulated radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the risks of secondary cancers from therapeutic doses received by patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), and tomotherapy (TOMO). Methods Treatments for five patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were planned using IMRT, VMAT, and TOMO. Based on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII method, the excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were evaluated from therapeutic doses, which were measured using radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGDs) for each organ inside a humanoid phantom. Results The average organ equivalent doses (OEDs) of 5 patients were measured as 0.23, 1.18, 0.91, 0.95, 0.97, 0.24, and 0.20 Gy for the thyroid, lung, stomach, liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum, respectively. From the OED measurements, LAR incidence were calculated as 83, 46, 22, 30, 2 and 6 per 104 person for the lung, stomach, normal liver, small intestine, prostate (or ovary), and rectum. Conclusions We estimated the secondary cancer risks at various organs for patients with HCC who received different treatment modalities. We found that HCC treatment is associated with a high secondary cancer risk in the lung and stomach. PMID:24886163

  17. Comparison of optimization algorithms in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Rachel

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is used to better conform the radiation dose to the target, which includes avoiding healthy tissue. Planning programs employ optimization methods to search for the best fluence of each photon beam, and therefore to create the best treatment plan. The Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), a program written in MATLAB, was used to examine some commonly-used algorithms for one 5-beam plan. Algorithms include the genetic algorithm, quadratic programming, pattern search, constrained nonlinear optimization, simulated annealing, the optimization method used in Varian EclipseTM, and some hybrids of these. Quadratic programing, simulated annealing, and a quadratic/simulated annealing hybrid were also separately compared using different prescription doses. The results of each dose-volume histogram as well as the visual dose color wash were used to compare the plans. CERR's built-in quadratic programming provided the best overall plan, but avoidance of the organ-at-risk was rivaled by other programs. Hybrids of quadratic programming with some of these algorithms seems to suggest the possibility of better planning programs, as shown by the improved quadratic/simulated annealing plan when compared to the simulated annealing algorithm alone. Further experimentation will be done to improve cost functions and computational time.

  18. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  19. Clinical and dosimetric implications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Matthew Christopher Pham, Yvonne D.; Kotecha, Rupesh; Zakem, Sara J.; Murray, Eric; Greskovich, John F.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional parallel-opposed radiotherapy (PORT) is the established standard technique for early-stage glottic carcinoma. However, case reports have reported the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with or without image guidance (image-guided radiotherapy, IGRT) in select patients. The proposed advantages of IMRT/VMAT include sparing of the carotid artery, thyroid gland, and the remaining functional larynx, although these benefits remain unclear. The following case study presents a patient with multiple vascular comorbidities treated with VMAT for early-stage glottic carcinoma. A detailed explanation of the corresponding treatment details, dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis, and a review of the relevant literature are provided. Conventional PORT remains the standard of care for early-stage glottic carcinoma. IMRT or VMAT may be beneficial for select patients, although great care is necessary to avoid a geographical miss. Clinical data supporting the benefit of CRT are lacking. Therefore, these techniques should be used with caution and only in selected patients.

  20. Accuracy of inhomogeneity correction algorithm in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head-and-neck tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Doo-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong . E-mail: cool_park@ncc.re.kr; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-04-01

    We examined the degree of calculated-to-measured dose difference for nasopharyngeal target volume in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) based on the observed/expected ratio using patient anatomy with humanoid head-and-neck phantom. The plans were designed with a clinical treatment planning system that uses a measurement-based pencil beam dose-calculation algorithm. Two kinds of IMRT plans, which give a direct indication of the error introduced in routine treatment planning, were categorized and evaluated. The experimental results show that when the beams pass through the oral cavity in anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom, the average dose difference becomes significant, revealing about 10% dose difference to prescribed dose at isocenter. To investigate both the physical reasons of the dose discrepancy and the inhomogeneity effect, we performed the 10 cases of IMRT quality assurance (QA) with plastic and humanoid phantoms. Our result suggests that the transient electronic disequilibrium with the increased lateral electron range may cause the inaccuracy of dose calculation algorithm, and the effectiveness of the inhomogeneity corrections used in IMRT plans should be evaluated to ensure meaningful quality assurance and delivery.

  1. Frequency domain approach for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, J.; Kawasumi, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a scheme for time-resolved pump-probe microscopy using intensity modulated laser diodes. The modulation frequencies of the pump and probe beams are varied up to 500 MHz with fixed frequency detuning typically set at 15 kHz. The frequency response of the pump-probe signal is detected using a lock-in amplifier referenced at the beat frequency. This frequency domain method is capable of characterizing the nanosecond to picosecond relaxation dynamics of sample species without the use of a high speed detector or a high frequency lock-in amplifier. Furthermore, as the pump-probe signal is based on the nonlinear interaction between the two laser beams and the sample, our scheme provides better spatial resolution than the conventional diffraction-limited optical microscopes. Time-resolved pump-probe imaging of fluorescence beads and aggregates of quantum dots demonstrates that this method is useful for the microscopic analysis of optoelectronic devices. The system is implemented using compact and low-cost laser diodes, and thus has a broad range of applications in the fields of photochemistry, optical physics, and biological imaging.

  2. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach.

  3. Risk of second malignant neoplasm following proton versus intensity-modulated photon radiotherapies for hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Krishnan, Sunil; Scarboro, Sarah B.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the sixth most common cancer in the world, is a global health concern. Radiotherapy for HCC is uncommon, largely because of the likelihood of radiation-induced liver disease, an acute side effect that is often fatal. Proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer HCC patients a better option for treating the diseased liver tissue while largely sparing the surrounding tissues, especially the non-tumor liver. However, even advanced radiotherapies carry a risk of late effects, including second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). It is unclear whether PBT or IMRT confers less risk of an SMN than the other. The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risk of developing an SMN for a patient with HCC between PBT and IMRT. For both treatments, radiation doses in organs and tissues from primary radiation were determined using a treatment planning system; doses in organs and tissues from stray radiation from PBT were determined using Monte Carlo simulations and from IMRT using thermo-luminescent dosimeter measurements. Risk models of SMN incidence were taken from the literature. The predicted absolute lifetime attributable risks of SMN incidence were 11.4% after PBT and 19.2% after IMRT. The results of this study suggest that using proton beams instead of photon beams for radiotherapy may reduce the risk of SMN incidence for some HCC patients.

  4. Accounting for range uncertainties in the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Chan, Timothy C Y; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-05-21

    Treatment plans optimized for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be sensitive to range variations. The dose distribution may deteriorate substantially when the actual range of a pencil beam does not match the assumed range. We present two treatment planning concepts for IMPT which incorporate range uncertainties into the optimization. The first method is a probabilistic approach. The range of a pencil beam is assumed to be a random variable, which makes the delivered dose and the value of the objective function a random variable too. We then propose to optimize the expectation value of the objective function. The second approach is a robust formulation that applies methods developed in the field of robust linear programming. This approach optimizes the worst case dose distribution that may occur, assuming that the ranges of the pencil beams may vary within some interval. Both methods yield treatment plans that are considerably less sensitive to range variations compared to conventional treatment plans optimized without accounting for range uncertainties. In addition, both approaches--although conceptually different--yield very similar results on a qualitative level.

  5. Certificate of need regulations and the diffusion of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bruce L.; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A.; Wei, John T.; Montie, James E.; Schroeck, Florian R.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To better understand the associations between certificate of need regulations and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dissemination. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified men (66 years or older) treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer diagnosed between 2001 and 2007. Based on data from the American Health Planning Association, we sorted Health Service Areas (HSAs) according to the stringency of certificate of need regulations (low vs. high) in that market. We assessed our outcomes (i.e., the probability of IMRT adoption and IMRT utilization in HSAs) using Cox proportional-hazards and Poisson regression models, respectively. Results Low and high stringency markets were similar in terms of racial composition (80% vs. 85% white, p=0.08), population density (1,085 vs. 558 people/square mile, p=0.08), and income (median: $38,683 vs. 40,309, p=0.44), but low stringency markets had more patients with stage T1 disease (45% vs. 36%, p<0.01). The probability of IMRT adoption across the two groups of HSAs was similar (p=0.65). However, among adopting HSAs, those with high stringency consistently had greater use of IMRT (p<0.01). Conclusions Certificate of need regulations fail to create significant barriers to entry for IMRT. Among HSAs that acquire IMRT, high stringency markets demonstrate a greater propensity for using IMRT. These findings raise questions regarding the ability of certificate of need regulations to control technology dissemination. PMID:22999447

  6. Compact multileaf collimator for conformal and intensity modulated fast neutron therapy: electromechanical design and validation.

    PubMed

    Farr, J B; Maughan, R L; Yudelev, M; Blosser, E; Brandon, J; Horste, T; Forman, J D

    2006-09-01

    The electromechanical properties of a 120-leaf, high-resolution, computer-controlled, fast neutron multileaf collimator (MLC) are presented. The MLC replaces an aging, manually operated multirod collimator. The MLC leaves project 5 mm in the isocentric plane perpendicular to the beam axis. A taper is included on the leaves matching beam divergence along one axis. The 5-mm leaf projection width is chosen to give high-resolution conformality across the entire field. The maximum field size provided is 30 x 30 cm2. To reduce the interleaf transmission a 0.254-mm blocking step is included. End-leaf steps totaling 0.762 mm are also provided allowing opposing leaves to close off within the primary radiation beam. The neutron MLC also includes individual 45 degrees and 60 degrees automated universal tungsten wedges. The automated high-resolution neutron collimation provides an increase in patient throughput capacity, enables a new modality, intensity modulated neutron therapy, and limits occupational radiation exposure by providing remote operation from a shielded console area.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiosurgery with rapidarc for multiple brain metastases and comparison with static approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Zhu; Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno J; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T

    2012-01-01

    Rotational RapidArc (RA) and static intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) have been used for brain radiosurgery. This study compares the 2 techniques from beam delivery parameters and dosimetry aspects for multiple brain metastases. Twelve patients with 2-12 brain lesions treated with IMRS were replanned using RA. For each patient, an optimal 2-arc RA plan from several trials was chosen for comparison with IMRS. Homogeneity, conformity, and gradient indexes have been calculated. The mean dose to normal brain and maximal dose to other critical organs were evaluated. It was found that monitor unit (MU) reduction by RA is more pronounced for cases with larger number of brain lesions. The MU-ratio of RA and IMRS is reduced from 104% to 39% when lesions increase from 2 to 12. The dose homogeneities are comparable in both techniques and the conformity and gradient indexes and critical organ doses are higher in RA. Treatment time is greatly reduced by RA in intracranial radiosurgery, because RA uses fewer MUs, fewer beams, and fewer couch angles. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with field rotation--a time-varying fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Dink, Delal; Langer, Mark P; Rardin, Ronald L; Pekny, Joseph F; Reklaitis, Gintaras V; Saka, Behlul

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel mathematical approach to the beam selection problem in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. The approach allows more beams to be used over the course of therapy while limiting the number of beams required in any one session. In the proposed field rotation method, several sets of beams are interchanged throughout the treatment to allow a wider selection of beam angles than would be possible with fixed beam orientations. The choice of beamlet intensities and the number of identical fractions for each set are determined by a mixed integer linear program that controls jointly for the distribution per fraction and the cumulative dose distribution delivered to targets and critical structures. Trials showed the method allowed substantial increases in the dose objective and/or sparing of normal tissues while maintaining cumulative and fraction size limits. Trials for a head and neck site showed gains of 25%-35% in the objective (average tumor dose) and for a thoracic site gains were 7%-13%, depending on how strict the fraction size limits were set. The objective did not rise for a prostate site significantly, but the tolerance limits on normal tissues could be strengthened with the use of multiple beam sets.

  9. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, Erik A.

    2012-06-07

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated

  10. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  11. [Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and oligometastases].

    PubMed

    Riesterer, Oliver

    2013-10-16

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a new radiation technique that combines improvements in radiotherapy planning, intensity modulation and image guidance. The use of SBRT enables radiotherapy to be delivered instead of in six weeks in only a few days and with ablative total dose. Prospective phase II studies in patients with inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer demonstrate that the use of SBRT results in local control rates of 85-95% with acceptable toxicity. SBRT is also increasingly used for treatment of metastases in the lung, liver, retroperitoneum and in bones. Because SBRT enables a locally curative dose to be delivered in a time efficient manner this technique also opens up new perspectives for the treatment of patients with oligometastases.

  12. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal metastases : a feasibility study of advanced techniques with modulated photons and protons.

    PubMed

    Scorsetti, Marta; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Clerici, Elena; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca; Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca

    2011-04-01

    To compare advanced treatment techniques with photons and protons as a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for adrenal glands metastases. Planning computer tomographic (CT) scans of 10 patients were selected. A total dose of 45 Gy in 7.5 Gy fractions was prescribed. Organs at risk (OAR) were liver and kidneys. Dose-volume metrics were defined to quantify quality of plans assessing target coverage and sparing of organs at risk. Plans for RapidArc, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), dynamic conformal arcs, 3D conformal static fields, and intensity modulated protons were compared. The main planning objective for the clinical target volume (CTV) was to cover 100% of the volume with 95% (V(95%) = 100%) and to keep the maximum dose below 107% of the prescribed dose (V(107%) = 0%). Planning objective for planning target volume (PTV) was V(95%) > 80%. For kidneys, the general planning objective was V(15Gy) < 35% and for liver V(15Gy) < (liver volume-700 cm(3)). All techniques achieved the minimum and maximum dose objective for CTV and PTV, D(5-95%) ranged from 1 Gy (protons) to 1.6 Gy (conformal static fields) on CTV. Maximal organ at risk sparing was achieved by protons. RapidArc presented the second lowest dose bath (V(10Gy) and integral dose) after protons and the best conformality together with IMRT. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to adrenal glands metastases is achievable with several advanced techniques with either photons or protons. The intensity modulated approaches using either static fields, dynamic arcs or protons are superior to the other conformal solutions. For their simplicity, IMRT or RapidArc should be considered as the first option radiation treatment for those patients not eligible for proton treatment.

  13. Feasibility of dose escalation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in posthysterectomy cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D. . E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu; Ahamad, Anesa A.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving radiation at varying dose levels when the female pelvis after hysterectomy is treated to doses of 50.4 Gy and 54 Gy. Methods and materials: Computed tomography scans from 10 patients who had previously undergone conventional postoperative RT were selected. The clinical tumor volume (vaginal apex and iliac nodes) and organs at risk were contoured. Margins were added to generate the planning tumor volume. The Pinnacle and Corvus planning systems were used to develop conventional and IMRT plans, respectively. Conventional four-field plans were prescribed to deliver 45 Gy (4F{sub 45Gy}) or 50.4 Gy; eight-field IMRT plans were prescribed to deliver 50.4 Gy (IMRT{sub 50.4Gy}) or 54 Gy (IMRT{sub 54Gy}) to the planning tumor volume. All plans were normalized so that {>=}97% of the planning tumor volume received the prescribed dose. Student's t test was used to compare the volumes of organs at risk receiving the same doses with different plans. Results: The mean volume of bowel receiving {>=}45 Gy was lower with the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} (33% lower) and IMRT{sub 54Gy} (18% lower) plans than with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan. The mean volume of rectum receiving {>=}45 Gy or {>=}50 Gy was also significantly reduced with the IMRT plans despite an escalation of the prescribed dose from 45 Gy with the conventional plans to 54 Gy with IMRT. The mean volume of bladder treated to 45 Gy was the same or slightly lower with the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} and IMRT{sub 54Gy} plans compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan. Compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan, the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} plan resulted in a smaller volume of bowel receiving 35-45 Gy and a larger volume of bowel receiving 50-55 Gy. Compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan, the IMRT{sub 54Gy} plan resulted in smaller volumes of bowel receiving 45-50 Gy; however, small volumes of bowel received 55-60 Gy with the IMRT plan

  14. Algorithm development for intensity modulated continuous wave laser absorption spectrometry in atmospheric CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Bryant, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and ITT are jointly developing algorithms for demonstration of range discrimination using ITT's laser absorption spectrometer (LAS), which is being evaluated for the future NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The objective of this Decadal Survey mission is to measure atmospheric column CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) for improved determination of atmospheric carbon sources and sinks. Intensity Modulated Continuous Wave (IM-CW) techniques are used in this LAS approach. The LAS is designed to simultaneously measure CO2 and O2 columns, and these measurements are used to determine the required XCO2 column. The LAS measurements are enabled by the multi-channel operation of the instrument at 1.57 and 1.26-um for CO2 and O2, respectively. The algorithm development for the IM-CW techniques of the multi-channel LAS is focused on addressing key retrieval issues such as surface signal detection, thin cloud and/or aerosol layer rejection, vertical atmospheric range resolution, and optimizing the size of the measurement footprint. With these considerations, the modulation algorithm needs to maintain high enough signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) so that the mission scientific goals can be reached. A basic selection of the modulation algorithms that make XCO2 measurement and thin cloud rejection possible is the stepped frequency modulation scheme and a similar scheme of swept sine modulation. The differences between these two schemes for thin cloud rejection are small, assuming the proper selection of parameters is made. The stepped frequency approach is only a quantified version of swept sine method for the frequencies used. Swept sine scheme is a very common modulation technique for range discrimination, while the consideration of the stepped frequency scheme is based on the history of the rolling-tone modulation used in the instrument in previous successful column CO2 measurements. The

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira Vakaet, Luc; Bonte, Katrien; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer (UPC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2006, 23 patients with UPC of squamous cell carcinoma were treated with IMRT. Extended putative mucosal and bilateral nodal sites were irradiated to a median dose of 66 Gy. In 19 patients, IMRT was performed after lymph node dissection, and in 4 patients primary radiotherapy was given. The conventional radiotherapy group (historical control group) comprised 18 patients treated to a median dose of 66 Gy between August 1994 and October 2003. Results: Twenty patients completed treatment. As compared with conventional radiotherapy, the incidence of Grade 3 acute dysphagia was significantly lower in the IMRT group (4.5% vs. 50%, p = 0.003). By 6 months, Grade 3 xerostomia was detected in 11.8% patients in the IMRT group vs. 53.4% in the historical control group (p = 0.03). No Grade 3 dysphagia or skin fibrosis was observed after IMRT but these were noted after conventional radiotherapy (26.7%, p = 0.01) and 26.7%, p = 0.03) respectively). With median follow-up of living patients of 17 months, there was no emergence of primary cancer. One patient had persistent nodal disease and another had nodal relapse at 5 months. Distant metastases were detected in 4 patients. The 2-year overall survival and distant disease-free probability after IMRT did not differ significantly from those for conventional radiotherapy (74.8% vs. 61.1% and 76.3% vs. 68.4%, respectively). Conclusions: Use of IMRT for UPC resulted in lower toxicity than conventional radiotherapy, and was similar in efficacy.

