Science.gov

Sample records for inter-institutional automated patient-specific

  1. Assessing the accuracy of an inter-institutional automated patient-specific health problem list

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health problem lists are a key component of electronic health records and are instrumental in the development of decision-support systems that encourage best practices and optimal patient safety. Most health problem lists require initial clinical information to be entered manually and few integrate information across care providers and institutions. This study assesses the accuracy of a novel approach to create an inter-institutional automated health problem list in a computerized medical record (MOXXI) that integrates three sources of information for an individual patient: diagnostic codes from medical services claims from all treating physicians, therapeutic indications from electronic prescriptions, and single-indication drugs. Methods Data for this study were obtained from 121 general practitioners and all medical services provided for 22,248 of their patients. At the opening of a patient's file, all health problems detected through medical service utilization or single-indication drug use were flagged to the physician in the MOXXI system. Each new arising health problem were presented as 'potential' and physicians were prompted to specify if the health problem was valid (Y) or not (N) or if they preferred to reassess its validity at a later time. Results A total of 263,527 health problems, representing 891 unique problems, were identified for the group of 22,248 patients. Medical services claims contributed to the majority of problems identified (77%), followed by therapeutic indications from electronic prescriptions (14%), and single-indication drugs (9%). Physicians actively chose to assess 41.7% (n = 106,950) of health problems. Overall, 73% of the problems assessed were considered valid; 42% originated from medical service diagnostic codes, 11% from single indication drugs, and 47% from prescription indications. Twelve percent of problems identified through other treating physicians were considered valid compared to 28% identified through study

  2. Automated Measurement of Patient-Specific Tibial Slopes from MRI

    PubMed Central

    Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Summers, Rodney K.; Ahmadi, Kaveh; Goel, Vijay K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Nyman, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multi-planar proximal tibial slopes may be associated with increased likelihood of osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury, due in part to their role in checking the anterior-posterior stability of the knee. Established methods suffer repeatability limitations and lack computational efficiency for intuitive clinical adoption. The aims of this study were to develop a novel automated approach and to compare the repeatability and computational efficiency of the approach against previously established methods. Methods: Tibial slope geometries were obtained via MRI and measured using an automated Matlab-based approach. Data were compared for repeatability and evaluated for computational efficiency. Results: Mean lateral tibial slope (LTS) for females (7.2°) was greater than for males (1.66°). Mean LTS in the lateral concavity zone was greater for females (7.8° for females, 4.2° for males). Mean medial tibial slope (MTS) for females was greater (9.3° vs. 4.6°). Along the medial concavity zone, female subjects demonstrated greater MTS. Conclusion: The automated method was more repeatable and computationally efficient than previously identified methods and may aid in the clinical assessment of knee injury risk, inform surgical planning, and implant design efforts. PMID:28952547

  3. Automated patient-specific classification of long-term Electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ince, Turker; Zabihi, Morteza; Ince, Dilek

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a novel systematic approach for patient-specific classification of long-term Electroencephalography (EEG). The goal is to extract the seizure sections with a high accuracy to ease the Neurologist's burden of inspecting such long-term EEG data. We aim to achieve this using the minimum feedback from the Neurologist. To accomplish this, we use the majority of the state-of-the-art features proposed in this domain for evolving a collective network of binary classifiers (CNBC) using multi-dimensional particle swarm optimization (MD PSO). Multiple CNBCs are then used to form a CNBC ensemble (CNBC-E), which aggregates epileptic seizure frames from the classification map of each CNBC in order to maximize the sensitivity rate. Finally, a morphological filter forms the final epileptic segments while filtering out the outliers in the form of classification noise. The proposed system is fully generic, which does not require any a priori information about the patient such as the list of relevant EEG channels. The results of the classification experiments, which are performed over the benchmark CHB-MIT scalp long-term EEG database show that the proposed system can achieve all the aforementioned objectives and exhibits a significantly superior performance compared to several other state-of-the-art methods. Using a limited training dataset that is formed by less than 2 min of seizure and 24 min of non-seizure data on the average taken from the early 25% section of the EEG record of each patient, the proposed system establishes an average sensitivity rate above 89% along with an average specificity rate above 93% over the test set. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient-specific bone modeling and analysis: the role of integration and automation in clinical adoption.

    PubMed

    Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2015-03-18

    Patient-specific analysis of bones is considered an important tool for diagnosis and treatment of skeletal diseases and for clinical research aimed at understanding the etiology of skeletal diseases and the effects of different types of treatment on their progress. In this article, we discuss how integration of several important components enables accurate and cost-effective patient-specific bone analysis, focusing primarily on patient-specific finite element (FE) modeling of bones. First, the different components are briefly reviewed. Then, two important aspects of patient-specific FE modeling, namely integration of modeling components and automation of modeling approaches, are discussed. We conclude with a section on validation of patient-specific modeling results, possible applications of patient-specific modeling procedures, current limitations of the modeling approaches, and possible areas for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning.

  6. An automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, William J.; McWilliam, Alan; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Mackay, Ranald I.; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    Contour propagation is an essential component of adaptive radiotherapy, but current contour propagation algorithms are not yet sufficiently accurate to be used without manual supervision. Manual review of propagated contours is time-consuming, making routine implementation of real-time adaptive radiotherapy unrealistic. Automated methods of monitoring the performance of contour propagation algorithms are therefore required. We have developed an automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation and validated it on a cohort of head and neck patients, on which parotids were outlined by two observers. Two types of error were simulated—mislabelling of contours and introducing noise in the scans before propagation. The ability of the workflow to correctly predict the occurrence of errors was tested, taking both sets of observer contours as ground truth, using receiver operator characteristic analysis. The area under the curve was 0.90 and 0.85 for the observers, indicating good ability to predict the occurrence of errors. This tool could potentially be used to identify propagated contours that are likely to be incorrect, acting as a flag for manual review of these contours. This would make contour propagation more efficient, facilitating the routine implementation of adaptive radiotherapy.

  7. An automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation.

    PubMed

    Beasley, William J; McWilliam, Alan; Slevin, Nicholas J; Mackay, Ranald I; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-12-21

    Contour propagation is an essential component of adaptive radiotherapy, but current contour propagation algorithms are not yet sufficiently accurate to be used without manual supervision. Manual review of propagated contours is time-consuming, making routine implementation of real-time adaptive radiotherapy unrealistic. Automated methods of monitoring the performance of contour propagation algorithms are therefore required. We have developed an automated workflow for patient-specific quality control of contour propagation and validated it on a cohort of head and neck patients, on which parotids were outlined by two observers. Two types of error were simulated-mislabelling of contours and introducing noise in the scans before propagation. The ability of the workflow to correctly predict the occurrence of errors was tested, taking both sets of observer contours as ground truth, using receiver operator characteristic analysis. The area under the curve was 0.90 and 0.85 for the observers, indicating good ability to predict the occurrence of errors. This tool could potentially be used to identify propagated contours that are likely to be incorrect, acting as a flag for manual review of these contours. This would make contour propagation more efficient, facilitating the routine implementation of adaptive radiotherapy.

  8. Automated coronary artery calcium scoring from non-contrast CT using a patient-specific algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiaowei; Slomka, Piotr J.; Diaz-Zamudio, Mariana; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.; Terzopoulos, Demetri; Dey, Damini

    2015-03-01

    Non-contrast cardiac CT is used worldwide to assess coronary artery calcium (CAC), a subclinical marker of coronary atherosclerosis. Manual quantification of regional CAC scores includes identifying candidate regions, followed by thresholding and connected component labeling. We aimed to develop and validate a fully-automated, algorithm for both overall and regional measurement of CAC scores from non-contrast CT using a hybrid multi-atlas registration, active contours and knowledge-based region separation algorithm. A co-registered segmented CT atlas was created from manually segmented non-contrast CT data from 10 patients (5 men, 5 women) and stored offline. For each patient scan, the heart region, left ventricle, right ventricle, ascending aorta and aortic root are located by multi-atlas registration followed by active contours refinement. Regional coronary artery territories (left anterior descending artery, left circumflex artery and right coronary artery) are separated using a knowledge-based region separation algorithm. Calcifications from these coronary artery territories are detected by region growing at each lesion. Global and regional Agatston scores and volume scores were calculated in 50 patients. Agatston scores and volume scores calculated by the algorithm and the expert showed excellent correlation (Agatston score: r = 0.97, p < 0.0001, volume score: r = 0.97, p < 0.0001) with no significant differences by comparison of individual data points (Agatston score: p = 0.30, volume score: p = 0.33). The total time was <60 sec on a standard computer. Our results show that fast accurate and automated quantification of CAC scores from non-contrast CT is feasible.

  9. Automated identification of brain tumors from single MR images based on segmentation with refined patient-specific priors

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuán, Ana; Price, Cathy J.; Mancini, Laura; Josse, Goulven; Grogan, Alice; Yamamoto, Adam K.; Geva, Sharon; Leff, Alex P.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Seghier, Mohamed L.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors can have different shapes or locations, making their identification very challenging. In functional MRI, it is not unusual that patients have only one anatomical image due to time and financial constraints. Here, we provide a modified automatic lesion identification (ALI) procedure which enables brain tumor identification from single MR images. Our method rests on (A) a modified segmentation-normalization procedure with an explicit “extra prior” for the tumor and (B) an outlier detection procedure for abnormal voxel (i.e., tumor) classification. To minimize tissue misclassification, the segmentation-normalization procedure requires prior information of the tumor location and extent. We therefore propose that ALI is run iteratively so that the output of Step B is used as a patient-specific prior in Step A. We test this procedure on real T1-weighted images from 18 patients, and the results were validated in comparison to two independent observers' manual tracings. The automated procedure identified the tumors successfully with an excellent agreement with the manual segmentation (area under the ROC curve = 0.97 ± 0.03). The proposed procedure increases the flexibility and robustness of the ALI tool and will be particularly useful for lesion-behavior mapping studies, or when lesion identification and/or spatial normalization are problematic. PMID:24381535

  10. Automated identification of brain tumors from single MR images based on segmentation with refined patient-specific priors.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Ana; Price, Cathy J; Mancini, Laura; Josse, Goulven; Grogan, Alice; Yamamoto, Adam K; Geva, Sharon; Leff, Alex P; Yousry, Tarek A; Seghier, Mohamed L

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors can have different shapes or locations, making their identification very challenging. In functional MRI, it is not unusual that patients have only one anatomical image due to time and financial constraints. Here, we provide a modified automatic lesion identification (ALI) procedure which enables brain tumor identification from single MR images. Our method rests on (A) a modified segmentation-normalization procedure with an explicit "extra prior" for the tumor and (B) an outlier detection procedure for abnormal voxel (i.e., tumor) classification. To minimize tissue misclassification, the segmentation-normalization procedure requires prior information of the tumor location and extent. We therefore propose that ALI is run iteratively so that the output of Step B is used as a patient-specific prior in Step A. We test this procedure on real T1-weighted images from 18 patients, and the results were validated in comparison to two independent observers' manual tracings. The automated procedure identified the tumors successfully with an excellent agreement with the manual segmentation (area under the ROC curve = 0.97 ± 0.03). The proposed procedure increases the flexibility and robustness of the ALI tool and will be particularly useful for lesion-behavior mapping studies, or when lesion identification and/or spatial normalization are problematic.

  11. Process Improvement For Inter-Institutional Research Contracting

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Michael; Logan, Jennifer; Bjorklund, Todd; Whitfield, Jesse; Reed, Peggy; Lesher, Laurie; Sikalis, Amy; Brown, Brent; Drollinger, Sandy; Larrabee, Kristine; Thompson, Kristie; Clark, Erin; Workman, Michael; Boi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sponsored research increasingly requires multi-institutional collaboration. However, research contracting procedures have become more complicated and time-consuming. The perinatal research units of two co-located healthcare systems sought to improve their research contracting processes. METHODS The Lean Process, a management practice that iteratively involves team members in root cause analyses and process improvement, was applied to the research contracting process, initially using Process Mapping and then developing Problem Solving Reports. RESULTS Root Cause Analyses revealed that the longest delays were the individual contract legal negotiations. In addition, the ‘business entity’ was the research support personnel of both healthcare systems whose ‘customers’ were investigators attempting to conduct inter-institutional research. Development of mutually acceptable research contract templates and language, chain of custody templates, and process development and refinement formats decreased the Notice of Grant Award to Purchase Order time from a mean of 103.5 days in the year prior to LEAN Process implementation to 45.8 days in the year after implementation (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS The Lean Process can be applied to inter-institutional research contracting with significant improvement in contract implementation. PMID:26083433

  12. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  13. Patient-specific quantification of image quality: An automated technique for measuring the distribution of organ Hounsfield units in clinical chest CT images.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Ehsan; Sanders, Jeremiah; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-06-28

    To develop and validate an automated technique for measuring organ Hounsfield units (HUs) in clinical chest CT images. An automated computer algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of HUs inside four major organs: the lungs, liver, aorta, and spine. These organs were first identified using image processing techniques. Each organ was segmented into multiple regions of interest (ROIs) and characterized in terms of HU values. The medians of the ROI histograms were computed for each dataset. The automated results were validated by assessing their correlation with manual measurements in fifteen contrast-enhanced and fifteen non-contrast-enhanced clinical chest CT datasets. The robustness of the measurements with respect to dependency on image noise and CTDIvol was ascertained. One utility of the approach was further demonstrated in assessing the variability in aorta HUs across 732 patients undergoing noncontrast and contrast-enhanced examinations. The algorithm successfully measured the histograms of the four organs in both contrast and non-contrast-enhanced chest CT exams. The automated measurements were in agreement with manual measurements with a near unity slope of the relationship between automated and manual measurements with high coefficient of determination (slope = 0.931-1.003, R(2) = 0.89-0.99). Organ median HU measurements were found to be largely independent of both image noise and CTDIvol (P > 0.05), as expected. Across patient cases, the program ran successfully across 95% (697/732) of cases. Aorta median HUs demonstrated five times more variability in contrast-enhanced exams compared to that in non-contrast-enhanced exams. Patient-specific organ HUs can be measured from clinical datasets. The algorithm that was developed can be run on both contrast-enhanced and non-contrast-enhanced clinical datasets. The method can be applied to automatically extract image HU-contrast characteristics of clinical CT images, not captured in phantom data

  14. Automated Peritoneal Dialysis Prescriptions for Enhancing Sodium and Fluid Removal: A Predictive Analysis of Optimized, Patient-Specific Dwell Times for the Day Period

    PubMed Central

    Akonur, Alp; Guest, Steven; Sloand, James A.; Leypoldt, John K.

    2013-01-01

    short optimized dwell (1426 mL and 155 mmol) or without such a dwell (1327 mL and 148 mmol). ♦ Conclusions: The 3-pore model predictions revealed that patient-specific optimal dwell times and regimens with a longer day dwell might provide improved UF and NaR options in APD patients with a variety of peritoneal membrane transport characteristics. In patients without access to icodextrin, therapy 1 might enhance UF and NaR and provide a short-term option to increase fluid removal. Although that approach may offer clinicians a therapeutic option for the overhydrated patient who requires increased UF in the short term, APD prescriptions including icodextrin provide a means to augment sodium and fluid removal. Data from clinical trials are needed to confirm the predictions from this study. PMID:24335125

  15. Collected Papers: Inter-Institutional Seminar in Childhood Education (8th, Ogden, Utah, August, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Ruth C., Ed.

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented during the 1979 Utah Inter-Institutional Seminar in Childhood Education. Introductory lectures provide an overview of theories of human development and indicate techniques for understanding child behavior. Self-reflection by teachers and techniques for influencing children are emphasized.…

  16. A Factor Analysis on Teamwork Performance: An Empirical Study of Inter-Instituted Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Mingchang; Chen, Ya-Hsueh

    2014-01-01

    Problem Statement: Inter-instituted collaboration has attracted broad attention for educational quality improvement in the last decade. The team performance of these innovative team projects received foremost attention, particularly with knowledge-sharing, emotional intelligence, and team conflicts. Purpose of Study: The purpose of the study was…

  17. MarylandOnline's Inter-Institutional Project to Train Higher Education Adjunct Faculty to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shattuck, Julie; Dubins, Bobbi; Zilberman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an inter-institutional project to design, develop, pilot, and evaluate a state-wide online training course for higher education adjunct faculty who are preparing to teach their first online course. We begin with a brief literature review to contextualize the stated problem the project sought to address: the need for…

  18. Collaboration-Focused Workshop for Interdisciplinary, Inter-Institutional Teams of College Science Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Pamela K.; Stultz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Many science educators know of the pedagogical benefits of inquiry- and research-based labs, yet numerous barriers to implementation exist. In this article we describe a faculty development workshop that explored interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaborations as potential mechanisms for overcoming barriers to curricular innovation.

  19. An Inter-Institutional Partnership for a Doctoral Program in an Era of Financial Constraint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margulus, Lisabeth S.; Price, William J.; Tracy, Jaclynn C.

    As educational indicators continue to signal tough times ahead, higher education institutions are also likely to continue to face further belt tightening. This means operating more efficiently and will also require that institutions look for opportunities to collaborate through inter-institutional partnerships that provide creative ways to address…

  20. Use of Copyrighted Material for Instruction Through Inter-Institutional Distribution by the Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Fred S.

    Electronic media transmit instructional material that is protected by copyright law. Under the present Copyright Act (U.S. Code, Title 17, 1909) teachers may use material in the "public domain," and excerpts from copyrighted works under the judicial doctrine of "fair use." Inter-institutional transmission of live performances…

  1. Canadian Association of Radiologists Radiation Protection Working Group: Automated Patient-Specific Dose Registries—What Are They and What Are They Good for?

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Thorarin A; Thakur, Yogesh; Chakraborty, Santanu; Liu, Peter; O'Malley, Martin E; Coulden, Richard; Noga, Michelle; Mason, Andrew; Mayo, John

    2015-08-01

    Medical radiation should be used appropriately and with a dose as low as reasonably achievable. Dose monitoring technologies have been developed that automatically accumulate patient dose indicators, providing effective dose estimates and patient-specific dose histories. Deleterious radiation related events have prompted increased public interest in the safe use of medical radiation. Some view individualized patient dose histories as a tool to help manage the patient dose. However, it is imperative that dose monitoring technologies be evaluated on the outcomes of dose reduction and effective patient management. Patient dose management needs to be consistent with the widely accepted linear no-threshold model of stochastic radiation effects. This essay reviews the attributes and limitations of dose monitoring technologies to provoke discussion regarding resource allocation in the current fiscally constrained health care system. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated, patient-specific estimation of regional imparted energy and dose from tube current modulated computed tomography exams across 13 protocols.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jeremiah; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, William Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on surrogates for dose, such as CT dose index and size-specific dose estimates, rather than dose per se. Organ dose is considered as the gold standard for radiation dosimetry. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden and are beneficial because they do not require knowledge of organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique to retrospectively estimate the imparted energy from tube current-modulated (TCM) CT exams across 13 protocols. Monte Carlo simulations of various head and body TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product. Results from the Monte Carlo simulations indicate that normalized imparted energy increases with increasing both scanned mass and tube potential, but it is relatively unaffected by the strength of the TCM. The automated algorithm was tested on 40 clinical datasets with a 98% success rate.

  3. The effects of integrating service learning into computer science: an inter-institutional longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Jamie; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey; Zuo, Huifang

    2015-07-01

    This study is a follow-up to one published in computer science education in 2010 that reported preliminary results showing a positive impact of service learning on student attitudes associated with success and retention in computer science. That paper described how service learning was incorporated into a computer science course in the context of the Students & Technology in Academia, Research, and Service (STARS) Alliance, an NSF-supported broadening participation in computing initiative that aims to diversify the computer science pipeline through innovative pedagogy and inter-institutional partnerships. The current paper describes how the STARS Alliance has expanded to diverse institutions, all using service learning as a vehicle for broadening participation in computing and enhancing attitudes and behaviors associated with student success. Results supported the STARS model of service learning for enhancing computing efficacy and computing commitment and for providing diverse students with many personal and professional development benefits.

  4. Inter-institutional development of a poster-based cancer biology learning tool.

    PubMed

    Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Modzelewski, Ruth A; Steinman, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    There is a paucity of African-American Cancer researchers. To help address this, an educational collaboration was developed between a Comprehensive Cancer Center and a distant undergraduate biology department at a minority institution that sought to teach students introductory cancer biology while modeling research culture. A student-centered active learning curriculum was established that incorporated scientific poster presentations and simulated research exercises to foster learning of cancer biology. Students successfully mined primary literature for supportive data to test cancer-related hypotheses. Student feedback indicated that the poster project substantially enhanced depth of understanding of cancer biology and laid the groundwork for subsequent laboratory work. This inter-institutional collaboration modeled the research process while conveying facts and concepts about cancer.

  5. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students

    PubMed Central

    WONG, REBECCA S.Y.; SIOW, HENG LOKE; KUMARASAMY, VINOTH; SHAHERAH FADHLULLAH SUHAIMI, NAZRILA

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of <0.05 was considered as statistically significant, and <0.001 as highly significant. Results: Both statistically significant interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences were observed. Out of the 337 students, a majority of the participants were unimodal learners (n=263, 78.04%). The most common type of learners was the reading/writing type (n=92, 27.30%) while the kinesthetic subscale (M=6.98, SD=2.85) had the

  6. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    PubMed

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of <0.05 was considered as statistically significant, and <0.001 as highly significant. Both statistically significant interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences were observed. Out of the 337 students, a majority of the participants were unimodal learners (n=263, 78.04%). The most common type of learners was the reading/writing type (n=92, 27.30%) while the kinesthetic subscale (M=6.98, SD=2.85) had the highest mean score. Female students (M

  7. Are Mergers a Win-Win Strategic Model? A Content Analysis of Inter-Institutional Collaboration between Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripoll-Soler, Carlos; de-Miguel-Molina, María

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper, based on a content analysis of the literature about models of inter-institutional collaboration between higher education institutions, is to establish the characteristics that set them apart, contextualize each of these models in terms of the features of the setting in which they are implemented, and ascertain their…

  8. Are Mergers a Win-Win Strategic Model? A Content Analysis of Inter-Institutional Collaboration between Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripoll-Soler, Carlos; de-Miguel-Molina, María

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper, based on a content analysis of the literature about models of inter-institutional collaboration between higher education institutions, is to establish the characteristics that set them apart, contextualize each of these models in terms of the features of the setting in which they are implemented, and ascertain their…

  9. Activity-Based Restorative Therapies after Spinal Cord Injury: Inter-institutional conceptions and perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Dolbow, David R.; Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Recio, Albert C.; Stiens, Steven A.; Curry, Amanda C.; Sadowsky, Cristina L.; Gater, David R.; Martin, Rebecca; McDonald, John W.

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript is a review of the theoretical and clinical concepts provided during an inter-institutional training program on Activity-Based Restorative Therapies (ABRT) and the perceptions of those in attendance. ABRT is a relatively recent high volume and intensity approach toward the restoration of neurological deficits and decreasing the risk of secondary conditions associated with paralysis after spinal cord injury (SCI). ABRT is guided by the principle of neuroplasticity and the belief that even those with chronic SCI can benefit from repeated activation of the spinal cord pathways located both above and below the level of injury. ABRT can be defined as repetitive-task specific training using weight-bearing and external facilitation of neuromuscular activation. The five key components of ABRT are weight-bearing activities, functional electrical stimulation, task-specific practice, massed practice and locomotor training which includes body weight supported treadmill walking and water treadmill training. The various components of ABRT have been shown to improve functional mobility, and reverse negative body composition changes after SCI leading to the reduction of cardiovascular and other metabolic disease risk factors. The consensus of those who received the ABRT training was that ABRT has much potential for enhancement of recovery of those with SCI. Although various institutions have their own strengths and challenges, each institution was able to initiate a modified ABRT program. PMID:26236547

  10. Multi-laboratory inter-institute reproducibility study of IVOCT and IVUS assessments using published consensus document definitions.

    PubMed

    Gerbaud, Edouard; Weisz, Giora; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Manabu; Shimizu, Takehisa; Wang, Lin; Souza, Christiano; Bouma, Brett E; Suter, Melissa J; Shishkov, Milen; Ughi, Giovanni J; Halpern, Elkan F; Rosenberg, Mireille; Waxman, Sergio; Moses, Jeffrey W; Mintz, Gary S; Maehara, Akiko; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) assessments, including a comparison to intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities of IVOCT have been previously described, whereas inter-institute reliability in multiple laboratories has never been systematically studied. In 2 independent laboratories with intravascular imaging expertise, 100 randomized matched data sets of IVOCT and IVUS images were analysed by 4 independent observers according to published consensus document definitions. Intra-observer, inter-observer, and inter-institute variabilities of IVOCT qualitative and quantitative measurements vs. IVUS measurements were assessed. Minor inter- and intra-observer variability of both imaging techniques was observed for detailed qualitative and geometric analysis, except for inter-observer mixed plaque identification on IVUS (κ = 0.70) and for inter-observer fibrous cap thickness measurement reproducibility on IVOCT (ICC = 0.48). The magnitude of inter-institute measurement differences for IVOCT was statistically significantly less than that for IVUS concerning lumen cross-sectional area (CSA), maximum and minimum lumen diameters, stent CSA, and maximum and minimum stent diameters (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.02, P < 0.001, and P = 0.01, respectively). Minor inter-institute measurement variabilities using both techniques were also found for plaque identification. In the measurement of lumen CSA, maximum and minimum lumen diameters, stent CSA, and maximum and minimum stent diameters by analysts from two different laboratories, reproducibility of IVOCT was more consistent than that of IVUS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Multi-laboratory inter-institute reproducibility study of IVOCT and IVUS assessments using published consensus document definitions

    PubMed Central

    Gerbaud, Edouard; Weisz, Giora; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Manabu; Shimizu, Takehisa; Wang, Lin; Souza, Christiano; Bouma, Brett E.; Suter, Melissa J.; Shishkov, Milen; Ughi, Giovanni J.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Rosenberg, Mireille; Waxman, Sergio; Moses, Jeffrey W.; Mintz, Gary S.; Maehara, Akiko; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) assessments, including a comparison to intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Intra-observer and inter-observer variabilities of IVOCT have been previously described, whereas inter-institute reliability in multiple laboratories has never been systematically studied. Methods and results In 2 independent laboratories with intravascular imaging expertise, 100 randomized matched data sets of IVOCT and IVUS images were analysed by 4 independent observers according to published consensus document definitions. Intra-observer, inter-observer, and inter-institute variabilities of IVOCT qualitative and quantitative measurements vs. IVUS measurements were assessed. Minor inter- and intra-observer variability of both imaging techniques was observed for detailed qualitative and geometric analysis, except for inter-observer mixed plaque identification on IVUS (κ = 0.70) and for inter-observer fibrous cap thickness measurement reproducibility on IVOCT (ICC = 0.48). The magnitude of inter-institute measurement differences for IVOCT was statistically significantly less than that for IVUS concerning lumen cross-sectional area (CSA), maximum and minimum lumen diameters, stent CSA, and maximum and minimum stent diameters (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.02, P < 0.001, and P = 0.01, respectively). Minor inter-institute measurement variabilities using both techniques were also found for plaque identification. Conclusion In the measurement of lumen CSA, maximum and minimum lumen diameters, stent CSA, and maximum and minimum stent diameters by analysts from two different laboratories, reproducibility of IVOCT was more consistent than that of IVUS. PMID:26377904

  12. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  13. Inter-Institutional Variation in Management Decisions for Treatment of Four Common Cancers: A Multi-Institutional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Jane C.; Uno, Hajime; Taback, Nathan; Ting, Gladys; Cronin, Angel; D’Amico, Thomas A.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Background When clinical practice is governed by evidenced-based guidelines and there is consensus regarding their validity, practice variation should be minimal. Where evidence gaps exist, greater variation is expected. Objective To systematically assess inter-institutional variation in management decisions for 4 common cancers. Design Multi-institutional observational cohort study of cancer patients diagnosed between July 2006 through May 2011 and observed through December 31, 2011. Setting 18 cancer centers participating in the formulation of treatment guidelines and systematic outcomes assessment through the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Patients 25,589 patients with incident cancer of the breast, colorectum, lung, or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Measurements Inter-institutional variation for 171 binary management decisions with varying levels of supporting evidence. For each decision, variation was characterized by the median absolute deviation (MAD) of the center-specific proportions. Results Inter-institutional variation was high (MAD >10%) for 35/171 (20%) oncology management decisions. This included: 9/22 (41%) for NHL, 16/76 (21%) for breast, 7/47 (15%) for lung, and 3/26 (12%) for colorectal. Decisions involving imaging and/or diagnostic procedures accounted for 46% and chemotherapy regimen choice for 37% of high variance decisions. The evidence grade underpinning the 35 high variance decisions was level I for 0%, 2A for 49% and 2B/other for 51%. Limitations Physician identifiers were unavailable, and results may not generalize outside of major cancer centers. Conclusions The substantial variation in institutional practice manifest among cancer centers reveals a lack of consensus about optimal management for common clinical scenarios. For clinicians, awareness of management decisions with high variation should prompt attention to patient preferences. For health systems, high variation can be used to prioritize comparative effectiveness

  14. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  15. Patient specific physical anatomy models.

    PubMed

    Cameron, B M; Holmes, D R; Rettmann, M E; Robb, R A

    2008-01-01

    The advent of small footprint stereo-lithographic printers and the ready availability of segmentation and surface modeling software provide a unique opportunity to create patient-specific physical models of anatomy, validation of image guided intervention applications against phantoms that exhibit naturally occurring anatomic variation. Because these models can incorporate all structures relevant to a procedure, this allows validation to occur under realistic conditions using the same or similar techniques as would be used in a clinical application. This in turn reduces the number of trials and time spent performing in-vivo validation experiments. In this paper, we describe our general approach for the creation of both non-tissue and tissue-mimicking patient-specific models as part of a general-purpose patient emulation system used to validate image guided intervention applications.

  16. Inter-Institutional Pathology Consultation: The Importance of Breast Pathology Subspecialization in a Setting of Tertiary Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Yousef; Khoury, Thaer

    2015-01-01

    Inter-institutional pathology consultation (IPC) has shown to be significant in patient care. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of IPC for breast biopsies in our institution. A total of 502 consecutive consult cases of breast core needle biopsies were reviewed. The original pathology reports from the referring institutions and our reports were compared for all cases. All cases were reviewed by specialized breast pathologists. Discordance was divided into minor and major based on the impact on patient care. We reviewed the subsequent excisional biopsy for all discordant cases. Discordance was seen in 104 (20.7%) cases; 40 (8%) had a major discordance and 64 (13%) had a minor discordance. Subsequent surgical excision was available for 25 (62.5%) cases with major discordance and for 13 (20.3%) with minor discordance. Our interpretation changed management in 15 (3%) patients, while 25 (5%) had a potential of management change. The cases with major discordance could be subcategorized into five groups, malignant 5 (12.5%), premalignant 16 (40%), biomarkers 10 (25%), fibroepithelial lesions 6 (15%), and others 3 (7.5%). Our findings support the value of IPC review in decreasing the likelihood of diagnostic errors that may lead to significant impact on patient care. It is necessary that outside pathology material in the referral settings been reviewed by a specialized breast pathologist. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Elimination of inter-institutional discrepancies in health check-up results: standardization of diagnostic decision level and uniformity of examination data.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M

    1998-06-01

    In Japan, more people are taking AMHTS and the number of medical institutions where it is provided is also increasing. AMHTS is expected to continue to expand in scope and importance from now on. People do not necessarily take AMHTS at the same medical institutions year after year. For AMHTS to be truly useful from the viewpoint of preventive medicine and be able to continue its development, it is imperative that the level of diagnosis be standardized and the compatibility of examination data be established among different institutions. The Japan Society of MHTS is conducting pilot studies of reversed quality control (RQC) as part of its activities with the aim of clearly understanding inter-institution gaps regarding AMHTS and to establish uniformity in examination data.

  18. Factors associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates of very-low-birth-weight infants in 34 Malaysian neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Boo, Nem-Yun; Cheah, Irene Guat-Sim

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether patient loads, infant status on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants in the Malaysian National Neonatal Registry (MNNR). This was a retrospective study of 3,880 VLBW (≤ 1,500 g) infants admitted to 34 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the MNNR. Sepsis was diagnosed in symptomatic infants with positive blood culture. Sepsis developed in 623 (16.1%) infants; 61 (9.8%) had early-onset sepsis (EOS) and 562 (90.2%) had late-onset sepsis (LOS). The median EOS rate of all NICUs was 1.0% (interquartile range [IQR] 0%, 2.0%). Compared with NICUs reporting no EOS (n = 14), NICUs reporting EOS (n = 20) had significantly higher patient loads (total live births, admissions, VLBW infants, outborns); more mothers with a history of abortions, and antenatal steroids and intrapartum antibiotic use; more infants requiring resuscitation procedures at birth; higher rates of surfactant therapy, pneumonia and insertion of central venous catheters. The median LOS rate of all NICUs was 14.5% (IQR 7.8%, 19.2%). Compared with NICUs with LOS rates below the first quartile (n = 8), those above the third quartile (n = 8) used less intrapartum antibiotics, and had significantly bigger and more mature infants, more outborns, as well as a higher number of sick infants requiring ventilator support and total parenteral nutrition. Patient loads, resuscitation at birth, status of infants on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Factors associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates of very-low-birth-weight infants in 34 Malaysian neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Nem-Yun; Cheah, Irene Guat-Sim

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine whether patient loads, infant status on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis rates in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants in the Malaysian National Neonatal Registry (MNNR). METHODS This was a retrospective study of 3,880 VLBW (≤ 1,500 g) infants admitted to 34 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the MNNR. Sepsis was diagnosed in symptomatic infants with positive blood culture. RESULTS Sepsis developed in 623 (16.1%) infants; 61 (9.8%) had early-onset sepsis (EOS) and 562 (90.2%) had late-onset sepsis (LOS). The median EOS rate of all NICUs was 1.0% (interquartile range [IQR] 0%, 2.0%). Compared with NICUs reporting no EOS (n = 14), NICUs reporting EOS (n = 20) had significantly higher patient loads (total live births, admissions, VLBW infants, outborns); more mothers with a history of abortions, and antenatal steroids and intrapartum antibiotic use; more infants requiring resuscitation procedures at birth; higher rates of surfactant therapy, pneumonia and insertion of central venous catheters. The median LOS rate of all NICUs was 14.5% (IQR 7.8%, 19.2%). Compared with NICUs with LOS rates below the first quartile (n = 8), those above the third quartile (n = 8) used less intrapartum antibiotics, and had significantly bigger and more mature infants, more outborns, as well as a higher number of sick infants requiring ventilator support and total parenteral nutrition. CONCLUSION Patient loads, resuscitation at birth, status of infants on admission and treatment interventions were significantly associated with inter-institutional variations in sepsis. PMID:26996633

  20. A parameter estimation framework for patient-specific hemodynamic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itu, Lucian; Sharma, Puneet; Passerini, Tiziano; Kamen, Ali; Suciu, Constantin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a fully automated parameter estimation framework for performing patient-specific hemodynamic computations in arterial models. To determine the personalized values of the windkessel models, which are used as part of the geometrical multiscale circulation model, a parameter estimation problem is formulated. Clinical measurements of pressure and/or flow-rate are imposed as constraints to formulate a nonlinear system of equations, whose fixed point solution is sought. A key feature of the proposed method is a warm-start to the optimization procedure, with better initial solution for the nonlinear system of equations, to reduce the number of iterations needed for the calibration of the geometrical multiscale models. To achieve these goals, the initial solution, computed with a lumped parameter model, is adapted before solving the parameter estimation problem for the geometrical multiscale circulation model: the resistance and the compliance of the circulation model are estimated and compensated. The proposed framework is evaluated on a patient-specific aortic model, a full body arterial model, and multiple idealized anatomical models representing different arterial segments. For each case it leads to the best performance in terms of number of iterations required for the computational model to be in close agreement with the clinical measurements.