  16. Vulvar Recurrences After Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anus.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, Hilary P; Sause, William T; Gawlick, Ute; Kim, H Tae; Whisenant, Jonathan; Cannon, George M

    2016-07-19

    The objective is to determine localregional control (LRC), distant metastasis free survival, disease-free survival, overall survival (OS), and toxicity for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anus treated with definitive chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We conducted a retrospective review of patients treated using IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus at our institution since 2005. Patients with local recurrences were identified and reviewed. The Kaplan-Meier curves were used for LRC and OS. From 2005 to 2014, 52 patients were treated with IMRT-based chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. Median dose to the primary tumor was 54 Gy. LRC, distant metastasis free survival, OS, and disease-free survival were 92.3%, 88.5%, 86.5%, and 84.6%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 20 months. Two local failures occurred at the anal primary site and 2 in the vulva. Despite subsequent palliative radiotherapy and chemotherapy, neither patient with a vulvar recurrence achieved disease control. In a cohort of patients treated with IMRT-based chemoradiation, 2 vulvar recurrences were identified within the avoided external genitalia despite limited recurrence rates within the cohort overall. This experience suggests that for patients with a locally advanced primary tumor and bulky bilateral inguinal or pelvic disease, the in-transit vulvar dermal lymphatics may be at risk for subclinical involvement and subsequent recurrence. If substantiated by a similar pattern of recurrence at other institutions, the external genitalia may need to be reclassified from an avoidance structure to a clinical treatment volume in patients with locally advanced anal cancer.

  17. Stochastic versus deterministic kernel-based superposition approaches for dose calculation of intensity-modulated arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A.; Luan, Shuang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Daliang; Yu, Cedric X.; Naqvi, Shahid A.

    2008-09-01

    Dose calculations for radiation arc therapy are traditionally performed by approximating continuous delivery arcs with multiple static beams. For 3D conformal arc treatments, the shape and weight variation per degree is usually small enough to allow arcs to be approximated by static beams separated by 5°-10°. But with intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), the variation in shape and dose per degree can be large enough to require a finer angular spacing. With the increase in the number of beams, a deterministic dose calculation method, such as collapsed-cone convolution/superposition, will require proportionally longer computational times, which may not be practical clinically. We propose to use a homegrown Monte Carlo kernel-superposition technique (MCKS) to compute doses for rotational delivery. The IMAT plans were generated with 36 static beams, which were subsequently interpolated into finer angular intervals for dose calculation to mimic the continuous arc delivery. Since MCKS uses random sampling of photons, the dose computation time only increased insignificantly for the interpolated-static-beam plans that may involve up to 720 beams. Ten past IMRT cases were selected for this study. Each case took approximately 15-30 min to compute on a single CPU running Mac OS X using the MCKS method. The need for a finer beam spacing is dictated by how fast the beam weights and aperture shapes change between the adjacent static planning beam angles. MCKS, however, obviates the concern by allowing hundreds of beams to be calculated in practically the same time as for a few beams. For more than 43 beams, MCKS usually takes less CPU time than the collapsed-cone algorithm used by the Pinnacle3 planning system.

  18. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  19. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  20. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  1. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  2. SU-E-T-814: Whole Breast Irradiation with Two Different Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Yin, Y; Lin, X; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer now mainly received forward intensity modulation radiotherapy (f-IMRT) and inverse IMRT (i-IMRT). The purpose of this study was to observe the differences of two treatment methods. Methods: 10 patients after left breast-conserving surgery were selected to receive radiotherapy. For each patient, two treatment plans (f-IMRT and i-IMRT) were designed. For f-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target, and in each tangent orientation two or three segment beams were designed to reduced high dose region in the target and the dose of lung received. For i-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target and the treatment planning system optimize the dose according to the optimization parameters. For each plan 50Gy was prescribed. Results: In f-IMRT and i-IMRT plans, the average target conformal index (CI) were (0.67±0.06) and (0.66±0.06), (P>0.05); average homogeneity index (HI) were (28.2±6.0)% and (26.1±6.8)%, (P>0.05); volume of left lung received 20Gy (V20) were (18.7±3.3)% and (17.0±2.8)%, (P<0.05), V30 were (15.5±3.0)% and (14.0±2.6)%, (P<0.05); V30 of heart were (4.1±3.1)% and (3.5±2.5)%, (P>0.05); Monitor Unit (MU) were (262±5)MU and (308±14)MU. Conclusion: Compared with i-IMRT plan, for breast cancer, the differences of CI and HI were not significant. Because of fewer MU, f-IMRT plan could reduce the machine abrasion and treatment time, but dose of normal tissue received were higher significantly than i-IMRT plan.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Tumors: Ghent University Hospital Update

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira Bonte, Katrien; Vakaet, Luc; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcome of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2006, 84 patients with sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT to a median dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Of the 84 patients, 73 had a primary tumor and 11 had local recurrence. The tumor histologic type was adenocarcinoma in 54, squamous cell carcinoma in 17, esthesioneuroblastoma in 9, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 4. The tumors were located in the ethmoid sinus in 47, maxillary sinus in 19, nasal cavity in 16, and multiple sites in 2. Postoperative IMRT was performed in 75 patients and 9 patients received primary IMRT. Results: The median follow-up of living patients was 40 months (range, 8-106). The 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival, and freedom from distant metastasis rate was 70.7%, 58.5%, 67%, 59.3%, and 82.2%, respectively. No difference was found in local control and survival between patients with primary or recurrent tumors. On multivariate analysis, invasion of the cribriform plate was significantly associated with lower local control (p = 0.0001) and overall survival (p = 0.0001). Local and distant recurrence was detected in 19 and 10 patients, respectively. Radiation-induced blindness was not observed. One patient developed Grade 3 radiation-induced retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma. Nonocular late radiation-induced toxicity comprised complete lacrimal duct stenosis in 1 patient and brain necrosis in 3 patients. Osteoradionecrosis of the maxilla and brain necrosis were detected in 1 of the 5 reirradiated patients. Conclusion: IMRT for sinonasal tumors provides low rates of radiation-induced toxicity without blindness with high local control and survival. IMRT could be considered as the treatment of choi0008.

  4. Retrospective estimate of the quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jihye; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-07-01

    This study estimated the planning quality of intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 42 lung cancer cases to provide preliminary data for the development of a planning quality assurance algorithm. Organs in or near the thoracic cavity (ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, liver, esophagus, spinal cord, and bronchus) were selected as organs at risk (OARs). Radiotherapy plans were compared by using the conformity index (CI), coverage index (CVI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), the OAR-PTV distance and the OAR-PTV overlap volume, and the V10 Gy , V20 Gy , and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of the OARs. The CI, CVI, and HI of the PTV were 0.54-0.89 (0.77 ± 0.08), 0.90-1.00 (0.98 ± 0.02), and 0.11-0.41, (0.15 ± 0.05), respectively. The mean EUDs (V10 Gy , V20 Gy ) of the ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, esophagus, cord, liver, heart, and bronchus were 8.07 Gy (28.06, 13.17), 2.59 Gy (6.53, 1.18), 7.02 Gy (26.17, 12.32), 3.56 Gy (13.56, 4.48), 0.72 Gy (2.15, 0.91), 5.14 Gy (19.68, 8.62), and 10.56 Gy (36.08, 19.79), respectively. EUDs tended to decrease as the OAR-PTV distance increased and the OAR-PTV overlap volume decreased. Because the plans in this study were from a single department, relatively few people were involved in treatment planning. Differences in treatment results for a given patient would be much more pronounced if many departments were involved.

  5. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  6. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  7. Dosimetric impact of different multileaf collimators on prostate intensity modulated treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Orlandini, Lucia Clara; Betti, Margherita; Fulcheri, Christian; Coppola, Marianna; Cionini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Aim The main purpose of this study is to perform a dosimetric comparison on target volumes and organs at risks (OARs) between prostate intensity modulated treatment plans (IMRT) optimized with different multileaf collimators (MLCs). Background The use of MLCs with a small leaf width in the IMRT optimization may improve conformity around the tumor target whilst reducing the dose to normal tissues. Materials and methods Two linacs mounting MLCs with 5 and 10 mm leaf-width, respectively, implemented in Pinnacle3 treatment planning system were used for this work. Nineteen patients with prostate carcinoma undergoing a radiotherapy treatment were enrolled. Treatment planning with different setup arrangements (7 and 5 beams) were performed for each patient and each machine. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) cut-off points were used in the treatment planning comparison. Results Comparable planning target volume (PTV) coverage was obtained with 7- and 5-beam configuration (both with 5 and 10 mm MLC leaf-width). The comparison of bladder and rectum DVH cut-off points for the 5-beam arrangement shows that 52.6% of the plans optimized with a larger leaf-width did not satisfy at least one of the OARs’ constraints. This percentage is reduced to 10.5% for the smaller leaf-width. If a 7-beam arrangement is used the value of 52.6% decreases to 21.1% while the value of 10.5% remains unchanged. Conclusion MLCs collimators with different widths and number of leaves lead to a comparable prostate treatment planning if a proper adjustment is made of the number of gantry angles. PMID:26549993

  8. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-06-17

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dose-painting for pediatric sarcomas with pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joanna C; Wexler, Leonard H; Meyers, Paul A; Happersett, Laura; La Quaglia, Michael P; Wolden, Suzanne L

    2013-10-01

    We examined patterns of failure in pediatric patients with thoracic sarcoma and pulmonary metastases treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy with dose-painting (DP-IMRT). Eleven pediatric patients, five with Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT) and six with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), with primary thoracic tumors and pulmonary metastases underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Eight patients also underwent surgery. Median time to RT was 21 (15-31) weeks. Nine patients received 45-50.4-Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions to the primary tumor (n = 3) or post-operative tumor bed (n = 6). Two patients ≤4 years received 12 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy and 30.6-36 Gy IMRT postoperatively to the tumor bed. All patients received 14-16.8 Gy in 0.54-0.88 Gy fractions to the whole lungs (n = 6) or hemithorax (n = 5) using dose-painting technique. A representative case was re-planned with IMRT plus standard AP/PA whole lung irradiation (WLI) for dosimetric comparison. With 27-month median follow-up, 3-year pulmonary relapse-free survival in all patients was 61%: 80% for RMS and 40% for ESFT. Five patients (4 ESFT and 1 RMS) experienced pulmonary relapse at median 16 (9-41) months. There were no local failures. Our representative case demonstrated more homogeneous target volume coverage of the whole lungs and decreased mean dose to esophagus (15%), heart (31%), spinal cord (15%), and liver (19%) with DP-IMRT. The treatment of children with a primary thoracic tumor and pulmonary metastases poses a significant challenge. DP-IMRT is one solution to this technical problem. Initial data from this small series suggest DP-IMRT is feasible and produces superior sparing of critical normal tissues. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  11. A Multiplan Treatment-Planning Framework: A Paradigm Shift for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Robert R.; Zhang, Hao H.; Goadrich, Laura; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Shi Leyuan; D'Souza, Warren D. . E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To describe a multiplan intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning framework, and to describe a decision support system (DSS) for ranking multiple plans and modeling the planning surface. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-five plans were generated sequentially for a head-and-neck case and a pelvic case by varying the dose-volume constraints on each of the organs at risk (OARs). A DSS was used to rank plans according to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values, as well as equivalent uniform dose (EUD) values. Two methods for ranking treatment plans were evaluated: composite criteria and pre-emptive selection. The planning surface determined by the results was modeled using quadratic functions. Results: The DSS provided an easy-to-use interface for the comparison of multiple plan features. Plan ranking resulted in the identification of one to three 'optimal' plans. The planning surface models had good predictive capability with respect to both DVH values and EUD values and generally, errors of <6%. Models generated by minimizing the maximum relative error had significantly lower relative errors than models obtained by minimizing the sum of squared errors. Using the quadratic model, plan properties for one OAR were determined as a function of the other OAR constraint settings. The modeled plan surface can then be used to understand the interdependence of competing planning objectives. Conclusion: The DSS can be used to aid the planner in the selection of the most desirable plan. The collection of quadratic models constructed from the plan data to predict DVH and EUD values generally showed excellent agreement with the actual plan values.

  12. Multivariate analysis of factors predicting prostate dose in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multivariate analysis to determine relationships between prostate radiation dose and the state of surrounding organs, including organ volumes and the internal angle of the levator ani muscle (LAM), based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images after bone matching. We analyzed 270 CBCT data sets from 30 consecutive patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. With patients in the supine position on a couch with the HipFix system, data for center of mass (COM) displacement of the prostate and the state of individual organs were acquired and compared between planning CT and CBCT scans. Dose distributions were then recalculated based on CBCT images. The relative effects of factors on the variance in COM, dose covering 95% of the prostate volume (D{sub 95%}), and percentage of prostate volume covered by the 100% isodose line (V{sub 100%}) were evaluated by a backward stepwise multiple regression analysis. COM displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (COM{sub AP}) correlated significantly with the rectum volume (δVr) and the internal LAM angle (δθ; R = 0.63). Weak correlations were seen for COM in the left-right (R = 0.18) and superior-inferior directions (R = 0.31). Strong correlations between COM{sub AP} and prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%} were observed (R ≥ 0.69). Additionally, the change ratios in δVr and δθ remained as predictors of prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}. This study shows statistically that maintaining the same rectum volume and LAM state for both the planning CT simulation and treatment is important to ensure the correct prostate dose in the supine position with bone matching.