  1. Inter-Institutional Comparison of Personalized Risk Assessments for Second Malignant Neoplasms for a 13-Year-Old Girl Receiving Proton versus Photon Craniospinal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Khater, Nabil; Zhang, Rui; Geara, Fady B.; Mahajan, Anita; Jalbout, Wassim; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Youssef, Bassem; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Children receiving radiotherapy face the probability of a subsequent malignant neoplasm (SMN). In some cases, the predicted SMN risk can be reduced by proton therapy. The purpose of this study was to apply the most comprehensive dose assessment methods to estimate the reduction in SMN risk after proton therapy vs. photon therapy for a 13-year-old girl requiring craniospinal irradiation (CSI). We reconstructed the equivalent dose throughout the patient’s body from therapeutic and stray radiation and applied SMN incidence and mortality risk models for each modality. Excluding skin cancer, the risk of incidence after proton CSI was a third of that of photon CSI. The predicted absolute SMN risks were high. For photon CSI, the SMN incidence rates greater than 10% were for thyroid, non-melanoma skin, lung, colon, stomach, and other solid cancers, and for proton CSI they were non-melanoma skin, lung, and other solid cancers. In each setting, lung cancer accounted for half the risk of mortality. In conclusion, the predicted SMN risk for a 13-year-old girl undergoing proton CSI was reduced vs. photon CSI. This study demonstrates the feasibility of inter-institutional whole-body dose and risk assessments and also serves as a model for including risk estimation in personalized cancer care. PMID:25763928

  2. SNAP-II and SNAPPE-II as predictors of death among infants born before the 28th week of gestation. Inter-institutional variations

    PubMed Central

    Dammann, Olaf; Shah, Bhavesh; Naples, Mary; Bednarek, Francis; Zupancic, John; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Leviton, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Background Illness severity scores predict death among infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. We know of no study limited to a population defined by an extremely low gestational age. Methods A total of 1467 infants born before the 28th postmenstrual week at 14 institutions were given Scores for Neonatal Acute Physiology (SNAP-II and SNAPPE-II) based on data collected within the first 12 postnatal hours. All deaths in the intensive care nursery were identified. Results The mortality rate before postnatal day 28 was 13% (inter-institutional range: 7–20%), while the overall mortality was 18% (8–31%). SNAP-IIs, SNAPPE-IIs, and death rates tended to decrease with increasing gestational age. However, even within gestational age strata, the risk of death declined with decreasing SNAP-IIs and SNAPPE-IIs. The predictive value positive of most SNAP-II and SNAPPE-II cut-offs was close to 30. In general an institution’s death rate increased with the proportion of infants whose SNAP-II was 30 or more. Conclusion The physiologic instability in the first 12 post-natal hours identified by illness severity scores conveys information about the risk of death among infants at the lowest gestational ages. PMID:19858146

  3. Current progress in patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of recent advancements in the emerging field of patient-specific modeling (PSM). Researchers in this field are currently simulating a wide variety of tissue and organ dynamics to address challenges in various clinical domains. The majority of this research employs three-dimensional, image-based modeling techniques. Recent PSM publications mostly represent feasibility or preliminary validation studies on modeling technologies, and these systems will require further clinical validation and usability testing before they can become a standard of care. We anticipate that with further testing and research, PSM-derived technologies will eventually become valuable, versatile clinical tools. PMID:19955236

  4. Inter-Institutional Communications Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starlin, Glen

    Can and should television broadcasts and distribution services act as links between institutions of higher education? Educational broadcasting in general has grown slowly since National Educational Television (NET) initiated "network" service in 1954, but now other groups are experimenting in telecommunications interconnection and the…

  5. Patient-specific simulation of tidal breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, M.; Wells, A. K.; Jones, I. P.; Hamill, I. S.; Veeckmans, B.; Vos, W.; Lefevre, C.; Fetitia, C.

    2016-03-01

    Patient-specific simulation of air flows in lungs is now straightforward using segmented airways trees from CT scans as the basis for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These models generally use static geometries, which do not account for the motion of the lungs and its influence on important clinical indicators, such as airway resistance. This paper is concerned with the simulation of tidal breathing, including the dynamic motion of the lungs, and the required analysis workflow. Geometries are based on CT scans obtained at the extremes of the breathing cycle, Total Lung Capacity (TLC) and Functional Residual Capacity (FRC). It describes how topologically consistent geometries are obtained at TLC and FRC, using a `skeleton' of the network of airway branches. From this a 3D computational mesh which morphs between TLC and FRC is generated. CFD results for a number of patient-specific cases, healthy and asthmatic, are presented. Finally their potential use in evaluation of the progress of the disease is discussed, focusing on an important clinical indicator, the airway resistance.

  6. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  7. Patient-specific dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Lagopati, Nefeli; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Vamvakas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an attempt to compare individualised palliative treatment absorbed doses, by planar images data and Monte Carlo simulation, in two in vivo treatment cases, one of bone metastases and the other of liver lesions. Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema was employed to estimate the absorbed doses. Radiopharmaceutical volume distributions and absorbed doses in the lesions as well as in critical organs were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Individualised planar data calculations remain the method of choice in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, but with the disadvantage of attenuation and scatter corrections lack and organ overlay. The overall error is about 7 % for planar data calculations compared with that using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetric calculations using single-photon emission computed tomography with a parallel computed tomography study is proposed as an accurate internal dosimetry with the additional use of dose-volume histograms, which express dose distributions in cases with obvious inhomogeneity.

  8. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.

  9. On the prospect of patient-specific biomechanics without patient-specific properties of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Karol; Lu, Jia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents main theses of two keynote lectures delivered at Euromech Colloquium “Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics” held in Saint Etienne in June 2012. We are witnessing an advent of patient-specific biomechanics that will bring in the future personalized treatments to sufferers all over the world. It is the current task of biomechanists to devise methods for clinically-relevant patient-specific modeling. One of the obstacles standing before the biomechanics community is the difficulty in obtaining patient-specific properties of tissues to be used in biomechanical models. We postulate that focusing on reformulating computational mechanics problems in such a way that the results are weakly sensitive to the variation in mechanical properties of simulated continua is more likely to bear fruit in near future. We consider two types of problems: i) displacement-zero traction problems whose solutions in displacements are weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of the considered continuum; and ii) problems that are approximately statically determinate and therefore their solutions in stresses are also weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of constituents. We demonstrate that the kinematically loaded biomechanical models of the first type are applicable in the field of image-guided surgery where the current, intraoperative configuration of a soft organ is of critical importance. We show that sac-like membranes, which are prototypes of many thin-walled biological organs, are approximately statically determinate and therefore useful solutions for wall stress can be obtained without the knowledge of the wall's properties. We demonstrate the clinical applicability and effectiveness of the proposed methods using examples from modeling neurosurgery and intracranial aneurysms. PMID:23491073

  10. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  11. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    PubMed

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  12. Evaluating and improving patient-specific QA for IMRT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanghua

    2009-12-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and newly-emerging volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) aim to deliver highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume while sparing nearby critical organs as much as possible with the complex motion of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) has become an essential part of IMRT in making sure the delivered dose distributions agree with the planned ones. This dissertation evaluates the performance of current patient-specific QA process and proposes solutions to improve its sensitivity, accuracy and efficiency. In step and shoot IMRT, the study on the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor MLC errors reveals tighter criterion such as 2%/2mm must be employed to detect systematic MLC positioning errors of 2 mm. However, such criterion results in low average passing rate which leads to excessive false alarms, mainly due to inadequate treatment planning system (TPS) beam modeling on beam penumbra. An analytical deconvolution approach is proposed to recover true photon beam profiles to obtain a true beam model which significantly improves agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. Thus a tighter criterion could be employed to enhance the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor errors in the delivery system. Measurement based patient-specific IMRT QA is a time-consuming process. A fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation algorithm is proposed to replace measurement based QA. The algorithm analytically models photons coming out from the accelerator and computes dose distribution from first principles. Accuracy of the algorithm is validated against 2D diode array measurements. The algorithm is found to be fast and accurate enough to replace time consuming measurement based QA. Patient-specific QA for VMAT differs significantly from step and shoot IMRT due to the increased use of dynamic

  13. Patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Henderson, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The use of patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty shifts computer navigation for bone landmark registration and implant positioning from the intraoperative to the preoperative setting. Each system requires preoperative MRI or CT, with specifications determined by the instrument manufacturer. The marketed advantages of patient-specific instruments include greater accuracy in coronal alignment with fewer outliers, no need for instrumentation of the intramedullary canal, reduced surgical time, lower hospital costs, and improved clinical outcomes. The few published results of these instruments suggest minimal gains obtained in hospital logistics variables and minimal evidence of improvement in either alignment or patient outcomes. Disadvantages of patient-specific instruments include increased costs for imaging and instrument fabrication as well as increased preoperative time required for surgical planning and reviewing the instrument plans, and the learning curve for the surgeon to work with the engineers and use these instruments intraoperatively. It is also necessary to have a set of standard instruments available in case the patient-specific instruments do not work properly. Additional data are required before deciding whether these instruments should be recommended.

  14. Patient Specific Dosimetry Phantoms Using Multichannel LDDMM of the Whole Body

    PubMed Central

    Tward, Daniel J.; Ceritoglu, Can; Kolasny, Anthony; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Segars, W. Paul; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an automated procedure for creating detailed patient-specific pediatric dosimetry phantoms from a small set of segmented organs in a child's CT scan. The algorithm involves full body mappings from adult template to pediatric images using multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (MC-LDDMM). The parallel implementation and performance of MC-LDDMM for this application is studied here for a sample of 4 pediatric patients, and from 1 to 24 processors. 93.84% of computation time is parallelized, and the efficiency of parallelization remains high until more than 8 processors are used. The performance of the algorithm was validated on a set of 24 male and 18 female pediatric patients. It was found to be accurate typically to within 1-2 voxels (2–4 mm) and robust across this large and variable data set. PMID:21960989

  15. Patient-specific multiscale modeling of blood flow for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Kahn, Andrew M; Tseng, Elaine E; Guccione, Julius M; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-10-01

    We present a computational framework for multiscale modeling and simulation of blood flow in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. Using this framework, only CT and non-invasive clinical measurements are required without the need to assume pressure and/or flow waveforms in the coronaries and we can capture global circulatory dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology in a case study of a patient with multiple CABGs. A patient-specific model of the blood vessels is constructed from CT image data to include the aorta, aortic branch vessels (brachiocephalic artery and carotids), the coronary arteries and multiple bypass grafts. The rest of the circulatory system is modeled using a lumped parameter network (LPN) 0 dimensional (0D) system comprised of resistances, capacitors (compliance), inductors (inertance), elastance and diodes (valves) that are tuned to match patient-specific clinical data. A finite element solver is used to compute blood flow and pressure in the 3D (3 dimensional) model, and this solver is implicitly coupled to the 0D LPN code at all inlets and outlets. By systematically parameterizing the graft geometry, we evaluate the influence of graft shape on the local hemodynamics, and global circulatory dynamics. Virtual manipulation of graft geometry is automated using Bezier splines and control points along the pathlines. Using this framework, we quantify wall shear stress, wall shear stress gradients and oscillatory shear index for different surgical geometries. We also compare pressures, flow rates and ventricular pressure-volume loops pre- and post-bypass graft surgery. We observe that PV loops do not change significantly after CABG but that both coronary perfusion and local hemodynamic parameters near the anastomosis region change substantially. Implications for future patient-specific optimization of CABG are discussed.

  16. Patient-specific instrumentation for total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Nuno Sampaio

    2016-05-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is a demanding procedure with a known complication rate. Most complications are associated with the glenoid component, a fact that has stimulated investigation into that specific component of the implant. Avoiding glenoid component malposition is very important and is a key reason for recent developments in pre-operative planning and instrumentation to minimise risk.Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) was developed as an alternative to navigation systems, originally for total knee arthroplasty, and is a valid option for shoulder replacements today. It offers increased accuracy in the placement of the glenoid component, which improves the likelihood of an optimal outcome.A description of the method of pre-operative planning and surgical technique is presented, based on the author's experience and a review of the current literature. Cite this article: Gomes N. Patient-specific instrumentation for total shoulder arthroplasty. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:177-182. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000033.

  17. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  18. Convolutional Neural Networks for patient-specific ECG classification.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ince, Turker; Hamila, Ridha; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    We propose a fast and accurate patient-specific electrocardiogram (ECG) classification and monitoring system using an adaptive implementation of 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that can fuse feature extraction and classification into a unified learner. In this way, a dedicated CNN will be trained for each patient by using relatively small common and patient-specific training data and thus it can also be used to classify long ECG records such as Holter registers in a fast and accurate manner. Alternatively, such a solution can conveniently be used for real-time ECG monitoring and early alert system on a light-weight wearable device. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system achieves a superior classification performance for the detection of ventricular ectopic beats (VEB) and supraventricular ectopic beats (SVEB).

  19. Feasibility of patient specific aortic blood flow CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Gårdhagen, Roland; Heiberg, Einar; Ebbers, Tino; Loyd, Dan; Länne, Toste; Karlsson, Matts

    2006-01-01

    Patient specific modelling of the blood flow through the human aorta is performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Velocity patterns are compared between computer simulations and measurements. The workflow includes several steps: MRI measurement to obtain both geometry and velocity, an automatic levelset segmentation followed by meshing of the geometrical model and CFD setup to perform the simulations follwed by the actual simulations. The computational results agree well with the measured data.

  20. Patient specific tube current modulation for CT dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yannan; Yin, Zhye; Yao, Yangyang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Mingye; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Radiation exposure during CT imaging has drawn growing concern from academia, industry as well as the general public. Sinusoidal tube current modulation has been available in most commercial products and used routinely in clinical practice. To further exploit the potential of tube current modulation, Sperl et al. proposed a Computer-Assisted Scan Protocol and Reconstruction (CASPAR) scheme [6] that modulates the tube current based on the clinical applications and patient specific information. The purpose of this study is to accelerate the CASPAR scheme to make it more practical for clinical use and investigate its dose benefit for different clinical applications. The Monte Carlo simulation in the original CASPAR scheme was substituted by the dose reconstruction to accelerate the optimization process. To demonstrate the dose benefit, we used the CATSIM package generate the projection data and perform standard FDK reconstruction. The NCAT phantom at thorax position was used in the simulation. We chose three clinical cases (routine chest scan, coronary CT angiography with and without breast avoidance) and compared the dose level with different mA modulation schemes (patient specific, sinusoidal and constant mA) with matched image quality. The simulation study of three clinical cases demonstrated that the patient specific mA modulation could significantly reduce the radiation dose compared to sinusoidal modulation. The dose benefits depend on the clinical application and object shape. With matched image quality, for chest scan the patient specific mA profile reduced the dose by about 15% compared to the sinusoid mA modulation; for the organ avoidance scan the dose reduction to the breast was over 50% compared to the constant mA baseline.

  1. Automatic construction of patient-specific finite-element mesh of the spine from IVDs and vertebra segmentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2016-03-01

    Computational medicine aims at developing patient-specific models to help physicians in the diagnosis and treatment selection for patients. The spine, and other skeletal structures, is an articulated object, composed of rigid bones (vertebrae) and non-rigid parts (intervertebral discs (IVD), ligaments and muscles). These components are usually extracted from different image modalities, involving patient repositioning. In the case of the spine, these models require the segmentation of IVDs from MR and vertebrae from CT. In the literature, there exists a vast selection of segmentations methods, but there is a lack of approaches to align the vertebrae and IVDs. This paper presents a method to create patient-specific finite element meshes for biomechanical simulations, integrating rigid and non-rigid parts of articulated objects. First, the different parts are aligned in a complete surface model. Vertebrae extracted from CT are rigidly repositioned in between the IVDs, initially using the IVDs location and then refining the alignment using the MR image with a rigid active shape model algorithm. Finally, a mesh morphing algorithm, based on B-splines, is employed to map a template finite-element (volumetric) mesh to the patient-specific surface mesh. This morphing reduces possible misalignments and guarantees the convexity of the model elements. Results show that the accuracy of the method to align vertebrae into MR, together with IVDs, is similar to that of the human observers. Thus, this method is a step forward towards the automation of patient-specific finite element models for biomechanical simulations.

  2. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Barney, Brett M; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E

    2014-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification.Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms.The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods.A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  3. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, Eric D.; Barney, Brett M.; Higgins, Patrick D.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  4. Inter-Institutional Cooperation and International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witman, Shepherd L.

    This report on the role and character of interinstitutional cooperation as a tool for strengthening international education rests on 2 convictions. They are that interinstitutional cooperation offers the best available means both for bringing about change in higher education, particularly in regard to its international component, and for self-help…

  5. Inter-Institutional Cooperation and International Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witman, Shepherd L.

    This report on the role and character of interinstitutional cooperation as a tool for strengthening international education rests on 2 convictions. They are that interinstitutional cooperation offers the best available means both for bringing about change in higher education, particularly in regard to its international component, and for self-help…

  6. Patient specific ankle-foot orthoses using rapid prototyping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prefabricated orthotic devices are currently designed to fit a range of patients and therefore they do not provide individualized comfort and function. Custom-fit orthoses are superior to prefabricated orthotic devices from both of the above-mentioned standpoints. However, creating a custom-fit orthosis is a laborious and time-intensive manual process performed by skilled orthotists. Besides, adjustments made to both prefabricated and custom-fit orthoses are carried out in a qualitative manner. So both comfort and function can potentially suffer considerably. A computerized technique for fabricating patient-specific orthotic devices has the potential to provide excellent comfort and allow for changes in the standard design to meet the specific needs of each patient. Methods In this paper, 3D laser scanning is combined with rapid prototyping to create patient-specific orthoses. A novel process was engineered to utilize patient-specific surface data of the patient anatomy as a digital input, manipulate the surface data to an optimal form using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, and then download the digital output from the CAD software to a rapid prototyping machine for fabrication. Results Two AFOs were rapidly prototyped to demonstrate the proposed process. Gait analysis data of a subject wearing the AFOs indicated that the rapid prototyped AFOs performed comparably to the prefabricated polypropylene design. Conclusions The rapidly prototyped orthoses fabricated in this study provided good fit of the subject's anatomy compared to a prefabricated AFO while delivering comparable function (i.e. mechanical effect on the biomechanics of gait). The rapid fabrication capability is of interest because it has potential for decreasing fabrication time and cost especially when a replacement of the orthosis is required. PMID:21226898

  7. Patient specific ankle-foot orthoses using rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Mavroidis, Constantinos; Ranky, Richard G; Sivak, Mark L; Patritti, Benjamin L; DiPisa, Joseph; Caddle, Alyssa; Gilhooly, Kara; Govoni, Lauren; Sivak, Seth; Lancia, Michael; Drillio, Robert; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-12

    Prefabricated orthotic devices are currently designed to fit a range of patients and therefore they do not provide individualized comfort and function. Custom-fit orthoses are superior to prefabricated orthotic devices from both of the above-mentioned standpoints. However, creating a custom-fit orthosis is a laborious and time-intensive manual process performed by skilled orthotists. Besides, adjustments made to both prefabricated and custom-fit orthoses are carried out in a qualitative manner. So both comfort and function can potentially suffer considerably. A computerized technique for fabricating patient-specific orthotic devices has the potential to provide excellent comfort and allow for changes in the standard design to meet the specific needs of each patient. In this paper, 3D laser scanning is combined with rapid prototyping to create patient-specific orthoses. A novel process was engineered to utilize patient-specific surface data of the patient anatomy as a digital input, manipulate the surface data to an optimal form using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, and then download the digital output from the CAD software to a rapid prototyping machine for fabrication. Two AFOs were rapidly prototyped to demonstrate the proposed process. Gait analysis data of a subject wearing the AFOs indicated that the rapid prototyped AFOs performed comparably to the prefabricated polypropylene design. The rapidly prototyped orthoses fabricated in this study provided good fit of the subject's anatomy compared to a prefabricated AFO while delivering comparable function (i.e. mechanical effect on the biomechanics of gait). The rapid fabrication capability is of interest because it has potential for decreasing fabrication time and cost especially when a replacement of the orthosis is required.

  8. Patient-specific instrumentation improves tibial component rotation in TKA.

    PubMed

    Silva, Alcindo; Sampaio, Ricardo; Pinto, Elisabete

    2014-03-01

    To compare the femoral and tibial components rotational alignment in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) performed either with conventional or with patient-specific instrumentation. Forty-five patients underwent primary TKA and were prospectively randomized into two groups: 22 patients into the conventional instrumentation group (group A) and 23 patients into the Signature™ patient-specific instrumentation group (group B). All patients underwent computed tomography of the operated knee in the first week after surgery to measure the components rotation. The femoral component rotation was 0.0° (-0.25, 1.0) in group A, and 0.0° (0.0, 1.0) in group B. The tibial component rotation was -16.0° (-18.5, 11.8) in group A, and -16.0° (-19.0, -14.0) in group B. There were no significant differences between the two groups in tibial and femoral components rotation. The difference between the tibial component rotation and the neutral tibial rotation was similar in both groups [2.0° (-0.5, 6.3) in group A and 2.0° (-1.0, 4.0) in group B], but the dispersion around the median was different between the two groups. The amplitude of the difference between tibial rotation and neutral position was 27° (-13, 14) in group A and 9° (-3, 6) in group B. There is a smaller chance of internal malrotation of the tibial component with the Signature™ patient-specific instrumentation system, with less dispersion and amplitude of the tibial component rotation around the neutral position. II.

  9. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  10. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-06

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment.

  11. Patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysmal stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appanaboyina, Sunil; Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2007-03-01

    Simulating blood flow around stents in intracranial aneurysms is important for designing better stents and to personalize and optimize endovascular stenting procedures in the treatment of these aneurysms. However, the main difficulty lies in the generation of acceptable computational grids inside the blood vessels and around the stents. In this paper, a hybrid method that combines body-fitted grid for the vessel walls and adaptive embedded grids for the stent is presented. Also an algorithm to map a particular stent to the parent vessel is described. These approaches tremendously simplify the simulation of blood flow past these devices. The methodology is evaluated with an idealized stented aneurysm under steady flow conditions and demonstrated in various patient-specific cases under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions. These examples show that the methodology can be used with ease in modeling any patient-specific anatomy and using different stent designs. This paves the way for using these techniques during the planning phase of endovascular stenting interventions, particularly for aneurysms that are difficult to treat with coils or by surgical clipping.

  12. Applications of patient-specific 3D printing in medicine.

    PubMed

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Roth, Klaus E; Drees, Philipp; Maier, Gerrit S; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Ghazy, Ahmed; Neufurth, Meik; Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    Already three decades ago, the potential of medical 3D printing (3DP) or rapid prototyping for improved patient treatment began to be recognized. Since then, more and more medical indications in different surgical disciplines have been improved by using this new technique. Numerous examples have demonstrated the enormous benefit of 3DP in the medical care of patients by, for example, planning complex surgical interventions preoperatively, reducing implantation steps and anesthesia times, and helping with intraoperative orientation. At the beginning of every individual 3D model, patient-specific data on the basis of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound data is generated, which is then digitalized and processed using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. Finally, the resulting data sets are used to generate 3D-printed models or even implants. There are a variety of different application areas in the various medical fields, eg, drill or positioning templates, or surgical guides in maxillofacial surgery, or patient-specific implants in orthopedics. Furthermore, in vascular surgery it is possible to visualize pathologies such as aortic aneurysms so as to improve the planning of surgical treatment. Although rapid prototyping of individual models and implants is already applied very successfully in regenerative medicine, most of the materials used for 3DP are not yet suitable for implantation in the body. Therefore, it will be necessary in future to develop novel therapy approaches and design new materials in order to completely reconstruct natural tissue.

  13. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling of Human Phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong; University of Maine Team

    2013-11-01

    Phonation is a common biological process resulted from the complex nonlinear coupling between glottal aerodynamics and vocal fold vibrations. In the past, the simplified symmetric straight geometric models were commonly employed for experimental and computational studies. The shape of larynx lumen and vocal folds are highly three-dimensional indeed and the complex realistic geometry produces profound impacts on both glottal flow and vocal fold vibrations. To elucidate the effect of geometric complexity on voice production and improve the fundamental understanding of human phonation, a full flow-structure interaction simulation is carried out on a patient-specific larynx model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient-specific flow-structure interaction study of human phonation. The simulation results are well compared to the established human data. The effects of realistic geometry on glottal flow and vocal fold dynamics are investigated. It is found that both glottal flow and vocal fold dynamics present a high level of difference from the previous simplified model. This study also paved the important step toward the development of computer model for voice disease diagnosis and surgical planning. The project described was supported by Grant Number ROlDC007125 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

  14. An automatic CFD-based flow diverter optimization principle for patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor; Daróczy, László; Berg, Philipp; Thévenin, Dominique; Skalej, Martin; Beuing, Oliver

    2015-11-05

    The optimal treatment of intracranial aneurysms using flow diverting devices is a fundamental issue for neuroradiologists as well as neurosurgeons. Due to highly irregular manifold aneurysm shapes and locations, the choice of the stent and the patient-specific deployment strategy can be a very difficult decision. To support the therapy planning, a new method is introduced that combines a three-dimensional CFD-based optimization with a realistic deployment of a virtual flow diverting stent for a given aneurysm. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method, it was applied to a patient-specific intracranial giant aneurysm that was successfully treated using a commercial flow diverter. Eight treatment scenarios with different local compressions were considered in a fully automated simulation loop. The impact on the corresponding blood flow behavior was evaluated qualitatively as well as quantitatively, and the optimal configuration for this specific case was identified. The virtual deployment of an uncompressed flow diverter reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 24.4% compared to the untreated case. Depending on the positioning of the local stent compression below the ostium, blood flow reduction could vary between 27.3% and 33.4%. Therefore, a broad range of potential treatment outcomes was identified, illustrating the variability of a given flow diverter deployment in general. This method represents a proof of concept to automatically identify the optimal treatment for a patient in a virtual study under certain assumptions. Hence, it contributes to the improvement of virtual stenting for intracranial aneurysms and can support physicians during therapy planning in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Tania K; Greer, Joseph D; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient.

  16. Patient-specific biodegradable implant in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Essig, H; Lindhorst, D; Gander, T; Schumann, P; Könü, D; Altermatt, S; Rücker, M

    2017-02-01

    Surgical correction of premature fusion of calvarial sutures involving the fronto-orbital region can be challenging due to the demanding three-dimensional (3D) anatomy. If fronto-orbital advancement (FOA) is necessary, surgery is typically performed using resorbable plates and screws that are bent manually intraoperatively. A new approach using individually manufactured resorbable implants (KLS Martin Group, Tuttlingen, Germany) is presented in the current paper. Preoperative CT scan data were processed in iPlan (ver. 3.0.5; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany) to generate a 3D reconstruction. Virtual osteotomies and simulation of the ideal outer contour with reassembled bony segments were performed. Digital planning was transferred with a cutting guide, and an individually manufactured resorbable implant was used for rigid fixation. A resorbable patient-specific implant (Resorb X-PSI) allows precise surgery for FOA in craniosynostosis using a complete digital workflow and should be considered superior to manually bent resorbable plates.

  17. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Tania K.; Greer, Joseph D.; Hsieh, Michael H.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2017-01-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient. PMID:28656124

  18. Towards the Design of a Patient-Specific Virtual Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Caraguel, Flavien; Lesart, Anne-Cécile; Estève, François; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2016-01-01

    The design of a patient-specific virtual tumour is an important step towards Personalized Medicine. However this requires to capture the description of many key events of tumour development, including angiogenesis, matrix remodelling, hypoxia, and cell state heterogeneity that will all influence the tumour growth kinetics and degree of tumour invasiveness. To that end, an integrated hybrid and multiscale approach has been developed based on data acquired on a preclinical mouse model as a proof of concept. Fluorescence imaging is exploited to build case-specific virtual tumours. Numerical simulations show that the virtual tumour matches the characteristics and spatiotemporal evolution of its real counterpart. We achieved this by combining image analysis and physiological modelling to accurately described the evolution of different tumour cases over a month. The development of such models is essential since a dedicated virtual tumour would be the perfect tool to identify the optimum therapeutic strategies that would make Personalized Medicine truly reachable and achievable. PMID:28096895

  19. Towards patient-specific modeling of mitral valve repair: 3D transesophageal echocardiography-derived parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Kanik, Jingjing; Mansi, Tommaso; Voigt, Ingmar; Sharma, Puneet; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Lin, Ben A; Sugeng, Lissa; Yuh, David; Comaniciu, Dorin; Duncan, James

    2017-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is routinely used to provide important qualitative and quantitative information regarding mitral regurgitation. Contemporary planning of surgical mitral valve repair, however, still relies heavily upon subjective predictions based on experience and intuition. While patient-specific mitral valve modeling holds promise, its effectiveness is limited by assumptions that must be made about constitutive material properties. In this paper, we propose and develop a semi-automated framework that combines machine learning image analysis with geometrical and biomechanical models to build a patient-specific mitral valve representation that incorporates image-derived material properties. We use our computational framework, along with 3D TEE images of the open and closed mitral valve, to estimate values for chordae rest lengths and leaflet material properties. These parameters are initialized using generic values and optimized to match the visualized deformation of mitral valve geometry between the open and closed states. Optimization is achieved by minimizing the summed Euclidean distances between the estimated and image-derived closed mitral valve geometry. The spatially varying material parameters of the mitral leaflets are estimated using an extended Kalman filter to take advantage of the temporal information available from TEE. This semi-automated and patient-specific modeling framework was tested on 15 TEE image acquisitions from 14 patients. Simulated mitral valve closures yielded average errors (measured by point-to-point Euclidean distances) of 1.86 ± 1.24 mm. The estimated material parameters suggest that the anterior leaflet is stiffer than the posterior leaflet and that these properties vary between individuals, consistent with experimental observations described in the literature.

  20. Patient-specific parameter estimation in single-ventricle lumped circulation models under uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Schiavazzi, Daniele E.; Baretta, Alessia; Pennati, Giancarlo; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Computational models of cardiovascular physiology can inform clinical decision-making, providing a physically consistent framework to assess vascular pressures and flow distributions, and aiding in treatment planning. In particular, lumped parameter network (LPN) models that make an analogy to electrical circuits offer a fast and surprisingly realistic method to reproduce the circulatory physiology. The complexity of LPN models can vary significantly to account, for example, for cardiac and valve function, respiration, autoregulation, and time-dependent hemodynamics. More complex models provide insight into detailed physiological mechanisms, but their utility is maximized if one can quickly identify patient specific parameters. The clinical utility of LPN models with many parameters will be greatly enhanced by automated parameter identification, particularly if parameter tuning can match non-invasively obtained clinical data. We present a framework for automated tuning of 0D lumped model parameters to match clinical data. We demonstrate the utility of this framework through application to single ventricle pediatric patients with Norwood physiology. Through a combination of local identifiability, Bayesian estimation and maximum a posteriori simplex optimization, we show the ability to automatically determine physiologically consistent point estimates of the parameters and to quantify uncertainty induced by errors and assumptions in the collected clinical data. We show that multi-level estimation, that is, updating the parameter prior information through sub-model analysis, can lead to a significant reduction in the parameter marginal posterior variance. We first consider virtual patient conditions, with clinical targets generated through model solutions, and second application to a cohort of four single-ventricle patients with Norwood physiology. PMID:27155892

  1. Patient-specific parameter estimation in single-ventricle lumped circulation models under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Schiavazzi, Daniele E; Baretta, Alessia; Pennati, Giancarlo; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison L

    2017-03-01

    Computational models of cardiovascular physiology can inform clinical decision-making, providing a physically consistent framework to assess vascular pressures and flow distributions, and aiding in treatment planning. In particular, lumped parameter network (LPN) models that make an analogy to electrical circuits offer a fast and surprisingly realistic method to reproduce the circulatory physiology. The complexity of LPN models can vary significantly to account, for example, for cardiac and valve function, respiration, autoregulation, and time-dependent hemodynamics. More complex models provide insight into detailed physiological mechanisms, but their utility is maximized if one can quickly identify patient specific parameters. The clinical utility of LPN models with many parameters will be greatly enhanced by automated parameter identification, particularly if parameter tuning can match non-invasively obtained clinical data. We present a framework for automated tuning of 0D lumped model parameters to match clinical data. We demonstrate the utility of this framework through application to single ventricle pediatric patients with Norwood physiology. Through a combination of local identifiability, Bayesian estimation and maximum a posteriori simplex optimization, we show the ability to automatically determine physiologically consistent point estimates of the parameters and to quantify uncertainty induced by errors and assumptions in the collected clinical data. We show that multi-level estimation, that is, updating the parameter prior information through sub-model analysis, can lead to a significant reduction in the parameter marginal posterior variance. We first consider virtual patient conditions, with clinical targets generated through model solutions, and second application to a cohort of four single-ventricle patients with Norwood physiology. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Patient-specific instruments: industry's innovation with a surgeon's interest.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Bellemans, Johan; Delport, Hendrik; Van Overschelde, Philippe; Stuyts, Bart; Brabants, Karl; Victor, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to survey the orthopaedic companies about the volume of patient-specific instruments (PSI) used in Europe and worldwide; (2) to survey a group of knee arthroplasty surgeons on their acceptance of PSI and finally; (3) to survey a medico-legal expert on PSI-related issues. Seven orthopaedic implant manufacturers were contacted to obtain their sales figures (in volume) of PSI in Europe and worldwide for the 2011 and 2012 period. During the Open Meeting of the Belgian Knee Society, a survey by a direct voting system was submitted to a selection of knee surgeons. Finally, a number of medico-legal 'PSI-related' questions were submitted to an adult reconstruction surgeon/legal expert. The total volume, for all contacted companies, of PSI in Europe for 2012 was 17,515 total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and 82,556 TKA worldwide. Biomet (Warsaw, USA) was the number one in volume, both in Europe as worldwide with their Signature system. Biomet represented 27 % of the market share in PSI worldwide. Stryker preferred not to reply to the survey because of the FDA class 1 recall on ShapeMatch cutting guides. Eighty per cent of the Belgian knee surgeons expressed a great interest in PSI and especially, for 58 % of them, if it would increase their surgical accuracy. They valued it even more in unicompartmental arthroplasty, and 55 % was ready to use single-use instruments. Surprisingly, 47 % of surgeons thought it was the company's responsibility if something goes wrong with a PSI-assisted case. The medico-legal expert concluded that PSI is a complex process that exposes surgeons to new risks in case of failure and stated that companies should not produce surgical guides without validation of the planning by the surgeon. Patient-specific instruments is of great interest if it can proof to increase the surgical accuracy in knee arthroplasty to the level surgeons are expecting and if in the same time it would make the surgical process more efficient. V.

  3. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  4. Patient-specific walking pattern simulation in a gait trajectory guiding device.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Kamrul; Park, Jang-Ho; Park, Seung-Hun; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Khang, Gon

    2009-01-01

    Repetitive training is of much importance for restoring full-fledged gait ability. At present, task-specific repetitive approach has been proved to be the most effective motor learning concept. In this regard, a gait trajectory guiding device with partial body weight support system can be a solution for gait rehabilitation. This paper presents a complete gait study with an objective to implement the motion of a natural walking pattern in the automated foot-boards of a gait trajectory guiding device. In our developed motion algorithm of foot-boards we have concentrated on adaptation of patient-specific true walking trajectory, determination of variable velocity pattern along different degrees of freedom and time-division for simulating different phases of a complete gait cycle. Gait database, collected from disparate sources and previous gait-studies have been used for kinetic and kinematic analysis of human walking. We have modeled those data based on the previous researches done in this area and adopt them for our motion algorithm. A precise velocity pattern and time-division have been described along different axes so that patient's biofeedback and postural stability in different walking phases can be recorded accordingly and motion-correction of the foot-boards can be done in consecutive cycles through iterative learning control algorithm with the help of motion sensors.

  5. Patient-specific mitral leaflet segmentation from 4D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert J; Tenenholtz, Neil A; Perrin, Douglas P; Marx, Gerald R; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Segmenting the mitral valve during closure and throughout a cardiac cycle from four dimensional ultrasound (4DUS) is important for creation and validation of mechanical models and for improved visualization and understanding of mitral valve behavior. Current methods of segmenting the valve from 4DUS either require extensive user interaction and initialization, do not maintain the valve geometry across a cardiac cycle, or are incapable of producing a detailed coaptation line and surface. We present a method of segmenting the mitral valve annulus and leaflets from 4DUS such that a detailed, patient-specific annulus and leaflets are tracked throughout mitral valve closure, resulting in a detailed coaptation region. The method requires only the selection of two frames from a sequence indicating the start and end of valve closure and a single point near a closed valve. The annulus and leaflets are first found through direct segmentation in the appropriate frames and then by tracking the known geometry to the remaining frames. We compared the automatically segmented meshes to expert manual tracings for both a normal and diseased mitral valve, and found an average difference of 0.59 +/- 0.49 mm, which is on the order of the spatial resolution of the ultrasound volumes (0.5-1.0 mm/voxel).

  6. Patient-specific modeling of the Assisted Bidirectional Glenn (ABG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Figliola, Richard; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    The Assisted Bidirectional Glenn (ABG) is proposed as an early-stage palliative procedure for single ventricle neonates. The ABG augments the pulmonary flow of the Bidirectional Glenn (BDG) with a secondary high-velocity flow through a nozzle-like shunt between the innominate artery and the superior vena cava (SVC). The ABG would provide a superior cavopulmonary connection than the systemic-pulmonary shunt that is typically employed as a stage-I procedure (e.g., a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt) and would address the low pulmonary flow associated with the BDG. Following simulations in vitro and in silico that show the ABG successfully increased pulmonary flows in idealized models, we implemented the ABG in several patient-specific models coupled to a lumped parameter network tuned to clinical values for each patient. The ABG performed similarly across different patients; compared to the BDG, the pulmonary flow increased 20% with a similar increase in the SVC pressure. The performance of the ABG was the most sensitive to nozzle outlet area, compared to nozzle inlet area and location of the shunt anastomosis. The study verified that the ABG benefits a range of patients and identified key parameters for further optimization of the ABG. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute NIH T32.

  7. Volumetric PIV in Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindise, Melissa; Dickerhoff, Ben; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms impose a unique challenge in which neurosurgeons must assess and decide between the risk of rupture and risk of treatment for each patient. Risk of rupture is often difficult to determine and most commonly assessed using geometric data including the size and shape of the aneurysm and parent vessel. Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in the growth and rupture of a cerebral aneurysm, but its specific influence is largely unknown due to the inability of in vivo modalities to characterize detailed flow fields and limited in vitro studies. In this work, we use a patient-specific basilar tip aneurysm model and volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV). In vivo, 4-D PC-MRI measurements were obtained for this aneurysm and the extracted pulsatile waveform was used for the in vitro study. Clinically relevant metrics including wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), relative residence time (RRT), 3-D pressure contours, and pressure wave speed were subsequently computed. This is the first study to investigate in vitro 3-D pressure fields within a cerebral aneurysm. The results of this study demonstrate how these metrics influence the biomechanics of the aneurysm and ultimately their affect on the risk of rupture.

  8. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  9. A low invasiveness patient's specific template for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, Farhad; Hassani, Kamran; Saveh, Amir Hossein; Tabatabai Ghomshe, Farhad

    2017-02-01

    Free-hand pedicle screw placement is still conventional in surgery, although it has potentially high risks. The surgical procedures such as pedicle screw placement are usually designed based on medical imaging, but during surgery, the procedures are not normally followed due to the fact that some points are missed in two-dimensional images and seen only during surgery. In this regards, some highly accurate computer-assisted systems have been proposed and are currently used. Moreover, it is possible to reduce or completely avoid hand working by applying modern digital technology. Therefore, using these technologies has remarkable advantages. In this study, we have presented a new approach of pedicle screw placement in the lumbar and sacral regions using a specific drill guide template. The template was created by additive manufacturing technology and was verified in a clinical study as well. The main aim of this research includes the following: design, analyze, manufacture and evaluate the accuracy of a new patient-specific drill guide template, for lumbar pedicle screw placement, and compare the template to the free-hand technique under fluoroscopy supervision. Our results show that the incidence of cortex perforation is substantially reduced compared to existing methods. Finally, we believe that this approach remarkably lowers the incidence of cortex perforation and could be potentially used in clinical applications, particularly in certain selected cases.

  10. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  11. Patient-specific liver deformation modeling for tumor tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young-Taek; Hwang, Youngkyoo; Kim, Jung-Bae; Bang, Won-Chul; Kim, James D. K.; Kim, Chang Yeong

    2013-03-01

    We present a new method for patient-specific liver deformation modeling for tumor tracking. Our method focuses on deforming two main blood vessels of the liver - hepatic and portal vein - to utilize them as features. A novel centerline editing algorithm based on ellipse fitting is introduced for vessel deformation. Centerline-based blood vessel model and various interpolation methods are often used for generating a deformed model at the specific time t. However, it may introduce artifacts when models used in interpolation are not consistent. One of main reason of this inconsistency is the location of bifurcation points differs from each image. To solve this problem, our method generates a base model from one of patient's CT images. Next, we apply a rigid iterative closest point (ICP) method to the base model with centerlines of other images. Because the transformation is rigid, the length of each vessel's centerline is preserved while some part of the centerline is slightly deviated from centerlines of other images. We resolve this mismatch using our centerline editing algorithm. Finally, we interpolate three deformed models of liver, blood vessels, tumor using quadratic Bézier curves. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach with the real patient data.

  12. Patient-Specific Early Seizure Detection from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Minasyan, Georgiy R.; Chatten, John B.; Chatten, Martha Jane; Harner, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Develop a method for automatic detection of seizures prior to or immediately after clinical onset using features derived from scalp EEG. Methods This detection method is patient-specific. It uses recurrent neural networks and a variety of input features. For each patient we trained and optimized the detection algorithm for two cases: 1) during the period immediately preceding seizure onset, and 2) during the period immediately following seizure onset. Continuous scalp EEG recordings (duration 15 – 62 h, median 25 h) from 25 patients, including a total of 86 seizures, were used in this study. Results Pre-onset detection was successful in 14 of the 25 patients. For these 14 patients, all of the testing seizures were detected prior to seizure onset with a median pre-onset time of 51 sec and false positive rate was 0.06/h. Post-onset detection had 100% sensitivity, 0.023/hr false positive rate and median delay of 4 sec after onset. Conclusions The unique results of this study relate to pre-onset detection. Significance Our results suggest that reliable pre-onset seizure detection may be achievable for a significant subset of epilepsy patients without use of invasive electrodes. PMID:20461014

  13. Multiscale prediction of patient-specific platelet function under flow.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Matthew H; Colace, Thomas V; Chatterjee, Manash S; Jing, Huiyan; Zhou, Songtao; Jaeger, Daniel; Brass, Lawrence F; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2012-07-05

    During thrombotic or hemostatic episodes, platelets bind collagen and release ADP and thromboxane A(2), recruiting additional platelets to a growing deposit that distorts the flow field. Prediction of clotting function under hemodynamic conditions for a patient's platelet phenotype remains a challenge. A platelet signaling phenotype was obtained for 3 healthy donors using pairwise agonist scanning, in which calcium dye-loaded platelets were exposed to pairwise combinations of ADP, U46619, and convulxin to activate the P2Y(1)/P2Y(12), TP, and GPVI receptors, respectively, with and without the prostacyclin receptor agonist iloprost. A neural network model was trained on each donor's pairwise agonist scanning experiment and then embedded into a multiscale Monte Carlo simulation of donor-specific platelet deposition under flow. The simulations were compared directly with microfluidic experiments of whole blood flowing over collagen at 200 and 1000/s wall shear rate. The simulations predicted the ranked order of drug sensitivity for indomethacin, aspirin, MRS-2179 (a P2Y(1) inhibitor), and iloprost. Consistent with measurement and simulation, one donor displayed larger clots and another presented with indomethacin resistance (revealing a novel heterozygote TP-V241G mutation). In silico representations of a subject's platelet phenotype allowed prediction of blood function under flow, essential for identifying patient-specific risks, drug responses, and novel genotypes.

  14. Patient-specific finite element analysis of ascending aorta aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Elefteriades, John

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic ascending aorta aneurysm (AsAA) dissection and rupture can be prevented by elective surgical repair, but identifying individuals at risk remains a challenge. Typically the decision to operate is based primarily on the overall aneurysm size, which may not be a reliable indicator of risk. In this study, AsAA inflation and rupture was simulated in 27 patient-specific finite element models constructed from clinical CT imaging data and tissue mechanical testing data from matching patients. These patients included n = 8 with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), n = 10 with bovine aortic arch (BAA), and n = 10 with neither BAV nor BAA. AsAA rupture risk was found to increase with elevated systolic wall stress and tissue stiffness. The aortic size index was sufficient for identifying the patients with the lowest risk of rupture, but unsuitable for delineating between patients at moderate and high risk. There was no correlation between BAV or BAA and AsAA rupture risk; however, the AsAA morphology was different among these patients. These results support the use of mechanical parameters such as vessel wall stress and tissue stiffness for AsAA presurgical evaluation. PMID:25770248

  15. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  16. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-01-01

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9–18.2kg) were created based on the patients’ actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120kVp, 70 or 75mA, 0.4s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7–5.3mSv∕100mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4–12.6mGy∕100mAs and 11.2–13.3mGy∕100mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%–18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%–77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient:r=−0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=−0.99, heart: r=−0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific

  17. [Total and unicompartmental knee replacement. Patient-specific Instrumentation].

    PubMed

    Köster, G; Biró, C

    2016-04-01

    The objective of patient-specific instrumentation (PSI Zimmer®) technology is to optimize positioning and selection of components as well as surgical procedure in uni- and bicompartimental knee replacement. The article contains a description of the planning and surgical technique and evaluates the method based on own results and literature. Using MRI or CT scans a virtual 3D model of the joint is created in order to simulate and plan the implant positioning. According to these data, pin placement and/or cutting guides are produced, which enable the surgeon to transfer the planning to the surgical procedure. In a prospective comparative study 88 patients (44 per each of the two techniques) were operated by one surgeon receiving the same TKA using either MRI-based PSI or a conventional technique. The number of surgical trays, operating time, intraoperative changes and frontal alignment using a full leg x‑ray (70 cases) were compared. In 17 patients the method was applied with unicondylar knee replacement. Anatomical abnormalities could be detected preoperatively and considered during the operation. With PSI the number of trays could be reduced and predictability of the component size was more precise. Intraoperative changes became necessary only for distal femoral (25 %) and proximal tibial (36 %) resection and tibial rotation (40 %). Alignment was more precise in the PSI cases PSI using the applied technique proved to be practicable and reliable. The advantages of precise planning became obvious. Results concerning alignment are inconsistent in the literature. Soft tissue balancing has only been included in the technique to a limited degree so far. PSI is still in an early stage of development and further development opportunities should be exploited before final assessment.

  18. Patient specific implants for amputation prostheses: design, manufacture and analysis.

    PubMed

    Devasconcellos, P; Balla, V K; Bose, S; Fugazzi, R; Dernell, W S; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2012-01-01

    To design, manufacture and analyze custom implants with functional gradation in macrostructure for attachment of amputation prostheses. The external shape of the implant was designed by extracting geometrical data of canine cadavers from computed tomography (CT) scans to suit the bone cavity. Three generations of implant designs were developed and were optimized with the help of fit/fill and mechanical performance of implant-cadaver bone assembly using CT analysis and compression testing, respectively. A final optimized, custom Ti6Al4V alloy amputation implant, with approximately 25% porosity in the proximal region and approximately zero percent porosity in the distal region, was fabricated using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™)--a laser based additive manufacturing technology. The proposed design changes in the second generation designs, in terms of refining thresholds, increased the average fill of the bone cavity from 58% to 83%. Addition of a flange between the stem and the head in the second generation designs resulted in more than a seven-fold increase in the compressive load carrying capacity of the assembly. Application of LENS™ in the fabrication of present custom fit Ti6Al4V alloy implants enabled incorporation of 20 to 30% porosity in the proximal region and one to two percent residual porosity in the distal portion of the implant. Patient specific prostheses having direct connection to the skeletal structure can potentially aid in problems related to load transfer and proprioception in amputees. Furthermore, application of LENS™ in the fabrication of custom implants can be faster to incorporate site specific porosity and gradients for improving long-term stability.

  19. Respiratory gated radiotherapy-pretreatment patient specific quality assurance

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Samuvel, Kothandaraman; Yadav, Girigesh; Sigamani, Ashok Kumar; Subramani, Vikraman; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi

    2016-01-01

    Organ motions during inter-fraction and intra-fraction radiotherapy introduce errors in dose delivery, irradiating excess of normal tissue, and missing target volume. Lung and heart involuntary motions cause above inaccuracies and gated dose delivery try to overcome above effects. Present work attempts a novel method to verify dynamic dose delivery using a four-dimensional (4D) phantom. Three patients with mobile target are coached to maintain regular and reproducible breathing pattern. Appropriate intensity projection image set generated from 4D-computed tomography (4D-CT) is used for target delineation. Intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on selected phase using CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) in conjunction with “Real-time position management” (Varian, USA) to acquire 4D-CT images. Verification plans were generated for both ion chamber and Gafchromic (EBT) film image sets. Gated verification plans were delivered on the phantom moving with patient respiratory pattern. We developed a MATLAB-based software to generate maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projections, and average intensity projections, also a program to convert patient breathing pattern to phantom compatible format. Dynamic thorax quality assurance (QA) phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems type) is used to perform the patient specific QA, which holds an ion chamber and film to measure delivered radiation intensity. Exposed EBT films are analyzed and compared with treatment planning system calculated dose. The ion chamber measured dose shows good agreement with planned dose within ± 0.5% (0.203 ± 0.57%). Gamma value evaluated from EBT film shows passing rates 92–99% (96.63 ± 3.84%) for 3% dose and 3 mm distance criteria. Respiratory gated treatment delivery accuracy is found to be within clinically acceptable level. PMID:27051173

  20. Patient-specific academic detailing for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Margaret; Gagnon, Antony; Levine, Mitchell; Thabane, Lehana; Rodriguez, Christine; Dolovich, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe and to determine the feasibility of a patient-specific academic detailing (PAD) smoking cessation (SC) program in a primary care setting. Design Descriptive cohort feasibility study. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants Pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners, and their patients. Interventions Integrated pharmacists received basic academic detailing training and education on SC and then delivered PAD to prescribers using structured verbal education and written materials. Data were collected using structured forms. Main outcome measures Five main feasibility criteria were generated based on Canadian academic detailing programs: PAD coordinator time to train pharmacists less than 40 hours; median time of SC education per pharmacist less than 20 hours; median time per PAD session less than 60 minutes for initial visit; percentage of prescribers receiving PAD within 3 months greater than 50%; and number of new SC referrals to pharmacists at 6 months more than 10 patients per 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) pharmacist (total of approximately 30 patients). Results Eight pharmacists (5.8 FTE) received basic academic detailing training and education on SC PAD. Forty-eight physicians and 9 nurse practitioners consented to participate in the study. The mean PAD coordinator training time was 29.1 hours. The median time for SC education was 3.1 hours. The median times for PAD sessions were 15 and 25 minutes for an initial visit and follow-up visit, respectively. The numbers of prescribers who had received PAD at 3 and 6 months were 50 of 64 (78.1%) and 57 of 64 (89.1%), respectively. The numbers of new SC referrals at 3 and 6 months were 11 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 66 patients) and 34 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 200 patients), respectively. Conclusion This study met the predetermined feasibility criteria with respect to the management, resources, process, and scientific components. Further study is warranted to determine

  1. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  2. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S.; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  3. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  4. Feasibility of a 3D-printed anthropomorphic patient-specific head phantom for patient-specific quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yea, Ji Woon; Park, Jae Won; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kim, Dong Youn; Kim, Jae Gu; Seo, Chan Young; Jeong, Won Hyo; Jeong, Man Youl

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of utilizing a 3D-printed anthropomorphic patient-specific head phantom for patient-specific quality assurance (QA) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Contoured left and right head phantoms were converted from DICOM to STL format. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) was used to construct an anthropomorphic patient-specific head phantom with a 3D printer. An established QA technique and the patient-specific head phantom were used to compare the calculated and measured doses. When the established technique was used to compare the calculated and measured doses, the gamma passing rate for γ ≤ 1 was 97.28%, while the gamma failure rate for γ > 1 was 2.72%. When the 3D-printed patient-specific head phantom was used, the gamma passing rate for γ ≤ 1 was 95.97%, and the gamma failure rate for γ > 1 was 4.03%. The 3D printed patient-specific head phantom was concluded to be highly feasible for patient-specific QA prior to complicated radiotherapy procedures such as IMRT. PMID:28727787

  5. Patterns of patient specific dosimetry in total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; McMullen, Kevin P.; Das, Indra J.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) has been used for bone marrow transplant for hematologic and immune deficiency conditions. The goal of TBI is to deliver a homogeneous dose to the entire body, with a generally accepted range of dose uniformity being within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. The moving table technique for TBI could make dose uniform in whole body by adjusting couch speed. However, it is difficult to accurately estimate the actual dose by calculation and hence in vivo dosimetry (IVD) is routinely performed. Here, the authors present patterns of patient-specific IVD in 161 TBI patients treated at our institution. Methods: Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit (Model C9 Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, Picker X-ray Corporation) with customized moving bed (SITI Industrial Products, Inc., Fishers, IN) were used for TBI treatment. During treatment, OneDose{sup TM} (Sicel Technology, NC) Metal Oxide-silicon Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor detectors were placed at patient body surface; both entrance and exit side of the beam at patient head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee to estimate midplane dose. When large differences (>10%) between the prescribed and measured dose were observed, dose delivery was corrected for subsequent fractions by the adjustment of couch speed and/or bolus placement. Under IRB exempt status, the authors retrospectively analyzed the treatment records of 161 patients who received TBI treatment between 2006 and 2011. Results: Across the entire cohort, the median {+-} SD (range) percent variance between calculated and measured dose for head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee was -2.3 {+-} 10.2% (-66.2 to +35.3), 1.1 {+-} 11.5% (-62.2 to +40.3), -1.9 {+-} 9.5% (-66.4 to +46.6), -1.1 {+-} 7.2% (-35.2 to +42.9), and 3.4 {+-} 12.2% (-47.9 to +108.5), respectively. More than half of treatments were within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose for all anatomical regions. For 80% of treatments (10%-90%), dose at the umbilicus was within {+-}10

  6. Three-dimensional left ventricular segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging for patient-specific modelling purposes.

    PubMed

    Caiani, Enrico G; Colombo, Andrea; Pepi, Mauro; Piazzese, Concetta; Maffessanti, Francesco; Lang, Roberto M; Carminati, Maria Chiara

    2014-11-01

    To propose a nearly automated left ventricular (LV) three-dimensional (3D) surface segmentation procedure, based on active shape modelling (ASM) and built on a database of 3D echocardiographic (3DE) LV surfaces, for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, and to test its accuracy for LV volumes computation compared with 'gold standard' manual tracings and discs-summation method. The ASM was created based on segmented LV surfaces (4D LV analysis, Tomtec) from 3DE datasets of 205 patients. Then, it was applied to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging short-axis (SAX) images stack of 12 consecutive patients. After proper realignment using two- and four-chambers CMR long-axis views both as reference and for initializing LV apex and base (six points in total), the ASM was iteratively and automatically updated to match the information of all the SAX planes contemporaneously, resulting in an endocardial LV 3D mesh from which volume was directly derived. The same CMR images were analysed by an experienced cardiologist to derive end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes. Linear correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were applied vs. the manual 'gold standard'. Active shape modelling results showed high correlations with manual values both for LV volumes (r(2) > 0.98) and ejection fraction (EF) (r(2) > 0.90), non-significant biases and narrow limits of agreement. The proposed method resulted in accurate detection of 3D LV endocardial surfaces, which lead to fast and reliable measurements of LV volumes and EF when compared with manual tracing of CMR SAX images. The segmented 3D mesh, including a realistic LV apex and base, could constitute a novel starting point for more realistic patient-specific finite element modelling. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. EFFICIENT DRUG SCREENING AND GENE CORRECTION FOR TREATING LIVER DISEASE USING PATIENT-SPECIFIC STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Su Mi; Kim, Yonghak; Shim, Joong Sup; Park, Joon Tae; Wang, Rui-Hong; Leach, Steven D; Liu, Jun O.; Deng, Chu-Xia; Ye, Zhaohui; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a potential source for developing novel drugand cell- therapies. Although increasing numbers of disease-specific iPSCs have been generated, there has been limited progress in iPSC-based drug screening/discovery for liver diseases, and the low gene targeting efficiency in human iPSCs warrants further improvement. Using iPSC lines from patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, for which there is currently no drug- or gene- therapy available, we established a platform to discover new drug candidates and to correct disease-causing mutation with a high efficiency. A high-throughput format screening assay based on our hepatic differentiation protocol was implemented to facilitate automated quantification of cellular AAT accumulation using a 96-well immunofluorescence reader. To expedite the eventual application of lead compounds to patients, we conducted drug screening utilizing our established library of clinical compounds, the Johns Hopkins Drug Library, with extensive safety profiles. Through a blind large-scale drug screening, five clinical drugs were identified to reduce AAT accumulation in diverse patient iPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells. In addition, using the recently developed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology, we achieved high gene targeting efficiency in AAT-deficiency patient iPSCs with 25–33% of the clones demonstrating simultaneous targeting at both diseased alleles. The hepatocyte-like cells derived from the gene-corrected iPSCs were functional without the mutant AAT accumulation. This highly efficient and cost-effective targeting technology will broadly benefit both basic and translational applications. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated the feasibility of effective large-scale drug screening using an iPSC-based disease model and highly robust gene targeting in human iPSCs; both of which are critical for translating the iPSC technology into

  8. Office automation.

    PubMed

    Arenson, R L

    1986-03-01

    By now, the term "office automation" should have more meaning for those readers who are not intimately familiar with the subject. Not all of the preceding material pertains to every department or practice, but certainly, word processing and simple telephone management are key items. The size and complexity of the organization will dictate the usefulness of electronic mail and calendar management, and the individual radiologist's personal needs and habits will determine the usefulness of the home computer. Perhaps the most important ingredient for success in the office automation arena relates to the ability to integrate information from various systems in a simple and flexible manner. Unfortunately, this is perhaps the one area that most office automation systems have ignored or handled poorly. In the personal computer world, there has been much emphasis recently on integration of packages such as spreadsheet, database management, word processing, graphics, time management, and communications. This same philosophy of integration has been applied to a few office automation systems, but these are generally vendor-specific and do not allow for a mixture of foreign subsystems. During the next few years, it is likely that a few vendors will emerge as dominant in this integrated office automation field and will stress simplicity and flexibility as major components.

  9. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  10. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  11. Tibial plateau coverage in UKA: a comparison of patient specific and off-the-shelf implants.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dylan P; Holmberg, Rebecca R; Quartulli, Marc J; Barnes, C Lowry

    2014-09-01

    Poor tibial component fit can lead to issues including pain, loosening and subsidence. Morphometric data, from 30 patients undergoing UKA were utilized; comparing size, match and fit between patient-specific and off-the-shelf implants. CT images were prospectively obtained and implants modeled in CAD, utilizing sizing templates with off-the-shelf and CAD designs with patient-specific implants. Virtual surgery was performed, maximizing tibial plateau coverage while minimizing implant overhang. Each implant evaluated to examine tibial fit. Patient-specific implants provided significantly greater cortical rim surface area coverage versus off-the-shelf implants: 77% v. 43% medially and 60% v. 37% laterally. Significantly less cortical rim overhang and undercoverage were observed with patient-specific implants. Patient-specific implants provide superior cortical bone coverage and fit while minimizing overhang and undercoverage seen in off-the-shelf implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining population and patient-specific characteristics for prostate segmentation on 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27660382

  14. How to grow a kidney: patient-specific kidney organoids come of age.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2017-01-01

    The notion of regrowing a patient's kidney in a dish has fascinated researchers for decades and has spurred visions of revolutionary clinical applications. Recently, this option has come closer to reality. Key technologies have been developed to generate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and to edit their genome. Several laboratories have devised protocols to differentiate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells into kidney cells or into in vitro organoids that resemble the kidney with respect to cell types, tissue architecture and disease pathology. This was possible because of rapidly expanding knowledge regarding the cellular and molecular basis of embryonic kidney development. Generating kidney cells or organoids from patient-specific stem cells may prove to be clinically useful in several ways. First, patient-specific kidney cells or organoids could be used to predict an individual's response to stressors, toxins or medications and thereby develop personalized treatment decisions. Second, patient-specific stem cells harbour the individual's genetic defects. This may potentially enable genetic rescue attempts to establish the significance of a genetic defect in a stem cell-derived organoid or it may allow testing of patient-specific targeted therapies for kidney disease in vitro. From a tissue engineering perspective, patient-specific kidney organoids might provide a key advance towards engineering immunocompatible transplantable kidneys. This review article summarizes recent developments in the field and discusses its current limitations and future perspectives. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  15. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Nurses' Perceptions of Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions to Mitigate Patient-Specific Fall Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deleise S; Montie, Mary; Conlon, Paul; Reynolds, Margaret; Ripley, Robert; Titler, Marita G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based (EB) fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risk factors are readily available but not routinely used in practice. Few studies have examined nurses' perceptions about both the use of these EB interventions and implementation strategies designed to promote their adoption. This article reports qualitative findings of nurses' perceptions about use of EB fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risks, and implementation strategies to promote use of these interventions. The findings revealed five major themes: before-study fall prevention practices, use of EB fall prevention interventions tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors, beneficial implementation strategies, overall impact on approach to fall prevention, and challenges These findings are useful to guide nurses' engagement and use of EB fall prevention practices tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors.

  17. Design of Optimal Treatments for Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders using Patient-Specific Multibody Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of the human neuromusculoskeletal system such as osteoarthritis, stroke, cerebral palsy, and paraplegia significantly affect mobility and result in a decreased quality of life. Surgical and rehabilitation treatment planning for these disorders is based primarily on static anatomic measurements and dynamic functional measurements filtered through clinical experience. While this subjective treatment planning approach works well in many cases, it does not predict accurate functional outcome in many others. This paper presents a vision for how patient-specific multibody dynamic models can serve as the foundation for an objective treatment planning approach that identifies optimal treatments and treatment parameters on an individual patient basis. First, a computational paradigm is presented for constructing patient-specific multibody dynamic models. This paradigm involves a combination of patient-specific skeletal models, muscle-tendon models, neural control models, and articular contact models, with the complexity of the complete model being dictated by the requirements of the clinical problem being addressed. Next, three clinical applications are presented to illustrate how such models could be used in the treatment design process. One application involves the design of patient-specific gait modification strategies for knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation, a second involves the selection of optimal patient-specific surgical parameters for a particular knee osteoarthritis surgery, and the third involves the design of patient-specific muscle stimulation patterns for stroke rehabilitation. The paper concludes by discussing important challenges that need to be overcome to turn this vision into reality. PMID:21785529

  18. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  19. Effects of Vessel Tortuosity on Coronary Hemodynamics: An Idealized and Patient-Specific Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Vorobtsova, Natalya; Chiastra, Claudio; Stremler, Mark A; Sane, David C; Migliavacca, Francesco; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-07-01

    Although coronary tortuosity can influence the hemodynamics of coronary arteries, the relationship between tortuosity and flow has not been thoroughly investigated partly due to the absence of a widely accepted definition of tortuosity and the lack of patient-specific studies that analyze complete coronary trees. Using a computational approach we investigated the effects of tortuosity on coronary flow parameters including pressure drop, wall shear stress, and helical flow strength as measured by helicity intensity. Our analysis considered idealized and patient-specific geometries. Overall results indicate that perfusion pressure decreases with increased tortuosity, but the patient-specific results show that more tortuous vessels have higher physiological wall shear stress values. Differences between the idealized and patient-specific results reveal that an accurate representation of coronary tortuosity must account for all relevant geometric aspects, including curvature imposed by the heart shape. The patient-specific results exhibit a strong correlation between tortuosity and helicity intensity, and the corresponding helical flow contributes directly to the observed increase in wall shear stress. Therefore, helicity intensity may prove helpful in developing a universal parameter to describe tortuosity and assess its impact on patient health. Our data suggest that increased tortuosity could have a deleterious impact via a reduction in coronary perfusion pressure, but the attendant increase in wall shear stress could afford protection against atherosclerosis.

  20. Development of an integrated CAD-FEA system for patient-specific design of spinal cages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzheng; Pu, Fang; Xu, Liqiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liang, Hang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cages are used to create a suitable mechanical environment for interbody fusion in cases of degenerative spinal instability. Due to individual variations in bone structures and pathological conditions, patient-specific cages can provide optimal biomechanical conditions for fusion, strengthening patient recovery. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool in the biomechanical evaluation of patient-specific cage designs, but the time- and labor-intensive process of modeling limits its clinical application. In an effort to facilitate the design and analysis of patient-specific spinal cages, an integrated CAD-FEA system (CASCaDeS, comprehensive analytical spinal cage design system) was developed. This system produces a biomechanical-based patient-specific design of spinal cages and is capable of rapid implementation of finite element modeling. By comparison with commercial software, this system was validated and proven to be both accurate and efficient. CASCaDeS can be used to design patient-specific cages with a superior biomechanical performance to commercial spinal cages.

  1. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  2. Mechanical evaluation by patient-specific finite element analyses demonstrates therapeutic effects for osteoporotic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Tawara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Jiro; Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Oda, Juhachi; Tomita, Katsuro

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis can lead to bone compressive fractures in the lower lumbar vertebrae. In order to assess the recovery of vertebral strength during drug treatment for osteoporosis, it is necessary not only to measure the bone mass but also to perform patient-specific mechanical analyses, since the strength of osteoporotic vertebrae is strongly dependent on patient-specific factors, such as bone shape and bone density distribution in cancellous bone, which are related to stress distribution in the vertebrae. In the present study, patient-specific general (not voxel) finite element analyses of osteoporotic vertebrae during drug treatment were performed over time. We compared changes in bone density and compressive principal strain distribution in a relative manner using models for the first lumbar vertebra based on computer tomography images of four patients at three time points (before therapy, and after 6 and 12 months of therapy). The patient-specific mechanical analyses indicated that increases in bone density and decreases in compressive principal strain were significant in some osteoporotic vertebrae. The data suggested that the vertebrae were strengthened structurally and the drug treatment was effective in preventing compression fractures. The effectiveness of patient-specific mechanical analyses for providing useful and important information for the prognosis of osteoporosis is demonstrated.

  3. From patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Baldock, A L; Rockne, R C; Boone, A D; Neal, M L; Hawkins-Daarud, A; Corwin, D M; Bridge, C A; Guyman, L A; Trister, A D; Mrugala, M M; Rockhill, J K; Swanson, K R

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO) is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern "precision medicine" approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient-specific models (PSMs) can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients, and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific MNO.

  4. Patient-Specific Computational Models of Coronary Arteries Using Monoplane X-Ray Angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease in western countries. Early detection and diagnosis of CAD is quintessential to preventing mortality and subsequent complications. We believe hemodynamic data derived from patient-specific computational models could facilitate more accurate prediction of the risk of atherosclerosis. We introduce a semiautomated method to build 3D patient-specific coronary vessel models from 2D monoplane angiogram images. The main contribution of the method is a robust segmentation approach using dynamic programming combined with iterative 3D reconstruction to build 3D mesh models of the coronary vessels. Results indicate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed pipeline. In conclusion, patient-specific modelling of coronary vessels is of vital importance for developing accurate computational flow models and studying the hemodynamic effects of the presence of plaques on the arterial walls, resulting in lumen stenoses, as well as variations in the angulations of the coronary arteries. PMID:27403203

  5. Toward patient-specific simulations of cardiac valves: state-of-the-art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Votta, Emiliano; Le, Trung Bao; Stevanella, Marco; Fusini, Laura; Caiani, Enrico G; Redaelli, Alberto; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-01-01

    Recent computational methods enabling patient-specific simulations of native and prosthetic heart valves are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on two critical components of such methods: 1) anatomically realistic finite element models for simulating the structural dynamics of heart valves; and 2) fluid structure interaction methods for simulating the performance of heart valves in a patient specific beating left ventricle. It is shown that the significant progress achieved in both fronts paves the way toward clinically relevant computational models that can simulate the performance of a range of heart valves, native and prosthetic, in a patient-specific left heart environment. The significant algorithmic and model validation challenges that need to be tackled in the future to realize this goal are also discussed. PMID:23174421

  6. Development of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis: design, mechanical behavior analysis and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chua C H, Matthew; Chui, Chee Kong; Rai, Bina; Lau D P, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to create patient specific organ replacements as there are differences in the anatomical dimensions among individuals. High failure rates in tracheal prosthesis are attributed to the lack of mechanical strength and flexibility, slow rate of growth of ciliated epithelium and leakage of interstitial fluid into the lumen. This paper proposes a methodology of design, simulations and fabrication of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis for implantation to closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the natural trachea, and describes the prototype device and its materials. Results show that the patient-specific trachea prosthesis has mechanical properties approximate that of normal tracheal rings. The user centric tracheal prosthesis is demonstrated to be a promising candidate for tracheal replacement.

  7. Using rapid prototyping molds to create patient specific polymethylmethacrylate implants in cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Gerber, N; Stieglitz, L; Peterhans, M; Nolte, L P; Raabe, A; Weber, S

    2010-01-01

    Cranioplasty is a commonly performed procedure. Outcomes can be improved by the use of patient specific implants, however, high costs limit their accessibility. This paper presents a low cost alternative technique to create patient specific polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implants using rapid prototyped mold template. We used available patient's CT-scans, one dataset without craniotomy and one with craniotomy, for computer-assisted design of a 3D mold template, which itself can be brought into the operating room and be used for fast and easy building of a PMMA implant. We applied our solution to three patients with positive outcomes and no complications.

  8. 3D patient-specific model of the tibia from CT for orthopedic use

    PubMed Central

    González-Carbonell, Raide A.; Ortiz-Prado, Armando; Jacobo-Armendáriz, Victor H.; Cisneros-Hidalgo, Yosbel A.; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Objectives 3D patient-specific model of the tibia is used to determine the torque needed to initialize the tibial torsion correction. Methods The finite elements method is used in the biomechanical modeling of tibia. The geometric model of the tibia is obtained from CT images. The tibia is modeled as an anisotropic material with non-homogeneous mechanical properties. Conclusions The maximum stress is located in the shaft of tibia diaphysis. With both meshes are obtained similar results of stresses and displacements. For this patient-specific model, the torque must be greater than 30 Nm to initialize the correction of tibial torsion deformity. PMID:25829755

  9. 3D patient-specific model of the tibia from CT for orthopedic use.

    PubMed

    González-Carbonell, Raide A; Ortiz-Prado, Armando; Jacobo-Armendáriz, Victor H; Cisneros-Hidalgo, Yosbel A; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando

    2015-03-01

    3D patient-specific model of the tibia is used to determine the torque needed to initialize the tibial torsion correction. The finite elements method is used in the biomechanical modeling of tibia. The geometric model of the tibia is obtained from CT images. The tibia is modeled as an anisotropic material with non-homogeneous mechanical properties. The maximum stress is located in the shaft of tibia diaphysis. With both meshes are obtained similar results of stresses and displacements. For this patient-specific model, the torque must be greater than 30 Nm to initialize the correction of tibial torsion deformity.

  10. Development of a patient-specific simulation tool to analyse aortic dissections: assessment of mixed patient-specific flow and pressure boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Agu, Obiekezie; Balabani, Stavroula; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    Aortic dissection has high morbidity and mortality rates and guidelines regarding surgical intervention are not clearly defined. The treatment of aortic dissection varies with each patient and detailed knowledge of haemodynamic and mechanical forces would be advantageous in the process of choosing a course of treatment. In this study, a patient-specific dissected aorta geometry is constructed from computed tomography scans. Dynamic boundary conditions are implemented by coupling a three element Windkessel model to the 3D domain at each outlet, in order to capture the essential behaviour of the downstream vasculature. The Windkessel model parameters are defined based on clinical data. The predicted minimum and maximum pressures are close to those measured invasively. Malperfusion is indicated and complex flow patterns are observed. Pressure, flow and wall shear stress distributions are analysed. The methodology presented here provides insight into the haemodynamics in a patient-specific dissected aorta and represents a development towards the use of CFD simulations as a diagnostic tool for aortic dissection. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-07

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  12. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue.

  13. An effective algorithm for the generation of patient-specific Purkinje networks in computational electrocardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Simone; Vergara, Christian; Faggiano, Elena; Nobile, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    The Purkinje network is responsible for the fast and coordinated distribution of the electrical impulse in the ventricle that triggers its contraction. Therefore, it is necessary to model its presence to obtain an accurate patient-specific model of the ventricular electrical activation. In this paper, we present an efficient algorithm for the generation of a patient-specific Purkinje network, driven by measures of the electrical activation acquired on the endocardium. The proposed method provides a correction of an initial network, generated by means of a fractal law, and it is based on the solution of Eikonal problems both in the muscle and in the Purkinje network. We present several numerical results both in an ideal geometry with synthetic data and in a real geometry with patient-specific clinical measures. These results highlight an improvement of the accuracy provided by the patient-specific Purkinje network with respect to the initial one. In particular, a cross-validation test shows an accuracy increase of 19% when only the 3% of the total points are used to generate the network, whereas an increment of 44% is observed when a random noise equal to 20% of the maximum value of the clinical data is added to the measures.

  14. Patient-Specific Modeling of Dyssynchronous Heart Failure: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Aguado-Sierra, Jazmin; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher; Chuang, Joyce; Howard, Elliot; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Omens, Jeff; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Kerckhoffs, Roy CP; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    The development and clinical use of patient-specific models of the heart is now a feasible goal. Models have the potential to aid in diagnosis and support decision-making in clinical cardiology. Several groups are now working on developing multi-scale models of the heart for understanding therapeutic mechanisms and better predicting clinical outcomes of interventions such as cardiac resynchronization therapy. Here we describe the methodology for generating a patient-specific model of the failing heart with a myocardial infarct and left ventricular bundle branch block. We discuss some of the remaining challenges in developing reliable patient-specific models of cardiac electromechanical activity, and identify some of the main areas for focusing future research efforts. Key challenges include: efficiently generating accurate patient-specific geometric meshes and mapping regional myofiber architecture to them; modeling electrical activation patterns based on cellular alterations in human heart failure, and estimating regional tissue conductivities based on clinically available electrocardiographic recordings; estimating unloaded ventricular reference geometry and material properties for biomechanical simulations; and parameterizing systemic models of circulatory dynamics from available hemodynamic measurements. PMID:21763714

  15. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  16. Patient-specific instrumentation does not improve radiographic alignment or clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Huijbregts, Henricus J T A M; Khan, Riaz J K; Sorensen, Emma; Fick, Daniel P; Haebich, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been introduced to improve alignment and reduce outliers, increase efficiency, and reduce operation time. In order to improve our understanding of the outcomes of patient-specific instrumentation, we conducted a meta-analysis. Patients and methods We identified randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patient-specific and conventional instrumentation in TKA. Weighted mean differences and risk ratios were determined for radiographic accuracy, operation time, hospital stay, blood loss, number of surgical trays required, and patient-reported outcome measures. Results 21 RCTs involving 1,587 TKAs were included. Patient-specific instrumentation resulted in slightly more accurate hip-knee-ankle axis (0.3°), coronal femoral alignment (0.3°, femoral flexion (0.9°), tibial slope (0.7°), and femoral component rotation (0.5°). The risk ratio of a coronal plane outlier (> 3° deviation of chosen target) for the tibial component was statistically significantly increased in the PSI group (RR =1.64). No significance was found for other radiographic measures. Operation time, blood loss, and transfusion rate were similar. Hospital stay was significantly shortened, by approximately 8 h, and the number of surgical trays used decreased by 4 in the PSI group. Knee Society scores and Oxford knee scores were similar. Interpretation Patient-specific instrumentation does not result in clinically meaningful improvement in alignment, fewer outliers, or better early patient-reported outcome measures. Efficiency is improved by reducing the number of trays used, but PSI does not reduce operation time. PMID:27249110

  17. Patient Specific Wall Stress Analysis and Mechanical Characterization of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using 4D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    van Disseldorp, E M J; Petterson, N J; Rutten, M C M; van de Vosse, F N; van Sambeek, M R H M; Lopata, R G P

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform wall stress analysis (WSA) using 4D ultrasound (US) in 40 patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The geometries and wall stress results were compared with computed tomography (CT) in seven patients. Additionally, the WSA models were calibrated using 4D motion estimation, resulting in patient specific material parameters that were compared among patients. 4D-US images were acquired for 40 patients (AAA diameter 27-52 mm). Patient specific AAA geometries and wall motion were extracted from the 4D-US. WSA was performed and corresponding patient specific material properties were derived. For seven patients, CT data were available and analyzed for geometry and wall stress comparison. The 4D-US based 99th percentile wall stress ranged from 198 to 390 kPa. Regression analysis showed no significant relation between wall stress and diameter of the AAA. The similarity indices between US and CT were very good and ranged between 0.90 and 0.96, and the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile wall stresses of the US and CT data were in agreement. The characterized patient specific shear modulus had a median of 1.1 MPa (interquartile range, 0.7-1.4 MPa). Based on the maximum AAA diameter, the AAAs were divided in a small, medium, and large diameter groups. The largest AAAs revealed an increased wall stiffness compared with the smallest AAAs. 4D ultrasound is applicable for wall stress analysis of AAAs, and offers the opportunity to perform wall stress analysis over time, also for AAAs who do not qualify for a CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, the patient specific material properties can be determined, which could possibly improve risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid prototyping for patient-specific surgical orthopaedics guides: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Diana; Laptoiu, Dan

    2016-06-01

    There has been a lot of hype surrounding the advantages to be gained from rapid prototyping processes in a number of fields, including medicine. Our literature review aims objectively to assess how effective patient-specific surgical guides manufactured using rapid prototyping are in a number of orthopaedic surgical applications. To this end, we carried out a systematic review to identify and analyse clinical and experimental literature studies in which rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical guides are used, focusing especially on those that entail quantifiable outcomes and, at the same time, providing details on the guides' design and type of manufacturing process. Here, it should be mentioned that in this field there are not yet medium- or long-term data, and no information on revisions. In the reviewed studies, the reported positive opinions on the use of rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical guides relate to the following main advantages: reduction in operating times, low costs and improvements in the accuracy of surgical interventions thanks to guides' personalisation. However, disadvantages and sources of errors which can cause patient-specific surgical guide failures are as well discussed by authors. Stereolithography is the main rapid prototyping process employed in these applications although fused deposition modelling or selective laser sintering processes can also satisfy the requirements of these applications in terms of material properties, manufacturing accuracy and construction time. Another of our findings was that individualised drill guides for spinal surgery are currently the favourite candidates for manufacture using rapid prototyping. Other emerging applications relate to complex orthopaedic surgery of the extremities: the forearm and foot. Several procedures such as osteotomies for radius malunions or tarsal coalition could become standard, thanks to the significant assistance provided by rapid prototyping patient-specific surgical

  19. Practice characteristics associated with patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Weems, Richard A; Litaker, Mark S; Shelton, Brent J

    2006-10-01

    To quantify the role of practice characteristics in patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographic services. Florida Dental Care Study (FDCS). Study Design. The FDCS was a 48-month prospective observational cohort study of community-dwelling adults. Participants' dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire about their practice characteristics. In-person interviews and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline, 24, and 48 months, with 6-monthly telephone interviews in between. A single multivariate (four radiographic service outcomes) multivariable (multiple explanatory covariates) logistic regression was used to model service receipts. These practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of radiographic services: number of different practices attended during follow-up; dentist's rating of how busy the practice was; typical waiting time for a new patient examination; practice size; percentage of patients that the dentist reported as interested in details about the condition of their mouths; percentage of African American patients in the practice; percentage of patients in the practice who do not have dental insurance; and dentist's agreement with a statement regarding whether patients should be dismissed from the practice. Effects had differential magnitudes and directions of effect, depending upon radiograph type. Practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of services. These effects were independent of patient-specific disease level and patient-specific sociodemographic characteristics, suggesting that practitioners do influence receipt of these diagnostic services. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that practitioners act in response to a mix of patients' interests, economic self-interests, and their own treatment preferences.