  13. Electromagnetic-Guided DMLC Tracking Enables Motion Management for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Keall, Paul J.; Sawant, Amit; Cho, Byungchul; Ruan, Dan; Wu, Junqing; Poulsen, Per; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Korreman, Stine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is attractive due to high dose conformality and efficient delivery. However, managing intrafraction motion is challenging for IMAT. The purpose of this research was to develop and investigate electromagnetic-guided DMLC tracking as an enabling technology to treat moving targets during IMAT. Materials/Methods A real-time 3D DMLC-based target tracking system was developed and integrated with a linac. The DMLC tracking software inputs a real-time electromagnetically measured target position and the IMAT plan and dynamically creates new leaf positions directed at the moving target. Low and high modulation IMAT plans were created for lung and prostate cancer cases. The IMAT plans were delivered to a 3-axis motion platform programmed with measured patient motion. Dosimetric measurements were acquired by placing an ion chamber array on the moving platform. Measurements were acquired with tracking, without tracking (current clinical practice), and with the phantom in a static position (reference). Analysis of dose distribution differences from the static reference used a γ-test. Results On average, 1.6% of dose points for the lung plans and 1.2% of points for the prostate plans failed the 3mm/3% γ-test with tracking; without tracking 34% and 14% (respectively) of points failed the γ-test. The delivery time was the same with and without tracking. Conclusions For the first time electromagnetic-guided DMLC target tracking with IMAT has been investigated. Dose distributions to moving targets with DMLC tracking were significantly superior to those without tracking. There was no loss of treatment efficiency with DMLC tracking. PMID:20615630

  14. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer from 2004 through 2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Elyn H; Mougalian, Sarah S; Soulos, Pamela R; Smith, Benjamin D; Haffty, Bruce G; Gross, Cary P; Yu, James B

    2015-02-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment and Minimization of Contralateral Breast Dose for Conventional and Intensity Modulated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, Jay Alvarado, Nicole; Way, Sarah; McDermott, Patrick; Bossenberger, Todd; Jaenisch, Harriett; Patel, Rajiv; Washington, Tara

    2008-04-01

    Breast radiotherapy is associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in women under age 45 at the time of treatment. This risk increases with increasing absorbed dose to the contralateral breast. The use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is expected to substantially reduce the dose to the contralateral breast by eliminating scattered radiation from physical beam modifiers. The absorbed dose to the contralateral breast was measured for 5 common radiotherapy techniques, including paired 15 deg. wedges, lateral 30 deg. wedge only, custom-designed physical compensators, aperture based (field-within-field) IMRT with segments chosen by the planner, and inverse planned IMRT with segments chosen by a leaf sequencing algorithm after dose volume histogram (DVH)-based fluence map optimization. Further reduction in contralateral breast dose through the use of lead shielding was also investigated. While shielding was observed to have the most profound impact on surface dose, the radiotherapy technique proved to be most important in determining internal dose. Paired wedges or compensators result in the highest contralateral breast doses (nearly 10% of the prescription dose on the medial surface), while use of IMRT or removal of the medial wedge results in significantly lower doses. Aperture-based IMRT results in the lowest internal doses, primarily due to the decrease in the number of monitor units required and the associated reduction in leakage dose. The use of aperture-based IMRT reduced the average dose to the contralateral breast by greater than 50% in comparison to wedges or compensators. Combined use of IMRT and 1/8-inch-thick lead shielding reduced the dose to the interior and surface of the contralateral breast by roughly 60% and 85%, respectively. This reduction may warrant the use of IMRT for younger patients who have a statistically significant risk of contralateral breast cancer associated with breast radiotherapy.

  16. Feasibility Study of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Treatment Planning Using Brain Functional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa Kowalski, Alex; Hou, Bob; Narayana, Ashwatha

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of incorporating functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) information for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning of brain tumors. Three glioma patients were retrospectively replanned for radiotherapy (RT) with additional fMRI information. The fMRI of each patient was acquired using a bilateral finger-tapping paradigm with a gradient echo EPI (Echo Planer Imaging) sequence. The fMRI data were processed using the Analysis of Functional Neuroimaging (AFNI) software package for determining activation volumes, and the volumes were fused with the simulation computed tomography (CT) scan. The actived pixels in left and right primary motor cortexes (PMCs) were contoured as critical structures for IMRT planning. The goal of replanning was to minimize the RT dose to the activation volumes in the PMC regions, while maintaining a similar coverage to the planning target volume (PTV) and keeping critical structures within accepted dose tolerance. Dose-volume histograms of the treatment plans with and without considering the fMRI information were compared. Beam angles adjustment or additional beams were needed for 2 cases to meet the planning criteria. Mean dose to the contralateral and ipsilateral PMC was significantly reduced by 66% and 55%, respectively, for 1 patient. For the other 2 patients, mean dose to contralateral PMC region was lowered by 73% and 69%. In general, IMRT optimization can reduce the RT dose to the PMC regions without compromising the PTV coverage or sparing of other critical organs. In conclusion, it is feasible to incorporate the fMRI information into the RT treatment planning. IMRT planning allows a significant reduction in RT dose to the PMC regions, especially if the region does not lie within the PTV.

  17. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  18. Beam angle optimization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a guided pattern search method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Humberto; Dias, Joana M.; Ferreira, Brígida C.; Lopes, Maria C.

    2013-05-01

    Generally, the inverse planning of radiation therapy consists mainly of the fluence optimization. The beam angle optimization (BAO) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) consists of selecting appropriate radiation incidence directions and may influence the quality of the IMRT plans, both to enhance better organ sparing and to improve tumor coverage. However, in clinical practice, most of the time, beam directions continue to be manually selected by the treatment planner without objective and rigorous criteria. The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel approach that uses beam’s-eye-view dose ray tracing metrics within a pattern search method framework in the optimization of the highly non-convex BAO problem. Pattern search methods are derivative-free optimization methods that require a few function evaluations to progress and converge and have the ability to better avoid local entrapment. The pattern search method framework is composed of a search step and a poll step at each iteration. The poll step performs a local search in a mesh neighborhood and ensures the convergence to a local minimizer or stationary point. The search step provides the flexibility for a global search since it allows searches away from the neighborhood of the current iterate. Beam’s-eye-view dose metrics assign a score to each radiation beam direction and can be used within the pattern search framework furnishing a priori knowledge of the problem so that directions with larger dosimetric scores are tested first. A set of clinical cases of head-and-neck tumors treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Coimbra is used to discuss the potential of this approach in the optimization of the BAO problem.

  19. The Effect of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy on Radiation-Induced Second Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, Jeremy D. Davis, Sidney; Evans, Cherie; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Haynes, Matthew; Hunter, Alistair

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of carcinogenic risk for actual clinical scenarios. Method and Materials: Clinically equivalent IMRT plans were generated for prostate, breast, and head-and-neck cases treated with 3D-CRT. Two possible dose-response models for radiocarcinogenesis were generated based on A-bomb survivor data corrected for fractionation. Dose-volume histogram analysis was used to determine dose and its distribution to nontargeted tissues within the planning CT scan volume and thermoluminescent dosimetry for the rest of the body. Carcinogenic estimates were calculated with and without a correction factor accounting for cancer patients' advanced age and reduced longevity. Results: For the model assuming a plateau in risk above 2-Gy single-fraction-equivalent (SFE), IMRT and 3D-CRT produced risks of 1.7% and 2.1%, respectively, for prostate; 1.9% and 1.8%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.4-2.2% and 1.5-1.6%, respectively, depending on technique, for breast. Assuming a reduction in risk above 2-Gy SFE, risks for IMRT and 3D-CRT were 1.1% and 1.5%, respectively, for prostate; 1.4% and 1.2%, respectively, for nasopharynx; 1% each for tonsil; and 1.3-1.8% vs. 1.3-1.6%, respectively, for breast. Applying a correction factor of 0.5 for cancer patients halved these risks and their relative differences. Conclusions: Carcinogenic risks were comparable in absolute terms between modalities. Risks are dependant on technique used. Risks with IMRT are influenced by monitor unit demand and are therefore software/hardware dependant. The dose-response model accounting for cell killing at higher doses fitted best with actual observed risks.

  20. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  1. Exercise intensity modulates the appearance of circulating microvesicles with proangiogenic potential upon endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Eurico N; González-Alonso, José; Parris, Christopher; Rakobowchuk, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The effect of endurance exercise on circulating microvesicle dynamics and their impact on surrounding endothelial cells is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise intensity modulates the time course of platelet (PMV) and endothelial-derived (EMV) microvesicle appearance in the circulation through hemodynamic and biochemical-related mechanisms, and that microvesicles formed during exercise would stimulate endothelial angiogenesis in vitro. Nine healthy young men had venous blood samples taken before, during, and throughout the recovery period after 1 h of moderate [46 ± 2% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max)] or heavy (67 ± 2% V̇o2max) intensity semirecumbent cycling and a time-matched resting control trial. In vitro experiments were performed by incubating endothelial cells with rest and exercise-derived microvesicles to examine their effects on cell angiogenic capacities. PMVs (CD41(+)) increased from baseline only during heavy exercise (from 21 ± 1 × 10(3) to 55 ± 8 × 10(3) and 48 ± 6 × 10(3) PMV/μl at 30 and 60 min, respectively; P < 0.05), returning to baseline early in postexercise recovery (P > 0.05), whereas EMVs (CD62E(+)) were unchanged (P > 0.05). PMVs were related to brachial artery shear rate (r(2) = 0.43) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (r(2) = 0.21) during exercise (P < 0.05). Exercise-derived microvesicles enhanced endothelial proliferation, migration, and tubule formation compared with rest microvesicles (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate substantial increases in circulating PMVs during heavy exercise and that exercise-derived microvesicles stimulate human endothelial cells by enhancing angiogenesis and proliferation. This involvement of microvesicles may be considered a novel mechanism through which exercise mediates vascular healing and adaptation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  3. Vaginal motion and bladder and rectal volumes during pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using individual patient anatomy to predict protocol compliance for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Hannah; Whalley, Deborah; Kneebone, Andrew; McCloud, Philip; Eade, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    If a prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan has protocol violations, it is often a challenge knowing whether this is due to unfavorable anatomy or suboptimal planning. This study aimed to create a model to predict protocol violations based on patient anatomical variables and their potential relationship to target and organ at risk (OAR) end points in the setting of definitive, dose-escalated IMRT/VMAT prostate planning. Radiotherapy plans from 200 consecutive patients treated with definitive radiation for prostate cancer using IMRT or VMAT were analyzed. The first 100 patient plans (hypothesis-generating cohort) were examined to identify anatomical variables that predict for dosimetric outcome, in particular OAR end points. Variables that scored significance were further assessed for their ability to predict protocol violations using a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis. These results were then validated in a second group of 100 patients (validation cohort). In the initial analysis of the hypothesis-generating cohort, percentage of rectum overlap in the planning target volume (PTV) (%OR) and percentage of bladder overlap in the PTV (%OB) were highlighted as significant predictors of rectal and bladder dosimetry. Lymph node treatment was also significant for bladder outcomes. For the validation cohort, CART analysis showed that %OR of < 6%, 6% to 9% and > 9% predicted a 13%, 63%, and 100% rate of rectal protocol violations respectively. For the bladder, %OB of < 9% vs > 9% is associated with 13% vs 88% rate of bladder constraint violations when lymph nodes were not treated. If nodal irradiation was delivered, plans with a %OB of < 9% had a 59% risk of violations. Percentage of rectum and bladder within the PTV can be used to identify individual plan potential to achieve dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints. A model based on these factors could be used to reduce planning time, improve

  5. Prognostic Value of Prevertebral Space Involvement in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Based on Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Guanqun; Mao YanPing; Chen Lei; Li Wenfei; Liu Lizhi; Sun Ying; Chen Yong; Tian Li; Lin Aihua; Li Li; and others

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of prevertebral space involvement (PSI) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of data from 506 biopsy-proven, nonmetastatic NPCs was performed. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging examinations and received IMRT as their primary treatment. Results: In this series, 161 NPC patients (31.8%) had PSI. Parapharyngeal space (p < 0.001), skull base (p < 0.001), and paranasal sinuses (p = 0.009) were associated with PSI after multivariate analysis. The 4-year overall survival (OS), local relapse-free survival (LRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for NPC patients with and without PSI was 69.1% and 89.2% (p < 0.0001), 83.9% and 96.4% (p < 0.0001), and 71.6% and 89.6% (p < 0.0001), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified PSI as an independent negative prognostic factor for both OS (HR = 1.478-4.380; p = 0.001) and DMFS (HR = 1.389-4.174; p = 0.002). Patients with PSI had similar survival rates in OS and DMFS (p = 0.241 and p = 0.493, respectively) to that of T4 disease, while the differences between PSI and T3 disease in both OS and DMFS were distinctly significant (p = 0.029 and p = 0.029, respectively). Conclusions: For NPC patients treated with IMRT, PSI was found to be an independent prognostic factor for both OS and DMFS. It seems reasonable that PSI should be classified as a T4 disease on the basis of the current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging classification criteria.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Poppe, Matthew; Jabbour, Salma; David, Vera; Garofalo, Michael; Pandya, Naimesh; Alexander, Richard; Hanna, Nader; Regine, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  7. Performance evaluation of intensity modulated optical OFDM system with digital baseband distortion.

    PubMed

    Vanin, Evgeny

    2011-02-28

    Bit-Error-Ratio (BER) of intensity modulated optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system is analytically evaluated accounting for nonlinear digital baseband distortion in the transmitter and additive noise in the photo receiver. The nonlinear distortion that is caused by signal clipping and quantization is taken into consideration. The signal clipping helps to overcome the system performance limitation related to high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the OFDM signal and to minimize the value of optical power that is required for achieving specified BER. The signal quantization due to a limited bit resolution of the digital to analog converter (DAC) causes an optical power penalty in the case when the bit resolution is too low. By introducing an effective signal to noise ratio (SNR) the optimum signal clipping ratio, system BER and required optical power at the input to the receiver is evaluated for the OFDM system with multi-level quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) applied to the optical signal subcarriers. Minimum required DAC bit resolution versus the size of QAM constellation is identified. It is demonstrated that the bit resolution of 7 and higher causes negligibly small optical power penalty at the system BER=10⁻³ when 256-QAM and a constellation of lower size is applied. The performance of the optical OFDM system is compared to the performance of the multi-level amplitude-shift keying (M-ASK) system for the same number of information bits transmitted per signal sample. It is demonstrated that in the case of the matched receiver the M-ASK system outperforms OFDM and requires 3-3.5 dB less of optical power at BER=10⁻³ when 1-4 data bits are transmitted per signal sample.

  8. Clinical response of advanced cancer patients to cellular immunotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasumi, Kenichiro; Aoki, Yukimasa; Wantanabe, Ryuko; Mann, Dean L

    2013-01-01

    Patients afflicted with advanced cancers were treated with the intratumoral injection of autologous immature dendritic cells (iDCs) followed by activated T-cell infusion and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A second round of iDCs and activated T cells was then administered to patients after the last radiation cycle. This complete regimen was repeated for new and recurring lesions after 6 weeks of follow-up. One year post therapy, outcome analyses were performed to evaluate treatment efficacy. Patients were grouped according to both the number and size of tumors and clinical parameters at treatment initiation, including recurrent disease after standard cancer therapy, Stage IV disease, and no prior therapy. Irrespective of prior treatment status, 23/37 patients with ≤ 5 neoplastic lesions that were ≤ 3 cm in diameter achieved complete responses (CRs), and 5/37 exhibited partial responses (PRs). Among 130 individuals harboring larger and more numerous lesions, CRs were observed in 7/74 patients that had received prior SCT and in 2/56 previously untreated patients. Some patients manifested immune responses including an increase in CD8+CD56+ lymphocytes among circulating mononuclear cells in the course of treatment. To prospectively explore the therapeutic use of these cells, CD8+ cells were isolated from patients that had been treated with cellular immunotherapy and IMRT, expanded in vitro, and injected into recurrent metastatic sites in 13 individuals who underwent the same immunoradiotherapeutic regimens but failed to respond. CRs were achieved in 34 of 58 of such recurrent lesions while PRs in 17 of 58. These data support the expanded use of immunoradiotherapy in advanced cancer patients exhibiting progressive disease. PMID:24349874

  9. Disease-Control Rates Following Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Small Primary Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Wong, Pei-Fong; Tung, Sam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Dong, Lei; Mason, Brian; Perkins, George H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to achieve favorable disease-control rates while minimizing parotid gland doses in patients treated for small primary tumors of the oropharynx. Methods We retrospectively identified all patients who received IMRT as treatment for a small (< 4 cm) primary tumor of the oropharynx from October 2000 through June 2002. Tumor characteristics, IMRT parameters, and patient outcomes were assessed. Results Fifty-one patients met the criteria for our study. All patients had treatment to gross disease with margin (CTV1), and all but 1 had treatment to the bilateral necks. The most common treatment schedule (39 patients) was a once-daily fractionation of prescribed doses of 63 - 66 Gy to the CTV1 and 54 Gy to subclinical sites, delivered in 30 fractions. Twenty-one patients (40%) had gastrostomy tubes placed during therapy; in 4 patients, the tube remained in place for more than 6 months following completion of IMRT. The median follow-up was 45 months. The 2-year actuarial local-regional control, recurrence-free, and overall survival rates were 94%, 88%, and 94%, respectively. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that treatment with IMRT results in favorable local-regional control of small primary oropharynx tumors. IMRT did not appear to have a more favorable acute toxicity profile in this group with respect to the use of a feeding tube; however, the mean dose of radiation delivered to the parotid gland by IMRT was decreased, as 95% of patients had a mean dose of < 30 Gy to at least one gland. PMID:17141972

  10. DICOM-based computer-aided evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Fion W. K.; Law, Maria Y. Y.

    2011-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has gained popularity in the treatment of cancers because of its excellent local control with decreased normal tissue complications. Yet, computer planning for the treatment relies heavily on human inspection of resultant radiation dose distribution within the irradiated region of the body. Even for experienced planners, comparison of IMRT plans is definitely cumbersome and not error-free. To solve this problem, a computer-aided decision-support system was built for automatic evaluation of IMRT plans based on the DICOM standard. A DICOM based IMRT plan with DICOM and DICOM-RT objects including CT images, RT Structure Set, RT Dose and RT Plan were retrieved from the Treatment Planning System for programming. Utilizing the MATLAB program language, the decoding-encoding software applications were developed on the basis of the DICOM information object definitions. After tracing the clinical workflow and understanding the needs and expectations from radiation oncologists, a set of routines were written to parse key data items such as isodose curves, region of interests, dose-volume histogram from the DICOM-RT objects. Then graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were created to allow planners to query for parameters such as overdose or underdose areas. A total of 30 IMRT plans were collected in a Department of Clinical Oncology for systematic testing of the DICOM-based decision-support system. Both structural and functional tests were implemented as a major step on the road to software maturity. With promising test results, this decision-support system could represent a major breakthrough in the routine IMRT planning workflow.

  11. Disease-control rates following intensity-modulated radiation therapy for small primary oropharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S. . E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org; Morrison, William H.; Wong, P.-F.; Tung, Sam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Dong Lei; Mason, Brian M.S.; Perkins, George H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2007-02-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to achieve favorable disease-control rates while minimizing parotid gland doses in patients treated for small primary tumors of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified all patients who received IMRT as treatment for a small (<4 cm) primary tumor of the oropharynx between October 2000 and June 2002. Tumor characteristics, IMRT parameters, and patient outcomes were assessed. Results: Fifty-one patients met the criteria for our study. All patients had treatment to gross disease with margin (CTV1), and all but 1 had treatment to the bilateral necks. The most common treatment schedule (39 patients) was a once-daily fractionation of prescribed doses of 63-66 Gy to the CTV1 and 54 Gy to subclinical sites, delivered in 30 fractions. Twenty-one patients (40%) had gastrostomy tubes placed during therapy; in 4 patients, the tube remained in place for more than 6 months after completion of IMRT. The median follow-up was 45 months. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, recurrence-free, and overall survival rates were 94%, 88%, and 94%, respectively. Conclusions: These preliminary data suggest that treatment with IMRT results in favorable locoregional control of small primary oropharynx tumors. IMRT did not appear to have a more favorable acute toxicity profile in this group with respect to the use of a feeding tube; however, the mean dose of radiation delivered to the parotid gland by IMRT was decreased, because 95% of patients had a mean dose of <30 Gy to at least one gland.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary: Toxicity and Preliminary Efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michelle L. Mechalakos, James G.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Kraus, Dennis; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin; Pfister, David G.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Unknown primary head and neck cancers often require comprehensive mucosal and bilateral neck irradiation. With conventional techniques, significant toxicity can develop. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has the potential to minimize the toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 21 patients underwent IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer at our center. Of the 21 patients, 5 received IMRT with definitive intent and 16 as postoperative therapy; 14 received concurrent chemotherapy and 7 IMRT alone. The target volumes included the bilateral neck and mucosal surface. The median dose was 66 Gy. Acute and chronic toxicities, esophageal strictures, and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence were evaluated. Progression-free survival, regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, the 2-year regional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 90%, and 85%, respectively. Acute grade 1 and 2 xerostomia was seen in 57% and 43% of patients, respectively. Salivary function improved with time. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement was required in 72% with combined modality treatment and 43% with IMRT alone. Only 1 patient required percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy support at the last follow-up visit. Two patients treated with combined modality and one treated with IMRT alone developed esophageal strictures, but all had improvement or resolution with dilation. Conclusion: The preliminary analysis of IMRT for unknown primary head and neck cancer has shown acceptable toxicity and encouraging efficacy. The analysis of the dosimetric variables showed excellent tumor coverage and acceptable doses to critical normal structures. Esophageal strictures developed but were effectively treated with dilation. Techniques to limit the esophageal dose

  13. Electromagnetic-Guided Dynamic Multileaf Collimator Tracking Enables Motion Management for Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Sawant, Amit; Cho, Byungchul; Ruan, Dan; Wu Junqing; Poulsen, Per; Petersen, Jay; Newell, Laurence J.; Cattell, Herbert; Korreman, Stine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is attractive because of high-dose conformality and efficient delivery. However, managing intrafraction motion is challenging for IMAT. The purpose of this research was to develop and investigate electromagnetically guided dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking as an enabling technology to treat moving targets during IMAT. Methods and Materials: A real-time three-dimensional DMLC-based target tracking system was developed and integrated with a linear accelerator. The DMLC tracking software inputs a real-time electromagnetically measured target position and the IMAT plan, and dynamically creates new leaf positions directed at the moving target. Low- and high-modulation IMAT plans were created for lung and prostate cancer cases. The IMAT plans were delivered to a three-axis motion platform programmed with measured patient motion. Dosimetric measurements were acquired by placing an ion chamber array on the moving platform. Measurements were acquired with tracking, without tracking (current clinical practice), and with the phantom in a static position (reference). Analysis of dose distribution differences from the static reference used a {gamma}-test. Results: On average, 1.6% of dose points for the lung plans and 1.2% of points for the prostate plans failed the 3-mm/3% {gamma}-test with tracking; without tracking, 34% and 14% (respectively) of points failed the {gamma}-test. The delivery time was the same with and without tracking. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-guided DMLC target tracking with IMAT has been investigated for the first time. Dose distributions to moving targets with DMLC tracking were significantly superior to those without tracking. There was no loss of treatment efficiency with DMLC tracking.

  14. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  15. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  16. Changes Mimicking New Leptomeningeal Disease After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Muscal, Jodi A.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Bertuch, Alison A.; Su, Jack; Woo, Shiao Y.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Acute and late changes in magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric brain have been described after radiotherapy (RT). We report the post-RT neuroimaging changes in the posterior fossa after intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) in children with medulloblastoma and contrast them with those of leptomeningeal disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 53 consecutive children with medulloblastoma who were treated with craniospinal RT followed by IMRT to the posterior fossa and chemotherapy between 1997 and 2006. Results: After IMRT to the posterior fossa, 8 (15%) of 53 patients developed increased fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery signal changes in the brainstem or cerebellum and patchy, multifocal, nodular contrast enhancement at a median of 6 months. The enhancement superficially resembled leptomeningeal disease. However, the enhancement resolved without intervention at a median of 6 months later. The accompanying fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery signal changes occasionally preceded the enhancement, were often parenchymal in location, and resolved or persisted to a lesser degree. All 8 patients with transient magnetic resonance imaging changes in the posterior fossa were alive at last follow-up. In contrast, leptomeningeal disease occurred in 8 (15%) of our 53 patients at a median of 19.5 months after IMRT completion. Of these 8 patients, 7 demonstrated initial nodular enhancement outside the conformal field, and 7 patients died. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging changes can occur in the posterior fossa of children treated with IMRT for medulloblastoma. In our experience, these transient changes occur at a characteristic time and location after RT, allowing them to be distinguished from leptomeningeal disease.

  17. Local Control After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Amarinthia E.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, 19 patients with a diagnosis of head-and-neck RMS received IMRT at The Methodist Hospital. There were 11 male and 8 female patients, with a median age of 6 years at time of irradiation. Tumor location was parameningeal in 7, orbital in 6, and other head-and-neck RMS in 6. Chemotherapy was given to all patients, with vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide being the most common regimen (n = 18). The median prescribed dose was 5040 cGy. The clinical target volume included the gross tumor volume with a 1.5-cm margin. The median duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 56 months. Results: The 4-year overall survival and local control rates were 76% and 92.9%, respectively. One patient developed a local failure in the high-dose region of the radiation field; there were no marginal failures. Distant metastasis was seen in 4 patients. Overall survival was 42.9% for parameningeal sites and 100% for other sites (p < 0.01). Late toxicities were seen in 7 patients. Two secondary malignancies occurred in 1 child with embryonal RMS of the face and a p53 mutation. Conclusions: Local control was excellent in patients receiving IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Patterns of local failure reveal no marginal failures in this group of patients.

  18. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nadeau, Sylvain . E-mail: sylvainn@rrsb.nb.ca; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements.

  19. Sparing level Ib lymph nodes by intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Ou, Dan; He, Xiayun; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-12-01

    We retrospectively investigated the patterns of locoregional relapse and survival of patients to evaluate whether sparing level Ib lymph nodes by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was feasible. One hundred and twenty nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients received treatment with level Ib lymph nodes spared by IMRT between January 2005 and August 2008 in our center. Before treatment, each patient underwent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the nasopharynx and neck. Patients with negative cervical lymph nodes received radiotherapy to the nasopharynx, skull base and upper neck drainage areas, while patients with cervical lymph node involvement received treatment to the whole neck. The prescription doses were 66-70.4 Gy/30-32 fractions to the gross tumor volume of nasopharynx, 66 Gy to the positive neck nodes, 60 Gy to the high-risk clinical target volume and 54 Gy to the low-risk clinical target volume. Patients staged III, IV A/B or II also received chemotherapy. The median follow-up of these 120 patients was 54 months. The 5-year local control, regional control, distant metastasis-free and overall survival rates were 90.7, 96.5, 84.8 and 81.4 %, respectively. Four patients suffered regional recurrence: 2, 1 and 1 experienced regional recurrence in level II, retropharyngeal and parotid lymph nodes, respectively. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with negative level Ib lymph nodes who are treated with level Ib-sparing IMRT, regional lymph node recurrence alone is rare. Therefore, sparing level Ib lymph nodes by IMRT is feasible in selected patients.

  20. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces gastrointestinal toxicity in locally advanced pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Shreya; Cambridge, Lajhem; Huguet, Florence; Chou, Joanne F.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.; O'Reilly, Eileen M.; Allen, Peter; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared gastrointestinal (GI) and hematologic toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer (LAPC) undergoing definitive chemoradiation using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning. Methods and Materials We retrospectively studied 205 patients with LAPC undergoing IMRT (n=134) and 3D-CRT (n=71) between 05/03 and 03/12. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics and acute GI/hematology toxicity according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 were recorded. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to test association between acute grade 2+ GI and hematologic toxicity outcomes and predictors. Propensity score analysis for grade 2+ GI toxicity was performed to reduce bias for confounding variables: age, gender, radiation dose, field size, and chemotherapy type. Results Median follow-up time for survivors was 22 months, similar between groups. Median RT dose was significantly higher for IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (5600 cGy vs 5040 cGy, P<.001); concurrent chemotherapy was mainly gemcitabine (56%) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 38%). Grade 2+ GI toxicity occurred in 34% (n=24) of 3D-CRT compared with 16% (n=21) of IMRT patients. Using propensity-score analysis, 3D-CRT had significantly higher grade 2+ GI toxicity (odds ratio, 1.26 [95%CI, 1.08-1.45], P=.001). Grade 2+ hematologic toxicity was similar between IMRT and 3D-CRT groups but was significantly greater in recipients of concurrent gemcitabine over 5-FU (62% vs 29%, P<.0001). Conclusions IMRT is associated with significant lower grade 2+ GI toxicity versus 3D-CRT for patients undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy for LAPC. Since IMRT is better tolerated at higher doses and may allow further dose escalation, potentially improving local control for this aggressive disease. Further prospective studies of dose-escalated chemoradiation using IMRT are warranted. PMID:26577010

  1. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  2. Accelerated Whole Breast Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to the Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Wu, Abraham J.; McCormick, Beryl; Beal, Kathryn P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation (WBI) is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer who opt for breast conservation. After a randomized trial demonstrated equivalent cosmesis and disease control with accelerated WBI (AWBI), our institution began to offer AWBI to appropriate patients. The aim of this study was to examine our unique experience with AWBI using prone positioning and simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning with a sequential boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: We identified 356 patients who had been treated with prone WBI using IMRT in our department between January 2004 and December 2006. Of these, 128 (36%) patients had received AWBI (representing 131 treated breasts), consisting of 16 daily fractions of 265 cGy to a total dose of 4,240 cGy followed by a conventionally fractionated boost. Results: Patients who opted for AWBI were similar demographically to the patients undergoing conventional WBI. In the AWBI cohort, 83% of the patients had Stage T1 disease and 22% had nodal involvement (N1). The tumors were estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive and Her-2/Neu-amplified in 82%, 69%, and 11%, respectively. The median duration of AWBI plus a boost was 29 days, and no patient required a toxicity-related treatment break. No Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity developed. At a median follow-up of 18 months, one ipsilateral breast recurrence developed that was salvaged with mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Conclusion: AWBI to the prone breast using simplified IMRT with a sequential boost offers women requiring breast-only adjuvant radiotherapy an abbreviated treatment with early tumor control and cosmesis comparable to that with standard fractionation.

  3. Automated Weekly Replanning for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, James

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The adoption of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat cervical malignancies has been limited in part by complex organ and tumor motion during treatment. This study explores the limits of a highly adaptive, small-margin treatment scenario to accommodate this motion. In addition, the dosimetric consequences of organ and tumor motion are modeled using a combination of deformable registration and fractional dose accumulation techniques. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three cervix cancer patients had target volumes and organs-at-risk contoured on fused, pretreatment magnetic resonance-computed tomography images and weekly magnetic resonance scans taken during treatment. The dosimetric impact of interfraction organ and target motion was compared for two hypothetical treatment scenarios: a 3-mm margin plan with no replanning, and a 3-mm margin plan with an automated replan performed on the updated weekly patient geometry. Results: Of the 33 patients, 24 (73%) met clinically acceptable target coverage (98% of the clinical target volume receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose) using the 3-mm margin plan without replanning. The range in dose to 98% of the clinical target volume across all patients was 7.9% of the prescription dose if no replanning was performed. After weekly replanning, this range was tightened to 2.6% of the prescription dose and all patients met clinically acceptable target coverage while maintaining organ-at-risk dose sparing. Conclusions: The dosimetric impact of anatomical motion underscores the challenges of applying IMRT to treat cervix cancer. An appropriate adaptive strategy can ensure target coverage for small-margin IMRT treatments and maintain favorable organ-at-risk dose sparing.

  4. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal. PMID:25742866

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate our initial experience in treating previously irradiated, recurrent head-and-neck cancers using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Between July 1997 and September 1999, 12 patients with previously irradiated, locally recurrent head-and-neck cancers were treated with IMRT. These included cancers of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, paranasal sinus, skin of the head-and-neck region, and malignant melanoma. Five of these 12 patients had received radiation as the primary treatment, with doses ranging from 66.0 to 126.0 Gy, and the remaining 7 patients had undergone definitive surgeries followed by an adjuvant course of radiation treatment, with doses ranging between 36.0 and 64.8 Gy. Recurrence after the initial course of radiation occurred in periods ranging from 4 to 35 months, with 11 of 12 cases recurring fully in the fields of previous irradiation. Recurrent tumors were treated with IMRT to total doses between 30 to 70 Gy (> 50 Gy in 10 cases) prescribed at the 75% to 92% isodose lines with daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy. The results revealed that acute toxicities were acceptable except in 1 patient who died of aspiration pneumonia during the course of retreatment. There were 4 complete responders, 2 partial responders, and 2 patients with stable disease in the IMRT-treated volumes. Three patients received IMRT as adjuvant treatment following salvage surgery. At 4 to 16 months of follow-up, 7 patients were still alive, with 5 revealing no evidence of disease. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates that IMRT offers a viable mode of re-irradiation for recurrent head-and-neck cancers in previously irradiated sites. Longer follow-up time and a larger number of patients are needed to better define the therapeutic advantage of IMRT in recurrent, previously irradiated head-and-neck cancers.

  6. Three-Year Outcomes of Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Godette, Karen D.; Whitaker, Daisy J.; Davis, Lawrence W.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experience using breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review identified 354 Stage 0 to III breast cancer patients treated with SIB-IMRT after conservative surgery between 2003 and 2006. The most common fractionation (89%) simultaneously delivered 1.8 Gy to the ipsilateral breast tissue and 2.14 Gy to the resection cavity, yielding a breast dose of 45 Gy (25 fractions) and cavity dose 59.92 Gy (28 fractions), biologically equivalent for tumor control to 45 Gy to the breast with sequential 16-Gy boost (33 fractions). Results: A total of 356 breasts in 354 patients were treated: 282 with invasive breast cancer, and 74 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). For left breast radiation, median cardiac V{sub 15} was 2.9% and left ventricular V{sub 15} 1.7%. Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 4-73 months). Acute toxicity was Grade 1 in 57% of cases, Grade 2 in 43%, and Grade 3 in <1%. For invasive breast cancer, the 3-year overall survival was 97.6% and risk of any locoregional recurrence was 2.8%. For ductal carcinoma in situ, 3-year overall survival was 98% and risk of locoregional recurrence 1.4%. In 142 cases at a minimum of 3 years follow-up, global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians as good or excellent in 96.5% and fair in 3.5%. Conclusions: Breast SIB-IMRT reduced treatment duration by five fractions with a favorable acute toxicity profile and low cardiac dose for left breast treatment. At 3 years, locoregional control was excellent, and initial assessment suggested good or excellent cosmesis in a high percentage of evaluable patients.

  7. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal.