  20. Autonomy and Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms autonomy and automation. Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present definitions of automation, pilot in the loop, pilot on the loop and pilot out of the loop. We further propose that in future, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) RPAS Panel avoids the use of the terms autonomy and autonomous when referring to automated systems on board RPA. Work Group 7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of Levels of Automation for RPAS.

  1. Insights from the Health OER Inter-Institutional Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are gaining ascendancy in education, particularly in higher education. Logic suggests that the potential benefits of OER are likely to be greatest in resource-poor contexts such as Africa. However, little is known about the feasibility and sustainability of their use in African institutions. In the Health OER…

  2. Insights from the Health OER Inter-Institutional Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are gaining ascendancy in education, particularly in higher education. Logic suggests that the potential benefits of OER are likely to be greatest in resource-poor contexts such as Africa. However, little is known about the feasibility and sustainability of their use in African institutions. In the Health OER…

  3. Comparative inter-institutional study of stress among dentists.

    PubMed

    Pozos-Radillo, Blanca E; Galván-Ramírez, Ma Luz; Pando, Manuel; Carrión, Ma De los Angeles; González, Guillermo J

    2010-01-01

    Dentistry is considered to be a stressful profession due to different factors caused by work, representing a threat to dentists'health. The objectives of this work were to identify and compare chronic stress in dentists among the different health institutions and the association of stress with risk factors. The study in question is observational, transversal and comparative; 256 dentists were included, distributed among five public health institutions in the city of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, namely: the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), the Ministry of Health (SS), the Integral Development of the Family (DIF), the Social Security Services Institute for the Workers (ISSSTE) and the University of Guadalajara (U. de G) Data were obtained by means of the census technique. Stress was identified using the Stress Symptoms Inventory and the statistical analysis was performed using the Odds Ratio (O.R.) and the chi-square statistic. From the total population studied, 219 subjects presented high levels of chronic stress and 37, low levels. In the results of comparative analysis, significant differences were found between IMSS and U. de G and likewise between IMSS and SS. However, in the analysis of association, only U. de G was found to be associated with the high level of chronic stress.

  4. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  5. A Framework for Patient-Specific Spinal Intervention Simulation: Application to Lumbar Spinal Durotomy Repair.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Denning, Lynn; Lownie, Stephen P; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-01-01

    We present a functional and patient-specific lumbar phantom for the training of spinal durotomy and dura closure under microscopic view, consisting of a lumbar model, pressurized dural surrogate, together immersed in a tissue-mimicking layer simulating fat, muscle and skin. The lumbar model was derived from a patient computed tomography scan, preserving the natural shape and curvature of the lumbar column. The inclusion of the simulated soft-tissue layer was critical for preserving the surgical ergonomics and presented a realistic view under the surgical microscope. As the success of dura repair is indicated by the watertight closure of the thecal sac, the dura surrogate was connected to a pressurized and closed-loop water system to provide functional cerebrospinal fluid leakage during durotomy. This functional phantom is inexpensive to construct, provides a realistic tactile and visual environment for spinal durotomy repair, and can be easily extended to simulate other patient-specific spinal interventions.

  6. Method for patient-specific finite element modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Tisch, Stephen; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Wårdell, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.

  7. MRI is more accurate than CT for patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Frye, Benjamin M; Najim, Amjad A; Adams, Joanne B; Berend, Keith R; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2015-12-01

    Previous reports have stated that MRI is less accurate than CT for patient specific guide creation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-three TKAs were performed with CT-based guides and 27 with MRI-based guides. A mechanical axis through the central third of the knee was achieved in 88.9% of MRI-guided TKA versus 69.6% of CT-guided TKA (p=0.07). There were nine component outliers in the CT group (39.1%) and two in the MRI group (7.4%, p=0.00768). The relative risk of having an outlier using a CT-based guide was 5.28 times that of an MRI-based guide. Superior overall alignment and fewer outliers were achieved with the use of MRI compared with CT. MRI is the best imaging modality for surgeons wishing to utilize patient specific guides for TKA.

  8. Numerical modeling of hemodynamics scenarios of patient-specific coronary artery bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    Ballarin, Francesco; Faggiano, Elena; Manzoni, Andrea; Quarteroni, Alfio; Rozza, Gianluigi; Ippolito, Sonia; Antona, Carlo; Scrofani, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    A fast computational framework is devised to the study of several configurations of patient-specific coronary artery bypass grafts. This is especially useful to perform a sensitivity analysis of the hemodynamics for different flow conditions occurring in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts, the investigation of the progression of the coronary artery disease and the choice of the most appropriate surgical procedure. A complete pipeline, from the acquisition of patient-specific medical images to fast parameterized computational simulations, is proposed. Complex surgical configurations employed in the clinical practice, such as Y-grafts and sequential grafts, are studied. A virtual surgery platform based on model reduction of unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for blood dynamics is proposed to carry out sensitivity analyses in a very rapid and reliable way. A specialized geometrical parameterization is employed to compare the effect of stenosis and anastomosis variation on the outcome of the surgery in several relevant cases.

  9. Derivation of Patient Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Clinically Discarded Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Lin, Chen-Ju; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, An-Sheng; Lu, Jean; Lu, Chung-Hao; Sung, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are powerful tools for basic and translational research, as well as regenerative medicine. In routine human in vitro fertilization (IVF) practices, cumulus cells (CCs) are discarded, representing a potential source of biological materials for regenerative medicine. In this study, we derived patient-specific iPSCs using CCs from human infertility clinics for the first time. The human cumulus cell derived iPSCs (hc-iPSCs) were characterized for growth, karyotype, expression of pluripotency genes, and were subjected to embryoid bodies (EBs) and teratoma assays to evaluate their differentiation capacity. Hc-iPSCs display typical iPSC characteristics, and are capable of differentiating into all germ layers in vitro and in vivo. We further show that putative primordial germ cell like cells (PGCLCs) can be derived using hc-iPSCs. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of deriving patient-specific pluripotent stem cells using CCs. PMID:27802323

  10. [Evolution of total knee arthroplasty. From robotics and navigation to patient-specific instruments].

    PubMed

    Haaker, R

    2016-04-01

    In this article the evolution beginning with the robotics of total knee arthroplasty to CT-based and kinematic navigation and patient-specific instruments is described. Thereby it is pointed out that in the early 1990s, CT imaging solely for the planning of a knee endoprosthesis was considered as obsolete radiation exposure and this led to the widespread development of kinematical systems.Also a patient specific planning tool based on CAD built acryl harz blocs existed at the time. There is an ongoing process of implanting total knee arthroplasties in a more exact position. Nowadays the new evolution of soft tissue balancing by using a kinematic alignment has put these efforts into perspective.

  11. Anisotropic Finite Element Modeling Based on a Harmonic Field for Patient-Specific Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wanqiu; Zou, Beiji

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. This study examined the influence of anisotropic material for human sclera. Method. First, the individual geometry of patient-specific sclera was reproduced from a laser scan. Then, high quality finite element modeling of individual sclera was performed using a convenient automatic hexahedral mesh generator based on harmonic field and integrated with anisotropic material assignment function. Finally, comparison experiments were designed to investigate the effects of anisotropy on finite element modeling of sclera biomechanics. Results. The experimental results show that the presented approach can generate high quality anisotropic hexahedral mesh for patient-specific sclera. Conclusion. The anisotropy shows significant differences for stresses and strain distribution and careful consideration should be given to its use in biomechanical FE studies. PMID:28271067

  12. Accuracy and efficacy of osteotomy in total knee arthroplasty with patient-specific navigational template

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yudong; Ding, Jing; Xu, Yongqing; Hou, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    This study develops and validates a novel patient-specific navigational template for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A total of 70 patients who underwent TKA were randomized and divided into conventional method group and navigational template group. In the navigational template group, the patient-specific navigational templates were designed and used intraoperatively to assist 35 patients with knee arthroplasty. Information on operation time and blood loss was recorded. After surgery, the positions of the prosthesis were evaluated using CT scan and X-rays. Analysis showed significant differences in errors between the two techniques. In addition, mean operation time and mean blood loss were statistically and significantly lower in the navigational template group than in the conventional group. Overall, the navigational template method showed a high degree of accuracy and efficacy. PMID:26550129

  13. Predictive Models with Patient Specific Material Properties for the Biomechanical Behavior of Ascending Thoracic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the patient-specific material properties of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAA) using preoperative dynamic gated computed tomography (CT) scans. The identification is based on the simultaneous minimization of two cost functions, which define the difference between model predictions and gated CT measurements of the aneurysm volume at respectively systole and cardiac mid-cycle. The method is applied on five patients who underwent surgical repair of their ATAA at the University Hospital Center of St. Etienne. For these patients, the aneurysms were collected and tested mechanically using an in vitro bench. For the sake of validation, the mechanical properties found using the in vivo approach and the in vitro bench were compared. We eventually performed finite-element stress analyses based on each set of material properties. Rupture risk indexes were estimated and compared, showing promising results of the patient-specific identification method based on gated CT.

  14. The utility of patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells for the modelling of Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cocks, Graham; Curran, Sarah; Gami, Priya; Uwanogho, Dafe; Jeffries, Aaron R; Kathuria, Annie; Lucchesi, Walter; Wood, Victoria; Dixon, Rosemary; Ogilvie, Caroline; Steckler, Thomas; Price, Jack

    2014-03-01

    Until now, models of psychiatric diseases have typically been animal models. Whether they were to be used to further understand the pathophysiology of the disorder, or as drug discovery tools, animal models have been the choice of preference in mimicking psychiatric disorders in an experimental setting. While there have been cellular models, they have generally been lacking in validity. This situation is changing with the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this article, we give a methodological evaluation of the current state of the iPS technology with reference to our own work in generating patient-specific iPSCs for the study of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). In addition, we will give a broader perspective on the validity of this technology and to what extent it can be expected to complement animal models of ASD in the coming years.

  15. Patient specific surgical simulator for the evaluation of the movability of bimanual robotic arms.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Turini, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Vincenzo; Ferrari, Mauro; Mosca, Franco

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a simulator based on patient specific data for bimanual surgical robots. Given a bimanual robot with a particular geometry and kinematics, and a patient specific virtual anatomy, the aim of this simulator was to evaluate if a dexterous movability was obtainable to avoid collisions with the surrounding virtual anatomy in order to prevent potential damages to the tissues during the real surgical procedure. In addition, it could help surgeons to find the optimal positioning of the robot before entering the operative room. This application was tested using a haptic device to reproduce the interactions of the robot with deformable organs. The results showed good performances in terms of frame rate for the graphic, haptic, and dynamic processes.

  16. Role of patient-specific virtual reality rehearsal in carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W I M; Aggarwal, R; Van Herzeele, I; Plessers, M; Stroobant, N; Nestel, D; Cheshire, N; Vermassen, F

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in simulation science permit patient-specific rehearsal of endovascular stenting procedures. This study aimed to evaluate how effectively real interventions are replicated by patient-specific rehearsal technology, and to assess its value as a preparatory tool for the interventionalist and the operating team. All patients deemed candidates for carotid artery stenting procedures with suitable computed tomography images were enrolled. Each team member rehearsed the virtual procedure in the laboratory, simulated operating theatre or angiography suite environment immediately before treating the real patient. Dexterity and qualitative metrics were recorded. Subjective questionnaires used a Likert scale from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Of 18 patients, three were excluded. In 11 of 15 and 13 of 15 patients respectively endovascular tool use and fluoroscopy angles were identical during rehearsal and the real procedure. In a third of patients, the simulator did not adequately predict difficulties in cannulating the stenotic internal or common carotid arteries. The procedure realism, value in evaluating the case, increase in efficiency in tool use, and potential to increase communication, confidence and team performance were all rated highly (4 of 5). Patient-specific rehearsal was rated highly for both face and content validity. Access strategy, endovascular material use and angiographic imaging were all replicated effectively, although certain biomechanical vessel properties seemed to be replicated to a lesser degree. Patient-specific rehearsal constitutes a unique tool that may help tailor endovascular material choice, and optimize the preoperative preparation of the interventionalist and team. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Integral-based identification of patient specific parameters for a minimal cardiac model.

    PubMed

    Hann, C E; Chase, J G; Shaw, G M

    2006-02-01

    A minimal cardiac model has been developed which accurately captures the essential dynamics of the cardiovascular system (CVS). However, identifying patient specific parameters with the limited measurements often available, hinders the clinical application of the model for diagnosis and therapy selection. This paper presents an integral-based parameter identification method for fast, accurate identification of patient specific parameters using limited measured data. The integral method turns a previously non-linear and non-convex optimization problem into a linear and convex identification problem. The model includes ventricular interaction and physiological valve dynamics. A healthy human state and four disease states, valvular stenosis, pulmonary embolism, cardiogenic shock and septic shock are used to test the method. Parameters for the healthy and disease states are accurately identified using only discretized flows into and out of the two cardiac chambers, the minimum and maximum volumes of the left and right ventricles, and the pressure waveforms through the aorta and pulmonary artery. These input values can be readily obtained non-invasively using echo-cardiography and ultra-sound, or invasively via catheters that are often used in Intensive Care. The method enables rapid identification of model parameters to match a particular patient condition in clinical real time (3-5 min) to within a mean value of 4-10% in the presence of 5-15% uniformly distributed measurement noise. The specific changes made to simulate each disease state are correctly identified in each case to within 10% without false identification of any other patient specific parameters. Clinically, the resulting patient specific model can then be used to assist medical staff in understanding, diagnosis and treatment selection.

  18. A Patient-Specific Computational Fluid Dynamic Model for Hemodynamic Analysis of Left Ventricle Diastolic Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Wibowo, Stella Nathania; Leow, Yue An; Nguyen, Hoang-Huy; Liang, Zhong; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate blood flows through the human heart's left ventricles (LV), providing patient-specific time-dependent hemodynamic characteristics from reconstructed MRI scans of LV. These types of blood flow visualization can be of great asset to the medical field helping medical practitioners better predict the existence of any abnormalities in the patient, hence offer an appropriate treatment. The methodology employed in this work processed geometries obtained from MRI scans of patient-specific LV throughout a cardiac cycle using computer-aided design tool. It then used unstructured mesh generation techniques to generate surface and volume meshes for flow simulations; thus provided flow visualization and characteristics in patient-specific LV. The resulting CFD model provides three dimensional velocity streamlines on the geometries at specific times in a cardiac cycle, and they are compared with existing literature findings, such as data from echocardiography particle image velocimetry. As an important flow characteristic, vortex formation of the blood flow of healthy as well as diseased subjects having a LV dysfunction condition are also obtained from simulations and further investigated for potential diagnosis. The current work established a pipeline for a non-invasive diagnostic tool for diastolic dysfunction by generating patient-specific LV models and CFD models in the spatiotemporal dimensions. The proposed framework was applied for analysis of a group of normal subjects and patients with cardiac diseases. Results obtained using the numerical tool showed distinct differences in flow characteristics in the LV between patient with diastolic dysfunction and healthy subjects. In particular, vortex structures do not develop during cardiac cycles for patients while it was clearly seen in the normal subjects. The current LV CFD model has proven to be a promising technology to aid in the diagnosis of LV

  19. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the Pulmonary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Rios, Lourdes; Smith, Triston; Schroeder, Theodore; Mueller, Jeffrey; Murali, Srinivas; Lasorda, David; Zikos, Anthony; Spotti, Jennifer; Reilly, John J.; Finol, Ender A.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the pulmonary vasculature has the potential to reveal continuum metrics associated with the hemodynamic stress acting on the vascular endothelium. It is widely accepted that the endothelium responds to flow-induced stress by releasing vasoactive substances that can dilate and constrict blood vessels locally. The objectives of this study are to examine the extent of patient specificity required to obtain a significant association of CFD output metrics and clinical measures in models of the pulmonary arterial circulation, and to evaluate the potential correlation of wall shear stress (WSS) with established metrics indicative of right ventricular (RV) afterload in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Right heart catheterization (RHC) hemodynamic data and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively acquired for 10 PH patients and processed to simulate blood flow in the pulmonary arteries. While conducting CFD modeling of the reconstructed patient-specific vasculatures, we experimented with three different outflow boundary conditions to investigate the potential for using computationally derived spatially averaged wall shear Stress (SAWSS) as a metric of RV afterload. SAWSS was correlated with both pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (R2 = 0.77, P < 0.05) and arterial compliance (C) (R2 = 0.63, P < 0.05), but the extent of the correlation was affected by the degree of patient specificity incorporated in the fluid flow boundary conditions. We found that decreasing the distal PVR alters the flow distribution and changes the local velocity profile in the distal vessels, thereby increasing the local WSS. Nevertheless, implementing generic outflow boundary conditions still resulted in statistically significant SAWSS correlations with respect to both metrics of RV afterload, suggesting that the CFD model could be executed without the need for complex outflow boundary conditions that require invasively obtained

  20. Patient-specific computational modeling of blood flow in the pulmonary arterial circulation.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Rios, Lourdes; Smith, Triston; Schroeder, Theodore; Mueller, Jeffrey; Murali, Srinivas; Lasorda, David; Zikos, Anthony; Spotti, Jennifer; Reilly, John J; Finol, Ender A

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of the pulmonary vasculature has the potential to reveal continuum metrics associated with the hemodynamic stress acting on the vascular endothelium. It is widely accepted that the endothelium responds to flow-induced stress by releasing vasoactive substances that can dilate and constrict blood vessels locally. The objectives of this study are to examine the extent of patient specificity required to obtain a significant association of CFD output metrics and clinical measures in models of the pulmonary arterial circulation, and to evaluate the potential correlation of wall shear stress (WSS) with established metrics indicative of right ventricular (RV) afterload in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Right Heart Catheterization (RHC) hemodynamic data and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively acquired for 10 PH patients and processed to simulate blood flow in the pulmonary arteries. While conducting CFD modeling of the reconstructed patient-specific vasculatures, we experimented with three different outflow boundary conditions to investigate the potential for using computationally derived spatially averaged wall shear stress (SAWSS) as a metric of RV afterload. SAWSS was correlated with both pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) (R(2)=0.77, P<0.05) and arterial compliance (C) (R(2)=0.63, P<0.05), but the extent of the correlation was affected by the degree of patient specificity incorporated in the fluid flow boundary conditions. We found that decreasing the distal PVR alters the flow distribution and changes the local velocity profile in the distal vessels, thereby increasing the local WSS. Nevertheless, implementing generic outflow boundary conditions still resulted in statistically significant SAWSS correlations with respect to both metrics of RV afterload, suggesting that the CFD model could be executed without the need for complex outflow boundary conditions that require invasively obtained

  1. Design of Patient-Specific Gait Modifications for Knee Osteoarthritis Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Fregly, Benjamin J.; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.; Rooney, Kelly L.; Mitchell, Kim H.; Chmielewski, Terese L.

    2007-01-01

    Gait modification is a nonsurgical approach for reducing the external knee adduction torque in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The magnitude of the first adduction torque peak in particular is strongly associated with knee OA progression. While toeing out has been shown to reduce the second peak, no clinically realistic gait modifications have been identified that effectively reduce both peaks simultaneously. This study predicts novel patient-specific gait modifications that achieve this goal without changing the foot path. The modified gait motion was designed for a single patient with knee OA using dynamic optimization of a patient-specific, full-body gait model. The cost function minimized the knee adduction torque subject to constraints limiting how much the new gait motion could deviate from the patient's normal gait motion. The optimizations predicted a “medial-thrust” gait pattern that reduced the first adduction torque peak between 32% and 54% and the second peak between 34% and 56%. The new motion involved three synergistic kinematic changes: slightly decreased pelvis obliquity, slightly increased leg flexion, and slightly increased pelvis axial rotation. After gait retraining, the patient achieved adduction torque reductions of 39% to 50% in the first peak and 37% to 55% in the second one. These reductions are comparable to those reported after high tibial osteotomy surgery. The associated kinematic changes were consistent with the predictions except for pelvis obliquity, which showed little change. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to design novel patient-specific gait modifications with potential clinical benefit using dynamic optimization of patient-specific, full-body gait models. Further investigation is needed to assess the extent to which similar gait modifications may be effective for other patients with knee OA. PMID:17867361

  2. Developing patient-specific anatomic models for validation of cardiac ablation guidance procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David, III; Rettmann, Maryam; Cameron, Bruce; Camp, Jon; Robb, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Image-guided cardiac ablation has the potential to decrease procedure times and improve clinical outcome for patients with cardiac arrhythmias. There are several proposed methods for integrating patient-specific anatomy into the cardiac ablation procedure; however, these methods require thorough validation. One of the primary challenges in validation is determining ground truth as a standard for comparison. Some validation protocols have been developed for animals models and even in patients; however, these methods can be costly to implement and may increase the risk to patients. We have developed an approach to building realistic patient-specific anatomic models at a low-cost in order to validate the guidance procedure without introducing additional risk to the patients. Using a pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography scan, the blood pool of the left and right atria of a patient are segmented semi-manually. In addition, several anatomical landmarks are identified in the image data. The segmented atria and landmarks are converted into a polygonalized model which is used to build a thin-walled patient-specific blood pool model in a stereo-lithography system. Thumbscrews are inserted into the model at the landmarks. The entire model is embedded in a platinum silicone material which has been shown to have tissue-mimicking properties relative to ultrasound. Once the pliable mold has set, the blood pool model is extracted by dissolving the rigid material. The resulting physical model correctly mimics a specific patient anatomy with embedded fiducals which can be used for validation experiments. The patient-specific anatomic model approach may also be used for pre-surgical practice and training of new interventionalists.

  3. The effect of inlet waveforms on computational hemodynamics of patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Siddiqui, A H; Meng, H

    2014-12-18

    Due to the lack of patient-specific inlet flow waveform measurements, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of intracranial aneurysms usually employ waveforms that are not patient-specific as inlet boundary conditions for the computational model. The current study examined how this assumption affects the predicted hemodynamics in patient-specific aneurysm geometries. We examined wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), the two most widely studied hemodynamic quantities that have been shown to predict aneurysm rupture, as well as maximal WSS (MWSS), energy loss (EL) and pressure loss coefficient (PLc). Sixteen pulsatile CFD simulations were carried out on four typical saccular aneurysms using 4 different waveforms and an identical inflow rate as inlet boundary conditions. Our results demonstrated that under the same mean inflow rate, different waveforms produced almost identical WSS distributions and WSS magnitudes, similar OSI distributions but drastically different OSI magnitudes. The OSI magnitude is correlated with the pulsatility index of the waveform. Furthermore, there is a linear relationship between aneurysm-averaged OSI values calculated from one waveform and those calculated from another waveform. In addition, different waveforms produced similar MWSS, EL and PLc in each aneurysm. In conclusion, inlet waveform has minimal effects on WSS, OSI distribution, MWSS, EL and PLc and a strong effect on OSI magnitude, but aneurysm-averaged OSI from different waveforms has a strong linear correlation with each other across different aneurysms, indicating that for the same aneurysm cohort, different waveforms can consistently stratify (rank) OSI of aneurysms.

  4. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-10-13

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration.

  5. A technique for intraoperative creation of patient-specific titanium mesh implants.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Ian Rp; Edwards, Glenn; Mainprize, James; Antonyshyn, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Prefabricated, patient-specific alloplastic implants for cranioplasty reduce surgical complexity, decrease operative times, minimize exposure and risk of contamination, and have resulted in improved aesthetic results. However, in creating a prefabricated custom implant using a patient's computed tomography data, a stable, unalterable defect must be clearly defined before surgery. In the event that an intraoperative modification of an exiting skull defect is required, or in cases of tumour resection in which the size of the skull defect is unknown preoperatively, these prefabricated implants cannot be used. The ideal method for alloplastic cranioplasty would enable cost-effective creation of a patient-specific implant with the capacity for intraoperative modification. The present article describes a novel technique of cranioplasty that uses a patient's computed tomography data to create a custom forming tool (ie, mold), enabling intraoperative creation of a patient-specific titanium mesh implant. The utility of these implants in creating a custom reconstructive solution in cases in which the size of the skull defect is unknown preoperatively will be demonstrated using two case presentations.

  6. The future of the patient-specific Body-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam; Singh, Sukhdeep; Fernekorn, Uta; Schober, Andreas

    2013-09-21

    As significant advancements in technology focused on Organ-on-a-chip continue, it is feasible to consider the future of Body-on-a-chip technology. With serious work being done to realize functioning artificial livers, kidneys, hearts, and lungs on chips, the next step is not only to interconnect these organs but also to consider the integration of stem cell technology to create interconnected patient-specific organs. Such a patient-specific Body-on-a-chip requires a sophisticated set of tools for micropattering cell cultures in 3D to create interconnected tissue-like organ structures. This review discusses advanced methods of the past two years in on-Chip organs, the complex 3D patterning of cultures and state-of-the-art scaffolding, and discusses some of the most relevant advancements in human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) research applied to these organs and scaffolds for the future of a patient-specific Body-on-a-chip. We anticipate that such a technology would have a wide area of application, primarily benefiting drug development, chemical safety testing, and disease modeling.

  7. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  8. A computational method for predicting inferior vena cava filter performance on a patient-specific basis.

    PubMed

    Aycock, Kenneth I; Campbell, Robert L; Manning, Keefe B; Sastry, Shankar P; Shontz, Suzanne M; Lynch, Frank C; Craven, Brent A

    2014-08-01

    A computational methodology for simulating virtual inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement and IVC hemodynamics was developed and demonstrated in two patient-specific IVC geometries: a left-sided IVC and an IVC with a retroaortic left renal vein. An inverse analysis was performed to obtain the approximate in vivo stress state for each patient vein using nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). Contact modeling was then used to simulate IVC filter placement. Contact area, contact normal force, and maximum vein displacements were higher in the retroaortic IVC than in the left-sided IVC (144 mm(2), 0.47 N, and 1.49 mm versus 68 mm(2), 0.22 N, and 1.01 mm, respectively). Hemodynamics were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), with four cases for each patient-specific vein: (1) IVC only, (2) IVC with a placed filter, (3) IVC with a placed filter and model embolus, all at resting flow conditions, and (4) IVC with a placed filter and model embolus at exercise flow conditions. Significant hemodynamic differences were observed between the two patient IVCs, with the development of a right-sided jet, larger flow recirculation regions, and lower maximum flow velocities in the left-sided IVC. These results support further investigation of IVC filter placement and hemodynamics on a patient-specific basis.

  9. Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Fabiola; Latorre, Malcolm A.; Göransson, Nathanael; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode. PMID:27618109

  10. A Numerical Multiscale Framework for Modeling Patient-Specific Coronary Artery Bypass Surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Abhay B.; Kahn, Andrew; Marsden, Alison

    2014-11-01

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is performed to revascularize diseased coronary arteries, using arterial, venous or synthetic grafts. Vein grafts, used in more than 70% of procedures, have failure rates as high as 50% in less than 10 years. Hemodynamics is known to play a key role in the mechano-biological response of vein grafts, but current non-invasive imaging techniques cannot fully characterize the hemodynamic and biomechanical environment. We numerically compute hemodynamics and wall mechanics in patient-specific 3D CABG geometries using stabilized finite element methods. The 3D patient-specific domain is coupled to a 0D lumped parameter circulatory model and parameters are tuned to match patient-specific blood pressures, stroke volumes, heart rates and heuristic flow-split values. We quantify differences in hemodynamics between arterial and venous grafts and discuss possible correlations to graft failure. Extension to a deformable wall approximation will also be discussed. The quantification of wall mechanics and hemodynamics is a necessary step towards coupling continuum models in solid and fluid mechanics with the cellular and sub-cellular responses of grafts, which in turn, should lead to a more accurate prediction of the long term outcome of CABG surgeries, including predictions of growth and remodeling.

  11. An integrated approach to patient-specific predictive modeling for single ventricle heart palliation.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Chiara; Baker, Catriona; Kung, Ethan; Schievano, Silvia; Arbia, Gregory; Baretta, Alessia; Biglino, Giovanni; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo; Marsden, Alison; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Taylor, Andrew; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Dorfman, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease and a single ventricle (SV), ventricular support of the circulation is inadequate, and staged palliative surgery (usually 3 stages) is needed for treatment. In the various palliative surgical stages individual differences in the circulation are important and patient-specific surgical planning is ideal. In this study, an integrated approach between clinicians and engineers has been developed, based on patient-specific multi-scale models, and is here applied to predict stage 2 surgical outcomes. This approach involves four distinct steps: (1) collection of pre-operative clinical data from a patient presenting for SV palliation, (2) construction of the pre-operative model, (3) creation of feasible virtual surgical options which couple a three-dimensional model of the surgical anatomy with a lumped parameter model (LPM) of the remainder of the circulation and (4) performance of post-operative simulations to aid clinical decision making. The pre-operative model is described, agreeing well with clinical flow tracings and mean pressures. Two surgical options (bi-directional Glenn and hemi-Fontan operations) are virtually performed and coupled to the pre-operative LPM, with the hemodynamics of both options reported. Results are validated against postoperative clinical data. Ultimately, this work represents the first patient-specific predictive modeling of stage 2 palliation using virtual surgery and closed-loop multi-scale modeling.

  12. An integrated approach to patient-specific predictive modeling for single ventricle heart palliation

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, Chiara; Baker, Catriona; Kung, Ethan; Schievano, Silvia; Arbia, Gregory; Baretta, Alessia; Biglino, Giovanni; Migliavacca, Francesco; Dubini, Gabriele; Pennati, Giancarlo; Marsden, Alison; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Taylor, Andrew; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Dorfman, Adam

    2014-01-01

    In patients with congenital heart disease and a single ventricle (SV), ventricular support of the circulation is inadequate, and staged palliative surgery (usually 3 stages) is needed for treatment. In the various palliative surgical stages individual differences in the circulation are important and patient-specific surgical planning is ideal. In this study, an integrated approach between clinicians and engineers has been developed, based on patient-specific multi-scale models, and is here applied to predict stage 2 surgical outcomes. This approach involves four distinct steps: (1) collection of pre-operative clinical data from a patient presenting for SV palliation, (2) construction of the pre-operative model, (3) creation of feasible virtual surgical options which couple a three-dimensional model of the surgical anatomy with a lumped parameter model (LPM) of the remainder of the circulation and (4) performance of post-operative simulations to aid clinical decision making. The pre-operative model is described, agreeing well with clinical flow tracings and mean pressures. Two surgical options (bi-directional Glenn and hemi-Fontan operations) are virtually performed and coupled to the pre-operative LPM, with the hemodynamics of both options reported. Results are validated against postoperative clinical data. Ultimately, this work represents the first patient-specific predictive modeling of stage 2 palliation using virtual surgery and closed-loop multi-scale modeling. PMID:23343002

  13. Corrective limb osteotomy using patient specific 3D-printed guides: A technical note.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, H; Rosseels, W; Sermon, A; Nijs, S

    2016-10-01

    We describe the step-by-step process of a corrective osteotomy using 3D printed patient specific guides. Before surgery, bilateral computed tomography (CT) scans are made to plan correction in the affected limb. The digital pre-planning defines the location of the K-wires, drill holes, and the osteotomy site(s). Subsequently, a 3D printed patient specific guide is applied, which indicates the exact position of these drill holes and the osteotomies. This increases the accuracy of the surgery by means of patient specific fit of the guide. During surgery an incision is made and the guide is applied on the bone, which allows the surgeon to perform a very precise osteotomy. Next, the bone is reduced either directly using the plate and marked drill holes, or indirectly using a second reduction guide. In the latter case, the previously drilled K-wires are used to adequately position the reduction guide. Fixation of the bone fragments using plating osteosynthesis finalizes the process. Although this technique has its specific limitations, it might serve as a powerful tool in the treatment of malunion of both articular and nonarticular fractures of the limb.

  14. Activity and High-Order Effective Connectivity Alterations in Sanfilippo C Patient-Specific Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Isaac; Soriano, Jordi; Orlandi, Javier G.; Torrent, Roger; Richaud-Patin, Yvonne; Jiménez-Delgado, Senda; Merlin, Simone; Follenzi, Antonia; Consiglio, Antonella; Vilageliu, Lluïsa; Grinberg, Daniel; Raya, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has been successfully used to recapitulate phenotypic traits of several human diseases in vitro. Patient-specific iPSC-based disease models are also expected to reveal early functional phenotypes, although this remains to be proved. Here, we generated iPSC lines from two patients with Sanfilippo type C syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder with inheritable progressive neurodegeneration. Mature neurons obtained from patient-specific iPSC lines recapitulated the main known phenotypes of the disease, not present in genetically corrected patient-specific iPSC-derived cultures. Moreover, neuronal networks organized in vitro from mature patient-derived neurons showed early defects in neuronal activity, network-wide degradation, and altered effective connectivity. Our findings establish the importance of iPSC-based technology to identify early functional phenotypes, which can in turn shed light on the pathological mechanisms occurring in Sanfilippo syndrome. This technology also has the potential to provide valuable readouts to screen compounds, which can prevent the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:26411903

  15. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  16. Automation of industrial bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, W; DaPra, E; Schneider, K

    2000-01-01

    The dramatic development of new electronic devices within the last 25 years has had a substantial influence on the control and automation of industrial bioprocesses. Within this short period of time the method of controlling industrial bioprocesses has changed completely. In this paper, the authors will use a practical approach focusing on the industrial applications of automation systems. From the early attempts to use computers for the automation of biotechnological processes up to the modern process automation systems some milestones are highlighted. Special attention is given to the influence of Standards and Guidelines on the development of automation systems.

  17. Shoe-String Automation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.L.

    2001-07-30

    Faced with a downsizing organization, serious budget reductions and retirement of key metrology personnel, maintaining capabilities to provide necessary services to our customers was becoming increasingly difficult. It appeared that the only solution was to automate some of our more personnel-intensive processes; however, it was crucial that the most personnel-intensive candidate process be automated, at the lowest price possible and with the lowest risk of failure. This discussion relates factors in the selection of the Standard Leak Calibration System for automation, the methods of automation used to provide the lowest-cost solution and the benefits realized as a result of the automation.

  18. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  19. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient’s clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDIvol) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller patients

  20. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered: This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary: Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation.

  1. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation. PMID:28277804

  2. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  3. Replicating Patient-Specific Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis With Functional 3D Modeling.

    PubMed

    Maragiannis, Dimitrios; Jackson, Matthew S; Igo, Stephen R; Schutt, Robert C; Connell, Patrick; Grande-Allen, Jane; Barker, Colin M; Chang, Su Min; Reardon, Michael J; Zoghbi, William A; Little, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    3D stereolithographic printing can be used to convert high-resolution computed tomography images into life-size physical models. We sought to apply 3D printing technologies to develop patient-specific models of the anatomic and functional characteristics of severe aortic valve stenosis. Eight patient-specific models of severe aortic stenosis (6 tricuspid and 2 bicuspid) were created using dual-material fused 3D printing. Tissue types were identified and segmented from clinical computed tomography image data. A rigid material was used for printing calcific regions, and a rubber-like material was used for soft tissue structures of the outflow tract, aortic root, and noncalcified valve cusps. Each model was evaluated for its geometric valve orifice area, echocardiographic image quality, and aortic stenosis severity by Doppler and Gorlin methods under 7 different in vitro stroke volume conditions. Fused multimaterial 3D printed models replicated the focal calcific structures of aortic stenosis. Doppler-derived measures of peak and mean transvalvular gradient correlated well with reference standard pressure catheters across a range of flow conditions (r=0.988 and r=0.978 respectively, P<0.001). Aortic valve orifice area by Gorlin and Doppler methods correlated well (r=0.985, P<0.001). Calculated aortic valve area increased a small amount for both methods with increasing flow (P=0.002). By combing the technologies of high-spatial resolution computed tomography, computer-aided design software, and fused dual-material 3D printing, we demonstrate that patient-specific models can replicate both the anatomic and functional properties of severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Patient-specific coronary artery blood flow simulation using myocardial volume partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kang, Dongwoo; Kang, Nahyup; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Hyong-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2013-03-01

    Using computational simulation, we can analyze cardiovascular disease in non-invasive and quantitative manners. More specifically, computational modeling and simulation technology has enabled us to analyze functional aspect such as blood flow, as well as anatomical aspect such as stenosis, from medical images without invasive measurements. Note that the simplest ways to perform blood flow simulation is to apply patient-specific coronary anatomy with other average-valued properties; in this case, however, such conditions cannot fully reflect accurate physiological properties of patients. To resolve this limitation, we present a new patient-specific coronary blood flow simulation method by myocardial volume partitioning considering artery/myocardium structural correspondence. We focus on that blood supply is closely related to the mass of each myocardial segment corresponding to the artery. Therefore, we applied this concept for setting-up simulation conditions in the way to consider many patient-specific features as possible from medical image: First, we segmented coronary arteries and myocardium separately from cardiac CT; then the myocardium is partitioned into multiple regions based on coronary vasculature. The myocardial mass and required blood mass for each artery are estimated by converting myocardial volume fraction. Finally, the required blood mass is used as boundary conditions for each artery outlet, with given average aortic blood flow rate and pressure. To show effectiveness of the proposed method, fractional flow reserve (FFR) by simulation using CT image has been compared with invasive FFR measurement of real patient data, and as a result, 77% of accuracy has been obtained.

  5. Interstitial ultrasound ablation of vertebral and paraspinal tumours: Parametric and patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Prakash, Punit; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Theoretical parametric and patient-specific models are applied to assess the feasibility of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumours in and near the spine and to identify potential treatment delivery strategies. Methods 3D patient-specific finite element models (n=11) of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumours associated with spine were generated. Gaseous nerve insulation and various applicator configurations, frequencies (3 and 7 MHz), placement trajectories, and tumour locations were simulated. Parametric studies with multilayered models investigated the impacts of tumour attenuation, tumour dimension, and the thickness of bone insulating critical structures. Temperature and thermal dose were calculated to define ablation (>240 equivalent minutes at 43°C (EM43°C)) and safety margins (<45°C & <6 EM43°C), and to determine performance and required delivery parameters. Results Osteolytic tumours (≤44 mm) encapsulated by bone could be successfully ablated with 7 MHz interstitial ultrasound (8.1-16.6 W/cm2, 120-5900 J, 0.4-15 min). Ablation of tumours (94.6-100% volumetric) 0-14.5 mm from the spinal canal was achieved within 3-15 min without damaging critical nerves. 3 MHz devices provided faster ablation (390 versus 930 s) of an 18 mm diameter osteoblastic (high bone content) volume than 7 MHz devices. Critical anatomy in proximity to the tumour could be protected by selection of appropriate applicator configurations, active sectors, and applied power schemas, and through gaseous insulation. Preferential ultrasound absorption at bone surfaces facilitated faster, more effective ablations in osteolytic tumours and provided isolation of ablative energies and temperatures. Conclusions Parametric and patient-specific studies demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantages of interstitial ultrasound ablation treatment of paraspinal and osteolytic vertebral tumours. PMID:25017322

  6. Patient-specific indirectly 3D printed mitral valves for pre-operative surgical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginty, Olivia; Moore, John; Xia, Wenyao; Bainbridge, Dan; Peters, Terry

    2017-03-01

    Significant mitral valve regurgitation affects over 2% of the population. Over the past few decades, mitral valve (MV) repair has become the preferred treatment option, producing better patient outcomes than MV replacement, but requiring more expertise. Recently, 3D printing has been used to assist surgeons in planning optimal treatments for complex surgery, thus increasing the experience of surgeons and the success of MV repairs. However, while commercially available 3D printers are capable of printing soft, tissue-like material, they cannot replicate the demanding combination of echogenicity, physical flexibility and strength of the mitral valve. In this work, we propose the use of trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) 3D image data and inexpensive 3D printing technology to create patient specific mitral valve models. Patient specific 3D TEE images were segmented and used to generate a profile of the mitral valve leaflets. This profile was 3D printed and integrated into a mold to generate a silicone valve model that was placed in a dynamic heart phantom. Our primary goal is to use silicone models to assess different repair options prior to surgery, in the hope of optimizing patient outcomes. As a corollary, a database of patient specific models can then be used as a trainer for new surgeons, using a beating heart simulator to assess success. The current work reports preliminary results, quantifying basic morphological properties. The models were assessed using 3D TEE images, as well as 2D and 3D Doppler images for comparison to the original patient TEE data.

  7. In Vitro Validation of Patient-Specific Hemodynamic Simulations in Coronary Aneurysms Caused by Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew M.; Burns, Jane C.; Marsden, Alison

    2014-01-01

    To perform experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applied to patient specific coronary aneurysm anatomy of Kawasaki disease. We quantified hemodynamics in a patient-specific coronary artery aneurysm physical phantom under physiologic rest and exercise flow conditions. Using phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), we acquired 3-component flow velocity at two slice locations in the aneurysms. We then performed numerical simulations with the same geometry and inflow conditions, and performed qualitative and quantitative comparisons of velocities between experimental measurements and simulation results. We observed excellent qualitative agreement in flow pattern features. The quantitative spatially and temporally varying differences in velocity between PCMRI and CFD were proportional to the flow velocity. As a result, the percent discrepancy between simulation and experiment was relatively constant regardless of flow velocity variations. Through 1D and 2D quantitative comparisons, we found a 5–17% difference between measured and simulated velocities. Additional analysis assessed wall shear stress differences between deformable and rigid wall simulations. This study demonstrated that CFD produced good qualitative and quantitative predictions of velocities in a realistic coronary aneurysm anatomy under physiological flow conditions. The results provide insights on factors that may influence the level of agreement, and a set of in vitro experimental data that can be used by others to compare against CFD simulation results. The findings of this study increase confidence in the use of CFD for investigating hemodynamics in the specialized anatomy of coronary aneurysms. This provides a basis for future hemodynamics studies in patient-specific models of Kawasaki disease. PMID:25050140

  8. Patient-specific in vitro models for hemodynamic analysis of congenital heart disease - Additive manufacturing approach.

    PubMed

    Medero, Rafael; García-Rodríguez, Sylvana; François, Christopher J; Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro

    2017-03-21

    Non-invasive hemodynamic assessment of total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is challenging due to the complex anatomy. Additive manufacturing (AM) is a suitable alternative for creating patient-specific in vitro models for flow measurements using four-dimensional (4D) Flow MRI. These in vitro systems have the potential to serve as validation for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), simulating different physiological conditions. This study investigated three different AM technologies, stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS) and fused deposition modeling (FDM), to determine differences in hemodynamics when measuring flow using 4D Flow MRI. The models were created using patient-specific MRI data from an extracardiac TCPC. These models were connected to a perfusion pump circulating water at three different flow rates. Data was processed for visualization and quantification of velocity, flow distribution, vorticity and kinetic energy. These results were compared between each model. In addition, the flow distribution obtained in vitro was compared to in vivo. The results showed significant difference in velocities measured at the outlets of the models that required internal support material when printing. Furthermore, an ultrasound flow sensor was used to validate flow measurements at the inlets and outlets of the in vitro models. These results were highly correlated to those measured with 4D Flow MRI. This study showed that commercially available AM technologies can be used to create patient-specific vascular models for in vitro hemodynamic studies at reasonable costs. However, technologies that do not require internal supports during manufacturing allow smoother internal surfaces, which makes them better suited for flow analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gantry angle dependence in IMRT pre-treatment patient-specific quality controls.

    PubMed

    Monti, Angelo Filippo; Berlusconi, Chiara; Gelosa, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a complex treatment modality that requires pre-treatment patient-specific quality control (QC) in order to assess a correct treatment delivery. The aim of this work is to investigate pre-treatment patient-specific per-field QCs performed with an on-board EPID at the gantry angle of 0° and at the treatment ones, and to asses if measurements executed at 0° are able to guarantee a correct treatment. Ten patients with prostate cancer were evaluated. Two "verification" plans were created for each patient in order to calculate the dose at the EPID surface: one with all fields positioned at 0° and one with all fields at the actual treatment angles. EPID's mechanical shifts due to gravity effects were always taken into account and corrected. 0 and no-0 plans were compared using a gamma-index method (3%, 3 mm). The gamma index was found dependent on gantry angles but the difference between 0 and no-0 samples was small (-0.3% mean value) and the criteria of acceptability of the gamma method was always satisfied for every field delivered at angles different from 0. Therefore patient-specific pre-treatment QCs should be done at treatments angles, but, if periodical quality assurance is performed on dynamic MLC for different gantry angles, this requirement was shown not strictly mandatory and pre-treatment IMRTQC can be reasonably executed at 0° angles too. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a high-resolution patient-specific model of the electrically stimulated cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, Ahmet; Dwyer, Robert T.; Noble, Jack H.

    2017-03-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are considered standard treatment for patients who experience sensorineural hearing loss. Although these devices have been remarkably successful at restoring hearing, it is rare to achieve natural fidelity, and many patients experience poor outcomes. Our group has developed the first image-guided CI programming (IGCIP) technique where the positions of the electrodes are found in CT images and used to estimate neural activation patterns, which is unique information that audiologists can use to define patient-specific processor settings. In our current system, neural activation is estimated using only the distance from each electrode to the neural activation sites. This approach might be less accurate than using a high-resolution electro-anatomical model (EAM) of the electrically stimulated cochlea to perform physics-based estimation of neural activation. In this work, we propose a patientcustomized EAM approach where the EAM is spatially and electrically adapted to a patient-specific configuration. Spatial adaptation is done through non-rigid registration of the model with the patient CT image. Electrical adaptation is done by adjusting tissue resistivity parameters so that the intra-cochlear voltage distributions predicted by the model best match those directly measured for the patient via their implant. We demonstrated our approach for N=7 patients. We found that our approach results in mean percent differences between direct and simulated measurements of voltage distributions of 11%. In addition, visual comparison shows the simulated and measured voltage distributions are qualitatively in good agreement. This represents a crucial step toward developing and validating the first in vivo patient-specific cochlea EAMs.

  11. Modeling of hemophilia A using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells derived from urine cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bei; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Zhiju; Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Du, Juan; Wu, Changwei; Chen, Qianyu; Cai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Yanhong; Pei, Duanqing; Zhong, Mei; Pan, Guangjin

    2014-07-11

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a severe, congenital bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII). For years, traditional laboratory animals have been used to study HA and its therapies, although animal models may not entirely mirror the human pathophysiology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can undergo unlimited self-renewal and differentiate into all cell types. This study aims to generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific iPSCs that differentiate into disease-affected hepatocyte cells. These hepatocytes are potentially useful for in vitro disease modeling and provide an applicable cell source for autologous cell therapy after genetic correction. In this study, we mainly generated iPSCs from urine collected from HA patients with integration-free episomal vectors PEP4-EO2S-ET2K containing human genes OCT4, SOX2, SV40LT and KLF4, and differentiated these iPSCs into hepatocyte-like cells. We further identified the genetic phenotype of the FVIII genes and the FVIII activity in the patient-specific iPSC derived hepatic cells. HA patient-specific iPSCs (HA-iPSCs) exhibited typical pluripotent properties evident by immunostaining, in vitro assays and in vivo assays. Importantly, we showed that HA-iPSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells and the HA-iPSC-derived hepatocytes failed to produce FVIII, but otherwise functioned normally, recapitulating the phenotype of HA disease in vitro. HA-iPSCs, particular those generated from the urine using a non-viral approach, provide an efficient way for modeling HA in vitro. Furthermore, HA-iPSCs and their derivatives serve as an invaluable cell source that can be used for gene and cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient-specific endovascular simulation influences interventionalists performing carotid artery stenting procedures.

    PubMed

    Willaert, W I M; Aggarwal, R; Van Herzeele, I; O'Donoghue, K; Gaines, P A; Darzi, A W; Vermassen, F E; Cheshire, N J

    2011-04-01

    The ability to perform patient-specific simulated rehearsal of complex endovascular interventions is a technological advance with potential benefits to patient outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate whether patient-specific rehearsal of a carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedure has an influence on tool selection and the use of fluoroscopy. Following case note and computed tomography (CT) angiographic review of a real patient case, subjects performed the CAS procedure on a virtual reality simulator. Endovascular tool requirements and fluoroscopic angles were evaluated with a pre- and post-case questionnaire. Participants also rated the simulation from 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent). Thirty-three endovascular physicians with varying degrees of CAS experience were recruited: inexperienced (5-20 CAS procedures) n = 11, moderately (21-50 CAS procedures) n = 7 or highly experienced (>50 CAS procedures) n = 15. For all participants, 96 of a possible 363 changes (26%) were observed from pre- to post-case questionnaires. This was most notable for optimal fluoroscopy C-arm position 15/33 (46%), choice of selective catheter 13/33 (39%), choice of sheath or guiding catheter 11/33 (33%) and balloon dilatation strategy 10/33 (30%). Experience with the CAS procedure did not influence the degree of change significantly (p > 0.05), and all groups exhibited a considerable modification in tool and fluoroscopy preference. The model was considered realistic and useful as a tool to practice a real case (median score 4/5). Patient-specific simulated rehearsal of a complex endovascular procedure strongly influences tool selection and fluoroscopy preferences for the real case. Further research has to evaluate how this technology may transfer from in vitro to in vivo and if it can reduce the radiation dose and the number of endovascular tools used and improve outcomes for patients in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2010 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  13. Augmented reality patient-specific reconstruction plate design for pelvic and acetabular fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangyang; Chen, Bailiang; Guo, Qingshan; Qi, Yue; Shen, Yue

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a preoperative reconstruction plate design system for unilateral pelvic and acetabular fracture reduction and internal fixation surgery, using computer graphics and augmented reality (AR) techniques, in order to respect the patient-specific morphology and to reduce surgical invasiveness, as well as to simplify the surgical procedure. Our AR-aided implant design and contouring system is composed of two subsystems: a semi-automatic 3D virtual fracture reduction system to establish the patient-specific anatomical model and a preoperative templating system to create the virtual and real surgical implants. Preoperative 3D CT data are taken as input. The virtual fracture reduction system exploits the symmetric nature of the skeletal system to build a "repaired" pelvis model, on which reconstruction plates are planned interactively. A lightweight AR environment is set up to allow surgeons to match the actual implants to the digital ones intuitively. The effectiveness of this system is qualitatively demonstrated with 6 clinical cases. Its reliability was assessed based on the inter-observer reproducibility of the resulting virtual implants. The implants designed with the proposed system were successfully applied to all cases through minimally invasive surgeries. After the treatments, no further complications were reported. The inter-observer variability of the virtual implant geometry is 0.63 mm on average with a standard deviation of 0.49 mm. The time required for implant creation with our system is 10 min on average. It is feasible to apply the proposed AR-aided design system for noninvasive implant contouring for unilateral fracture reduction and internal fixation surgery. It also enables a patient-specific surgical planning procedure with potentially improved efficiency.

  14. Patient-specific polyetheretherketone facial implants in a computer-aided planning workflow.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Rojas, Godoberto; Figl, Michael; Schicho, Kurt; Seemann, Rudolf; Traxler, Hannes; Vacariu, Apostolos; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Ewers, Rolf; Watzinger, Franz

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we report an innovative workflow using polyetheretherketone (PEEK) patient-specific implants for esthetic corrections in the facial region through onlay grafting. The planning includes implant design according to virtual osteotomy and generation of a subtraction volume. The implant design was refined by stepwise changing the implant geometry according to soft tissue simulations. One patient was scanned using computed tomography. PEEK implants were interactively designed and manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques. Positioning intraoperatively was assisted by computer-aided navigation. Two months after surgery, a 3-dimensional surface model of the patient's face was generated using photogrammetry. Finally, the Hausdorff distance calculation was used to quantify the overall error, encompassing the failures in soft tissue simulation and implantation. The implant positioning process during surgery was satisfactory. The simulated soft tissue surface and the photogrammetry scan of the patient showed a high correspondence, especially where the skin covered the implants. The mean total error (Hausdorff distance) was 0.81 ± 1.00 mm (median 0.48, interquartile range 1.11). The spatial deviation remained less than 0.7 mm for the vast majority of points. The proposed workflow provides a complete computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer-aided surgery chain for implant design, allowing for soft tissue simulation, fabrication of patient-specific implants, and image-guided surgery to position the implants. Much of the surgical complexity resulting from osteotomies of the zygoma, chin, or mandibular angle might be transferred into the planning phase of patient-specific implants. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rotational alignment in patient-specific instrumentation in TKA: MRI or CT?

    PubMed

    Silva, Alcindo; Pinto, Elisabete; Sampaio, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    To compare CT-guided and MRI-guided patient-specific instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Forty-four patients underwent primary TKA using either CT-guided or MR-guided Signature™ patient-specific instrumentation. They were prospectively assigned into two groups: 23 patients into the MR-guided instrumentation (group A) and 21 patients into the CT-guided patient-specific instrumentation (group B). All patients underwent computed tomography of the operated knee in the first week after the surgery to measure the components rotation. The femoral component rotation was 0.0° (0.0, 1.0) in group A and 0.0° (-2.0, 1.0) in group B. The tibial component rotation was -16.0° (-19.0, -14.0) in group A and -15.0° (-18.0, -8.0) in group B. In both components, there were no significant differences between the two groups. The difference between the tibial component rotation and the neutral tibial rotation was similar in both groups [2.0° (-1.4, 4.0) in group A and 3.0° (-0.5, 5.0) in group B], but the dispersion around the median was different between the two groups, with the amplitude of the difference between tibial rotation and neutral position 9° (-3.0, 6.0) in group A and 27° (-9.0, 18.0) in group B. MRI may be more accurate than CT using the Signature™ system when planning the surgical guides for TKA, with fewer patients with malrotation of the tibial component. II.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Ear for Patient-Specific Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nimeskern, Luc; Feldmann, Eva-Maria; Kuo, Willy; Schwarz, Silke; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Dürr, Susanne; Müller, Ralph; Rotter, Nicole; Stok, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Like a fingerprint, ear shape is a unique personal feature that should be reconstructed with a high fidelity during reconstructive surgery. Ear cartilage tissue engineering (TE) advantageously offers the possibility to use novel 3D manufacturing techniques to reconstruct the ear, thus allowing for a detailed auricular shape. However it also requires detailed patient-specific images of the 3D cartilage structures of the patient’s intact contralateral ear (if available). Therefore the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an imaging strategy for acquiring patient-specific ear cartilage shape, with sufficient precision and accuracy for use in a clinical setting. Methods and Materials Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 14 volunteer and six cadaveric auricles and manually segmented. Reproducibility of cartilage volume (Cg.V), surface (Cg.S) and thickness (Cg.Th) was assessed, to determine whether raters could repeatedly define the same volume of interest. Additionally, six cadaveric auricles were harvested, scanned and segmented using the same procedure, then dissected and scanned using high resolution micro-CT. Correlation between MR and micro-CT measurements was assessed to determine accuracy. Results Good inter- and intra-rater reproducibility was observed (precision errors <4% for Cg.S and <9% for Cg.V and Cg.Th). Intraclass correlations were good for Cg.V and Cg.S (>0.82), but low for Cg.Th (<0.23) due to similar average Cg.Th between patients. However Pearson’s coefficients showed that the ability to detect local cartilage shape variations is unaffected. Good correlation between clinical MRI and micro-CT (r>0.95) demonstrated high accuracy. Discussion and Conclusion This study demonstrated that precision and accuracy of the proposed method was high enough to detect patient-specific variation in ear cartilage geometry. The present study provides a clinical strategy to access the necessary information required for the

  17. Fuzzy control for closed-loop, patient-specific hypnosis in intraoperative patients: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brett L; Pyeatt, Larry D; Doufas, Anthony G

    2009-01-01

    Research has demonstrated the efficacy of closed-loop control of anesthesia using bispectral index (BIS) as the controlled variable, and the recent development of model-based, patient-adaptive systems has considerably improved anesthetic control. To further explore the use of model-based control in anesthesia, we investigated the application of fuzzy control in the delivery of patient-specific propofol-induced hypnosis. In simulated intraoperative patients, the fuzzy controller demonstrated clinically acceptable performance, suggesting that further study is warranted.

  18. Using vortex corelines to analyze the hemodynamics of patient specific cerebral aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Greg; Mut, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2012-02-01

    We construct one-dimensional sets known as vortex corelines for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of blood flow in patient specific cerebral aneurysm models. These sets identify centers of swirling blood flow that may play an important role in the biological mechanisms causing aneurysm growth, rupture, and thrombosis. We highlight three specific applications in which vortex corelines are used to assess flow complexity and stability in cerebral aneurysms, validate numerical models against PIV-based experimental data, and analyze the effects of flow diverting devices used to treat intracranial aneurysms.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ear for patient-specific reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Nimeskern, Luc; Feldmann, Eva-Maria; Kuo, Willy; Schwarz, Silke; Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Dürr, Susanne; Müller, Ralph; Rotter, Nicole; Stok, Kathryn S

    2014-01-01

    Like a fingerprint, ear shape is a unique personal feature that should be reconstructed with a high fidelity during reconstructive surgery. Ear cartilage tissue engineering (TE) advantageously offers the possibility to use novel 3D manufacturing techniques to reconstruct the ear, thus allowing for a detailed auricular shape. However it also requires detailed patient-specific images of the 3D cartilage structures of the patient's intact contralateral ear (if available). Therefore the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an imaging strategy for acquiring patient-specific ear cartilage shape, with sufficient precision and accuracy for use in a clinical setting. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 14 volunteer and six cadaveric auricles and manually segmented. Reproducibility of cartilage volume (Cg.V), surface (Cg.S) and thickness (Cg.Th) was assessed, to determine whether raters could repeatedly define the same volume of interest. Additionally, six cadaveric auricles were harvested, scanned and segmented using the same procedure, then dissected and scanned using high resolution micro-CT. Correlation between MR and micro-CT measurements was assessed to determine accuracy. Good inter- and intra-rater reproducibility was observed (precision errors <4% for Cg.S and <9% for Cg.V and Cg.Th). Intraclass correlations were good for Cg.V and Cg.S (>0.82), but low for Cg.Th (<0.23) due to similar average Cg.Th between patients. However Pearson's coefficients showed that the ability to detect local cartilage shape variations is unaffected. Good correlation between clinical MRI and micro-CT (r>0.95) demonstrated high accuracy. This study demonstrated that precision and accuracy of the proposed method was high enough to detect patient-specific variation in ear cartilage geometry. The present study provides a clinical strategy to access the necessary information required for the production of 3D ear scaffolds for TE purposes, including detailed patient-specific

  20. Creating Patient-Specific Neural Cells for the In Vitro Study of Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Brennand, Kristen J; Marchetto, M Carol; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brüstle, Oliver; Ebert, Allison; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Kaykas, Ajamete; Lancaster, Madeline A; Livesey, Frederick J; McConnell, Michael J; McKay, Ronald D; Morrow, Eric M; Muotri, Alysson R; Panchision, David M; Rubin, Lee L; Sawa, Akira; Soldner, Frank; Song, Hongjun; Studer, Lorenz; Temple, Sally; Vaccarino, Flora M; Wu, Jun; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Gage, Fred H; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-12-08

    As a group, we met to discuss the current challenges for creating meaningful patient-specific in vitro models to study brain disorders. Although the convergence of findings between laboratories and patient cohorts provided us confidence and optimism that hiPSC-based platforms will inform future drug discovery efforts, a number of critical technical challenges remain. This opinion piece outlines our collective views on the current state of hiPSC-based disease modeling and discusses what we see to be the critical objectives that must be addressed collectively as a field.

  1. A Computational Chemo-Fluidic Modeling for the Investigation of Patient-Specific Left Ventricle Thrombogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Abd, Thura; George, Richard T.

    2015-11-01

    Patients recovering from myocardial infarction (MI) are considered at high-risk for cardioembolic stroke due to the formation of left ventricle thrombus (LVT). The formation of LVT is the result of a complex interplay between the fluid dynamics inside the ventricle and the chemistry of coagulation, and the role of LV flow pattern on the thrombogenesis was not well understood. The previous computational study performed with the model ventricles suggested that the local flow residence time is the key variable governing the accumulation of coagulation factors. In the present study, a coupled, chemo-fluidic computational modeling is applied to the patient-specific cases of infracted ventricles to investigate the interaction between the LV hemodynamics and thrombogensis. In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins hospital, patient-specific LV models are constructed using the multi-modality medical imaging data. Blood flow in the left ventricle is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and the biochemical reactions for the thrombus formation are modeled with convection-diffusion-reaction equations. The formation and deposition of key coagulation chemical factors are then correlated with the hemodynamic flow metrics to explore the biophysics underlying LVT risk. Supported by the Johns Hopkins Medicine Discovery Fund and NSF Grant: CBET-1511200, Computational resource by XSEDE NSF grant TG-CTS100002.

  2. Designing patient-specific 3D printed craniofacial implants using a novel topology optimization method.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Nguyen, Tam H; Miller, Michael J; Paulino, Glaucio H

    2016-07-01

    Large craniofacial defects require efficient bone replacements which should not only provide good aesthetics but also possess stable structural function. The proposed work uses a novel multiresolution topology optimization method to achieve the task. Using a compliance minimization objective, patient-specific bone replacement shapes can be designed for different clinical cases that ensure revival of efficient load transfer mechanisms in the mid-face. In this work, four clinical cases are introduced and their respective patient-specific designs are obtained using the proposed method. The optimized designs are then virtually inserted into the defect to visually inspect the viability of the design . Further, once the design is verified by the reconstructive surgeon, prototypes are fabricated using a 3D printer for validation. The robustness of the designs are mechanically tested by subjecting them to a physiological loading condition which mimics the masticatory activity. The full-field strain result through 3D image correlation and the finite element analysis implies that the solution can survive the maximum mastication of 120 lb. Also, the designs have the potential to restore the buttress system and provide the structural integrity. Using the topology optimization framework in designing the bone replacement shapes would deliver surgeons new alternatives for rather complicated mid-face reconstruction.

  3. Manufacture of patient-specific vascular replicas for endovascular simulation using fast, low-cost method.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Naoki; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Taihei; Ohta, Makoto; Namba, Katsunari; Watanabe, Eiju; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-12-15

    Patient-specific vascular replicas are essential to the simulation of endovascular treatment or for vascular research. The inside of silicone replica is required to be smooth for manipulating interventional devices without resistance. In this report, we demonstrate the fabrication of patient-specific silicone vessels with a low-cost desktop 3D printer. We show that the surface of an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) model printed by the 3D printer can be smoothed by a single dipping in ABS solvent in a time-dependent manner, where a short dip has less effect on the shape of the model. The vascular mold is coated with transparent silicone and then the ABS mold is dissolved after the silicone is cured. Interventional devices can pass through the inside of the smoothed silicone vessel with lower pushing force compared to the vessel without smoothing. The material cost and time required to fabricate the silicone vessel is about USD $2 and 24 h, which is much lower than the current fabrication methods. This fast and low-cost method offers the possibility of testing strategies before attempting particularly difficult cases, while improving the training of endovascular therapy, enabling the trialing of new devices, and broadening the scope of vascular research.

  4. Methodology for patient-specific modeling of atrial fibrosis as a substrate for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Kathleen S; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Blake, Robert; Blauer, Joshua; Plank, Gernot; MacLeod, Rob S; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2012-01-01

    Personalized computational cardiac models are emerging as an important tool for studying cardiac arrhythmia mechanisms, and have the potential to become powerful instruments for guiding clinical anti-arrhythmia therapy. In this article, we present the methodology for constructing a patient-specific model of atrial fibrosis as a substrate for atrial fibrillation. The model is constructed from high-resolution late gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) images acquired in vivo from a patient suffering from persistent atrial fibrillation, accurately capturing both the patient's atrial geometry and the distribution of the fibrotic regions in the atria. Atrial fiber orientation is estimated using a novel image-based method, and fibrosis is represented in the patient-specific fibrotic regions as incorporating collagenous septa, gap junction remodeling, and myofibroblast proliferation. A proof-of-concept simulation result of reentrant circuits underlying atrial fibrillation in the model of the patient's fibrotic atrium is presented to demonstrate the completion of methodology development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient-Specific, Multi-Scale Modeling of Neointimal Hyperplasia in Vein Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Donadoni, Francesca; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar; Bartlett, Matthew; Dardik, Alan; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is amongst the major causes of failure of bypass grafts. The disease progression varies from patient to patient due to a range of different factors. In this paper, a mathematical model will be used to understand neointimal hyperplasia in individual patients, combining information from biological experiments and patient-specific data to analyze some aspects of the disease, particularly with regard to mechanical stimuli due to shear stresses on the vessel wall. By combining a biochemical model of cell growth and a patient-specific computational fluid dynamics analysis of blood flow in the lumen, remodeling of the blood vessel is studied by means of a novel computational framework. The framework was used to analyze two vein graft bypasses from one patient: a femoro-popliteal and a femoro-distal bypass. The remodeling of the vessel wall and analysis of the flow for each case was then compared to clinical data and discussed as a potential tool for a better understanding of the disease. Simulation results from this first computational approach showed an overall agreement on the locations of hyperplasia in these patients and demonstrated the potential of using new integrative modeling tools to understand disease progression. PMID:28458640

  6. Constructing a patient-specific computer model of the upper airway in sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Sandeep S; Hesabgar, Seyyed M; Haddad, Seyyed M H; Ladak, Hanif; Samani, Abbas; Rotenberg, Brian W

    2017-08-23

    The use of computer simulation to develop a high-fidelity model has been proposed as a novel and cost-effective alternative to help guide therapeutic intervention in sleep apnea surgery. We describe a computer model based on patient-specific anatomy of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) subjects wherein the percentage and sites of upper airway collapse are compared to findings on drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE). Basic science computer model generation. Three-dimensional finite element techniques were undertaken for model development in a pilot study of four OSA patients. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to capture patient anatomy and software employed to outline critical anatomical structures. A finite-element mesh was applied to the volume enclosed by each structure. Linear and hyperelastic soft-tissue properties for various subsites (tonsils, uvula, soft palate, and tongue base) were derived using an inverse finite-element technique from surgical specimens. Each model underwent computer simulation to determine the degree of displacement on various structures within the upper airway, and these findings were compared to DISE exams performed on the four study patients. Computer simulation predictions for percentage of airway collapse and site of maximal collapse show agreement with observed results seen on endoscopic visualization. Modeling the upper airway in OSA patients is feasible and holds promise in aiding patient-specific surgical treatment. NA. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Patient-Specific Modeling of Biomechanical Interaction in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a patient-specific computational model to quantify the biomechanical interaction between the transcatheter aortic valve (TAV) stent and the stenotic aortic valve during TAV intervention. Finite element models of a patient-specific stenotic aortic valve were reconstructed from multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scans, and TAV stent deployment into the aortic root was simulated. Three initial aortic root geometries of this patient were analyzed: (a) aortic root geometry directly reconstructed from MSCT scans, (b) aortic root geometry at the rapid right ventricle pacing phase, and (c) aortic root geometry with surrounding myocardial tissue. The simulation results demonstrated that stress, strain, and contact forces of the aortic root model directly reconstructed from MSCT scans were significantly lower than those of the model at the rapid ventricular pacing phase. Moreover, the presence of surrounding myocardium slightly increased the mechanical responses. Peak stresses and strains were observed around the calcified regions in the leaflets, suggesting the calcified leaflets helped secure the stent in position. In addition, these elevated stresses induced during TAV stent deployment indicated a possibility of tissue tearing and breakdown of calcium deposits, which might lead to an increased risk of stroke. The potential of paravalvular leak and occlusion of coronary ostia can be evaluated from simulated post-deployment aortic root geometries. The developed computational models could be a valuable tool for pre-operative planning of TAV intervention and facilitate next generation TAV device design. PMID:22698832

  8. The Importance of Patient-Specific Factors for Hepatic Drug Response and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Responses to drugs and pharmacological treatments differ considerably between individuals. Importantly, only 50%–75% of patients have been shown to react adequately to pharmacological interventions, whereas the others experience either a lack of efficacy or suffer from adverse events. The liver is of central importance in the metabolism of most drugs. Because of this exposed status, hepatotoxicity is amongst the most common adverse drug reactions and hepatic liabilities are the most prevalent reason for the termination of development programs of novel drug candidates. In recent years, more and more factors were unveiled that shape hepatic drug responses and thus underlie the observed inter-individual variability. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of different principle mechanisms of drug hepatotoxicity and illustrate how patient-specific factors, such as genetic, physiological and environmental factors, can shape drug responses. Furthermore, we highlight other parameters, such as concomitantly prescribed medications or liver diseases and how they modulate drug toxicity, pharmacokinetics and dynamics. Finally, we discuss recent progress in the field of in vitro toxicity models and evaluate their utility in reflecting patient-specific factors to study inter-individual differences in drug response and toxicity, as this understanding is necessary to pave the way for a patient-adjusted medicine. PMID:27754327

  9. Patient Specific Multiscale Simulations of Blood Flow in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalore Ramachandra, Abhay; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Kahn, Andrew M.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-11-01

    Coronary artery bypass surgery is performed to revascularize blocked coronary arteries in roughly 400,000 patients per year in the US.While arterial grafts offer superior patency, vein grafts are used in more than 70% of procedures, as most patients require multiple grafts. Vein graft failure (approx. 50% within 10 years) remains a major clinical issue. Mounting evidence suggests that hemodynamics plays a key role as a mechano-biological stimulus contributing to graft failure. However, quantifying relevant hemodynamic quantities (e.g. wall shear stress) invivo is not possible directly using clinical imaging techniques. We numerically compute graft hemodynamics in a cohort of 3-D patient specific models using a stabilized finite element method. The 3D flow domain is coupled to a 0D lumped parameter circulatory model. Boundary conditions are tuned to match patient specific blood pressures, stroke volumes & heart rates. Results reproduce clinically observed coronary flow waveforms. We quantify differences in multiple hemodynamic quantities between arterial & venous grafts & discuss possible correlations between graft hemodynamics & clinically observed graft failure.Such correlations will provide further insight into mechanisms of graft failure and may lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  10. Importance of patient-specific intraoperative guides in complex maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Dennis; Guijarro-Martínez, Raquel; Bucher, Peter; Hammer, Beat

    2013-07-01

    Conventional maxillofacial reconstruction often leads to suboptimal results due to inaccurate planning or surgical difficulties in adjusting a free flap and osteosynthesis plates into a three-dimensional defect. To justify the importance of patient-specific intraoperative guides in complex maxillofacial reconstruction. CLINICAL EXAMPLE: A 40-year old patient underwent a left hemimaxillectomy for an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the palate. Six years later, massive recurrence required radical resection of the left orbit and reconstruction with cranial bone grafts and a free latissimus dorsi flap. Postoperative radiotherapy resulted in local osteoradionecrosis. Surgical revision and restoration of the maxillary defect with a prefabricated fibula flap was performed. The authors provide ample information on the application of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and rapid prototyping at each reconstructive step. Stereolithographic models enable simulation of the resective and reconstructive phases, prebending of reconstruction plates and fabrication of surgical guides. Optimal restitution of complex maxillofacial defects requires meticulous planning of the surgical and prosthetic phases and effective transfer of the plan to the operating room through patient specific guides. CAD-CAM technology and stereolithographic models represent an effective strategy to achieve this. Improved patient outcomes and intraoperative efficiency certainly offset the inherent increase in costs. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulations of blood flow in patient-specific aortic dissections with a deformable wall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeumler, Kathrin; Vedula, Vijay; Sailer Karmann, Anna; Marsden, Alison; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition in which blood penetrates into the vessel wall, creating a second flow channel, often requiring emergency surgical repair. Up to 50% of patients who survive the acute event face late complications like aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. Prediction of late complications, however, remains challenging. We therefore aim to perform accurate and reliable patient-specific simulations of blood flow in aortic dissections, validated by 4D-Flow MRI. Among other factors, this is a computational challenge due to the compliance of the vessel walls and the large degree of membrane deformation between the two flow channels. We construct an anatomic patient-specific model from CT data including both flow channels and the membrane between them. We then run fluid structure interaction simulations using an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation within a multiscale variational framework, employing stabilized finite element methods. We compare hemodynamics between a rigid and a deformable wall model and examine membrane dynamics and pressure differences between the two flow channels. The study focuses on the computational and modeling challenges emphasizing the importance of employing a deformable wall model for aortic dissections.