  8. Gamma evaluation combined with isocenter optimal matching in intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Jino; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dose comparisons are widely performed by using a gamma evaluation with patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) or dose delivery quality assurance (DQA). In this way, a pass/fail determination is made for a particular treatment plan. When gamma evaluation results are close to the failure criterion, the pass/fail decision may change applying a small shift to the center of the 2D dose distribution. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the meaning of such a small relative shift in a 2D dose distribution comparison. In addition, we propose the use of a small shift for a pass/fail criterion in gamma analysis, where the concept of isocenter optimal matching (IOM) is applied to IMRT QA of 20 patients. Gamma evaluations were performed to compare two dose distributions, one with and the other without IOM. In-house software was developed in C++ in order to find IOM values including both translational and rotational shifts. Upon gamma evaluation failure, further investigation was initiated using IOM. In this way, three groups were categorized: group 1 for `pass' on gamma evaluation, group 21 for `fail' on the gamma evaluation and `pass' on the gamma the evaluation with IOM, and group 22 for `fail' on the both gamma evaluations and the IOM calculation. IOM results revealed that some failures could be considered as a `pass'. In group 21, 88.98% (fail) of the averaged gamma pass rate changed to 90.45% (pass) when IOM was applied. On average, a ratio of γ ≥ 1 was reduced by 11.06% in 20 patients. We propose that gamma evaluations that do not pass with a rate of 85% to 90% may be augmented with IOM to reveal a potential pass result.

  9. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Penninkhof, Joan; Spadola, Sara; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet; Lanconelli, Nico; Heijmen, Ben

    2017-06-01

    Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angles and patient anatomy. For patients with isocenter optimization, 847 IMRT plans were considered. Adding isocenter position optimization next to beam angle optimization had a small impact on the final plan quality. A method is proposed for individualized selection of beam angles in tangential breast IMRT. This may be especially important for patients with cardiac risk factors or an enhanced risk for the development of contralateral breast cancer

  10. Non-coplanar beam direction optimization for intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meedt, G.; Alber, M.; Nüsslin, F.

    2003-09-01

    An algorithm for the optimization of the direction of intensity-modulated beams is presented. Although the global optimum dose distribution cannot be predicted, usually a large number of equivalent beam configurations exists. This degeneracy facilitates beam direction optimization (BDO) through a number of possible approximations and because the target set of good beam configurations is very large. Usually, the target volume is accessible through a finite number of paths of little resistance, which are defined by the properties of the objective function and the global optimum dose distribution. Since these paths can be occupied by a finite number of beams, it is reasonable to assume that a minimum number of beams for a configuration that is degenerate to the global optimum exists. Efficiency of the BDO will be characterized by detecting this degeneracy threshold. Beam configurations are altered by adding and deleting beams. A fast exhaustive (up to 3500 non-coplanar orientations) search finds beam directions that improve a configuration. Redundant beams of a configuration can be identified by a fast criterion based on second-order derivative information of the objective function. This offers a fast means of iteratively substituting redundant beams from a configuration. Inferior stationary states can be evaded by adding more beams than the desired number to the current configuration, followed by the subsequent cancellation of superfluous beams. The significance of BDO is examined in a coplanar and a non-coplanar test case. The existence of a threshold number for the minimum configuration and its dependence on the complexity of the problem are shown. BDO outperforms manual configurations and equispaced coplanar beam arrangements in both example cases.

  11. A 2-D diode array and analysis software for verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery.

    PubMed

    Jursinic, Paul A; Nelms, Ben E

    2003-05-01

    An analysis is made of a two-dimensional array of diodes that can be used for measuring dose generated in a plane by a radiation beam. This measuring device is the MapCHECK Model 1175 (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL). This device has 445 N-type diodes in a 22 x 22 cm2 2-D array with variable spacing. The entire array of diodes is easily calibrated to allow for measurements in absolute dose. For IMRT quality assurance, each beam is measured individually with the beam central axis oriented perpendicular to the plane of diodes. Software is available to do the analytical comparison of measurements versus dose distributions calculated by a treatment planning system. Comparison criteria of percent difference and distance-to-agreement are defined by the operator. Data are presented that show the diode array has linear response when beam fluence changes by over 300-fold, which is typical of the level of modulation in intensity modulated radiation therapy, IMRT, beams. A linear dependence is also shown for a 100-fold change in monitors units delivered. Methods for how this device can be used in the clinic for quality assurance of IMRT fields are described. Measurements of typical IMRT beams that are modulated by compensators and MLCs are presented with comparisons to treatment planning system dose calculations. A time analysis is done for typical IMRT quality assurance measurements. The setup, calibration, and analysis time for the 2-D diode array are on the order of 20 min, depending on numbers of fields. This is significantly less time than required to do similar analysis with radiographic film. The 2-D diode array is ideal for per-plan quality assurance after an IMRT system is fully commissioned.

  12. The value of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in challenging clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Treece, S J; Mukesh, M; Rimmer, Y L; Tudor, S J; Dean, J C; Benson, R J; Gregory, D L; Horan, G; Jefferies, S J; Russell, S G; Williams, M V; Wilson, C B; Burnet, N G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To illustrate the wider potential scope of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT), outside of the “standard” indications for IMRT. Methods Nine challenging clinical cases were selected. All were treated with radical intent, although it was accepted that in several of the cases the probability of cure was low. IMRT alone was not adequate owing to the close proximity of the target to organs at risk, the risk of geographical miss, or the need to tighten planning margins, making image-guided radiotherapy an essential integral part of the treatment. Discrepancies between the initial planning scan and the daily on-treatment megavoltage CT were recorded for each case. The three-dimensional displacement was compared with the margin used to create the planning target volume (PTV). Results All but one patient achieved local control. Three patients developed metastatic disease but benefited from good local palliation; two have since died. A further patient died of an unrelated condition. Four patients are alive and well. Toxicity was low in all cases. Without daily image guidance, the PTV margin would have been insufficient to ensure complete coverage in 49% of fractions. It was inadequate by >3 mm in 19% of fractions, and by >5 mm in 9%. Conclusion IG-IMRT ensures accurate dose delivery to treat the target and avoid critical structures, acting as daily quality assurance for the delivery of complex IMRT plans. These patients could not have been adequately treated without image guidance. Advances in knowledge IG-IMRT can offer improved outcomes in less common clinical situations, where conventional techniques would provide suboptimal treatment. PMID:23255544

  13. Lymphatic atlas-based target volume definition for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qatarneh, S. M.; Kiricuta, I. C.; Brahme, A.; Noz, M. E.; Ferreira, B.; Kim, W. C.; Lind, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    Despite the improvements in current imaging modalities such as CT and MRI, the detection of normal or malignant lymph nodes remains a challenge due to the large variability in lymph node characteristics and the variation in imaging quality and the limited imaging resolution. A computerized lymph node atlas could be the ideal tool for target volume definition based on the distribution of normal lymph nodes surrounding the verified malignant nodes to improve the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The standard lymph node topography in the newly constructed 3D lymph node atlas offers a detailed topographical distribution of discrete nodal locations in relation to surrounding organs at risk. In the present paper, the recently developed lymph node atlas is used for selection and delineation of target volumes in the head and neck, thorax and pelvic region. Image registration techniques were implemented to integrate the topography of the lymph node atlas into the patient's data set. By combining the knowledge-based lymph node distribution with the patient's data set, more detailed definitions of the target volumes were obtained to facilitate biologically based treatment plan optimization. The response values of the biologically optimized treatment plans were used to derive the probability of tumor control and the probability of complications in organs at risk. The treatment outcome of the lung reference plan showed a lower probability of recurrence in comparison to planning without the lymph node atlas. The lymph node atlas can improve and standardize the target volume definition by including more accurate anatomical knowledge for target volume definition and biologically optimized radiation therapy planning.

  14. A critical evaluation of worst case optimization methods for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, Albin Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To critically evaluate and compare three worst case optimization methods that have been previously employed to generate intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment plans that are robust against systematic errors. The goal of the evaluation is to identify circumstances when the methods behave differently and to describe the mechanism behind the differences when they occur. Methods: The worst case methods optimize plans to perform as well as possible under the worst case scenario that can physically occur (composite worst case), the combination of the worst case scenarios for each objective constituent considered independently (objectivewise worst case), and the combination of the worst case scenarios for each voxel considered independently (voxelwise worst case). These three methods were assessed with respect to treatment planning for prostate under systematic setup uncertainty. An equivalence with probabilistic optimization was used to identify the scenarios that determine the outcome of the optimization. Results: If the conflict between target coverage and normal tissue sparing is small and no dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are present, then all three methods yield robust plans. Otherwise, they all have their shortcomings: Composite worst case led to unnecessarily low plan quality in boundary scenarios that were less difficult than the worst case ones. Objectivewise worst case generally led to nonrobust plans. Voxelwise worst case led to overly conservative plans with respect to DVH constraints, which resulted in excessive dose to normal tissue, and less sharp dose fall-off than the other two methods. Conclusions: The three worst case methods have clearly different behaviors. These behaviors can be understood from which scenarios that are active in the optimization. No particular method is superior to the others under all circumstances: composite worst case is suitable if the conflicts are not very severe or there are DVH constraints whereas

  15. Submandibular gland sparing in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for N0-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Zhang, W; Zhuang, T; Wu, F; Li, D; Zheng, M; Lin, B; Zhuang, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated and quantified the feasibility of submandibular gland (SMG) sparing in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for N0-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Ten patients with N0-stage NPC were enrolled in the study. Four IMRT plans were produced for each, with different limiting conditions. In plan A, SMG sparing was ignored; in plans B, C and D, the mean dose to SMGs was restricted to 39 Gy. In addition, at least 95% of planning target volume (PTV)-IIa (PTV of clinical target volume involving level IIa lymph node) in plan C and 90% of PTV-IIa in plan D were required to have a 60 Gy covering. Results: The average mean dose to SMGs was 54.6 ± 3.6 Gy in plan A and was lower 39.3 ± 0.3, 49.3 ± 1.9 and 46.7 ± 2.8 Gy in plans B, C and D, respectively. The volume of PTV-IIa covered by 60 Gy was 98.9%, 81.6%, 95.2% and 90.8% in plans A, B, C and D, respectively, and showed a parallel association between dose reduction to SMGs and the covering deficit of PTV-IIa. Conclusion: Reducing the mean dose received by SMG to 39 Gy or less in IMRT for N0-stage NPC is feasible. PMID:24620926

  16. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Wu, H; Das, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  17. Planning Hybrid Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Whole-breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farace, Paolo; Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orru, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Results: Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose ({approx}5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses ({approx}20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Conclusions: Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation.

  18. Ototoxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Children With Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Lobo, Mark; Teh, Bin S.; Okcu, M. Fatih; South, Michael; Butler, E. Brian; Su, Jack; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) Grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity in a cohort of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by posterior fossa (PF) and/or tumor bed (TB) boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 44 patients with medulloblastoma were treated with CSI followed by IMRT to the PF and/or TB and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients with standard-risk disease were treated with 18 to 23.4 Gy CSI followed by either a (1) PF boost to 36 Gy and TB boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy or (2) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Patients with high-risk disease received 36 to 39.6 Gy CSI followed by a (1) PF boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy, (2) PF boost to 45 Gy and TB boost to 55.8 Gy, or (3) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Median audiogram follow-up was 41 months (range, 11-92.4 months). Results: POG Grade Ototoxicity 0, 1, 2, 3. and 4 was found in 29, 32, 11, 13. and 3 ears. respectively, with POG Grade 3 or 4 accounting for 18.2% of cases. There was a statistically significant difference in mean radiation dose (D{sub mean}) cochlea according to degree of ototoxicity, with D{sub mean} cochlea increasing with severity of hearing loss (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Severe ototoxicity was seen in 18.2% of ears in children treated with IMRT boost and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Increasing dose to the cochlea was associated with increasing severity of hearing loss.

  19. Role of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Reducing Toxicity in Dose Escalation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated to a total dose of 78 Gy with either a three-conformal radiotherapy technique with a sequential boost (SEQ) or a simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 78 prostate cancer patients participating in the randomized Dutch trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. They were all treated at the same institution to a total dose of 78 Gy. The median follow-up was 76 and 56 months for the SEQ and SIB-IMRT groups, respectively. The primary endpoints were acute and late GI and GU toxicity. Results: A significantly lower incidence of acute Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity occurred in patients treated with SIB-IMRT compared with SEQ (20% vs. 61%, p = 0.001). For acute GU toxicity and late GI and GU toxicity, the incidence was lower after SIB-IMRT, but these differences were not statistically significant. No statistically significant difference were found in the 5-year freedom from biochemical failure rate (Phoenix definition) between the two groups (70% for the SIB-IMRT group vs. 61% for the SEQ group, p = 0.3). The same was true for the 5-year freedom from clinical failure rate (90% vs. 72%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SIB-IMRT reduced the toxicity without compromising the outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer treated to 78 Gy radiation.

  20. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-01

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To ‘scan’ the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient’s body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s-1, changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  1. Candidate Dosimetric Predictors of Long-Term Swallowing Dysfunction After Oropharyngeal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Hutcheson, Katherine; Barringer, Denise; Tucker, Susan L.; Kies, Merrill; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Dong Lei; Lewin, Jan S.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment. Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans. Twenty-one (68%) cases were base of tongue and 10 (32%) were tonsil. Stage distribution was T1 (12 patients), T2 (10), T3 (4), T4 (2), and TX (3), and N2 (24), N3 (5), and NX (2). Median age was 52.8 years (range, 42-78 years). Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT. Thirteen (42%) were former smokers. Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields. Results: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Aspiration and feeding tube dependence were observed in only 1 patient at 24 months. Conclusions: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation. Strict protection of the glottic larynx via beam-split IMRT techniques promises to make chronic aspiration an uncommon outcome.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  3. Proton energy optimization and reduction for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino; Liao, Li; Li, Yupeng; Jiang, Shengpeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Zhu, X Ronald; Gomez, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-11-07

    Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is commonly delivered via the spot-scanning technique. To 'scan' the target volume, the proton beam is controlled by varying its energy to penetrate the patient's body at different depths. Although scanning the proton beamlets or spots with the same energy can be as fast as 10-20 m s(-1), changing from one proton energy to another requires approximately two additional seconds. The total IMPT delivery time thus depends mainly on the number of proton energies used in a treatment. Current treatment planning systems typically use all proton energies that are required for the proton beam to penetrate in a range from the distal edge to the proximal edge of the target. The optimal selection of proton energies has not been well studied. In this study, we sought to determine the feasibility of optimizing and reducing the number of proton energies in IMPT planning. We proposed an iterative mixed-integer programming optimization method to select a subset of all available proton energies while satisfying dosimetric criteria. We applied our proposed method to six patient datasets: four cases of prostate cancer, one case of lung cancer, and one case of mesothelioma. The numbers of energies were reduced by 14.3%-18.9% for the prostate cancer cases, 11.0% for the lung cancer cases and 26.5% for the mesothelioma case. The results indicate that the number of proton energies used in conventionally designed IMPT plans can be reduced without degrading dosimetric performance. The IMPT delivery efficiency could be improved by energy layer optimization leading to increased throughput for a busy proton center in which a delivery system with slow energy switch is employed.