  12. Towards Patient-Specific Modeling of Coronary Hemodynamics in Healthy and Diseased State

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Arjen; Boogaard, Frits L.; van't Veer, Marcel; Rutten, Marcel C. M.; Pijls, Nico H. J.; van de Vosse, Frans N.

    2013-01-01

    A model describing the primary relations between the cardiac muscle and coronary circulation might be useful for interpreting coronary hemodynamics in case multiple types of coronary circulatory disease are present. The main contribution of the present study is the coupling of a microstructure-based heart contraction model with a 1D wave propagation model. The 1D representation of the vessels enables patient-specific modeling of the arteries and/or can serve as boundary conditions for detailed 3D models, while the heart model enables the simulation of cardiac disease, with physiology-based parameter changes. Here, the different components of the model are explained and the ability of the model to describe coronary hemodynamics in health and disease is evaluated. Two disease types are modeled: coronary epicardial stenoses and left ventricular hypertrophy with an aortic valve stenosis. In all simulations (healthy and diseased), the dynamics of pressure and flow qualitatively agreed with observations described in literature. We conclude that the model adequately can predict coronary hemodynamics in both normal and diseased state based on patient-specific clinical data. PMID:23533537

  13. Toward Patient-Specific, Biologically Optimized Radiation Therapy Plans for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, David; Holdsworth, Clay; Rockne, Russell C.; Trister, Andrew D.; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Stewart, Robert D.; Phillips, Mark; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a method of generating patient-specific, biologically-guided radiotherapy dose plans and compare them to the standard-of-care protocol. Methods and Materials We integrated a patient-specific biomathematical model of glioma proliferation, invasion and radiotherapy with a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm for intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization to construct individualized, biologically-guided plans for 11 glioblastoma patients. Patient-individualized, spherically-symmetric simulations of the standard-of-care and optimized plans were compared in terms of several biological metrics. Results The integrated model generated spatially non-uniform doses that, when compared to the standard-of-care protocol, resulted in a 67% to 93% decrease in equivalent uniform dose to normal tissue, while the therapeutic ratio, the ratio of tumor equivalent uniform dose to that of normal tissue, increased between 50% to 265%. Applying a novel metric of treatment response (Days Gained) to the patient-individualized simulation results predicted that the optimized plans would have a significant impact on delaying tumor progression, with increases from 21% to 105% for 9 of 11 patients. Conclusions Patient-individualized simulations using the combination of a biomathematical model with an optimization algorithm for radiation therapy generated biologically-guided doses that decreased normal tissue EUD and increased therapeutic ratio with the potential to improve survival outcomes for treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24265748

  14. Patient-specific computer modelling of coronary bifurcation stenting: the John Doe programme.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Peter; Wentzel, Jolanda J; De Santis, Gianluca; Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco; De Beule, Matthieu; Louvard, Yves; Dubini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    John Doe, an 81-year-old patient with a significant distal left main (LM) stenosis, was treated using a provisional stenting approach. As part of an European Bifurcation Club (EBC) project, the complete stenting procedure was repeated using computational modelling. First, a tailored three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the bifurcation anatomy was created by fusion of multislice computed tomography (CT) imaging and intravascular ultrasound. Second, finite element analysis was employed to deploy and post-dilate the stent virtually within the generated patient-specific anatomical bifurcation model. Finally, blood flow was modelled using computational fluid dynamics. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of such patient-specific simulations for bifurcation stenting and has provided unique insights into the bifurcation anatomy, the technical aspects of LM bifurcation stenting, and the positive impact of adequate post-dilatation on blood flow patterns. Potential clinical applications such as virtual trials and preoperative planning seem feasible but require a thorough clinical validation of the predictive power of these computer simulations.

  15. Manufacture of patient-specific vascular replicas for endovascular simulation using fast, low-cost method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Naoki; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Taihei; Ohta, Makoto; Namba, Katsunari; Watanabe, Eiju; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-12-01

    Patient-specific vascular replicas are essential to the simulation of endovascular treatment or for vascular research. The inside of silicone replica is required to be smooth for manipulating interventional devices without resistance. In this report, we demonstrate the fabrication of patient-specific silicone vessels with a low-cost desktop 3D printer. We show that the surface of an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) model printed by the 3D printer can be smoothed by a single dipping in ABS solvent in a time-dependent manner, where a short dip has less effect on the shape of the model. The vascular mold is coated with transparent silicone and then the ABS mold is dissolved after the silicone is cured. Interventional devices can pass through the inside of the smoothed silicone vessel with lower pushing force compared to the vessel without smoothing. The material cost and time required to fabricate the silicone vessel is about USD $2 and 24 h, which is much lower than the current fabrication methods. This fast and low-cost method offers the possibility of testing strategies before attempting particularly difficult cases, while improving the training of endovascular therapy, enabling the trialing of new devices, and broadening the scope of vascular research.

  16. Beyond finite elements: a comprehensive, patient-specific neurosurgical simulation utilizing a meshless method.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Horton, A; Joldes, G R; Wittek, A

    2012-10-11

    To be useful in clinical (surgical) simulations, a method must use fully nonlinear (both geometric and material) formulations to deal with large (finite) deformations of tissues. The method must produce meaningful results in a short time on consumer hardware and not require significant manual work while discretizing the problem domain. In this paper, we showcase the Meshless Total Lagrangian Explicit Dynamics Method (MTLED) which meets these requirements, and use it for computing brain deformations during surgery. The problem geometry is based on patient-specific MRI data and includes the parenchyma, tumor, ventricles and skull. Nodes are distributed automatically through the domain rendering the normally difficult problem of creating a patient-specific computational grid a trivial exercise. Integration is performed over a simple, regular background grid which does not need to conform to the geometry boundaries. Appropriate nonlinear material formulation is used. Loading is performed by displacing the parenchyma surface nodes near the craniotomy and a finite frictionless sliding contact is enforced between the skull (rigid) and parenchyma. The meshless simulation results are compared to both intraoperative MRIs and Finite Element Analysis results for multiple 2D sections. We also calculate Hausdorff distances between the computed deformed surfaces of the ventricles and those observed intraoperatively. The difference between previously validated Finite Element results and the meshless results presented here is less than 0.2mm. The results are within the limits of neurosurgical and imaging equipment accuracy (~1 mm) and demonstrate the method's ability to fulfill all of the important requirements for surgical simulation.

  17. Patient-specific biomechanical model as whole-body CT image registration tool.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and movements of body organs/tissues and skeletal structures for whole-body CT image registration using patient-specific non-linear biomechanical modelling. Unlike the conventional biomechanical modelling, our approach for building the biomechanical models does not require time-consuming segmentation of CT scans to divide the whole body into non-overlapping constituents with different material properties. Instead, a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm is used for tissue classification to assign the constitutive properties automatically at integration points of the computation grid. We use only very simple segmentation of the spine when determining vertebrae displacements to define loading for biomechanical models. We demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of our approach on CT images of seven patients suffering from cancer and aortic disease. The results confirm that accurate whole-body CT image registration can be achieved using a patient-specific non-linear biomechanical model constructed without time-consuming segmentation of the whole-body images.

  18. Manufacture of patient-specific vascular replicas for endovascular simulation using fast, low-cost method

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Naoki; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Ohnishi, Taihei; Ohta, Makoto; Namba, Katsunari; Watanabe, Eiju; Kawai, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Patient-specific vascular replicas are essential to the simulation of endovascular treatment or for vascular research. The inside of silicone replica is required to be smooth for manipulating interventional devices without resistance. In this report, we demonstrate the fabrication of patient-specific silicone vessels with a low-cost desktop 3D printer. We show that the surface of an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) model printed by the 3D printer can be smoothed by a single dipping in ABS solvent in a time-dependent manner, where a short dip has less effect on the shape of the model. The vascular mold is coated with transparent silicone and then the ABS mold is dissolved after the silicone is cured. Interventional devices can pass through the inside of the smoothed silicone vessel with lower pushing force compared to the vessel without smoothing. The material cost and time required to fabricate the silicone vessel is about USD $2 and 24 h, which is much lower than the current fabrication methods. This fast and low-cost method offers the possibility of testing strategies before attempting particularly difficult cases, while improving the training of endovascular therapy, enabling the trialing of new devices, and broadening the scope of vascular research. PMID:27976687

  19. Image-guided distal radius osteotomy using patient-specific instrument guides.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manuela; Ma, Burton; Rudan, John F; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for computer-assisted distal radius osteotomies in which computer-generated, patient-specific plastic guides are used for intraoperative guidance. Before surgery, the correction and plate location are planned using computed tomography scans for both radii and ulnae, and the planned locations of the distal and proximal drill holes for the plate are saved. A plastic, patient-specific instrument guide is created using a rapid prototyping machine into which a mirror image of intraoperative, accessible bone structure of the distal radius is integrated. This allows for unique positioning of the guide during surgery. For each planned drill location, a guidance hole is incorporated into the guide. During surgery, a conventional incision is made, and the guide is positioned on the radius. The surgeon drills the holes for the plate screws into the intact radius and performs the osteotomy using the conventional technique. Using the predrilled holes, the surgeon affixes the plate to the radius fragments. The guides are easy to integrate into the surgical workflow and minimize the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy for guidance of the procedure.

  20. Just-in-time Design and Additive Manufacture of Patient-specific Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidid, Darpan; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Brandt, Milan

    Recent advances in medical imaging and manufacturing science have enabled the design and production of complex, patient-specific orthopaedic implants. Additive Manufacture (AM) generates three-dimensional structures layer by layer, and is not subject to the constraints associated with traditional manufacturing methods. AM provides significant opportunities for the design of novel geometries and complex lattice structures with enhanced functional performance. However, the design and manufacture of patient-specific AM implant structures requires unique expertise in handling various optimization platforms. Furthermore, the design process for complex structures is computationally intensive. The primary aim of this research is to enable the just-in-time customisation of AM prosthesis; whereby AM implant design and manufacture be completed within the time constraints of a single surgical procedure, while minimising prosthesis mass and optimising the lattice structure to match the stiffness of the surrounding bone tissue. In this research, a design approach using raw CT scan data is applied to the AM manufacture of femoral prosthesis. Using the proposed just-in-time concept, the mass of the prosthesis was rapidly designed and manufactured while satisfying the associated structural requirements. Compressive testing of lattice structures manufactured using proposed method shows that the load carrying capacity of the resected composite bone can be recovered by up to 85% and the compressive stiffness of the AM prosthesis is statistically indistinguishable from the stiffness of the initial bone.

  1. MRI and Additive Manufacturing of Nasal Alar Constructs for Patient-specific Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels P T J; Wolff, Jan; Hofman, Mark B M; Helder, Marco N; Don Griot, J Peter W; Zuijlen, Paul P M van

    2017-08-30

    Surgical reconstruction of cartilaginous defects remains a major challenge. In the current study, we aimed to identify an imaging strategy for the development of patient-specific constructs that aid in the reconstruction of nasal deformities. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was performed on a human cadaver head to find the optimal MRI sequence for nasal cartilage. This sequence was subsequently used on a volunteer. Images of both were assessed by three independent researchers to determine measurement error and total segmentation time. Three dimensionally (3D) reconstructed alar cartilage was then additively manufactured. Validity was assessed by comparing manually segmented MR images to the gold standard (micro-CT). Manual segmentation allowed delineation of the nasal cartilages. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was acceptable in the cadaver (coefficient of variation 4.6-12.5%), but less in the volunteer (coefficient of variation 0.6-21.9%). Segmentation times did not differ between observers (cadaver P = 0.36; volunteer P = 0.6). The lateral crus of the alar cartilage was consistently identified by all observers, whereas part of the medial crus was consistently missed. This study suggests that MRI is a feasible imaging modality for the development of 3D alar constructs for patient-specific reconstruction.

  2. Development of the Patient-specific Cardiovascular Modeling System Using Immersed Boundary Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Wee-Beng; Lin, Liang-Yu; Tseng, Wen-Yih; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2010-05-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based, patient-specific cardiovascular modeling system is under-developed. The system can identify possible diseased conditions and facilitate physicians' diagnosis at early stage through the hybrid CFD simulation and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CFD simulation is initially based on the three-dimensional heart model developed by McQueen and Peskin, which can simultaneously compute fluid motions and elastic boundary motions using the immersed boundary method. We extend and improve the three-dimensional heart model for the clinical application by including the patient-specific hemodynamic information. The flow features in the ventricles and their responses are investigated under different inflow and outflow conditions during diastole and systole phases based on the quasi-realistic heart model, which takes advantage of the observed flow scenarios. Our results indicate distinct differences between the two groups of participants, including the vortex formation process in the left ventricle (LV), as well as the flow rate distributions at different identified sources such as the aorta, vena cava and pulmonary veins/artery. We further identify some key parameters which may affect the vortex formation in the LV. Thus it is hypothesized that disease-related dysfunctions in intervals before complete heart failure can be observed in the dynamics of transmitral blood flow during early LV diastole.

  3. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  4. Development of Patient-specific AAV Vectors After Neutralizing Antibody Selection for Enhanced Muscle Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengwen; Wu, Shuqing; Albright, Blake; Hirsch, Matthew; Li, Wuping; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McPhee, Scott; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-02-01

    A major hindrance in gene therapy trials with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that inhibit AAV transduction. In this study, we used directed evolution techniques in vitro and in mouse muscle to select novel NAb escape AAV chimeric capsid mutants in the presence of individual patient serum. AAV mutants isolated in vitro escaped broad patient-specific NAb activity but had poor transduction ability in vivo. AAV mutants isolated in vivo had enhanced NAb evasion from cognate serum and had high muscle transduction ability. More importantly, structural modeling identified a 100 amino acid motif from AAV6 in variable region (VR) III that confers this enhanced muscle tropism. In addition, a predominantly AAV8 capsid beta barrel template with a specific preference for AAV1/AAV9 in VR VII located at threefold symmetry axis facilitates NAb escape. Our data strongly support that chimeric AAV capsids composed of modular and nonoverlapping domains from various serotypes are capable of evading patient-specific NAbs and have enhanced muscle transduction.

  5. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Levitt, Michael; Barbour, Michael; Mourad, Pierre; Kim, Louis; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    We study the hemodynamic conditions in patients with cerebral aneurysms through endovascular measurements and computational fluid dynamics. Ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms were clinically assessed by three dimensional rotational angiography and an endovascular guidewire with dual Doppler ultrasound transducer and piezoresistive pressure sensor at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations. These measurements are used to define boundary conditions for flow simulations at and near the aneurysms. The additional in vivo measurements, which were not prescribed in the simulation, are used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure. We also performed simulations with stereotypical literature-derived boundary conditions. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions showed good agreement with the guidewire measurements, with no systematic bias and a random scatter of about 25%. Simulated velocities using the literature-derived values showed a systematic over-prediction in velocity by 30% with a random scatter of about 40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly-derived patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics. Supported by an R03 grant from NIH/NINDS

  6. Patient-specific left atrial wall-thickness measurement and visualization for radiofrequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jiro; Skanes, Allan C.; White, James A.; Rajchl, Martin; Drangova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: For radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the left atrium, safe and effective dosing of RF energy requires transmural left atrium ablation without injury to extra-cardiac structures. The thickness of the left atrial wall may be a key parameter in determining the appropriate amount of energy to deliver. While left atrial wall-thickness is known to exhibit inter- and intra-patient variation, this is not taken into account in the current clinical workflow. Our goal is to develop a tool for presenting patient-specific left atrial thickness information to the clinician in order to assist in the determination of the proper RF energy dose. METHODS: We use an interactive segmentation method with manual correction to segment the left atrial blood pool and heart wall from contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. We then create a mesh from the segmented blood pool and determine the wall thickness, on a per-vertex basis, orthogonal to the mesh surface. The thickness measurement is visualized by assigning colors to the vertices of the blood pool mesh. We applied our method to 5 contrast-enhanced cardiac CT images. RESULTS: Left atrial wall-thickness measurements were generally consistent with published thickness ranges. Variations were found to exist between patients, and between regions within each patient. CONCLUSION: It is possible to visually determine areas of thick vs. thin heart wall with high resolution in a patient-specific manner.

  7. Patient-specific models of microglia-mediated engulfment of synapses and neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sellgren, C M; Sheridan, S D; Gracias, J; Xuan, D; Fu, T; Perlis, R H

    2017-01-01

    Engulfment of synapses and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) by microglia is critical for the development and maintenance of proper brain circuitry, and has been implicated in neurodevelopmental as well as neurodegenerative disease etiology. We have developed and validated models of these mechanisms by reprogramming microglia-like cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and combining them with NPCs and neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to create patient-specific cellular models of complement-dependent synaptic pruning and elimination of NPCs. The resulting microglia-like cells express appropriate markers and function as primary human microglia, while patient-matched macrophages differ markedly. As a demonstration of disease-relevant application, we studied the role of C4, recently implicated in schizophrenia, in engulfment of synaptic structures by human microglia. The ability to create complete patient-specific cellular models of critical microglial functions utilizing samples taken during a single clinical visit will extend the ability to model central nervous system disease while facilitating high-throughput screening. PMID:27956744

  8. A patient-specific aortic valve model based on moving resistive immersed implicit surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Marco; Faggiano, Elena; Dedè, Luca; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2017-06-07

    In this paper, we propose a full computational framework to simulate the hemodynamics in the aorta including the valve. Closed and open valve surfaces, as well as the lumen aorta, are reconstructed directly from medical images using new ad hoc algorithms, allowing a patient-specific simulation. The fluid dynamics problem that accounts from the movement of the valve is solved by a new 3D-0D fluid-structure interaction model in which the valve surface is implicitly represented through level set functions, yielding, in the Navier-Stokes equations, a resistive penalization term enforcing the blood to adhere to the valve leaflets. The dynamics of the valve between its closed and open position is modeled using a reduced geometric 0D model. At the discrete level, a finite element formulation is used and the SUPG stabilization is extended to include the resistive term in the Navier-Stokes equations. Then, after time discretization, the 3D fluid and 0D valve models are coupled through a staggered approach. This computational framework, applied to a patient-specific geometry and data, allows to simulate the movement of the valve, the sharp pressure jump occurring across the leaflets, and the blood flow pattern inside the aorta.

  9. Management Planning for Workplace Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDole, Thomas L.

    Several factors must be considered when implementing office automation. Included among these are whether or not to automate at all, the effects of automation on employees, requirements imposed by automation on the physical environment, effects of automation on the total organization, and effects on clientele. The reasons behind the success or…

  10. Laboratory Automation and Middleware.

    PubMed

    Riben, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The practice of surgical pathology is under constant pressure to deliver the highest quality of service, reduce errors, increase throughput, and decrease turnaround time while at the same time dealing with an aging workforce, increasing financial constraints, and economic uncertainty. Although not able to implement total laboratory automation, great progress continues to be made in workstation automation in all areas of the pathology laboratory. This report highlights the benefits and challenges of pathology automation, reviews middleware and its use to facilitate automation, and reviews the progress so far in the anatomic pathology laboratory.

  11. Complacency and Automation Bias in the Use of Imperfect Automation.

    PubMed

    Wickens, Christopher D; Clegg, Benjamin A; Vieane, Alex Z; Sebok, Angelia L

    2015-08-01

    We examine the effects of two different kinds of decision-aiding automation errors on human-automation interaction (HAI), occurring at the first failure following repeated exposure to correctly functioning automation. The two errors are incorrect advice, triggering the automation bias, and missing advice, reflecting complacency. Contrasts between analogous automation errors in alerting systems, rather than decision aiding, have revealed that alerting false alarms are more problematic to HAI than alerting misses are. Prior research in decision aiding, although contrasting the two aiding errors (incorrect vs. missing), has confounded error expectancy. Participants performed an environmental process control simulation with and without decision aiding. For those with the aid, automation dependence was created through several trials of perfect aiding performance, and an unexpected automation error was then imposed in which automation was either gone (one group) or wrong (a second group). A control group received no automation support. The correct aid supported faster and more accurate diagnosis and lower workload. The aid failure degraded all three variables, but "automation wrong" had a much greater effect on accuracy, reflecting the automation bias, than did "automation gone," reflecting the impact of complacency. Some complacency was manifested for automation gone, by a longer latency and more modest reduction in accuracy. Automation wrong, creating the automation bias, appears to be a more problematic form of automation error than automation gone, reflecting complacency. Decision-aiding automation should indicate its lower degree of confidence in uncertain environments to avoid the automation bias. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. Towards patient-specific cardiovascular modeling system using the immersed boundary technique.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wee-Beng; Tseng, Yu-Heng; Lin, Liang-Yu; Tseng, Wen-Yih

    2011-06-17

    Previous research shows that the flow dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) reveal important information about cardiac health. This information can be used in early diagnosis of patients with potential heart problems. The current study introduces a patient-specific cardiovascular-modelling system (CMS) which simulates the flow dynamics in the LV to facilitate physicians in early diagnosis of patients before heart failure. The proposed system will identify possible disease conditions and facilitates early diagnosis through hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (4-D MRI). The simulation is based on the 3-D heart model, which can simultaneously compute fluid and elastic boundary motions using the immersed boundary method. At this preliminary stage, the 4-D MRI is used to provide an appropriate comparison. This allows flexible investigation of the flow features in the ventricles and their responses. The results simulate various flow rates and kinetic energy in the diastole and systole phases, demonstrating the feasibility of capturing some of the important characteristics of the heart during different phases. However, some discrepancies exist in the pulmonary vein and aorta flow rate between the numerical and experimental data. Further studies are essential to investigate and solve the remaining problems before using the data in clinical diagnostics. The results show that by using a simple reservoir pressure boundary condition (RPBC), we are able to capture some essential variations found in the clinical data. Our approach establishes a first-step framework of a practical patient-specific CMS, which comprises a 3-D CFD model (without involving actual hemodynamic data yet) to simulate the heart and the 4-D PC-MRI system. At this stage, the 4-D PC-MRI system is used for verification purpose rather than input. This brings us closer to our goal of developing a practical patient-specific CMS, which will be pursued

  13. Visualizing electrocardiographic information on a patient specific model of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Anne, Wim; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbuchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2003-05-01

    The treatment of atrial tachycardia by radio-frequency ablation is a complex and minimally invasive procedure. In most cases the surgeon uses fluoroscopic imaging to guide catheters into the atria. After recording activation potentials from the electrodes on the catheter, which has to be done for different catheter positions, the physiologist has to fuse both the activation times derived from the potentials with the fluoroscopic images and extract from these a 3D anatomical model of the atrium. This model will provide him with the necessary information to locate the ablation regions. To alleviate the problem of mentally reconstructing these different sources of information, we propose a virtual environment that has the ability to visualize the electrodes information onto a patient specific model of the atria. This 3D atrium surface model is derived from pre-operatively taken MR-images. Within the system this model is visualized in 3 different ways: two views correspond to the 2 fluoroscopes images, which are shown registred in the background while the third one can be freely manipulated by the physiologist. The system allows to annotate measurements onto the 3D model. Since the heart is not a static organ, tools are provided to modify previous annotations interactively. The information contained in the measurements can than be dispersed across the heart after extrapolation and interpolation and subsequently visualized by color coding the surface model. Preliminary clinical evaluation on 30 patients indicates that the combined representation of the activation times and the heart model provides a thorough and more accurate insight into the possible causes and solutions to the tachycardia than would be obtained using solely the fluoroscopes images and mental reconstruction. Unlike other tachycardia visualization software, our approach starts with a patient specific surface model which in itself provides extra insight into the problem. Furthermore it can be used very

  14. Towards patient-specific cardiovascular modeling system using the immersed boundary technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous research shows that the flow dynamics in the left ventricle (LV) reveal important information about cardiac health. This information can be used in early diagnosis of patients with potential heart problems. The current study introduces a patient-specific cardiovascular-modelling system (CMS) which simulates the flow dynamics in the LV to facilitate physicians in early diagnosis of patients before heart failure. Methods The proposed system will identify possible disease conditions and facilitates early diagnosis through hybrid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (4-D MRI). The simulation is based on the 3-D heart model, which can simultaneously compute fluid and elastic boundary motions using the immersed boundary method. At this preliminary stage, the 4-D MRI is used to provide an appropriate comparison. This allows flexible investigation of the flow features in the ventricles and their responses. Results The results simulate various flow rates and kinetic energy in the diastole and systole phases, demonstrating the feasibility of capturing some of the important characteristics of the heart during different phases. However, some discrepancies exist in the pulmonary vein and aorta flow rate between the numerical and experimental data. Further studies are essential to investigate and solve the remaining problems before using the data in clinical diagnostics. Conclusions The results show that by using a simple reservoir pressure boundary condition (RPBC), we are able to capture some essential variations found in the clinical data. Our approach establishes a first-step framework of a practical patient-specific CMS, which comprises a 3-D CFD model (without involving actual hemodynamic data yet) to simulate the heart and the 4-D PC-MRI system. At this stage, the 4-D PC-MRI system is used for verification purpose rather than input. This brings us closer to our goal of developing a practical patient-specific

  15. Development, validation, and implementation of a patient-specific Monte Carlo 3D internal dosimetry platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besemer, Abigail E.

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as an attractive treatment option for a broad spectrum of tumor types because it has the potential to simultaneously eradicate both the primary tumor site as well as the metastatic disease throughout the body. Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations for radionuclide therapies are important for reducing the risk of normal tissue complications and optimizing tumor response. However, the only FDA approved software for internal dosimetry calculates doses based on the MIRD methodology which estimates mean organ doses using activity-to-dose scaling factors tabulated from standard phantom geometries. Despite the improved dosimetric accuracy afforded by direct Monte Carlo dosimetry methods these methods are not widely used in routine clinical practice because of the complexity of implementation, lack of relevant standard protocols, and longer dose calculation times. The main goal of this work was to develop a Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform in order to (1) calculate patient-specific voxelized dose distributions in a clinically feasible time frame, (2) examine and quantify the dosimetric impact of various parameters and methodologies used in 3D internal dosimetry methods, and (3) develop a multi-criteria treatment planning optimization framework for multi-radiopharmaceutical combination therapies. This platform utilizes serial PET/CT or SPECT/CT images to calculate voxelized 3D internal dose distributions with the Monte Carlo code Geant4. Dosimetry can be computed for any diagnostic or therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and for both pre-clinical and clinical applications. In this work, the platform's dosimetry calculations were successfully validated against previously published reference doses values calculated in standard phantoms for a variety of radionuclides, over a wide range of photon and electron energies, and for many different organs and tumor sizes. Retrospective dosimetry was also calculated for various pre

  16. Patient-Specific Predictive Modeling Using Random Forests: An Observational Study for the Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background With a large-scale electronic health record repository, it is feasible to build a customized patient outcome prediction model specifically for a given patient. This approach involves identifying past patients who are similar to the present patient and using their data to train a personalized predictive model. Our previous work investigated a cosine-similarity patient similarity metric (PSM) for such patient-specific predictive modeling. Objective The objective of the study is to investigate the random forest (RF) proximity measure as a PSM in the context of personalized mortality prediction for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods A total of 17,152 ICU admissions were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. A number of predictor variables were extracted from the first 24 hours in the ICU. Outcome to be predicted was 30-day mortality. A patient-specific predictive model was trained for each ICU admission using an RF PSM inspired by the RF proximity measure. Death counting, logistic regression, decision tree, and RF models were studied with a hard threshold applied to RF PSM values to only include the M most similar patients in model training, where M was varied. In addition, case-specific random forests (CSRFs), which uses RF proximity for weighted bootstrapping, were trained. Results Compared to our previous study that investigated a cosine similarity PSM, the RF PSM resulted in superior or comparable predictive performance. RF and CSRF exhibited the best performances (in terms of mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [95% confidence interval], RF: 0.839 [0.835-0.844]; CSRF: 0.832 [0.821-0.843]). RF and CSRF did not benefit from personalization via the use of the RF PSM, while the other models did. Conclusions The RF PSM led to good mortality prediction performance for several predictive models, although it failed to induce improved performance in RF and CSRF. The distinction

  17. Patient-specific computer-based decision support in primary healthcare—a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computer-based decision support systems are a promising method for incorporating research evidence into clinical practice. However, evidence is still scant on how such information technology solutions work in primary healthcare when support is provided across many health problems. In Finland, we designed a trial where a set of evidence-based, patient-specific reminders was introduced into the local Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system. The aim was to measure the effects of such reminders on patient care. The hypothesis was that the total number of triggered reminders would decrease in the intervention group compared with the control group, indicating an improvement in patient care. Methods From July 2009 to October 2010 all the patients of one health center were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of patient-specific reminders concerning 59 different health conditions triggered when the healthcare professional (HCP) opened and used the EPR. In the intervention group, the triggered reminders were shown to the HCP; in the control group, the triggered reminders were not shown. The primary outcome measure was the change in the number of reminders triggered over 12 months. We developed a unique data gathering method, the Repeated Study Virtual Health Check (RSVHC), and used Generalized Estimation Equations (GEE) for analysing the incidence rate ratio, which is a measure of the relative difference in percentage change in the numbers of reminders triggered in the intervention group and the control group. Results In total, 13,588 participants were randomized and included. Contrary to our expectation, the total number of reminders triggered increased in both the intervention and the control groups. The primary outcome measure did not show a significant difference between the groups. However, with the inclusion of patients followed up over only six months, the total number of reminders increased significantly less in the

  18. Establishing patient-specific criteria for selecting the optimal upper extremity vascular access procedure

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Karen; Ulloa, Jesus; Allon, Michael; Carsten, Christopher G.; Chemla, Eric S.; Henry, Mitchell L.; Huber, Thomas S.; Lawson, Jeffrey H.; Lok, Charmaine E.; Peden, Eric K.; Scher, Larry; Sidawy, Anton; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Cull, David

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative and Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative call for the indiscriminate creation of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) over arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) without providing patient-specific criteria for vascular access selection. Although the U.S. AVF rate has increased dramatically, several reports have found that this singular focus on increasing AVFs has resulted in increased AVF nonmaturation/early failure and a high prevalence of catheter dependence. The objective of this study was to determine the appropriateness of vascular access procedures in clinical scenarios constructed with combinations of relevant factors potentially influencing outcomes. Methods The RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used. Accordingly, a comprehensive literature search was performed and a synthesis of results compiled. The RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was applied to 2088 AVF and 1728 AVG clinical scenarios with varying patient characteristics. Eleven international vascular access experts rated the appropriateness of each scenario in two rounds. On the basis of the distribution of the panelists’ scores, each scenario was determined to be appropriate, inappropriate, or indeterminate. Results Panelists achieved agreement in 2964 (77.7%) scenarios; 860 (41%) AVF and 588 (34%) AVG scenarios were scored appropriate, 686 (33%) AVF and 480 (28%) AVG scenarios were scored inappropriate, and 542 (26%) AVF and 660 (38%) AVG scenarios were indeterminate. Younger age, larger outflow vein diameter, normal or obese body mass index (vs morbidly obese), larger inflow artery diameter, and higher patient functional status were associated with appropriateness of AVF creation. Older age, dialysis dependence, and smaller vein size were associated with appropriateness of AVG creation. Gender, diabetes, and coronary artery disease were not associated with AVF or AVG appropriateness. Dialysis status was not associated with AVF appropriateness. Body mass

  19. Automating checks of plan check automation.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Tarek; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2014-07-08

    While a few physicists have designed new plan check automation solutions for their clinics, fewer, if any, managed to adapt existing solutions. As complex and varied as the systems they check, these programs must gain the full confidence of those who would run them on countless patient plans. The present automation effort, planCheck, therefore focuses on versatility and ease of implementation and verification. To demonstrate this, we apply planCheck to proton gantry, stereotactic proton gantry, stereotactic proton fixed beam (STAR), and IMRT treatments.

  20. Automation and Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furuta, Kenneth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    These three articles address issues in library cataloging that are affected by automation: (1) the impact of automation and bibliographic utilities on professional catalogers; (2) the effect of the LASS microcomputer software on the cost of authority work in cataloging at the University of Arizona; and (3) online subject heading and classification…

  1. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  2. More Benefits of Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Malcolm

    1988-01-01

    Describes a study that measured the benefits of an automated catalog and automated circulation system from the library user's point of view in terms of the value of time saved. Topics discussed include patterns of use, access time, availability of information, search behaviors, and the effectiveness of the measures used. (seven references)…

  3. Work and Programmable Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W.

    A new industrial era based on electronics and the microprocessor has arrived, an era that is being called intelligent automation. Intelligent automation, in the form of robots, replaces workers, and the new products, using microelectronic devices, require significantly less labor to produce than the goods they replace. The microprocessor thus…

  4. The Automated Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naclerio, Nick

    1979-01-01

    Clerical personnel may be able to climb career ladders as a result of office automation and expanded job opportunities in the word processing area. Suggests opportunities in an automated office system and lists books and periodicals on word processing for counselors and teachers. (MF)

  5. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherron, Gene T.

    1982-01-01

    The steps taken toward office automation by the University of Maryland are described. Office automation is defined and some types of word processing systems are described. Policies developed in the writing of a campus plan are listed, followed by a section on procedures adopted to implement the plan. (Author/MLW)

  6. WANTED: Fully Automated Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of indexing focuses on the possibilities of fully automated indexing. Topics discussed include controlled indexing languages such as subject heading lists and thesauri, free indexing languages, natural indexing languages, computer-aided indexing, expert systems, and the need for greater creativity to further advance automated indexing.…

  7. GPU-accelerated Lattice Boltzmann method for anatomical extraction in patient-specific computational hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, C.; Chen, N.; Zhao, Y.; Sawchuk, A. P.; Dalsing, M. C.; Teague, S. D.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-11-01

    Existing research of patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) heavily relies on software for anatomical extraction of blood arteries. Data reconstruction and mesh generation have to be done using existing commercial software due to the gap between medical image processing and CFD, which increases computation burden and introduces inaccuracy during data transformation thus limits the medical applications of PSCH. We use lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to solve the level-set equation over an Eulerian distance field and implicitly and dynamically segment the artery surfaces from radiological CT/MRI imaging data. The segments seamlessly feed to the LBM based CFD computation of PSCH thus explicit mesh construction and extra data management are avoided. The LBM is ideally suited for GPU (graphic processing unit)-based parallel computing. The parallel acceleration over GPU achieves excellent performance in PSCH computation. An application study will be presented which segments an aortic artery from a chest CT dataset and models PSCH of the segmented artery.

  8. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  9. Finite element analysis of patient-specific condyle fracture plates: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Peter; Parr, William C H; Chamoli, Uphar; Wroe, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Various patterns of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures have been proposed in the literature. This study investigates the stability of two patient-specific implants (PSIs) for the open reduction and internal fixation of a subcondylar fracture of the mandible. A subcondylar fracture of a mandible was simulated by a series of finite element models. These models contained approximately 1.2 million elements, were heterogeneous in bone material properties, and also modeled the muscles of mastication. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. The stability and von Mises stresses of the simulated condylar fracture reduced with each of the PSIs were compared. The most stable of the plate configurations examined was PSI 1, which had comparable mechanical performance to a single 2.0 mm straight four-hole plate.

  10. Intraoperative navigation of patient-specific instrumentation does not predict final implant position.

    PubMed

    Abdel, Matthew P; von Roth, Philipp; Hommel, Hagen; Perka, Carsten; Pfitzner, Tilman

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if intraoperative navigation predicted final implant position of total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) performed with patient-specific instrumentation (PSI). We retrospectively reviewed 60 TKAs performed with PSI and imageless navigation. These values were compared to postoperative coronal alignment based on long-leg radiographs, as well as rotation and tibial slope based on CT scans. The intraoperative coronal position of the tibia as measured by the intraoperative navigation indicated a significantly higher deviation from the neutral mechanical axis than the actual final position (P=0.03). Similarly, tibial slope and femoral component rotation measured by intraoperative navigation significantly deviated from the final slope and femoral component rotation (P<0.0001). In conclusion, intraoperative navigation of PSI position showed a significantly high deviation from the true final implant position. Level III, therapeutic. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Constructing Patient Specific Clinical Trajectories from Electronic Healthcare Reimbursement Claims using Sequential Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Hobson, Tanner C

    2015-01-01

    We examine the use of electronic healthcare reimbursement claims (EHRC) for analyzing healthcare delivery and practice patterns across the United States (US). By analyzing over 1 billion EHRCs, we track patterns of clinical procedures administered to patients with heart disease (HD) using sequential pattern mining algorithms. Our analyses reveal that the clinical procedures performed on HD patients are highly varied leading up to and after the primary diagnosis. The discovered clinical procedure sequences reveal significant differences in the overall costs incurred across different parts of the US, indicating significant heterogeneity in treating HD patients. We show that a data-driven approach to understand patient specific clinical trajectories constructed from EHRC can provide quantitative insights into how to better manage and treat patients.

  12. Wall Shear Stress Distribution in a Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm Model using Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suyue; Chang, Gary Han; Schirmer, Clemens; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    We construct a reduced-order model (ROM) to study the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distributions in image-based patient-specific aneurysms models. The magnitude of WSS has been shown to be a critical factor in growth and rupture of human aneurysms. We start the process by running a training case using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation with time-varying flow parameters, such that these parameters cover the range of parameters of interest. The method of snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is utilized to construct the reduced-order bases using the training CFD simulation. The resulting ROM enables us to study the flow patterns and the WSS distributions over a range of system parameters computationally very efficiently with a relatively small number of modes. This enables comprehensive analysis of the model system across a range of physiological conditions without the need to re-compute the simulation for small changes in the system parameters.

  13. "True" color surface anatomy: mapping the Visible Human to patient-specific CT data.