  4. Proton Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Patterns of Care and Early Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton radiotherapy (PRT) is an emerging treatment for prostate cancer despite limited knowledge of clinical benefit or potential harms compared with other types of radiotherapy. We therefore compared patterns of PRT use, cost, and early toxicity among Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer with those of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods We performed a retrospective study of all Medicare beneficiaries aged greater than or equal to 66 years who received PRT or IMRT for prostate cancer during 2008 and/or 2009. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of PRT. To assess toxicity, each PRT patient was matched with two IMRT patients with similar clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. The main outcome measures were receipt of PRT or IMRT, Medicare reimbursement for each treatment, and early genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and other toxicity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 27,647 men; 553 (2%) received PRT and 27,094 (98%) received IMRT. Patients receiving PRT were younger, healthier, and from more affluent areas than patients receiving IMRT. Median Medicare reimbursement was $32,428 for PRT and $18,575 for IMRT. Although PRT was associated with a statistically significant reduction in genitourinary toxicity at 6 months compared with IMRT (5.9% vs 9.5%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38 to 0.96, P = .03), at 12 months post-treatment there was no difference in genitourinary toxicity (18.8% vs 17.5%; OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.76 to 1.54, P = .66). There was no statistically significant difference in gastrointestinal or other toxicity at 6 months or 12 months post-treatment. Conclusions Although PRT is substantially more costly than IMRT, there was no difference in toxicity in a comprehensive cohort of Medicare beneficiaries with prostate cancer at 12 months post-treatment. PMID:23243199

  5. Acute toxicity of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drodge, C.S.; Boychak, O.; Patel, S.; Usmani, N.; Amanie, J.; Parliament, M.B.; Murtha, A.; Field, C.; Ghosh, S.; Pervez, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dose-escalated hypofractionated radiotherapy (hfrt) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt), with inclusion of the pelvic lymph nodes (plns), plus androgen suppression therapy (ast) in high-risk prostate cancer patients should improve patient outcomes, but acute toxicity could limit its feasibility. Methods Our single-centre phase ii prospective study enrolled 40 high-risk prostate cancer patients. All patients received hfrt using imrt with daily mega-voltage computed tomography imaging guidance, with 95% of planning target volumes (ptv68 and ptv50) receiving 68 Gy and 50 Gy (respectively) in 25 daily fractions. The boost volume was targeted to the involved plns and the prostate (minus the urethra plus 3 mm and minus 3 mm from adjacent rectal wall) and totalled up to 75 Gy in 25 fractions. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during and 3 months after radiotherapy (rt) administration. Results For the 37 patients who completed rt and the 3-month follow-up, median age was 65.5 years (range: 50–76 years). Disease was organ-confined (T1c–T2c) in 23 patients (62.1%), and node-positive in 5 patients (13.5%). All patients received long-term ast. Maximum acute genitourinary (gu) and gastrointestinal (gi) toxicity peaked at grade 2 in 6 of 36 evaluated patients (16.6%) and in 4 of 31 evaluated patients (12.9%) respectively. Diarrhea and urinary frequency were the chief complaints. Dose–volume parameters demonstrated no correlation with toxicity. The ptv treatment objectives were met in 36 of the 37 patients. Conclusions This hfrt dose-escalation trial in high-risk prostate cancer has demonstrated the feasibility of administering 75 Gy in 25 fractions with minimal acute gi and gu toxicities. Further follow-up will report late toxicities and outcomes. PMID:25908924

  6. Whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-wook; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-hong; Jeong, Yuri; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Ahn, Seung Do

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the clinical efficacy and toxicity of whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for high-risk prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated between 2008 and 2013 were reviewed. The study included patients who had undergone WP-IMRT with image guidance using electronic portal imaging devices and/or cone-beam computed tomography. The endorectal balloon was used in 93% of patients. Patients received either 46 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 76 Gy to the prostate in 2 Gy daily fractions, or 44 Gy to the whole pelvis plus a boost of up to 72.6 Gy to the prostate in 2.2 Gy fractions. Results The study cohort included 70 patients, of whom 55 (78%) had a Gleason score of 8 to 10 and 50 (71%) had a prostate-specific antigen level > 20 ng/mL. The androgen deprivation therapy was combined in 62 patients. The biochemical failure-free survival rate was 86.7% at 2 years. Acute any grade gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates were 47% and 73%, respectively. The actuarial rate of late grade 2 or worse toxicity at 2 years was 12.9% for GI, and 5.7% for GU with no late grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion WP-IMRT was well tolerated with no severe acute or late toxicities, resulting in at least similar biochemical control to that of the historic control group with a small field. The long-term efficacy and toxicity will be assessed in the future, and a prospective randomized trial is needed to verify these findings. PMID:24501707

  7. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle{sup 3}) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s {+-} 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical

  8. Simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Joong-Won; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Woo, Sang Myung; Moon, Sung Ho; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Chang-Min

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 53 patients with inoperable HCC underwent SIB-IMRT using two dose-fractionation schemes, depending on the proximity of gastrointestinal structures. The 41 patients in the low dose-fractionation (LD) group, with internal target volume (ITV) < 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 55 and 44 Gy in 22 fractions to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 2 (PTV2), respectively. The 12 patients in the high dose-fractionation (HD) group, with ITV ≥ 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 66 and 55 Gy in 22 fractions to the PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no grade > 3 toxicity. The LD group had larger sized tumors (median: 6 vs. 3.4 cm) and greater frequencies of vascular invasion (80.6 vs. 16.7 %) than patients in the HD group (p < 0.05 each). The median overall survival (OS) was 25.1 mKonzept ist machbar und sicheronths and the actuarial 2-year local progression-free survival (LPFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and OS rates were 67.3, 14.7, and 54.7  %, respectively. The HD group tended to show better tumor response (100 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.039) and 2-year LPFS (85.7 vs. 59  %, p = 0.119), RFS (38.1 vs. 7.3 %, p = 0.063), and OS (83.3 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.037) rates than the LD group. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor response was significantly associated with OS. SIB-IMRT is feasible and safe for patients with inoperable HCC.

  9. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  10. Aichi Cancer Center Initial Experience of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaira, Takeshi Tomita, Natsuo; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of helical tomotherapy (HT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From June 2006 to June 2007, 20 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with HT with (n = 18) or without (n = 2) systemic chemotherapy. The primary tumor and involved lymph node (PTV1) were prescribed 70 Gy and the prophylactic region 54 Gy at D95, respectively. The majority of patients received 2 Gy per fraction for PTV1 in 35 fractions. Parotid function was evaluated using quantitative scintigraphy at pretreatment, and posttreatment at 3 months and 1 year later. Results: The median patient age was 53 years, ranging from 15 to 83. Our cohort included 5, 8, 4, 2, and 1 patients with disease Stages IIB, III, IVA, IVB, and IVC, respectively. Histopathological record revealed two for World Health Organization Type I and 18 for Type 2 or 3. The median duration time for treatment preparation was 9.5 days, and all plans were thought to be acceptable regarding dose constraints of both the planning target volume and organ at risk. All patients completed their treatment procedure of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). All patients achieved clinical remission after IMRT. The majority of patients had Grade 3 or higher toxicity of skin, mucosa, and neutropenia. At the median follow-up of 10.9 months, two patients recurred, and one patient died from cardiac disease. Parotid gland function at 1 year after completion of IMRT was significantly improved compared with that at 3 months. Conclusion: HT was clinically effective in terms of IMRT planning and utility for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

  11. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  12. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, Alberto . E-mail: alberto.bossi@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT.

  13. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  14. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul . E-mail: pjkeall@vcu.edu; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-07-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer.

  15. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  16. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Yong, J H E; McGowan, T; Redmond-Misner, R; Beca, J; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Hoch, J S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  17. Radiation efficacy and biological risk from whole-breast irradiation via intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desantis, David M.

    Radiotherapy is an established modality for women with breast cancer. During the delivery of external beam radiation to the breast, leakage, scattered x-rays from the patient and the linear accelerator also expose healthy tissues and organs outside of the breast, thereby increasing the patient's whole-body dose, which then increases the chance of developing a secondary, radiation-induced cancer. Generally, there are three IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery techniques from a conventional linear accelerator; forward planned (FMLC), inverse planned 'sliding window' (DMLC), and inverse planned 'step-and-shoot' (SMLC). The goal of this study was to determine which of these three techniques delivers an optimal dose to the breast with the least chance of causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. A conventional, non-IMRT, 'Wedge' plan also was compared. Computerized Tomography (CT) data sets for both a large and small sized patient were used in this study. With Varian's Eclipse AAA algorithm, the organ doses specified in the revised ICRP 60 publication were used to calculate the whole-body dose. Also, an anthropomorphic phantom was irradiated with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) at each organ site for measured doses. The risk coefficient from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report of 4.69 x 10-2 deaths per Gy was used to convert whole-body dose to risk of a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. The FMLC IMRT delivered superior tumor coverage over the 3D conventional plan and the inverse DMLC or SMLC treatment plans delivered clinically equivalent tumor coverage. However, the FMLC plan had the least likelihood of inadvertently causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer compared to the inverse DMLC, SMLC, and Wedge plans.

  18. Critical analysis of locoregional failures following intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Ester; Tomatis, Stefano; Potepan, Paolo; Bossi, Paolo; Mongioj, Valeria; Carrara, Mauro; Palazzi, Mauro; Franceschini, Marzia; Bergamini, Cristiana; Locati, Laura; Iannacone, Eva; Guzzo, Marco; Ibba, Tullio; Crippa, Flavio; Licitra, Lisa; Pignoli, Emanuele; Fallai, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the patterns of locoregional failure following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) at our institution, as part of an internal quality assurance program. We aimed to investigate the potential existence of a correlation between any part of the IMRT process and clinical outcome. A total of 106 non-metastatic NPC patients consecutively treated with IMRT (with or without chemotherapy) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered using a sequential or simultaneous integrated boost approach at the total prescribed dose of 66-70 Gy (2.00-2.12 Gy per fraction). MRI studies of recurrences were recorded with the planning computed tomography studies to identify volume of failure. Recurrence-related characteristics were analyzed with respect to the original treatment. Failures were classified as 'in-field', 'marginal' or 'out-field' if at least 95, 20-95 or less than 20% of the volume of failure, respectively, was within 95% of the total prescription dose. With a median follow-up of 43.4 months, 5-years local control, regional control, locoregional control and overall survival rates were 87.7, 88.0, 83.5 and 81.3% respectively. A total of 21 failures were registered in 15 patients. In particular, ten failures (47.6%) were classified as 'in-field' (seven local failures and three regional failures [RFs]), nine failures (42.9%) as 'marginal' (five local failures and four RFs) and only two failures (9.5%) as 'out-field' (both RFs). The most relevant causes of failures were suboptimal target definition and target coverage as well as a longer than planned overall treatment time. IMRT determines excellent outcome in NPC patients. However, great attention in all IMRT steps is necessary to reduce potential causes of failure.

  19. Intensity modulation with respiratory gating for radiotherapy of the pleural space

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Raef S.; Shen, Sui; Ove, Roger; Duan, Jun; Fiveash, John B.; Russo, Suzanne M. . E-mail: suzrusso@msn.com

    2007-04-01

    We wanted to describe a technique for the implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a real-time position monitor (RPM) respiratory gating system for the treatment of pleural space with intact lung. The technique is illustrated by a case of pediatric osteosarcoma, metastatic to the pleura of the right lung. The patient was simulated in the supine position where a breathing tracer and computed tomography (CT) scans synchronized at end expiration were acquired using the RPM system. The gated CT images were used to define target volumes and critical structures. Right pleural gated IMRT delivered at end expiration was prescribed to a dose of 44 Gy, with 55 Gy delivered to areas of higher risk via simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique. IMRT was necessary to avoid exceeding the tolerance of intact lung. Although very good coverage of the target volume was achieved with a shell-shaped dose distribution, dose over the targets was relatively inhomogeneous. Portions of target volumes necessarily intruded into the right lung, the liver, and right kidney, limiting the degree of normal tissue sparing that could be achieved. The radiation doses to critical structures were acceptable and well tolerated. With intact lung, delivering a relatively high dose to the pleura with acceptable doses to surrounding normal tissues using respiratory gated pleural IMRT is feasible. Treatment delivery during a limited part of the respiratory cycle allows for reduced CT target volume motion errors, with reduction in the portion of the planning margin that accounts for respiratory motion, and subsequent increase in the therapeutic ratio.

  20. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Yong, J.H.E.; McGowan, T.; Redmond-Misner, R.; Beca, J.; Warde, P.; Gutierrez, E.; Hoch, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. Methods An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. Results From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Conclusions Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption. PMID:27330359

  1. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  2. Hypofractionated Dose-Painting Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard L.; Lee, Nancy; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose-painting intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) with a hypofractionated regimen to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with concomitant toxicity reduction. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2007, 25 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled in a prospective trial. DP-IMRT was prescribed to deliver 70.2 Gy using 2.34-Gy fractions to the gross tumor volume for the primary and nodal sites while simultaneously delivering 54 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to regions at risk of microscopic disease. Patients received concurrent and adjuvant platin-based chemotherapy similar to the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient and disease characteristics are as follows: median age, 46; 44% Asian; 68% male; 76% World Health Organization III; 20% T1, 52% T2, 16% T3, 12% T4; 20% N0, 36% N1, 36% N2, 8% N3. With median follow-up of 33 months, 3-year local control was 91%, regional control was 91%, freedom from distant metastases was 91%, and overall survival was 89%. The average mean dose to each cochlea was 43 Gy. With median audiogram follow-up of 14 months, only one patient had clinically significant (Grade 3) hearing loss. Twelve percent of patients developed temporal lobe necrosis; one patient required surgical resection. Conclusions: Preliminary findings using a hypofractionated DP-IMRT regimen demonstrated that local control, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival compared favorably with other series of IMRT and chemotherapy. The highly conformal boost to the tumor bed resulted low rates of severe ototoxicity (Grade 3-4). However, the incidence of in-field brain radiation necrosis indicates that 2.34 Gy per fraction is not safe in this setting.

  3. Disease Control and Ototoxicity Using Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Tumor-Bed Boost for Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Polkinghorn, William R.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Souweidane, Mark M.; Khakoo, Yasmin; Lyden, David C.; Gilheeney, Stephen W.; Becher, Oren J.; Budnick, Amy S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We previously reported excellent local control for treating medulloblastoma with a limited boost to the tumor bed. In order to decrease ototoxicity, we subsequently implemented a tumor-bed boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the clinical results of which we report here. Patients and Methods: A total of 33 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma, 25 with standard risk, and 8 with high risk, were treated on an IMRT tumor-bed boost following craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Six standard-risk patients were treated with an institutional protocol with 18 Gy CSI in conjunction with intrathecal iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibody. The majority of patients received concurrent vincristine and standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Pure-tone audiograms were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median age was 9 years old (range, 4-46 years old). Median follow-up was 63 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for standard-risk patients who received 23.4 or 36 Gy CSI (not including those who received 18 Gy CSI with radioimmunotherapy) were 81.4% and 88.4%, respectively, at 5 years; 5-year PFS and OS rates for high-risk patients were both 87.5%. There were no isolated posterior fossa failures outside of the boost volume. Posttreatment audiograms were available for 31 patients, of whom 6%, at a median follow-up of 19 months, had developed Grade 3 hearing loss. Conclusion: An IMRT tumor-bed boost results in excellent local control while delivering a low mean dose to the cochlea, resulting in a low rate of ototoxicity.

  4. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-05-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique.

  5. High-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and inverse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W. . E-mail: coen.hurkmans@cze.nl; Meijer, Gert J.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Cassee, Jorien

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Recently a Phase III randomized trial has started comparing a boost of 16 Gy as part of whole-breast irradiation to a high boost of 26 Gy in young women. Our main aim was to develop an efficient simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) technique for the high-dose arm of the trial. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning was performed for 5 left-sided and 5 right-sided tumors. A tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique added to a sequentially planned 3-field boost (SEQ) was compared with a simultaneously planned technique (SIB) using inverse optimization. Normalized total dose (NTD)-corrected dose volume histogram parameters were calculated and compared. Results: The intended NTD was produced by 31 fractions of 1.66 Gy to the whole breast and 2.38 Gy to the boost volume. The average volume of the PTV-breast and PTV-boost receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose was 97% or more for both techniques. Also, the mean lung dose and mean heart dose did not differ much between the techniques, with on average 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SEQ and 3.8 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SIB, respectively. However, the SIB resulted in a significantly more conformal irradiation of the PTV-boost. The volume of the PTV-breast, excluding the PTV-boost, receiving a dose higher than 95% of the boost dose could be reduced considerably using the SIB as compared with the SEQ from 129 cc (range, 48-262 cc) to 58 cc (range, 30-102 cc). Conclusions: A high-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost technique has been developed. The unwanted excessive dose to the breast was significantly reduced.

  6. DEMAT: A multi-institutional dosimetry audit of rotational and static intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Caroline; Chiavassa, Sophie; Bertaut, Cindy; Boussion, Nicolas; Chapel, Nathalie; Chapron, Lucie; Coste, Frédéric; Crespin, Sylvain; Dy, Gilles; Faye, Papa Abdoulaye; Leleu, Cyril; Bouvier, Jeanne; Madec, Ludovic; Mesgouez, Jérôme; Palisson, Jérémy; Vela, Anthony; Delpon, Grégory

    2016-05-01

    Static beam intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT) and/or Volumetric-Modulated-Arc-Therapy (VMAT) are now available in many regional radiotherapy departments. The aim of this multi-institutional audit was to design a new methodology based on radiochromic films to perform an independent quality control. A set of data were sent to all participating centres for two clinical localizations: prostate and Head and Neck (H&N) cancers. The agreement between calculations and measurements was verified in the Octavius phantom (PTW) by point measurements using ionization chambers and by 2D measurements using EBT3 radiochromic films. Due to uncertainties in the whole procedure, criteria were set to 5% and 3% in local dose and 3mm in distance excluding doses lower than 10% of the maximum doses. No normalization point or area was used for the quantitative analysis. 13 radiotherapy centres participated in this audit involving 28 plans (12 IMRT, 16 VMAT). For point measurements, mean errors were -0.18±1.54% and 0.00±1.58% for prostate and H&N cases respectively. For 2D measurements with 5%/3mm criteria, gamma map analysis showed a pixel pass rate higher than 95% for prostate and H&N. Mean gamma index was lower than 0.4 for prostate and 0.5 for H&N. Both techniques yielded similar results. This study showed the feasibility of an independent quality control by peers for conventional IMRT and VMAT. Results from all participating centres were found to be in good agreement. This regional study demonstrated the feasibility of our new methodology based on radiochromic films without dose normalization on a specific point. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade >=3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  8. A particle swarm optimization algorithm for beam angle selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjie; Yao, Dezhong; Yao, Jonathan; Chen, Wufan

    2005-08-07

    Automatic beam angle selection is an important but challenging problem for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Though many efforts have been made, it is still not very satisfactory in clinical IMRT practice because of overextensive computation of the inverse problem. In this paper, a new technique named BASPSO (Beam Angle Selection with a Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm) is presented to improve the efficiency of the beam angle optimization problem. Originally developed as a tool for simulating social behaviour, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique first introduced by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. In the proposed BASPSO, the beam angles are optimized using PSO by treating each beam configuration as a particle (individual), and the beam intensity maps for each beam configuration are optimized using the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. These two optimization processes are implemented iteratively. The performance of each individual is evaluated by a fitness value calculated with a physical objective function. A population of these individuals is evolved by cooperation and competition among the individuals themselves through generations. The optimization results of a simulated case with known optimal beam angles and two clinical cases (a prostate case and a head-and-neck case) show that PSO is valid and efficient and can speed up the beam angle optimization process. Furthermore, the performance comparisons based on the preliminary results indicate that, as a whole, the PSO-based algorithm seems to outperform, or at least compete with, the GA-based algorithm in computation time and robustness. In conclusion, the reported work suggested that the introduced PSO algorithm could act as a new promising solution to the beam angle optimization problem and potentially other optimization problems in IMRT, though further studies need to be investigated.