    PubMed

    Kerr, J P; Knapp, D; Frake, B; Sellberg, M

    2000-01-01

    The mapping of "true" color and texture information into traditional medical imaging modality data can add considerable information and aid in diagnostics. One of the goals of this work has been to create CT color lookup tables for all visually well-defined structures in the Visible Human male cryosection data set which then can be used to color patient-specific CT data. The primary goal has been to develop a method for stripping textures from a volumetric data set for polygonal models and non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) models generated from a volumetric data set. It is believed that these methods can eventually be used to provide clinicians with 3D models with physiologically accurate color textures.

  14. Patient-specific meta-analysis for risk assessment using multivariate proportional hazards regression.

    PubMed

    Crager, Michael R; Tang, Gong

    We propose a method for assessing an individual patient's risk of a future clinical event using clinical trial or cohort data and Cox proportional hazards regression, combining the information from several studies using meta-analysis techniques. The method combines patient-specific estimates of the log cumulative hazard across studies, weighting by the relative precision of the estimates, using either fixed- or random-effects meta-analysis calculations. Risk assessment can be done for any future patient using a few key summary statistics determined once and for all from each study. Generalizations of the method to logistic regression and linear models are immediate. We evaluate the methods using simulation studies and illustrate their application using real data.

  15. Vascular growth and remodeling coupled with fluid simulation in patient specific geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiacheng; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we propose a computational framework to couple vascular growth and remodeling (G&R) with fluid simulation in 3D patient specific geometry. Hyperelastic and anisotropic properties are considered for the vessel wall material. A constrained mixture model is used to represent multiple constituents in the vessel wall. The coupled simulation is divided into two time scales, the longer time scale for G&R and the shorter time scale for fluid dynamics simulation. G&R is simulated to determine the boundary of the fluid domain, the fluid simulation in turn generates wall shear stress and transmural pressure data that regulates G&R. To minimize required computation cost, fluid is only simulated when G&R causes significant vascular geometric change. This coupled model can be used to study the influence of the stress-mediated law parameters on the stability of the vascular tissue growth, and predict progression of vascular diseases such as aneurysm expansion.

  16. Ansys Fluent versus Sim Vascular for 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics in renal arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumbaraddi, Avinash; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this clinical-need driven research is to investigate the effect of renal artery stenosis (RAS) on the blood flow and wall shear stress in renal arteries through 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) and search for possible critical RASs that significantly alter the pressure gradient across the stenosis by manually varying the size of RAS from 50% to 95%. The identification of the critical RAS is important to understand the contribution of RAS to the overall renal resistance thus appropriate clinical therapy can be determined in order to reduce the hypertension. Clinical CT angiographic data together with Doppler Ultra sound images of an anonymous patient are used serving as the required inputs of the PSCH. To validate the PSCH, we use both Ansys Fluent and Sim Vascular and compare velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress under identical conditions. Renal Imaging Technology Development Program (RITDP) Grant.

  17. Technical concept of patient-specific, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene orbital wall implant.

    PubMed

    Kozakiewicz, Marcin; Elgalal, Marcin; Walkowiak, Bogdan; Stefanczyk, Ludomir

    2013-06-01

    The authors have been using patient-specific implants since 2006 and are constantly looking for new reconstructive materials, in order to create precise implants for orbital reconstruction. Such materials should be biocompatible and stable in the human body, as well as easy to machine and form into complex 3D shapes. Biocompatible ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) has several unique properties including high impact strength and a low friction coefficient that result in self-lubricating and thus non-sticking surfaces after processing. To present the concept of a patient-specific, UHMW-PE orbital wall implant. The material used to manufacture the orbital implant was UHMW-PE converted into a solid block of medical polymer from a powder material. A delayed treatment unilateral orbital fracture case was chosen for reconstruction with patient-specific orbital wall implant. On the basis of computerized tomography, a virtual model of both orbits was prepared. The injured orbit was significantly enlarged due to dislocation of its walls. The 3D model of the facial skeleton was symmetrically divided into two parts. This resulted in two models - left and right orbit, then the uninjured orbit was superimposed onto the contralateral side. As a result two surfaces were created; the outer surface (taken from the injured orbit) was used to design the outer surface of the implant, and the inner (taken from the uninjured orbit) for the inner surface. By combining both these surfaces it was possible to determine the unique shape and thickness of the UHMW-PE implant that would allow for accurate reconstruction of the orbit. Following this, the CAD model was transferred to CAM software and a numerical code for a 5-axis milling machine was generated. The manufactured implant was sterilized in gas plasma and used to reconstruct three orbital walls. The thickness of the manufactured implant ranged from 0.2 mm to 1.5 mm and was successfully inserted via transconjunctival

  18. Patient-specific volume conductor modeling for non-invasive imaging of cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, B; Hanser, F; Seger, M; Fischer, G; Modre-Osprian, R; Tilg, B

    2008-01-01

    We propose a general workflow to numerically estimate the spread of electrical excitation in the patients' hearts. To this end, a semi-automatic segmentation pipeline for extracting the volume conductor model of structurally normal hearts is presented. The cardiac electrical source imaging technique aims to provide information about the spread of electrical excitation in order to assist the cardiologist in developing strategies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. The volume conductor models of eight patients were extracted from cine-gated short-axis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The non-invasive estimation of electrical excitation was compared with the CARTO maps. The development of a volume conductor modeling pipeline for constructing a patient-specific volume conductor model in a fast and accurate way is one essential step to make the technique clinically applicable.

  19. Patient-specific modelling of pulmonary airflow using GPU cluster for the application in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Miki, T; Wang, X; Aoki, T; Imai, Y; Ishikawa, T; Takase, K; Yamaguchi, T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel patient-specific method of modelling pulmonary airflow using graphics processing unit (GPU) computation that can be applied in medical practice. To overcome the barriers imposed by computation speed, installation price and footprint to the application of computational fluid dynamics, we focused on GPU computation and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The GPU computation and LBM are compatible due to the characteristics of the GPU. As the optimisation of data access is essential for the performance of the GPU computation, we developed an adaptive meshing method, in which an airway model is covered by isotropic subdomains consisting of a uniform Cartesian mesh. We found that 4(3) size subdomains gave the best performance. The code was also tested on a small GPU cluster to confirm its performance and applicability, as the price and footprint are reasonable for medical applications.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Patient-Specific Condyle Fracture Plates: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Aquilina, Peter; Parr, William C. H.; Chamoli, Uphar; Wroe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Various patterns of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures have been proposed in the literature. This study investigates the stability of two patient-specific implants (PSIs) for the open reduction and internal fixation of a subcondylar fracture of the mandible. A subcondylar fracture of a mandible was simulated by a series of finite element models. These models contained approximately 1.2 million elements, were heterogeneous in bone material properties, and also modeled the muscles of mastication. Models were run assuming linear elasticity and isotropic material properties for bone. The stability and von Mises stresses of the simulated condylar fracture reduced with each of the PSIs were compared. The most stable of the plate configurations examined was PSI 1, which had comparable mechanical performance to a single 2.0 mm straight four-hole plate. PMID:26000081

  1. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  2. Towards patient-specific modelling of lesion formation during radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Soor, Navjeevan; Morgan, Ross; Varela, Marta; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures are a first-line method of clinical treatment for atrial fibrillation. However, they suffer from suboptimal success rates and are also prone to potentially serious adverse effects. These limitations can be at least partially attributed to the inter- and intra- patient variations in atrial wall thickness, and could be mitigated by patient-specific approaches to the procedure. In this study, a modelling approach to optimising ablation procedures in subject-specific 3D atrial geometries was applied. The approach enabled the evaluation of optimal ablation times to create lesions for a given wall thickness measured from MRI. A nonliner relationship was revealed between the thickness and catheter contact time required for fully transmural lesions. Hence, our approach based on MRI reconstruction of the atrial wall combined with subject-specific modelling of ablation can provide useful information for improving clinical procedures.

  3. Patient-Specific Implant for Residual Facial Asymmetry following Orthognathic Surgery in Unilateral Craniofacial Microsomia

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Femke; Pluijmers, Britt; Wolvius, Eppo; Koudstaal, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital anomaly with a variable phenotype. The most prominent feature of CFM is a predominantly unilateral hypoplasia of the mandible, leading to facial asymmetry. Even after correction of the midline, there is often a remaining hard- and soft-tissue deficiency over the body of the mandible and cheek on the affected side. This clinical report describes the skeletal augmentation of the mandible with a patient-specific implant to treat residual facial asymmetry in two female patients with unilateral CFM. Good aesthetic results were achieved in both patients treated with either a Medpor or polyetheretherketone implant without complications after a follow-up time of 55 and 30 months, respectively. PMID:27516845

  4. Patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Schjodt, Kathleen; Puntel, Anthony; Kostov, Nikolay; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2012-12-01

    We present the special arterial fluid mechanics techniques we have developed for patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent. These techniques are used in conjunction with the core computational technique, which is the space-time version of the variational multiscale (VMS) method and is called "DST/SST-VMST." The special techniques include using NURBS for the spatial representation of the surface over which the stent mesh is built, mesh generation techniques for both the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent, techniques for generating refined layers of mesh near the arterial and stent surfaces, and models for representing double stent. We compute the unsteady flow patterns in the aneurysm and investigate how those patterns are influenced by the presence of single and double stents. We also compare the flow patterns obtained with the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent.

  5. Development of a patient-specific model for calculation of pulmonary function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Ding, Mingyue; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a patient-specific finite element model (FEM) to calculate the pulmonary function of lung cancer patients for evaluation of radiation treatment. The lung model was created with an in-house developed FEM software with region-specific parameters derived from a four-dimensional CT (4DCT) image. The model was used first to calculate changes in air volume and elastic stress in the lung, and then to calculate regional compliance defined as the change in air volume corrected by its associated stress. The results have shown that the resultant compliance images can reveal the regional elastic property of lung tissue, and could be useful for radiation treatment planning and assessment.

  6. The impact patient-specific instrumentation has had on my practice in the last 5 years.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    I have performed total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using patient- specific instrumentation (PSI) (TRUMATCH® Personalized Solutions, DePuy Synthes Joint Reconstruction, Warsaw, Indiana) since July 2009. Since that time, I have performed over 600 of these procedures, all at the same hospital and all using the same personnel I worked with before I began using PSI. I do not have a physician assistant, but I do have a surgical assistant who scrubs with and assists me on all TKAs. There are a number of reasons why a surgeon may decide to use PSI. This paper discusses the effect PSI has had on my practice in the last 5 years, including my experiences and conclusions.

  7. Advances in inspection automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Walter H.; Mair, H. Douglas; Jansen, Dion; Lombardi, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    This new session at QNDE reflects the growing interest in inspection automation. Our paper describes a newly developed platform that makes the complex NDE automation possible without the need for software programmers. Inspection tasks that are tedious, error-prone or impossible for humans to perform can now be automated using a form of drag and drop visual scripting. Our work attempts to rectify the problem that NDE is not keeping pace with the rest of factory automation. Outside of NDE, robots routinely and autonomously machine parts, assemble components, weld structures and report progress to corporate databases. By contrast, components arriving in the NDT department typically require manual part handling, calibrations and analysis. The automation examples in this paper cover the development of robotic thickness gauging and the use of adaptive contour following on the NRU reactor inspection at Chalk River.

  8. Automation in Immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Kaur, Ravneet; Gupta, Ekta

    2012-01-01

    There have been rapid technological advances in blood banking in South Asian region over the past decade with an increasing emphasis on quality and safety of blood products. The conventional test tube technique has given way to newer techniques such as column agglutination technique, solid phase red cell adherence assay, and erythrocyte-magnetized technique. These new technologies are adaptable to automation and major manufacturers in this field have come up with semi and fully automated equipments for immunohematology tests in the blood bank. Automation improves the objectivity and reproducibility of tests. It reduces human errors in patient identification and transcription errors. Documentation and traceability of tests, reagents and processes and archiving of results is another major advantage of automation. Shifting from manual methods to automation is a major undertaking for any transfusion service to provide quality patient care with lesser turnaround time for their ever increasing workload. This article discusses the various issues involved in the process. PMID:22988378

  9. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a “marching cubes” algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing. PMID:25300886

  10. SU-E-T-603: PBS Prostate Plan Robustness: A Tool for Patient Specific Setup Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, S; Song, L; Chen, C; Chang, C; Chon, B; Tsai, H; Soffen, E; Cahlon, O; Mah, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fiducial markers are commonly used for setup of prostate patients using orthogonal radiographs. After aligned with the markers, the displacement of the bony anatomy relative to the planned DRR can be up to 10 mm. Such offset can potentially have significant dosimetric effects because it changes the radiological path length of protons in differing amounts of bone. It is imperative to develop a method to evaluate its impact on target coverage and hence establish patient specific setup tolerance for prostate proton PBS treatment. Methods: Prostate patients were planned in RayStation according to the PCG protocol with bi-lateral beams. The primary planning objectives are: (1) 100% of CTV receives full prescription dose; (2) 98% of the prescription dose covers at least 98% of the PTV; (3) OARs meet criteria per protocol. For each patient 108 dose perturbations were automatically generated using an in-house script, which considered the isocenter shifting in S-I and A-P directions (up to ±15 mm with an interval of 6mm) as well as the range uncertainty (±3.5%). The target coverage was evaluated on the contour shifted along with prostate to mimic the daily treatment. Results: The minimum CTV coverage as a function of offsets in S-I and A-P directions is presented in a 2D contour map. The offsets along A-P direction generally have greater impact than along S-I direction. Both the CTV D98%>98% or CTV V98%>98% are achievable for most patients if the offset is <10 mm in either direction despite of range uncertainties. Conclusion: We developed a method to evaluate the plan robustness for proton PBS prostate treatment. It can provide patient specific setup tolerance of bony structure offset. For our current planning approach, a 1 cm displacement is acceptable. This approach can be generalized to other target structures that move relative to bony anatomy.

  11. Mechanistic patient-specific predictive correlation of tumor drug response with microenvironment and perfusion measurements

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Jennifer; Bearer, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhihui; Koay, Eugene J.; Curley, Steven A.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Physical properties of the microenvironment influence penetration of drugs into tumors. Here, we develop a mathematical model to predict the outcome of chemotherapy based on the physical laws of diffusion. The most important parameters in the model are the volume fraction occupied by tumor blood vessels and their average diameter. Drug delivery to cells, and kill thereof, are mediated by these microenvironmental properties and affected by the diffusion penetration distance after extravasation. To calculate parameter values we fit the model to histopathology measurements of the fraction of tumor killed after chemotherapy in human patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to liver (coefficient of determination R2 = 0.94). To validate the model in a different tumor type, we input patient-specific model parameter values from glioblastoma; the model successfully predicts extent of tumor kill after chemotherapy (R2 = 0.7–0.91). Toward prospective clinical translation, we calculate blood volume fraction parameter values from in vivo contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging from a separate cohort of patients with colorectal cancer metastatic to liver, and demonstrate accurate model predictions of individual patient responses (average relative error = 15%). Here, patient-specific data from either in vivo imaging or histopathology drives output of the model’s formulas. Values obtained from standard clinical diagnostic measurements for each individual are entered into the model, producing accurate predictions of tumor kill after chemotherapy. Clinical translation will enable the rational design of individualized treatment strategies such as amount, frequency, and delivery platform of drug and the need for ancillary non–drug-based treatment. PMID:23940372

  12. Poster - Thur Eve - 21: ROC analysis in patient specific quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Carlone, M; Cruje, C; McCabe, R; Nielsen, M; Macpherson, M

    2012-07-01

    Many institutions rely on a patient specific measurement for IMRT/VMAT patient QA. In diagnostic imaging, radiologists use Receiver Operator Curves (ROC) to help quantify the value of a diagnostic imaging test. The purpose of this work is to investigate the value or ROC methodology for patient specific IMRT QA. Beam fluences for 34 prostate IMRT patients were analyzed using gamma analysis. For half of these, measurements were done using the planned beam fluences. For the rest, perturbations to the MLC leaf positions were introduced. Gamma analysis was then used to measure fluence differences. Assuming that the unperturbed fluencies were positive measurements, distributions of true positive and false negatives were calculated. For poorly performing beam delivery systems the choice of γ-DTA criterion has little effect on test sensitivity and specificity. The AUC is increased by about 10% for high performance beam delivery systems. For a 3%/3mm γ-DTA condition, ideal cut off values are reasonably independent of MLC performance. At a tighter γ-DTA condition of 2%/2mm, then the optimal sensitivity and specificity of the test is more dependent on MLC performance. For a pass-fail test such as the γ-DTA map is, it is important to choose an optimal cut off value to maximize the sensitivity and specificity of the test. ROC methodology allows users to follow a prescriptive method to obtain ideal cut-off values for gamma analysis, and to assess improvements in sensitivity and specificity for higher performing beam delivery system. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Comparison of Patient-Specific Computational Modeling Predictions and Clinical Outcomes of LASIK for Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Ibrahim; Vahdati, Ali; De Stefano, Vinicius Silbiger; Krueger, Ronald R.; Dupps, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the predictive accuracy of simulation-based LASIK outcomes. Methods Preoperative and 3-month post-LASIK tomographic data from 20 eyes of 12 patients who underwent wavefront-optimized LASIK for myopia were obtained retrospectively. Patient-specific finite element models were created and case-specific treatment settings were simulated. Simulated keratometry (SimK) values and the mean tangential curvature of the central 3 mm (Kmean) were obtained from the anterior surfaces of the clinical tomographies, and computational models were compared. Correlations between Kmean prediction error and patient age, preoperative corneal hysteresis (CH), and corneal resistance factor (CRF) were assessed. Results The mean difference for Kmean between simulated and actual post-LASIK cases was not statistically significant (−0.13 ± 0.36 diopters [D], P = 0.1). The mean difference between the surgically induced clinical change in Kmean and the model-predicted change was −0.11 ± 0.34 D (P = 0.2). Kmean prediction error was correlated to CH, CRF, and patient age (r = 0.63, 0.53, and 0.5, respectively, P < 0.02), and incorporation of CH values into predictions as a linear offset increased their accuracy. Simulated changes in Kmean accounted for 97% of the variance in actual spherical equivalent refractive change. Conclusions Clinically feasible computational simulations predicted corneal curvature and manifest refraction outcomes with a level of accuracy in myopic LASIK cases that approached the limits of measurement error. Readily available preoperative biomechanical measures enhanced simulation accuracy. Patient-specific simulation may be a useful tool for clinical guidance in de novo LASIK cases. PMID:27893094

  14. Patient-specific connectivity pattern of epileptic network in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng; An, Dongmei; Yao, Dezhong; Gotman, Jean

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that focal epilepsy may involve the dysfunction of a brain network in addition to the focal region. To delineate the characteristics of this epileptic network, we collected EEG/fMRI data from 23 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy. For each patient, EEG/fMRI analysis was first performed to determine the BOLD response to epileptic spikes. The maximum activation cluster in the frontal lobe was then chosen as the seed to identify the epileptic network in fMRI data. Functional connectivity analysis seeded at the same region was also performed in 63 healthy control subjects. Nine features were used to evaluate the differences of epileptic network patterns in three connection levels between patients and controls. Compared with control subjects, patients showed overall more functional connections between the epileptogenic region and the rest of the brain and higher laterality. However, the significantly increased connections were located in the neighborhood of the seed, but the connections between the seed and remote regions actually decreased. Comparing fMRI runs with interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) and without IEDs, the patient-specific connectivity pattern was not changed significantly. These findings regarding patient-specific connectivity patterns of epileptic networks in FLE reflect local high connectivity and connections with distant regions differing from those of healthy controls. Moreover, the difference between the two groups in most features was observed in the strictest of the three connection levels. The abnormally high connectivity might reflect a predominant attribute of the epileptic network, which may facilitate propagation of epileptic activity among regions in the network.

  15. Patient-specific Finite Element Analysis of Fiber Post and Ferrule Design.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Valdivia, Andréa Dollores Correia Miranda; Pessoa, Roberto Sales; Veríssimo, Crisnicaw; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2017-09-01

    A ferrule on anterior endodontic-treated teeth has been evaluated using clinical trials, in vitro tests, and finite element analysis (FEA). The patient-specific FEA with a nonuniform ferrule and nonlinear contact biting load associated with clinical validation can be used to predict failure. A patient was selected with both maxillary central incisors with different ferrule designs who received endodontic treatment and restoration using a fiber post, composite core, and computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing lithium disilicate ceramic crowns. Strain gauges were attached to the buccal surfaces of both teeth to record ceramic strain during bite force recording for FEA validation. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging was performed, and the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine files were exported to Mimics, 3-Matic (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium) and Patran (MSC Software, Santa Ana, CA) software to create a patient-specific FEA model. Bite load was applied using contact load applied by antagonist teeth (155 N). Mechanical properties were obtained from the literature. Modified von Mises equivalent stress was used for stress evaluation. Stresses on the dentin and fiber post on the left incisor, which had a nonuniform ferrule, were higher compared with the right incisor. The strain values recorded for the right central incisor (strain gauge =79.9 ± 3.8 μS and FEA = 69.5 μS) and the left central incisor (strain gauge = 83.5 ± 5.3 μS and FEA = 73.9 μS) validate the FEA analysis. FEA was validated with in vivo strain values measured at the buccal crown surfaces, supporting that the stress levels were realistic for investigation of the clinical performance of fiber posts. Maintaining a uniform ferrule was more favorable than a localized higher ferrule. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Patient-specific independent 3D GammaPlan quality assurance for Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A; Drzymala, Robert E

    2013-01-07

    One of the most important aspects of quality assurance (QA) in radiation therapy is redundancy of patient treatment dose calculation. This work is focused on the patient-specific time and 3D dose treatment plan verification for stereotactic radiosurgery using Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX). The virtual model of LGK PFX was developed in MATLAB, based on the physical dimensions provided by the manufacturer. The ring-specific linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) and output factors (OFs) reported by the manufacturer were replaced by the measurement-based collimator size-specific OFs and a single LAC = 0.0065 mm-1. Calculation depths for each LGK PFX shot were obtained by ray-tracing technique, and the dose calculation formalism was similar to the one used by GammaPlan treatment planning software versions 8 and 9. The architecture of the QA process was based on the in-house online database search of the LGK PFX database search for plan-specific information. A series of QA phantom plans was examined to verify geometric and dosimetric accuracy of the software. The accuracy of the QA process was further evaluated through evaluation of a series of patient plans. The shot time/focus point dose verification for each shot took less than 1 sec/shot with full 3D isodose verification taking about 30 sec/shot on a desktop PC. GammaPlan database access time took less than 0.05 sec. The geometric accuracy (location of the point of maximum dose) of the phantom and patient plan was dependent on the resolution of the original dose matrix and was of the order of 1 dose element. Dosimetric accuracy of the independently calculated phantom and patient point (focus) doses was within 3.5% from the GammaPlan, with the mean = 2.3% and SD= 1.1%. The process for independent pretreatment patient-specific Gamma Knife Perfexion time and dose verification was created and validated.

  17. Patient specific CFD models of nasal airflow: overview of methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Na, Yang; Kim, Jee-In; Chung, Seung-Kyu

    2013-01-18

    Respiratory physiology and pathology are strongly dependent on the airflow inside the nasal cavity. However, the nasal anatomy, which is characterized by complex airway channels and significant individual differences, is difficult to analyze. Thus, commonly adopted diagnostic tools have yielded limited success. Nevertheless, with the rapid advances in computer resources, there have been more elaborate attempts to correlate airflow characteristics in human nasal airways with the symptoms and functions of the nose by computational fluid dynamics study. Furthermore, the computed nasal geometry can be virtually modified to reflect predicted results of the proposed surgical technique. In this article, several computational fluid mechanics (CFD) issues on patient-specific three dimensional (3D) modeling of nasal cavity and clinical applications were reviewed in relation to the cases of deviated nasal septum (decision for surgery), turbinectomy, and maxillary sinus ventilation (simulated- and post-surgery). Clinical relevance of fluid mechanical parameters, such as nasal resistance, flow allocation, wall shear stress, heat/humidity/NO gas distributions, to the symptoms and surgical outcome were discussed. Absolute values of such parameters reported by many research groups were different each other due to individual difference of nasal anatomy, the methodology for 3D modeling and numerical grid, laminar/turbulent flow model in CFD code. But, the correlation of these parameters to symptoms and surgery outcome seems to be obvious in each research group with subject-specific models and its variations (virtual- and post-surgery models). For the more reliable, patient-specific, and objective tools for diagnosis and outcomes of nasal surgery by using CFD, the future challenges will be the standardizations on the methodology for creating 3D airway models and the CFD procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA.

  19. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for estimating patient-specific dose from abdomen-pelvis CT examinations and to investigate dose variation across patients in the same weight group. Our study consisted of seven pediatric patients in the same weight/protocol group, for whom full-body computer models were previously created based on the patients' CT data obtained for clinical indications. Organ and effective dose of these patients from an abdomen-pelvis scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120-kVp, 85-90 mA, 0.4-s gantry rotation period, 1.375-pitch, 40-mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for the same CT system. The seven patients had effective dose of 2.4-2.8 mSv, corresponding to normalized effective dose of 6.6-8.3 mSv/100mAs (coefficient of variation: 7.6%). Dose variations across the patients were small for large organs in the scan coverage (mean: 6.6%; range: 4.9%-9.2%), larger for small organs in the scan coverage (mean: 10.3%; range: 1.4%-15.6%), and the largest for organs partially or completely outside the scan coverage (mean: 14.8%; range: 5.7%-27.7%). Normalized effective dose correlated strongly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r = -0.94). Normalized dose to the kidney and the adrenal gland correlated strongly with mid-liver equivalent diameter (kidney: r = -0.97; adrenal glands: r = -0.98). Normalized dose to the small intestine correlated strongly with mid-intestine equivalent diameter (r = -0.97). These strong correlations suggest that patient-specific dose may be estimated for any other child in the same size group who undergoes the abdomen-pelvis scan.

  20. Intraoperative template-molded bone flap reconstruction for patient-specific cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Marbacher, Serge; Andereggen, Lukas; Erhardt, Salome; Fathi, Ali-Reza; Fandino, Javier; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Cranioplasty is a common neurosurgical procedure. Free-hand molding of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement into complex three-dimensional shapes is often time-consuming and may result in disappointing cosmetic outcomes. Computer-assisted patient-specific implants address these disadvantages but are associated with long production times and high costs. In this study, we evaluated the clinical, radiological, and cosmetic outcomes of a time-saving and inexpensive intraoperative method to mold custom-made implants for immediate single-stage or delayed cranioplasty. Data were collected from patients in whom cranioplasty became necessary after removal of bone flaps affected by intracranial infection, tumor invasion, or trauma. A PMMA replica was cast between a negative form of the patient's own bone flap and the original bone flap with exactly the same shape, thickness, and dimensions. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed 2 months post-surgery. Patient satisfaction (Odom criteria) and cosmesis (visual analogue scale for cosmesis) were evaluated 1 to 3 years after cranioplasty. Twenty-seven patients underwent intraoperative template-molded patient-specific cranioplasty with PMMA. The indications for cranioplasty included bone flap infection (56%, n = 15), calvarian tumor resection (37%, n = 10), and defect after trauma (7%, n = 2). The mean duration of the molding procedure was 19 ± 7 min. Excellent radiological implant alignment was achieved in 94% of the cases. All (n = 23) but one patient rated the cosmetic outcome (mean 1.4 years after cranioplasty) as excellent (70%, n = 16) or good (26%, n = 6). Intraoperative cast-molded reconstructive cranioplasty is a feasible, accurate, fast, and cost-efficient technique that results in excellent cosmetic outcomes, even with large and complex skull defects.

  1. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  2. Patient-specific in silico models can quantify primary implant stability in elderly human bone.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Hofmann, Urs A T; Christen, Patrik; Favre, Jean M; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2017-09-06

    Secure implant fixation is challenging in osteoporotic bone. Due to the high variability in inter- and intra-patient bone quality, ex vivo mechanical testing of implants in bone is very material- and time-consuming. Alternatively, in silico models could substantially reduce costs and speed up the design of novel implants if they had the capability to capture the intricate bone microstructure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate a micro-finite element model of a multi-screw fracture fixation system. Eight human cadaveric humerii were scanned using micro-CT and mechanically tested to quantify bone stiffness. Osteotomy and fracture fixation were performed, followed by mechanical testing to quantify displacements at 12 different locations on the instrumented bone. For each experimental case, a micro-finite element model was created. From the micro-finite element analyses of the intact model, the patient-specific bone tissue modulus was determined such that the simulated apparent stiffness matched the measured stiffness of the intact bone. Similarly, the tissue modulus of a small damage region around each screw was determined for the instrumented bone. For validation, all in silico models were rerun using averaged material properties, resulting in an average coefficient of determination of 0.89 ± 0.04 with a slope of 0.93 ± 0.19 and a mean absolute error of 43 ± 10 μm when correlating in silico marker displacements with the ex vivo test. In conclusion, we validated a patient-specific computer model of an entire organ bone-implant system at the tissue-level at high resolution with excellent overall accuracy. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The influence of boundary conditions on wall shear stress distribution in patients specific coronary trees.

    PubMed

    van der Giessen, Alina G; Groen, Harald C; Doriot, Pierre-André; de Feyter, Pim J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van de Vosse, Frans N; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2011-04-07

    Patient specific geometrical data on human coronary arteries can be reliably obtained multislice computer tomography (MSCT) imaging. MSCT cannot provide hemodynamic variables, and the outflow through the side branches must be estimated. The impact of two different models to determine flow through the side branches on the wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in patient specific geometries is evaluated. Murray's law predicts that the flow ratio through the side branches scales with the ratio of the diameter of the side branches to the third power. The empirical model is based on flow measurements performed by Doriot et al. (2000) in angiographically normal coronary arteries. The fit based on these measurements showed that the flow ratio through the side branches can best be described with a power of 2.27. The experimental data imply that Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. We applied the two models to study the WSS distribution in 6 coronary artery trees. Under steady flow conditions, the average WSS between the side branches differed significantly for the two models: the average WSS was 8% higher for Murray's law and the relative difference ranged from -5% to +27%. These differences scale with the difference in flow rate. Near the bifurcations, the differences in WSS were more pronounced: the size of the low WSS regions was significantly larger when applying the empirical model (13%), ranging from -12% to +68%. Predicting outflow based on Murray's law underestimates the flow through the side branches. Especially near side branches, the regions where atherosclerotic plaques preferentially develop, the differences are significant and application of Murray's law underestimates the size of the low WSS region.

  4. Initial simulated FFR investigation using flow measurements in patient-specific 3D printed coronary phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Lauren; Sommer, Kelsey; Izzo, Richard; Podgorsak, Alexander; Wilson, Michael; Said, Zaid; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Angel, Erin; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate patient-specific phantoms for device testing or endovascular treatment planning can be 3D printed. We expand the applicability of this approach for cardiovascular disease, in particular, for CT-geometry derived benchtop measurements of Fractional Flow Reserve, the reference standard for determination of significant individual coronary artery atherosclerotic lesions. Materials and Methods: Coronary CT Angiography (CTA) images during a single heartbeat were acquired with a 320x0.5mm detector row scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE). These coronary CTA images were used to create 4 patientspecific cardiovascular models with various grades of stenosis: severe, <75% (n=1); moderate, 50-70% (n=1); and mild, <50% (n=2). DICOM volumetric images were segmented using a 3D workstation (Vitrea, Vital Images); the output was used to generate STL files (using AutoDesk Meshmixer), and further processed to create 3D printable geometries for flow experiments. Multi-material printed models (Stratasys Connex3) were connected to a programmable pulsatile pump, and the pressure was measured proximal and distal to the stenosis using pressure transducers. Compliance chambers were used before and after the model to modulate the pressure wave. A flow sensor was used to ensure flow rates within physiological reported values. Results: 3D model based FFR measurements correlated well with stenosis severity. FFR measurements for each stenosis grade were: 0.8 severe, 0.7 moderate and 0.88 mild. Conclusions: 3D printed models of patient-specific coronary arteries allows for accurate benchtop diagnosis of FFR. This approach can be used as a future diagnostic tool or for testing CT image-based FFR methods.

  5. Patient-specific atrium models for training and pre-procedure surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, Justin; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2017-03-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac procedures requiring a trans-septal puncture such as atrial ablation and MitraClip® mitral valve repair are becoming increasingly common. These procedures are performed on the beating heart, and require clinicians to rely on image-guided techniques. For cases of complex or diseased anatomy, in which fluoroscopic and echocardiography images can be difficult to interpret, clinicians may benefit from patient-specific atrial models that can be used for training, surgical planning, and the validation of new devices and guidance techniques. Computed tomography (CT) images of a patient's heart were segmented and used to generate geometric models to create a patient-specific atrial phantom. Using rapid prototyping, the geometric models were converted into physical representations and used to build a mold. The atria were then molded using tissue-mimicking materials and imaged using CT. The resulting images were segmented and used to generate a point cloud data set that could be registered to the original patient data. The absolute distance of the two point clouds was compared and evaluated to determine the model's accuracy. The result when comparing the molded model point cloud to the original data set, resulted in a maximum Euclidean distance error of 4.5 mm, an average error of 0.5 mm and a standard deviation of 0.6 mm. Using our workflow for creating atrial models, potential complications, particularly for complex repairs, may be accounted for in pre-operative planning. The information gained by clinicians involved in planning and performing the procedure should lead to shorter procedural times and better outcomes for patients.

  6. Patient-specific pediatric silicone heart valve models based on 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Jolley, Matthew A.; Wohler, Brittany; Nguyen, Alex; Scanlan, Adam; Baum, Zachary; McGowan, Frank; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Patient-specific heart and valve models have shown promise as training and planning tools for heart surgery, but physically realistic valve models remain elusive. Available proprietary, simulation-focused heart valve models are generic adult mitral valves and do not allow for patient-specific modeling as may be needed for rare diseases such as congenitally abnormal valves. We propose creating silicone valve models from a 3D-printed plastic mold as a solution that can be adapted to any individual patient and heart valve at a fraction of the cost of direct 3D-printing using soft materials. METHODS: Leaflets of a pediatric mitral valve, a tricuspid valve in a patient with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a complete atrioventricular canal valve were segmented from ultrasound images. A custom software was developed to automatically generate molds for each valve based on the segmentation. These molds were 3D-printed and used to make silicone valve models. The models were designed with cylindrical rims of different sizes surrounding the leaflets, to show the outline of the valve and add rigidity. Pediatric cardiac surgeons practiced suturing on the models and evaluated them for use as surgical planning and training tools. RESULTS: Five out of six surgeons reported that the valve models would be very useful as training tools for cardiac surgery. In this first iteration of valve models, leaflets were felt to be unrealistically thick or stiff compared to real pediatric leaflets. A thin tube rim was preferred for valve flexibility. CONCLUSION: The valve models were well received and considered to be valuable and accessible tools for heart valve surgery training. Further improvements will be made based on surgeons' feedback.

  7. Patient-specific image denoising for ultra-low-dose CT-guided lung biopsies.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael; Marom, Edith M; Konen, Eli; Kiryati, Nahum; Mayer, Arnaldo

    2017-06-10

    Low-dose CT screening of the lungs is becoming a reality, triggering many more CT-guided lung biopsies. During these biopsies, the patient is submitted to repeated guiding scans with substantial cumulated radiation dose. Extension of the dose reduction to the biopsy procedure is therefore necessary. We propose an image denoising algorithm that specifically addresses the setup of CT-guided lung biopsies. It minimizes radiation exposure while keeping the image quality appropriate for navigation to the target lesion. A database of high-SNR CT patches is used to filter noisy pixels in a non-local means framework, while explicitly enforcing local spatial consistency in order to preserve fine image details and structures. The patch database may be created from a multi-patient set of high-SNR lung scans. Alternatively, the first scan, acquired at high-SNR right before the needle insertion, can provide a convenient patient-specific patch database. The proposed algorithm is compared to state-of-the-art denoising algorithms for a dataset of 43 real CT-guided biopsy scans. Ultra-low-dose scans were simulated by synthetic noise addition to the sinogram, equivalent to a 96% reduction in radiation dose. The feature similarity score for the proposed algorithm outperformed the compared methods for all the scans in the dataset. The benefit of the patient-specific patch database over the multi-patient one is demonstrated in terms of recovered contrast for a tiny porcine lung nodule, following denoising with both approaches. The proposed method provides a promising approach to the denoising of ultra-low-dose CT-guided biopsy images.

  8. The numerical analysis of non-Newtonian blood flow in human patient-specific left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Doost, Siamak N; Zhong, Liang; Su, Boyang; Morsi, Yosry S

    2016-04-01

    Recently, various non-invasive tools such as the magnetic resonance image (MRI), ultrasound imaging (USI), computed tomography (CT), and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been widely utilized to enhance our current understanding of the physiological parameters that affect the initiation and the progression of the cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with heart failure (HF). In particular, the hemodynamics of left ventricle (LV) has attracted the attention of the researchers due to its significant role in the heart functionality. In this study, CFD owing its capability of predicting detailed flow field was adopted to model the blood flow in images-based patient-specific LV over cardiac cycle. In most published studies, the blood is modeled as Newtonian that is not entirely accurate as the blood viscosity varies with the shear rate in non-linear manner. In this paper, we studied the effect of Newtonian assumption on the degree of accuracy of intraventricular hemodynamics. In doing so, various non-Newtonian models and Newtonian model are used in the analysis of the intraventricular flow and the viscosity of the blood. Initially, we used the cardiac MRI images to reconstruct the time-resolved geometry of the patient-specific LV. After the unstructured mesh generation, the simulations were conducted in the CFD commercial solver FLUENT to analyze the intraventricular hemodynamic parameters. The findings indicate that the Newtonian assumption cannot adequately simulate the flow dynamic within the LV over the cardiac cycle, which can be attributed to the pulsatile and recirculation nature of the flow and the low blood shear rate.