  9. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, Adam S.; Dong, Lei; Morrison, William H.; Stugis, Erich M.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Schwartz, David L.; Kies, Merill S.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3-4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50-77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  11. Linear energy transfer-guided optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy: feasibility study and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose-volume and LET-volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in identifying the clinically optimal solution. Copyright © 2013

  12. Postoperative pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Shih, Karin K; Milgrom, Sarah A; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Gardner, Ginger J; Tew, William P; Barakat, Richard R; Alektiar, Kaled M

    2013-03-01

    According to national surveys, the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in gynecologic cancers is on the rise, yet there is still some reluctance to adopt adjuvant IMRT as standard practice. The purpose of this study is to report a single-institution experience using postoperative pelvic IMRT with or without chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer. From 11/2004 to 12/2009, 46 patients underwent hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for stage I-III (22% stage I/II and 78% stage III) endometrial cancer. Median IMRT dose was 50.4Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to 30 (65%) patients. With a median follow-up of 52months, 4 patients recurred: 1 vaginal plus lung metastasis, 2 isolated para-aortic recurrences, and 1 lungs and liver metastasis. Five-year relapse rate was 9% (95% CI, 0-13.6%). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 88% (95% CI, 77-98%) and overall survival (OS) was 97% (95% CI, 90-100%). There were 2 patients with non-hematological grade 3 toxicity: 1 (2%) acute and 1 (2%) chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients treated with IMRT and chemotherapy (n=30), 5 had grade 3 leukopenia, 8 grade 2 anemia, and 2 grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Oncologic outcomes with postoperative IMRT were very good, with DFS and OS rates of >88% at median follow-up of 52months, despite a preponderance (78%) of stage III disease. Toxicity was minimal even in the setting of an aggressive trimodality (65% of patients) approach. Data from this study and emerging data from RTOG trial 0418 demonstrate the advantages of IMRT in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated solutions for intact prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is intended to investigate the implementation of a modified class solution for intact prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The class solution uses 2 additional optimization structures intended to increase target conformity and decrease unnecessary dose to healthy tissue. A total of 10 randomly selected intact prostate IMRT patients were chosen for this retrospective study. Each of the original IMRT plans was compared with a modified class solution. The class solution implemented 2 additional optimization structures. The 95{sub O}PT was intended to increase target conformity, and the Avoidance{sub 3}780 was intended to reduce normal tissue. Each plan was evaluated for minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the target. Additionally, mean normal tissue dose, total monitor units (MUs), and segments were investigated. Conformity index and normal healthy index were also compared. All comparisons were evaluated using a paired t-test using GraphPad software. Evaluations of MUs; segments; minimum, maximum, mean target doses; mean normal tissue dose; and conformity index did not demonstrate a significant difference between the modified class solution and the original plans. However, evaluation of healthy tissue conformity index indicated a significant difference. Overall, 70% of the original plans failed to demonstrate a satisfactory score (< 0.6) of properly sparing normal healthy tissue, whereas 70% of the modified plans exhibited a satisfactory score (> 0.6). Most (90%) of the modified plans demonstrated a greater number of segments than the compared original plan. A modified class solution provides a good starting point for planning intact prostate cancer. The addition of the Avoidance{sub 3}780 structure increases the healthy tissue conformity index score.

  14. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Helical Tomotherapy in Nasopharynx Cancer: Planning Comparison and NTCP Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Widesott, Lamberto Pierelli, Alessio; Fiorino, Claudio; Dell'Oca, Italo; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo; Schwarz, Marco

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) treatment plans for nasopharynx cancer using a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Methods and Materials: The data from 6 patients who had previously been treated with HT were used. A three-beam IMPT technique was optimized in the Hyperion treatment planning system, simulating a 'beam scanning' technique. HT was planned using the tomotherapy treatment planning system. Both techniques were optimized to simultaneously deliver 66 Gy in 30 fractions to planning target volume (PTV1; GTV and enlarged nodes) and 54 Gy to PTV2 subclinical, electively treated nodes. Normal tissue complication probability calculation was performed for the parotids and larynx. Results: Very similar PTVs coverage and homogeneity of the target dose distribution for IMPT and HT were found. The conformity index was significantly lower for protons than for photons (1.19 vs. 1.42, respectively). The mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid glands decreased by 6.4 Gy and 5.6 Gy, respectively, with IMPT. The volume of mucosa and esophagus receiving {>=}20 Gy and {>=}30 Gy with IMPT was significantly lower than with HT. The average volume of larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy was significantly lower with HT, while for thyroid, it was comparable. The volume receiving {>=}30, {>=}20, and {>=}10 Gy in total body volume decreased with IMPT by 14.5%, 19.4%, and 23.1%, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability for the parotid glands was significantly lower with IMPT for all sets of parameters; however, we also estimated an almost full recovery of the contralateral parotid with HT. The normal tissue complication probability for the larynx was not significantly different between the two irradiation techniques. Conclusion: Excellent target coverage, homogeneity within the PTVs, and sparing of the organs at risk were reached with both modalities. IMPT allows for better sparing of most organs at

  15. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y. O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser

  16. A general model for stray dose calculation of static and intensity-modulated photon radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hauri, Pascal Schneider, Uwe; Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing number of cancer survivors who are at risk of developing late effects caused by ionizing radiation such as induction of second tumors. Hence, the determination of out-of-field dose for a particular treatment plan in the patient’s anatomy is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to analytically model the stray dose according to its three major components. Methods: For patient scatter, a mechanistic model was developed. For collimator scatter and head leakage, an empirical approach was used. The models utilize a nominal beam energy of 6 MeV to describe two linear accelerator types of a single vendor. The parameters of the models were adjusted using ionization chamber measurements registering total absorbed dose in simple geometries. Whole-body dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters in an anthropomorphic phantom for static and intensity-modulated treatment plans were compared to the 3D out-of-field dose distributions calculated by a combined model. Results: The absolute mean difference between the whole-body predicted and the measured out-of-field dose of four different plans was 11% with a maximum difference below 44%. Computation time of 36 000 dose points for one field was around 30 s. By combining the model-calculated stray dose with the treatment planning system dose, the whole-body dose distribution can be viewed in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The results suggest that the model is accurate, fast and can be used for a wide range of treatment modalities to calculate the whole-body dose distribution for clinical analysis. For similar energy spectra, the mechanistic patient scatter model can be used independently of treatment machine or beam orientation.

  17. Multivariate analysis of factors predicting prostate dose in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multivariate analysis to determine relationships between prostate radiation dose and the state of surrounding organs, including organ volumes and the internal angle of the levator ani muscle (LAM), based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images after bone matching. We analyzed 270 CBCT data sets from 30 consecutive patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. With patients in the supine position on a couch with the HipFix system, data for center of mass (COM) displacement of the prostate and the state of individual organs were acquired and compared between planning CT and CBCT scans. Dose distributions were then recalculated based on CBCT images. The relative effects of factors on the variance in COM, dose covering 95% of the prostate volume (D95%), and percentage of prostate volume covered by the 100% isodose line (V100%) were evaluated by a backward stepwise multiple regression analysis. COM displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (COMAP) correlated significantly with the rectum volume (δVr) and the internal LAM angle (δθ; R = 0.63). Weak correlations were seen for COM in the left-right (R = 0.18) and superior-inferior directions (R = 0.31). Strong correlations between COMAP and prostate D95% and V100% were observed (R ≥ 0.69). Additionally, the change ratios in δVr and δθ remained as predictors of prostate D95% and V100%. This study shows statistically that maintaining the same rectum volume and LAM state for both the planning CT simulation and treatment is important to ensure the correct prostate dose in the supine position with bone matching. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of coplanar and noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy and helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To compare the differences in dose-volume data among coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), noncoplanar IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT) among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal vein thrombosis (PVT). Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC and PVT underwent step and shoot coplanar IMRT with intent to deliver 46 - 54 Gy to the tumor and portal vein. The volume of liver received 30Gy was set to keep less than 30% of whole normal liver (V30 < 30%). The mean dose to at least one side of kidney was kept below 23 Gy, and 50 Gy as for stomach. The maximum dose was kept below 47 Gy for spinal cord. Several parameters including mean hepatic dose, percent volume of normal liver with radiation dose at X Gy (Vx), uniformity index, conformal index, and doses to organs at risk were evaluated from the dose-volume histogram. Results HT provided better uniformity for the planning-target volume dose coverage than both IMRT techniques. The noncoplanar IMRT technique reduces the V10 to normal liver with a statistically significant level as compared to HT. The constraints for the liver in the V30 for coplanar IMRT vs. noncoplanar IMRT vs. HT could be reconsidered as 21% vs. 17% vs. 17%, respectively. When delivering 50 Gy and 60-66 Gy to the tumor bed, the constraints of mean dose to the normal liver could be less than 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Conclusion Noncoplanar IMRT and HT are potential techniques of radiation therapy for HCC patients with PVT. Constraints for the liver in IMRT and HT could be stricter than for 3DCRT. PMID:20492727

  19. Managed care and the diffusion of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bruce L.; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A.; Wei, John T.; Montie, James E.; Schroeck, Florian R.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To better understand associations between managed care penetration in healthcare markets and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) adoption. Methods We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007 who were treated with radiation therapy (n=55,162). We categorized managed care penetration in Health Service Areas (HSAs) as low (<3%), intermediate (3–10%), and high (>10%); and assessed our main outcomes (i.e., probability of IMRT adoption, which is the ability of a healthcare market to deliver IMRT, and IMRT utilization in HSA markets) using a Cox proportional-hazards model and Poisson regression model, respectively. Results Compared to markets with low managed care penetration, populations in highly penetrated HSAs were more racially diverse (25% vs. 15% non-white, p<0.01), densely populated (2,110 vs. 145 people/square mile, p<0.01), and wealthier (median income $48,500 vs. $31,900, p<0.01). The probability of IMRT adoption was greatest in markets with the highest managed care penetration (e.g., 0.82 (high) vs. 0.72 (low) in 2007, p=0.05). Among adopting markets, the use of IMRT increased in all HSA categories. However, relative to markets with low managed care penetration, IMRT utilization was constrained in markets with the highest penetration (0.69 (high) vs. 0.76 (low) in 2007, p<0.01). Conclusion Markets with higher managed care penetration demonstrated a greater propensity for acquiring IMRT technology. However, after adopting IMRT, more highly penetrated markets had roughly 7% slower growth in utilization over the study period. These findings provide insight into the implications of delivery system reforms for cancer-related technologies. PMID:23206767

  20. Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Toxicity After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, David C. Smythe, W. Roy; Liao Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D.; Correa, Arlene Ph.D.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Liu, H. Helen; Komaki, Ritsuko; Forster, Kenneth M.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of other noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Farrey, Karl J.; Rash, Carla C.; Heimann, Ruth; Chmura, Steven J. . E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade {>=}3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose.

  2. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  3. TH-A-BRE-01: The Status of Intensity Modulated Proton and Ion Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L; Zhu, X; Unkelbach, J; Schulte, R

    2014-06-15

    IMRT with photons has become a radiation therapy standard of care for many cancer treatment sites. The situation is quite different with intensity modulated particle (protons and ion) radiation therapy (IMPT). With the rapid development of beam scanning techniques and many of the newer proton facilities exclusively offering active beam scanning as their radiation delivery technique, it is timely to give an update on the status and challenges of IMPT. The leading principle in IMPT is to aim at the target from several, not necessarily coplanar, directions with multiple pencil beams that are modulated in their intensity and adjusted in their energy such that a desired dose distribution or, more generally, a desired bio-effective dose distribution is achieved. Different from low-LET photons, the varying relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along the beam path adds an additional dimension to the treatment planning process and will require biophysical modeling at least for carbon ion therapy. IMPT involves computationally challenging tasks, yet it needs to be very fast in order to be clinically relevant. To make IMPT computationally tractable, robust and efficient optimization methods are required. Lastly, IMPT planning is very sensitive to accurate knowledge of relative stopping and scattering powers of the intervening tissues as well as intra- and inter-fraction motion. Robust planning methods are being developed in order to obtain IMPT plans that are less sensitive against such uncertainties. This therapy symposium will present an update on the current status and emerging developments of IMPT from the medical physics perspective. Learning Objectives: Become familiar with current delivery techniques for IMPT and their limitations. Understand the basics of dose calculational algorithms and commissioning of IMPT. Learn how to assess the accuracy of planning and delivery of IMPT treatments. Get an overview of currently used and emerging optimization techniques. Learn

  4. Dosimetric effects of endorectal balloons on intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, In-Ah; Eom, Keun-Yong

    2013-10-01

    We used an endorectal balloon (ERB) for prostate immobilization during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer treatment. To investigate the dosimetric effects of ERB-filling materials, we changed the ERB Hounsfield unit (HU) from 0 to 1000 HU in 200-HU intervals to simulate the various ERB fillings; 0 HU simulated a water-filled ERB, and 1000 HU simulated the densest material-filled ERB. Dosimetric data (coverage, homogeneity, conformity, maximal dose, and typical volume dose) for the tumor and the organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated in prostate IMRT treatment plans with 6-MV and 15-MV beams. The tumor coverage appeared to differ by approximately 1%, except for the clinical target volume (CTV) V100% and the planning target volume (PTV) V100%. The largest difference for the various ERB fillings was observed in the PTV V100%. In spite of increasing HU, the prostate IMRT plans at both energies had relatively low dosimetric effects on the PTV and the CTV. However, the maximal and the typical volume doses (D25%, D30%, and D50%) to the rectal wall and the bladder increased with increasing HU. For an air-filled ERB, the maximal doses to the rectal wall and the monitor units were lower than the corresponding values for the water-filled and the densest material-filled ERBs. An air-filled ERB spared the rectal wall because of its dosimetric effect. Thus, we conclude that the use of an air-filled ERB provides a dosimetric benefit to the rectal wall without a loss of target coverage and is an effective option for prostate IMRT treatment.

  5. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  6. Prognostic Nomogram for Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shixiu; Xia, Bing; Han, Fei; Xie, Ruifei; Song, Tao; Lu, Lixia; Yu, Wei; Deng, Xiaowu; He, Qiancheng; Zhao, Cong; Xie, Conghua

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to define possible predictors of overall survival in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), to establish an effective prognostic nomogram that could provide individualized predictions of treatment outcome in this setting. We reviewed the records of 533 patients with non-metastatic NPC who underwent IMRT with or without concurrent chemotherapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology of Sun Yat-Sen University from 2002 to 2009; none of these patients received induction or adjuvant chemotherapy. These data sets were used to construct a nomogram based on Cox regression. Nomogram performance was determined via a concordance index (C-index) and a calibration curve which was compared with the TNM staging system for NPC. The results were validated in an external cohort of 442 patients from the Department of Radiation Oncology of Wenzhou Medical College who were treated during the same period. Results showed that the greatest influence on survival were primary gross tumor volume, age, tumor stage and nodal stage (2002 Union for International Cancer Control [UICC] staging system), which were selected into the nomogram. The C-index of the nomogram for predicting survival was 0.748 (95%CI, 0.704–0.785), which was statistically higher than that of TNM staging system (0.684, P<0.001). The calibration curve exhibited agreement between nomogram-predicted and the actual observed probabilities for overall survival. In the validation cohort, the nomogram discrimination was superior to the TNM staging system (C-index: 0.768 vs 0.721; P = 0.026). In conclusion, the nomogram proposed in this study resulted in more-accurate prognostic prediction for patients with NPC after IMRT and compared favorably to the TNM staging system; this individualized information will aid in patient counseling and may be used for de-escalation trials in the future. PMID:26248338

  7. Managed care and the diffusion of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bruce L; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A; Wei, John T; Montie, James E; Schroeck, Florian R; Hollenbeck, Brent K

    2012-12-01

    To better understand associations between managed care penetration in health care markets and the adoption of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007 who were treated with radiotherapy (n = 55,162). We categorized managed care penetration in Health Service Areas (HSAs) as low (<3%), intermediate (3%-10%), and high (>10%), and assessed our main outcomes (ie, probability of IMRT adoption, which is the ability of a health care market to deliver IMRT, and IMRT utilization in HSA markets) using a Cox proportional hazards model and Poisson regression model, respectively. Compared with markets with low managed care penetration, populations in highly penetrated HSAs were more racially diverse (25% vs 15% non-white, P <.01), densely populated (2110 vs 145 people/square mile, P <.01), and wealthier (median income, $48,500 vs $31,900, P <.01). The probability of IMRT adoption was greatest in markets with the highest managed care penetration (eg, 0.82 [high] vs 0.72 [low] in 2007, P = .05). Among adopting markets, the use of IMRT increased in all HSA categories. However, relative to markets with low managed care penetration, IMRT use was constrained in markets with the highest penetration (0.69 [high] vs 0.76 [low] in 2007, P <.01). Markets with higher managed care penetration demonstrated a greater propensity for acquiring IMRT technology. However, after adopting IMRT, more highly penetrated markets had roughly 7% slower growth in IMRT use during the study period. These findings provide insight into the implications of delivery system reforms for cancer-related technologies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescence guidance during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Brucker, David; Ehrhardt, Andre; Fischer, Stefan; Goebel, Werner; Goetz, Marcus; Guenther, Bettina; Hennig, Georg; Herms, Jochen; Irion, Klaus-Martin; Johansson, Ann; Kienast, Yvonne; Kniebuehler, Gesa; Li, Pan; Ruehm, Adrian; Sandner, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Objective: When a stereotactic biopsy is taken to enable histopathological diagnosis of a suspected brain tumor, it is essential to i) do this safely, that is not injure a major blood vessel and ii) to obtain relevant vital material from the tumor. We are investigating the suitability of Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence for blood vessel recognition and 5- Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence for identification of proliferative brain tumor tissue. Methods: A fiber-optic endoscopic approach was studied to generate and detect both fluorescence signals. PpIX concentrations in brain tumors have been measured by chemical extraction. Preliminary equipment was studied in a mouse model. Results: PpIX-concentrations in glioblastoma tissue showed high inner- and inter-patient variability, but each patient out of 15 with interpretable data showed at least one sample with a PpIX-concentration exceeding 2.4 μmol/l, which is easily detectable by state-of-the-art fiberoptic fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. The imaging fluoroscope with 30,000 pixels resolution could be introduced through a position controlled stereotactic needle. ICG-fluorescence from vessels with diameters >= 0.1 mm can be detected with a contrast of 2-2.5 against surrounding tissue. Conclusion: Fluorescence detection during stereotactic biopsy might increase safety and precision of the procedure significantly.

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  10. Locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix associated with pelvic kidney treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Overcoming a therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Lakhan; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Pandey, Rambha; Sharma, Daya Nand

    2017-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of carcinoma of the cervix and pelvic kidney is rare. As the pelvic kidney occupies the conventional radiation portal for carcinoma of the cervix, treatment of these patients with radiation presents a therapeutic challenge. A 48-year-old stage IIIB cervical carcinoma patient with an incidental diagnosis of pelvic kidney was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin, followed by intracavitary radiotherapy. The bilateral kidney dose was restricted within a tolerance limit of 16.6 Gy. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient was disease free and had no deterioration in kidney function. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided the necessary means for delivering radical radiation doses in this case scenario with adequate sparing of the kidney. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Laser-induced damage of fused silica on high-power laser: beam intensity modulation, optics defect, contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfeng; Sun, Mingyin; Wu, Rong; Lu, Xinqiang; Lin, Zunqi; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    The wedged focus lens of fused silica, one of the final optics assembly's optics, focuses the 351 nm beam onto target and separates the residual 1053 and 527 nm light with 351 nm light. After the experiment with beam energies at 3ω range from 3 to 5KJ, and pulse shapes about 3ns, the wedged focus lens has laser-induced damage at particular area. Analysis the damage result, there are three reasons to induce these damages. These reasons are beam intensity modulation, optics defect and contamination that cause different damage morphologies. The 3ω beam intensity modulation, one of three factors, is the mostly import factor to induce damage. Here, the n2 nonlinear coefficient of fused silica material can lead to small-scale self-focusing filament because of optics thickness and beam intensity. And some damage-filaments' tails are bulk damage spots because there are subsurface scratches or metal contaminations.

  12. SU-E-T-353: Decoding the Beam Complexity in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W; Cho, S; Zhang, X; Hoffman, K; Kudchadker, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Modern IMRT relies on computers to generate treatment plans of varied complexity. A highly complex treatment plan may use a large number of small and irregular beam apertures in order to achieve high dose conformity. However, excessive beam complexity can increase dosimetric uncertainty, prolong treatment time, and increase susceptibility to target or organ motion. In this study we sought to develop metrics to assess the complexity of IMRT beams and plans. Methods: Based the information of leaf positions and MU for each beam segment, we calculated the following beam complexity metrics: aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation. Then these beam complexity metrics were averaged to obtain the corresponding plan complexity metrics, using the beam MUs as weighting factors. We evaluated and compared the beam and plan complexity scores for 65 IMRT plans from 3 sites (prostate, head and neck, and spine). We also studied how the plan complexity scores were affected by adjusting inverse planning parameters. Results: For prostate IMRT, the lateral beams had large MUs and smaller shape irregularity, while the anterior or posterior beams had larger modulation values. On average, the prostate IMRT plans had the smallest shape irregularity and beam modulation; the HN IMRT plans had the largest aperture area, shape irregularity, and beam modulation; and the spine stereotactic IMRT plans often had small aperture area, which may be associated with relatively large discrepancies between calculated and measures doses. The plan complexity increased as the number of optimization iterations and the number of beam segments increased and as the minimum segment area decreased. Conclusion: Complexity of IMRT beams and plans were quantified in terms of aperture area, shape irregularity and beam modulation. The complexity metrics varied among IMRT plans for different disease sites and were affected when the planning parameters were adjusted.

  13. Continuous-time method and its discretization to inverse problem of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving box-constrained inverse problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning based on the idea of continuous dynamical methods and split-feasibility algorithms. Our method can compute a feasible solution without the second derivative of an objective function, which is required for gradient-based optimization algorithms. We prove theoretically that a double Kullback-Leibler divergence can be used as the Lyapunov function for the IMRT planning system.

  14. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan . E-mail: jonathan.knisely@yale.edu

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients.

  15. Dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam on a photocathode RF gun: Toward intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Takafumi; Kashima, Hiroaki; Yang, Jinfeng; Yoshida, Yoichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2008-10-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the aim is to deliver reduced doses of radiation to normal tissue. As a step toward IMRT, we examined dynamic optical modulation of an electron beam produced by a photocathode RF gun. Images on photomasks were transferred onto a photocathode by relay imaging. The resulting beam was controlled by a remote mirror. The modulated electron beam maintained its shape on acceleration, had a fine spatial resolution, and could be moved dynamically by optical methods.

  16. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  17. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D.; Sher, David J.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  18. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  19. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin; Eijkeren, Marc van; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Lambert, Bieke; Beerens, Anne-Sophie; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambein, Kathleen; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation

  20. Optimal beam design on intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost in nasopharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Hu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lee, Jeun-Shenn; Huang, Pin-I; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lee, Yuh-Lin; Hsieh, Chun-Mei; Shiau, Cheng-Ying

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to determine the optimal beam design among various combinations of field numbers and beam trajectories for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We used 10 fields with gantry angles of 155°, 130°, 75°, 25°, 0° L, 0° R, 335°, 285°, 230°, and 205° denoted as F10. To decrease doses in the spinal cord, the F10 technique was designed by featuring 2 pairs of split-opposed beam fields at 155° to 335° and 205° to 25°, as well as one pair of manually split beam fields at 0°. The F10 technique was compared with 4 other common field arrangements: F7E, 7 fields with 50° equally spaced gantry angles; F7, the basis of F10 with 155°, 130°, 75°, 0°, 285°, 230°, and 205°; F9E, 9 fields with 40° equally spaced gantry angles; and FP, 7 posterior fields with 180°, 150°, 120°, 90°, 270°, 240°, and 210°. For each individual case of 10 patients, the customized constraints derived after optimization with the standard F10 technique were applied to 4 other field arrangements. The 4 new optimized plans of each individual case were normalized to achieve the same coverage of planning target volume (PTV){sub 63} {sub Gy} as that of the standard F10 technique. The F10 field arrangement exhibited the best coverage in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} and the least mean dose in the trachea-esophagus region. Furthermore, the F10 field arrangement demonstrated the highest level of conformity in the low-dose region and the least monitor unit. The F10 field arrangement performed more outstandingly than the other field arrangements in PTV{sub 70} {sub Gy} coverage and spared the central organ. This arrangement also exhibited the highest conformity and delivery efficiency. The F10 technique is recommended as the standard beam geometry for the SIB-IMRT of NPC.

  1. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Thotakura, Vijaya; Balboni, Tracy A.; Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J.; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  2. An FMEA Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Delivery Failures at Tolerance Criteria Levels.

    PubMed

    Faught, Jacqueline Tonigan; Balter, Peter A; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kry, Stephen F; Court, Laurence E; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this work was to assess both the perception of failure modes in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) when the linac is operated at the edge of tolerance given in AAPM TG-40(1) and TG-142(2) as well as the application of FMEA to this specific section of the IMRT process. An online survey was distributed to approximately 2000 physicists worldwide that participate in quality services provided by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core - Houston (IROC-H). The survey briefly described eleven different failure modes covered by basic quality assurance in step-and-shoot IMRT at or near TG-40(1) and TG-142(2) tolerance criteria levels. Respondents were asked to estimate the worst case scenario percent dose error that could be caused by each of these failure modes in a head and neck patient as well as the FMEA scores: Occurrence, Detectability, and Severity. Risk probability number (RPN) scores were calculated as the product of these scores. Demographic data was also collected. 181 individual and three group responses were submitted. 84% were from North America. Most (76%) individual respondents performed at least 80% clinical work and 92% were nationally certified. Respondent medical physics experience ranged from 2.5-45 years (average 18 years). 52% of individual respondents were at least somewhat familiar with FMEA, while 17% were not familiar. Several IMRT techniques, treatment planning systems, and linear accelerator manufacturers were represented. All failure modes received widely varying scores ranging from 1-10 for occurrence, at least 1-9 for detectability, and at least 1-7 for severity. Ranking failure modes by RPN scores also resulted in large variability, with each failure mode being ranked both most risky (1st) and least risky (11th) by different respondents. On average MLC modeling had the highest RPN scores. Individual estimated percent dose errors and severity scores positively correlated (p<0.01) for each FM as expected. No universal

  3. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. Results The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV Dmin and PTV Dmin pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel Dmax (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and Dmax by 25% (0.022). Conclusions TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors

  4. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a method to include robustness in a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base-of-skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analyzed in more detail to demonstrate the involved trade-offs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  5. A feedback constraint optimization method for intensity-modulated radiation therapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, YONGWU; SUN, XIAONAN; WANG, QI; ZHOU, QINXUAN; GU, BENXING; SHI, GUOZHI; JIANG, DONGLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is able to achieve good target conformance with a limited dose to organs at risk (OARs); however, IMRT increases the irradiation volume and monitor units (MUs) required. The present study aimed to evaluate the use of an IMRT plan with fewer segments and MUs, while maintaining quality in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In the present study, two types of IMRT plan were therefore compared: The direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO)-RT method and the feedback constraint DMPO-RT (fc_DMPO-RT) method, which utilizes compensative feedback constraint in DMPO-RT and maintains optimization. Plans for 23 patients were developed with identical dose prescriptions. Each plan involved synchronous delivery to various targets, with identical OAR constraints, by means of 7 coplanar fields. The average dose, maximum dose, dose-volume histograms of targets and the OAR, MUs of the plan, the number of segments, delivery time and accuracy were subsequently compared. The fc_DMPO-RT exhibited superior dose distribution in terms of the average, maximum and minimum doses to the gross tumor volume compared with that of DMPO-RT (t=62.7, 20.5 and 22.0, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT also resulted in a smaller maximum dose to the spinal cord (t=7.3; P<0.05), as well as fewer MUs, fewer segments and decreased treatment times than that of the DMPO-RT (t=6.2, 393.4 and 244.3, respectively; P<0.05). The fc_DMPO-RT maintained plan quality with fewer segments and MUs, and the treatment time was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in reduced radiation leakage and an enhanced curative effect. Therefore, introducing feedback constraint into DMPO may result in improved IMRT planning. In nasopharyngeal carcinoma specifically, feedback constraint resulted in the improved protection of OARs in proximity of targets (such as the brainstem and parotid) due to sharp dose distribution and reduced MUs. PMID:26622793

  6. Whole Abdominopelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Subbiah, Vivek; Bilton, Stephen D.; Chang, Eric L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Sulman, Eric P.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Anderson, Peter; Green, Holly L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is an uncommon pediatric tumor with a poor prognosis. Aggressive multimodality therapy is the current treatment approach; however. treatment toxicity is of concern. We report our results with whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WAP-IMRT) as a component of multimodality therapy for DSCRT at a single institution. Materials/Methods: Medical records of all patients with DSCRT who received WAP-IMRT as part of definitive treatment at MD Anderson (2006-2010) were identified and reviewed. Results: Eight patients with DSRCT received WAP-IMRT with a median follow-up of 15.2 months. All patients received multiple courses of chemotherapy followed by surgical debulking of intra-abdominal disease; seven also had intraoperative hyperthermic cisplatin. WAP-IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy postoperatively; four patients received a simultaneous boost (6-10 Gy) to sites of gross residual disease. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy during WAP-IMRT. No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurred during RT. Red-cell transfusions were given to two patients to maintain hemoglobin levels >10 g/dL. Grade 4 cytopenia requiring growth factor support occurred in only one patient; no other significant cytopenias were noted. WAP-IMRT resulted in 25% lower radiation doses to the lumbosacral vertebral bodies and pelvic bones than conventional RT plans. The median time to local or distant failure after WAP-IMRT was 8.73 months in seven patients. One patient who had completed RT 20 months before the last follow-up remains alive without evidence of disease. Five patients (63%) experienced treatment failure in the abdomen. Distant failure occurred in three patients (37.5%). Conclusions: WAP-IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy was well tolerated after aggressive surgery for DSCRT. Enhanced bone sparing with IMRT probably accounts for the low hematologic

  7. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 106 particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 105 particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation time

  8. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clivio, Alessandro; Kluge, Anne; Cozzi, Luca; Köhler, Christhardt; Neumann, Oliver; Vanetti, Eugenio; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  9. Particle swarm optimizer for weighting factor selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Liyuan; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Gui, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    In inverse treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the objective function is typically the sum of the weighted sub-scores, where the weights indicate the importance of the sub-scores. To obtain a high-quality treatment plan, the planner manually adjusts the objective weights using a trial-and-error procedure until an acceptable plan is reached. In this work, a new particle swarm optimization (PSO) method which can adjust the weighting factors automatically was investigated to overcome the requirement of manual adjustment, thereby reducing the workload of the human planner and contributing to the development of a fully automated planning process. The proposed optimization method consists of three steps. (i) First, a swarm of weighting factors (i.e., particles) is initialized randomly in the search space, where each particle corresponds to a global objective function. (ii) Then, a plan optimization solver is employed to obtain the optimal solution for each particle, and the values of the evaluation functions used to determine the particle's location and the population global location for the PSO are calculated based on these results. (iii) Next, the weighting factors are updated based on the particle's location and the population global location. Step (ii) is performed alternately with step (iii) until the termination condition is reached. In this method, the evaluation function is a combination of several key points on the dose volume histograms. Furthermore, a perturbation strategy - the crossover and mutation operator hybrid approach - is employed to enhance the population diversity, and two arguments are applied to the evaluation function to improve the flexibility of the algorithm. In this study, the proposed method was used to develop IMRT treatment plans involving five unequally spaced 6MV photon beams for 10 prostate cancer cases. The proposed optimization algorithm yielded high-quality plans for all of the cases, without human

  10. Integral dose in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Xu, S; Jiang, W; Xie, C; Wang, J

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs), normal tissue and the whole body in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy for whole pelvic r