  9. Patient-specific hemodynamics and stress-strain state of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Dol, Aleksandr; Polienko, Asel

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5% of the adult population has one or more cerebral aneurysm. Aneurysms are one of the most dangerous cerebral vascular pathologies. Aneurysm rupture leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage with a very high mortality rate of 45-50%. Despite the high importance of this disease there are no criteria for assessing the probability of aneurysm rupture. Moreover, mechanisms of aneurysm development and rupture are not fully understood until now. Biomechanical and numerical computer simulations allow us to estimate the behavior of vessels in normal state and under pathological conditions as well as to make a prediction of their postoperative state. Biomechanical studies may help clinicians to find and investigate mechanical factors which are responsible for the initiation, growth and rupture of the cerebral aneurysms. In this work, biomechanical and numerical modeling of healthy and pathological cerebral arteries was conducted. Patient-specific models of the basilar and posterior cerebral arteries and patient-specific boundary conditions at the inlet were used in numerical simulations. A comparative analysis of the three vascular wall models (rigid, perfectly elastic, hyperelastic) was performed. Blood flow and stress-strain state of the two posterior cerebral artery aneurysm models was compared. Numerical simulations revealed that hyperelastic material most adequately and realistically describes the behavior of the cerebral vascular walls. The size and shape of the aneurysm have a significant impact on the blood flow through the affected vessel and on the effective stress distribution in the aneurysm dome. It was shown that large aneurysm is more likely to rupture than small aneurysm.

  10. The technique for 3D printing patient-specific models for auricular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Flores, Roberto L; Liss, Hannah; Raffaelli, Samuel; Humayun, Aiza; Khouri, Kimberly S; Coelho, Paulo G; Witek, Lukasz

    2017-06-01

    Currently, surgeons approach autogenous microtia repair by creating a two-dimensional (2D) tracing of the unaffected ear to approximate a three-dimensional (3D) construct, a difficult process. To address these shortcomings, this study introduces the fabrication of patient-specific, sterilizable 3D printed auricular model for autogenous auricular reconstruction. A high-resolution 3D digital photograph was captured of the patient's unaffected ear and surrounding anatomic structures. The photographs were exported and uploaded into Amira, for transformation into a digital (.stl) model, which was imported into Blender, an open source software platform for digital modification of data. The unaffected auricle as digitally isolated and inverted to render a model for the contralateral side. The depths of the scapha, triangular fossa, and cymba were deepened to accentuate their contours. Extra relief was added to the helical root to further distinguish this structure. The ear was then digitally deconstructed and separated into its individual auricular components for reconstruction. The completed ear and its individual components were 3D printed using polylactic acid filament and sterilized following manufacturer specifications. The sterilized models were brought to the operating room to be utilized by the surgeon. The models allowed for more accurate anatomic measurements compared to 2D tracings, which reduced the degree of estimation required by surgeons. Approximately 20 g of the PLA filament were utilized for the construction of these models, yielding a total material cost of approximately $1. Using the methodology detailed in this report, as well as departmentally available resources (3D digital photography and 3D printing), a sterilizable, patient-specific, and inexpensive 3D auricular model was fabricated to be used intraoperatively. This technique of printing customized-to-patient models for surgeons to use as 'guides' shows great promise. Copyright © 2017 European

  11. Towards Effective and Efficient Patient-Specific Quality Assurance for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. Ronald.; Li, Yupeng; Mackin, Dennis; Li, Heng; Poenisch, Falk; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahajan, Anita; Frank, Steven J.; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    An intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) patient-specific quality assurance (PSQA) program based on measurement alone can be very time consuming due to the highly modulated dose distributions of IMPT fields. Incorporating independent dose calculation and treatment log file analysis could reduce the time required for measurements. In this article, we summarize our effort to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program that consists of three components: measurements, independent dose calculation, and analysis of patient-specific treatment delivery log files. Measurements included two-dimensional (2D) measurements using an ionization chamber array detector for each field delivered at the planned gantry angles with the electronic medical record (EMR) system in the QA mode and the accelerator control system (ACS) in the treatment mode, and additional measurements at depths for each field with the ACS in physics mode and without the EMR system. Dose distributions for each field in a water phantom were calculated independently using a recently developed in-house pencil beam algorithm and compared with those obtained using the treatment planning system (TPS). The treatment log file for each field was analyzed in terms of deviations in delivered spot positions from their planned positions using various statistical methods. Using this improved PSQA program, we were able to verify the integrity of the data transfer from the TPS to the EMR to the ACS, the dose calculation of the TPS, and the treatment delivery, including the dose delivered and spot positions. On the basis of this experience, we estimate that the in-room measurement time required for each complex IMPT case (e.g., a patient receiving bilateral IMPT for head and neck cancer) is less than 1 h using the improved PSQA program. Our experience demonstrates that it is possible to develop an efficient and effective PSQA program for IMPT with the equipment and resources available in the clinic. PMID:25867000

  12. Use of 3-Dimensional Printing to Create Patient-Specific Thoracic Spine Models as Task Trainers.

    PubMed

    Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Baribeau, Yanick; Bortman, Jeffrey; Mahmood, Feroze; Shnider, Marc; Ahmed, Muneeb; Mashari, Azad; Amir, Rabia; Amador, Yannis; Matyal, Robina

    Thoracic epidural anesthesia is a technically challenging procedure with a high failure rate of 24% to 32% nationwide. Residents in anesthesiology have limited opportunities to practice this technique adequately, and there are no training tools available for this purpose. Our objective was to build a low-cost patient-specific thoracic epidural training model. We obtained thoracic computed tomography scan data from patients with normal and kyphotic spine. The thoracic spine was segmented from the scan, and a 3-dimensional model of the spine was generated and printed. It was then placed in a customized wooden box and filled with different types of silicone to mimic human tissues. Attending physicians in our institution then tested the final model. They were asked to fill out a brief questionnaire after the identification of the landmarks and epidural space using ultrasound and real-time performance for a thoracic epidural on the model (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/AAP/A197). Likert scoring system was used for scoring. The time to develop this simulator model took less than 4 days, and the materials cost approximately $400. Fourteen physicians tested the model for determining the realistic sensation while palpating the spinous process, needle entry through the silicone, the "pop" sensation and ultrasound fidelity of the model. Whereas the tactile fidelity scores were "neutral" (3.08, 3.06, and 3.0, respectively), the ultrasound guidance and overall suitability for residents were highly rated as being the most realistic (4.85 and 4.0, respectively). It is possible to develop homemade, low-cost, patient-specific, and high-fidelity ultrasound guidance simulators for resident training in thoracic epidurals using 3-dimensional printing technology.

  13. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  14. CT-based patient-specific simulation software for pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Klein, Shawn; Whyne, Cari M; Rush, Raphael; Ginsberg, Howard J

    2009-10-01

    Development of a 3-dimensional, patient-specific simulator for pedicle screw insertion. To allow the user to practice the insertion of pedicle screws into a 3-dimensional model of a patient-specific spine, and have both visual and quantitative feedback provided to the user. The goal is to better prepare surgeons to perform pedicle screw insertion surgery and help reduce the risk of pedicle screw misplacement. Pedicle screw insertion is particularly challenging to carry out on patients with abnormal spine morphology. Currently, preoperative planning for pedicle screw insertion is carried out using patient computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans. In addition, once screws are inserted, there are no quantitative metrics against which to measure the results. The simulator was developed in the TCL scripting language as a graphical plug-in for the commercial visualization software AmiraDev 3.11. Surgical simulation uses a 3-dimensional model of patient's spine developed from the patient's computed tomography scan. Pedicle screw insertion can be practiced using pedicle screws of various sizes and analyzed in both 2-dimension and 3-dimension. Quantitative feedback is provided to the user in the form of anatomic lengths and angles, relative purchase of inserted screws, and a screw placement grading system. The software allows the user to adjust the translucency of a patient's spine to develop a better sense of the trajectories and depths involved with performing pedicle screw insertion on a patient. The simulator offers many helpful features to the surgeon with respect to complex cases and to the surgical trainee learning the basic technique of pedicle screw insertion. A study is currently underway to evaluate the efficacy of the simulator as a teaching tool for surgical trainees in placing pedicle screws. Future work will focus on the transfer of the software to a stand-alone platform.

  15. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  16. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-13

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  17. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation.

  18. Automated Acquisition of Proximal Femur Morphological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakovic, Slobodan; Zeljkovic, Milan; Milojevic, Zoran

    2014-10-01

    The success of the hip arthroplasty surgery largely depends on the endoprosthesis adjustment to the patient's femur. This implies that the position of the femoral bone in relation to the pelvis is preserved and that the endoprosthesis position ensures its longevity. Dimensions and body shape of the hip joint endoprosthesis and its position after the surgery depend on a number of geometrical parameters of the patient's femur. One of the most suitable methods for determination of these parameters involves 3D reconstruction of femur, based on diagnostic images, and subsequent determination of the required geometric parameters. In this paper, software for automated determination of geometric parameters of the femur is presented. Detailed software development procedure for the purpose of faster and more efficient design of the hip endoprosthesis that ensures patients' specific requirements is also offered

  19. Systematic review automation technologies.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

    2014-07-09

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time.

  20. Systematic review automation technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  1. Automation synthesis modules review.

    PubMed

    Boschi, S; Lodi, F; Malizia, C; Cicoria, G; Marengo, M

    2013-06-01

    The introduction of (68)Ga labelled tracers has changed the diagnostic approach to neuroendocrine tumours and the availability of a reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator has been at the bases of the development of (68)Ga radiopharmacy. The huge increase in clinical demand, the impact of regulatory issues and a careful radioprotection of the operators have boosted for extensive automation of the production process. The development of automated systems for (68)Ga radiochemistry, different engineering and software strategies and post-processing of the eluate were discussed along with impact of automation with regulations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Managing laboratory automation

    PubMed Central

    Saboe, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the process of managing automated systems through their life cycles within the quality-control (QC) laboratory environment. The focus is on the process of directing and managing the evolving automation of a laboratory; system examples are given. The author shows how both task and data systems have evolved, and how they interrelate. A BIG picture, or continuum view, is presented and some of the reasons for success or failure of the various examples cited are explored. Finally, some comments on future automation need are discussed. PMID:18925018

  3. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a 3D patient’s external surface

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Hadi; Pan, Tinsu; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion modeling of both tumor and surrounding tissues is a key element in minimizing errors and uncertainties in radiation therapy. Different continuous motion models have been previously developed. However, most of these models are based on the use of parameters such as amplitude and phase extracted from 1D external respiratory signal. A potentially reduced correlation between the internal structures (tumor and healthy organs) and the corresponding external surrogates obtained from such 1D respiratory signal is a limitation of these models. The objective of this work is to describe a continuous patient specific respiratory motion model, accounting for the irregular nature of respiratory signals, using patient external surface information as surrogate measures rather than a 1D respiratory signal. Methods: Ten patients were used in this study having each one 4D CT series, a synchronized RPM signal and patient surfaces extracted from the 4D CT volumes using a threshold based segmentation algorithm. A patient specific model based on the use of principal component analysis was subsequently constructed. This model relates the internal motion described by deformation matrices and the external motion characterized by the amplitude and the phase of the respiratory signal in the case of the RPM or using specific regions of interest (ROI) in the case of the patients’ external surface utilization. The capability of the different models considered to handle the irregular nature of respiration was assessed using two repeated 4D CT acquisitions (in two patients) and static CT images acquired at extreme respiration conditions (end of inspiration and expiration) for one patient. Results: Both quantitative and qualitative parameters covering local and global measures, including an expert observer study, were used to assess and compare the performance of the different motion estimation models considered. Results indicate that using surface information

  4. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a 3D patient's external surface.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Hadi; Pan, Tinsu; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-06-01

    Respiratory motion modeling of both tumor and surrounding tissues is a key element in minimizing errors and uncertainties in radiation therapy. Different continuous motion models have been previously developed. However, most of these models are based on the use of parameters such as amplitude and phase extracted from 1D external respiratory signal. A potentially reduced correlation between the internal structures (tumor and healthy organs) and the corresponding external surrogates obtained from such 1D respiratory signal is a limitation of these models. The objective of this work is to describe a continuous patient specific respiratory motion model, accounting for the irregular nature of respiratory signals, using patient external surface information as surrogate measures rather than a 1D respiratory signal. Ten patients were used in this study having each one 4D CT series, a synchronized RPM signal and patient surfaces extracted from the 4D CT volumes using a threshold based segmentation algorithm. A patient specific model based on the use of principal component analysis was subsequently constructed. This model relates the internal motion described by deformation matrices and the external motion characterized by the amplitude and the phase of the respiratory signal in the case of the RPM or using specific regions of interest (ROI) in the case of the patients' external surface utilization. The capability of the different models considered to handle the irregular nature of respiration was assessed using two repeated 4D CT acquisitions (in two patients) and static CT images acquired at extreme respiration conditions (end of inspiration and expiration) for one patient. Both quantitative and qualitative parameters covering local and global measures, including an expert observer study, were used to assess and compare the performance of the different motion estimation models considered. Results indicate that using surface information [correlation coefficient (CC): 0

  5. TU-C-BRE-09: Performance Comparisons of Patient Specific IMRT QA Methodologies Using ROC Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, E; Balter, P; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Kry, S; Jones, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a selection of patient-specific QA methods to accurately classify IMRT plans as acceptable or unacceptable based on a multiple ion chamber (MIC) phantom. Methods: Twenty-four IMRT plans were selected (20 previously failed the institutional QA), and were measured on a MIC phantom to assess their dosimetric acceptability. These same plans were then measured using film (Kodak EDR2) and ion chamber (Wellhofer cc04), ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear), and MapCheck (Sun Nuclear) (delivered AP field-by-field, AP composite, and with original gantry angles). All gamma analyses were performed at 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 5%/3mm. By using the MIC results as a gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated across a range of cut-off thresholds (% pixels passing for gamma analysis, and % dose difference for ion chamber), and were used to form ROC curves. Area under the curve (AUC) was used as a metric to quantify the performance of the various QA methods. Results: Grouping device’s AUC’s revealed two statistically significant different groups: ion chamber (AUC of 0.94), AP composite MapCheck (AUC of 0.85), ArcCheck (AUC of 0.84), and film (AUC of 0.82) were in the better performing group, while original gantry angles and AP field-by-field MapCheck (AUC of 0.65 and 0.66, respectively) matched less well with the gold standard results. Optimal cut-offs were also assessed using the ROC curves. We found that while often 90% of pixels passing is used as a criteria, the differing sensitivities of QA methods can lead to device and methodology-based optimal cutoff thresholds. Conclusion: While many methods exist to perform the same task of patient-specific IMRT QA, they utilize different strategies. This work has shown that there are inconsistencies in these methodologies in terms of their sensitivity and specificity to dosimetric acceptability. This work was supported by Public Health Service grants CA010953, CA081647, and CA21661 awarded by the

  6. A method to enhance 2D ion chamber array patient specific quality assurance for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Diaz Moreno, Rogelio Manuel; Venencia, Daniel; Garrigo, Edgardo; Pipman, Yakov

    2016-11-21

    Gamma index comparison has been established as a method for patient specific quality assurance in IMRT. Detector arrays can replace radiographic film systems to record 2D dose distributions and fulfill quality assurance requirements. These electronic devices present spatial resolution disadvantages with respect to films. This handicap can be partially overcome with a multiple acquisition sequence of adjacent 2D dose distributions. The detector spatial response influence can also be taken into account through the convolution of the calculated dose with the detector spatial response. A methodology that employs both approaches could allow for enhancements of the quality assurance procedure. 35 beams from different step and shoot IMRT plans were delivered on a phantom. 2D dose distributions were recorded with a PTW-729 ion chamber array for individual beams, following the multiple acquisition methodology. 2D dose distributions were also recorded on radiographic films. Measured dose distributions with films and with the PTW-729 array were processed with the software RITv5.2 for Gamma index comparison with calculated doses. Calculated dose was also convolved with the ion chamber 2D response and the Gamma index comparisons with the 2D dose distribution measured with the PTW-729 array was repeated. 3.7 ± 2.7% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index when using radiographic films compared with calculated dose, with a minimum of 0.67 and a maximum of 13.27. With the PTW-729 multiple acquisition methodology compared with calculated dose, 4.1 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 1.44 and a maximum of 11.26. With the PTW- multiple acquisition methodology compared with convolved calculated dose, 2.7 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 0.42 and a maximum of 5.75. The results obtained in this work suggest that the comparison of merged adjacent dose distributions with convolved calculated dose

  7. Development of a patient-specific 3D dose evaluation program for QA in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present preliminary results for a 3-dimensional dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient-specific 3-dimensional dose real evaluation system). Scanned computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using dosimetry were transferred to the radiation treatment planning system (ECLIPSE, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) where the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) nasopharynx plan was designed. We used a 10 MV photon beam (CLiX, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) to deliver the nasopharynx treatment plan. After irradiation, the TENOMAG dosimeter was scanned using a VISTA ™ scanner. The scanned data were reconstructed using VistaRecon software to obtain a 3D dose distribution of the optical density. An optical-CT scanner was used to readout the dose distribution in the gel dosimeter. Moreover, we developed the P DRESS by using Flatform, which were developed by our group, to display the 3D dose distribution by loading the DICOM RT data which are exported from the radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) and the optical-CT reconstructed VFF file, into the independent P DRESS with an ioniz ation chamber and EBT film was used to compare the dose distribution calculated from the RTP with that measured by using a gel dosimeter. The agreement between the normalized EBT, the gel dosimeter and RTP data was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods, such as the isodose distribution, dose difference, point value, and profile. The profiles showed good agreement between the RTP data and the gel dosimeter data, and the precision of the dose distribution was within ±3%. The results from this study showed significantly discrepancies between the dose distribution calculated from the treatment plan and the dose distribution measured by a TENOMAG gel and by scanning with an optical CT scanner. The 3D dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient specific dose real evaluation system), which were developed in this study evaluates the accuracies of the three-dimensional dose

  8. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  9. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for (103)Pd breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Miksys, N; Cygler, J E; Caudrelier, J M; Thomson, R M

    2016-04-07

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (103)Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV [Formula: see text] and skin [Formula: see text] each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV [Formula: see text] and skin [Formula: see text] are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV [Formula: see text] of up to 11% and skin [Formula: see text] of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ([Formula: see text] on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ([Formula: see text] on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images

  10. Patient-specific mental rehearsal with interactive visual aids: a path worth exploring?

    PubMed

    Yiasemidou, Marina; Galli, Raffaele; Glassman, Daniel; Tang, Matthew; Aziz, Rahoz; Jayne, David; Miskovic, Danilo

    2017-08-24

    Surgeons of today are faced with unprecedented challenges; necessitating a novel approach to pre-operative preparation which takes into account the specific tests each case poses. In this study, we examine patient-specific mental rehearsal for pre-surgical practice and assess whether this method has an additional effect when compared to generic mental rehearsal. Sixteen medical students were trained how to perform a simulated laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SLC). After baseline assessments, they were randomised to two equal groups and asked to complete three SLCs involving different anatomical variants. Prior to each procedure, Group A practiced mental rehearsal with the use of a pre-prepared checklist and Group B mental rehearsal with the checklist combined with virtual models matching the anatomical variations of the SLCs. The performance of the two groups was compared using simulator provided metrics and competency assessment tool (CAT) scoring by two blinded assessors. The participants performed equally well when presented with a "straight-forward" anatomy [Group A vs. Group B-time sec: 445.5 vs. 496 p = 0.64-NOM: 437 vs. 413 p = 0.88-PL cm: 1317 vs. 1059 p = 0.32-per: 0.5 vs. 0 p = 0.22-NCB: 0 vs. 0 p = 0.71-DVS: 0 vs. 0 p = 0.2]; however, Group B performed significantly better [Group A vs. B Total CAT score-Short Cystic Duct (SCD): 20.5 vs. 26.31 p = 0.02 η (2) = 0.32-Double cystic Artery (DA): 24.75 vs. 30.5 p = 0.03 η (2) = 0.28] and committed less errors (Damage to Vital Structures-DVS, SCD: 4 vs. 0 p = 0.03 η (2)=0.34, DA: 0 vs. 1 p = 0.02 η (2) = 0.22). in the cases with more challenging anatomies. These results suggest that patient-specific preparation with the combination of anatomical models and mental rehearsal may increase operative quality of complex procedures.

  11. Modeling of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Itzhaki, Ilanit; Maizels, Leonid; Huber, Irit; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Caspi, Oren; Miller, Liron; Belhassen, Bernard; Nof, Eyal; Glikson, Michael; Gepstein, Lior

    2012-09-11

    The goal of this study was to establish a patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) model of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT is a familial arrhythmogenic syndrome characterized by abnormal calcium (Ca(2+)) handling, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained from a CPVT patient due to the M4109R heterozygous point RYR2 mutation and reprogrammed to generate the CPVT-hiPSCs. The patient-specific hiPSCs were coaxed to differentiate into the cardiac lineage and compared with healthy control hiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSCs-CMs). Intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated the development of delayed afterdepolarizations in 69% of the CPVT-hiPSCs-CMs compared with 11% in healthy control cardiomyocytes. Adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol (1 μM) or forskolin (5 μM) increased the frequency and magnitude of afterdepolarizations and also led to development of triggered activity in the CPVT-hiPSCs-CMs. In contrast, flecainide (10 μM) and thapsigargin (10 μM) eliminated all afterdepolarizations in these cells. The latter finding suggests an important role for internal Ca(2+) stores in the pathogenesis of delayed afterdepolarizations. Laser-confocal Ca(2+) imaging revealed significant whole-cell [Ca(2+)] transient irregularities (frequent local and large-storage Ca(2+)-release events, broad and double-humped transients, and triggered activity) in the CPVT cardiomyocytes that worsened with adrenergic stimulation and Ca(2+) overload and improved with beta-blockers. Store-overload-induced Ca(2+) release was also identified in the hiPSCs-CMs and the threshold for such events was significantly reduced in the CPVT cells. This study highlights the potential of hiPSCs for studying inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes, in general, and CPVT specifically. As such, it represents a promising paradigm to study disease mechanisms, optimize patient care, and aid in the

  12. Bicompartmental individualized knee replacement : Use of patient-specific implants and instruments (iDuo™).

    PubMed

    Steinert, A F; Beckmann, J; Holzapfel, B M; Rudert, M; Arnholdt, J

    2017-02-01

    Bicompartmental knee replacement in patients with combined osteoarthritis (OA) of the medial or lateral and patellofemoral compartment. Patient-specific instruments and implants (ConforMIS iDuo™) with a planning protocol for optimal implant fit. Bicompartmental OA of the knee (Kellgren & Lawrence stage IV) affecting both the medial or lateral and patellofemoral compartment after unsuccessful conservative or joint-preserving surgery. Tricompartmental OA, knee ligament instabilities, knee deformities >15° (varus, valgus, extension deficit). Relative contraindication: body mass index >40; prior unicompartmental knee replacement or osteotomies. Midline or parapatellar medial skin incision, medial arthrotomy; identify mechanical contact zone of the intact femoral condyle (linea terminalis); remove remaining cartilage and all osteophytes that may interfere with the correct placement of the individually designed instruments. Balance knee in extension with patient-specific balancing chips. Resection of proximal tibia with an individual cutting block; confirm axial alignment using an extramedullary alignment guide, balance flexion gap using spacer blocks in 90° flexion. Final femur preparation with resection of the anterior trochlea. After balancing and identification of insert heights, final tibial preparation is performed. Implant is cemented in 45° of knee flexion. Remove excess cement and final irrigation, followed by closure. Sterile wound dressing; compressive bandage. No limitation of active/passive range of motion (ROM). Partial weight bearing the first 2 weeks, then transition to full weight bearing. Follow-up directly after surgery, at 12 and 52 weeks, then every 1-2 years. In all, 44 patients with bicompartmental OA of the medial and patellofemoral compartment were treated. Mean age 59 years. Minimum follow-up 12 months. Implant converted to TKA due to tibial loosening (1 patient); patella resurfacing (3 patients). No further revisions or

  13. A systematic review of image segmentation methodology, used in the additive manufacture of patient-specific 3D printed models of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Byrne, N; Velasco Forte, M; Tandon, A; Valverde, I; Hussain, T

    2016-01-01

    Shortcomings in existing methods of image segmentation preclude the widespread adoption of patient-specific 3D printing as a routine decision-making tool in the care of those with congenital heart disease. We sought to determine the range of cardiovascular segmentation methods and how long each of these methods takes. A systematic review of literature was undertaken. Medical imaging modality, segmentation methods, segmentation time, segmentation descriptive quality (SDQ) and segmentation software were recorded. Totally 136 studies met the inclusion criteria (1 clinical trial; 80 journal articles; 55 conference, technical and case reports). The most frequently used image segmentation methods were brightness thresholding, region growing and manual editing, as supported by the most popular piece of proprietary software: Mimics (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium, 1992-2015). The use of bespoke software developed by individual authors was not uncommon. SDQ indicated that reporting of image segmentation methods was generally poor with only one in three accounts providing sufficient detail for their procedure to be reproduced. Predominantly anecdotal and case reporting precluded rigorous assessment of risk of bias and strength of evidence. This review finds a reliance on manual and semi-automated segmentation methods which demand a high level of expertise and a significant time commitment on the part of the operator. In light of the findings, we have made recommendations regarding reporting of 3D printing studies. We anticipate that these findings will encourage the development of advanced image segmentation methods.

  14. Xenon International Automated Control

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-05

    The Xenon International Automated Control software monitors, displays status, and allows for manual operator control as well as fully automatic control of multiple commercial and PNNL designed hardware components to generate and transmit atmospheric radioxenon concentration measurements every six hours.

  15. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  16. Planning for Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Colin K.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a practical approach to planning for office automation termed the "Focused Process Approach" (the "what" phase, "how" phase, "doing" phase) which is a synthesis of the problem-solving and participatory planning approaches. Thirteen references are provided. (EJS)

  17. Automated decision stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischendorf, Mark

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the combination of software robots and expert systems to automate everyday business tasks. Tasks which require people to repetitively interact with multiple systems screens as well as multiple systems.

  18. Patient-specific structural effects on hemodynamics in the ischemic lower limb artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Pengcheng; Liu, Xin; Song, Qi; Chen, Guishan; Wang, Defeng; Zhang, Heye; Yan, Li; Liu, Dan; Huang, Wenhua

    2016-12-01

    Lower limb peripheral artery disease is a prevalent chronic non-communicable disease without obvious symptoms. However, the effect of ischemic lower limb peripheral arteries on hemodynamics remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the variation of the hemodynamics caused by patient-specific structural artery characteristics. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed on seven lower limb (including superficial femoral, deep femoral and popliteal) artery models that were reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. We found that increased wall shear stress (WSS) was mainly caused by the increasing severity of stenosis, bending, and branching. Our results showed that the increase in the WSS value at a stenosis at the bifurcation was 2.7 Pa. In contrast, the isolated stenosis and branch caused a WSS increase of 0.7 Pa and 0.5 Pa, respectively. The WSS in the narrow popliteal artery was more sensitive to a reduction in radius. Our results also demonstrate that the distribution of the velocity and pressure gradient are highly structurally related. At last, Ultrasound Doppler velocimeter measured result was presented as a validation. In conclusion, the distribution of hemodynamics may serve as a supplement for clinical decision-making to prevent the occurrence of a morbid or mortal ischemic event.

  19. Planning acetabular fracture reduction using patient-specific multibody simulation of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveri, Hadrien; Boudissa, Mehdi; Tonetti, Jerome; Chabanas, Matthieu

    2017-03-01

    Acetabular fractures are a challenge in orthopedic surgery. Computer-aided solutions were proposed to segment bone fragments, simulate the fracture reduction or design the osteosynthesis fixation plates. This paper addresses the simulation part, which is usually carried out by freely moving bone fragments with six degrees of freedom to reproduce the pre-fracture state. Instead we propose a different paradigm, closer to actual surgeon's requirements: to simulate the surgical procedure itself rather than the desired result. A simple, patient-specific, biomechanical multibody model is proposed, integrating the main ligaments and muscles of the hip joint while accounting for contacts between bone fragments. Main surgical tools and actions can be simulated, such as clamps, Schanz screws or traction of the femur. Simulations are computed interactively, which enables clinicians to evaluate different strategies for an optimal surgical planning. Six retrospective cases were studied, with simple and complex fracture patterns. After interactively building the models from preoperative CT, gestures from the surgical reports were reproduced. Results of the simulations could then be compared with postoperative CT data. A qualitative study shows the model behavior is excellent and the simulated reductions fit the observed data. A more quantitative analysis is currently being completed. Two cases are particularly significant, for which the surgical reduction actually failed. Simulations show it was indeed not possible to reduce these fractures with the chosen approach. Had our simulator being used, a better planning may have avoided a second surgery to these patients.

  20. An augmented reality system for patient-specific guidance of cardiac catheter ablation procedures.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stijn; Maes, Frederik; Ector, Joris; Bogaert, Jan; Dymarkowski, Steven; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present a system to assist in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias by catheter ablation. A patient-specific three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical model, constructed from magnetic resonance images, is merged with fluoroscopic images in an augmented reality environment that enables the transfer of electrocardiography (ECG) measurements and cardiac activation times onto the model. Accurate mapping is realized through the combination of: a new calibration technique, adapted to catheter guided treatments; a visual matching registration technique, allowing the electrophysiologist to align the model with contrast-enhanced images; and the use of virtual catheters, which enable the annotation of multiple ECG measurements on the model. These annotations can be visualized by color coding on the patient model. We provide an accuracy analysis of each of these components independently. Based on simulation and experiments, we determined a segmentation error of 0.6 mm, a calibration error in the order of 1 mm and a target registration error of 1.04 +/- 0.45 mm. The system provides a 3-D visualization of the cardiac activation pattern which may facilitate and improve diagnosis and treatment of the arrhytmia. Because of its low cost and similar advantages we believe our approach can compete with existing commercial solutions, which rely on dedicated hardware and costly catheters. We provide qualitative results of the first clinical use of the system in 11 ablation procedures.

  1. Use of patient-specific cutting blocks reduces blood loss after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    León, Vicente J; Lengua, María A; Calvo, Víctor; Lisón, Alonso J

    2017-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with substantial blood loss. Sources of bleeding are the femoral and tibial intramedullary canals, which are violated during implantation using standard instrumentation. Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) and computer-assisted surgery (CAS) do not require violation of the intramedullary canals. Therefore, we sought to assess the impact of these methods on blood loss and transfusion requirement. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in a series of 107 consecutive primary TKAs. The first group (n = 32) was operated with standard instrumentation, the second group (n = 35) with CAS and the third group (n = 40) with PSI. A tourniquet was used in all cases. Mean (standard deviation) calculated total blood loss was 442 (160), 750 (271) and 700 (401) ml for the PSI, CAS and standard instrumentation groups, respectively (p < 0.001), with no significant differences between CAS and standard instrumentation (p = 0.799). Significant differences were found in terms of transfusion requirements, with 12.5, 42.9 and 21.8% of the patients requiring transfusion (p = 0.010). Post hoc analysis revealed that only the difference between PSI and CAS were statistically significant (p = 0.003). In conclusion, PSI reduces blood loss when compared to both CAS and standard instrumentation TKA performed with the use of a tourniquet.

  2. Concise Review: Guidance in Developing Commercializable Autologous/Patient-Specific Cell Therapy Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Armant, Myriam; Brandwein, Harvey; Burger, Scott; Campbell, Andrew; Carpenito, Carmine; Clarke, Dominic; Fong, Timothy; Karnieli, Ohad; Niss, Knut; Van't Hof, Wouter; Wagey, Ravenska

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy is poised to play an enormous role in regenerative medicine. However, little guidance is being made available to academic and industrial entities in the start-up phase. In this technical review, members of the International Society for Cell Therapy provide guidance in developing commercializable autologous and patient-specific manufacturing strategies from the perspective of process development. Special emphasis is placed on providing guidance to small academic or biotech researchers as to what simple questions can be addressed or answered at the bench in order to make their cell therapy products more feasible for commercial-scale production. We discuss the processes that are required for scale-out at the manufacturing level, and how many questions can be addressed at the bench level. The goal of this review is to provide guidance in the form of topics that can be addressed early in the process of development to better the chances of the product being successful for future commercialization. PMID:24101671

  3. Experimental unsteady flow study in a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatopoulos, Ch.; Mathioulakis, D. S.; Papaharilaou, Y.; Katsamouris, A.

    2011-06-01

    The velocity field in a patient-specific abdominal aneurysm model including the aorto-iliac bifurcation was measured by 2D PIV. Phase-averaged velocities obtained in 14 planes reveal details of the flow evolution during a cycle. The aneurysm expanding asymmetrically toward the anterior side of the aorta causes the generation of a vortex at its entrance, covering the entire aneurysm bulge progressively before flow peak. The fluid entering the aneurysm impinges on the left side of its distal end, following the axis of the upstream aorta segment, causing an increased flow rate in the left (compared to the right) common iliac artery. High shear stresses appear at the aneurysm inlet and outlet as well as along the posterior wall, varying proportionally to the flow rate. At the same regions, elevated flow disturbances are observed, being intensified at flow peak and during the deceleration phase. Low shear stresses are present in the recirculation region, being two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous ones. At flow peak and during the deceleration phase, a clockwise swirling motion (viewed from the inlet) is present in the aneurysm due to the out of plane curvature of the aorta.

  4. Flow topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent, localized widening of the abdominal aorta. Flow in AAA is dominated by recirculation, transitional turbulence and low wall shear stress. Image-based CFD has recently enabled high resolution flow data in patient-specific AAA. This study aims to characterize transport in different AAAs, and understand flow topology changes from rest to exercise, which has been a hypothesized therapy due to potential acute changes in flow. Velocity data in 6 patients with different AAA morphology were obtained using image-based CFD under rest and exercise conditions. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from integration of the velocity data to identify dominant Lagrangian coherent structures. The flow topology was compared between rest and exercise conditions. For all patients, the systolic inflow jet resulted in coherent vortex formation. The evolution of this vortex varied greatly between patients and was a major determinant of transport inside the AAA during diastole. During exercise, previously observed stagnant regions were either replaced with undisturbed flow, regions of uniform high mixing, or persisted relatively unchanged. A mix norm measure provided a quantitative assessment of mixing. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, grant number 5R21HL108272.

  5. Patient specific quality control for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR): it takes more than one phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, T.; Ungureanu, E.; Antony, R.; Hardcastle, N.; Clements, N.; Ukath, J.; Fox, C.; Lonski, P.; Wanigaratne, D.; Haworth, A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is an extension of the concepts of Stereotactic Radiosurgery from intracranial procedures to extracranial targets. This brings with it new technological challenges for set-up of a SABR program and continuing quality assurance. Compared with intracranial procedures SABR requires consideration of motion and inhomogeneities and has to deal with a much larger variety of targets ranging from lung to liver, kidney and bone. To meet many of the challenges virtually all advances in modern radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IMRT and IGRT) are used. Considering the few fractions and high doses per fraction delivered to complex targets it is not surprising that patient specific quality control is considered essential for safe delivery. Given the variety of targets and clinical scenarios we employ different strategies for different patients to ensure that the most important aspects of the treatment are appropriately tested, be it steep dose gradients, inhomogeneities or the delivery of dose in the presence of motion. The current paper reviews the different approaches and phantoms utilised at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for SABR QA.

  6. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Zastrow, Earl; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Medow, Joshua E.

    2011-05-01

    We present a numerical study of an array-based microwave beamforming approach for non-invasive hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain tumors. The transmit beamformer is designed to achieve localized heating—that is, to achieve constructive interference and selective absorption of the transmitted electromagnetic waves at the desired focus location in the brain while achieving destructive interference elsewhere. The design process takes into account patient-specific and target-specific propagation characteristics at 1 GHz. We evaluate the effectiveness of the beamforming approach using finite-difference time-domain simulations of two MRI-derived child head models from the Virtual Family (IT'IS Foundation). Microwave power deposition and the resulting steady-state thermal distribution are calculated for each of several randomly chosen focus locations. We also explore the robustness of the design to mismatch between the assumed and actual dielectric properties of the patient. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of the beamformer to suppress hot spots caused by pockets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Our results show that microwave beamforming has the potential to create localized heating zones in the head models for focus locations that are not surrounded by large amounts of CSF. These promising results suggest that the technique warrants further investigation and development.

  7. Linear elastic properties of the facial soft tissues using an aspiration device: towards patient specific characterization.

    PubMed

    Luboz, V; Promayon, E; Payan, Y

    2014-11-01

    Biomechanical modeling of the facial soft tissue behavior is needed in aesthetic or maxillo-facial surgeries where the simulation of the bone displacements cannot accurately predict the visible outcome on the patient's face. Because these tissues have different nature and elastic properties across the face, depending on their thickness, and their content in fat or muscle, individualizing their mechanical parameters could increase the simulation accuracy. Using a specifically designed aspiration device, the facial soft tissues deformation is measured at four different locations (cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip) on 16 young subjects. The stiffness is estimated from the deformations generated by a set of negative pressures using an inverse analysis based on a Neo Hookean model. The initial Young's modulus of the cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip are respectively estimated to be 31.0 kPa±4.6, 34.9 kPa±6.6, 17.3 kPa±4.1, and 33.7 kPa±7.3. Significant intra-subject differences in tissue stiffness are highlighted by these estimations. They also show important inter-subject variability for some locations even when mean stiffness values show no statistical difference. This study stresses the importance of using a measurement device capable of evaluating the patient specific tissue stiffness during an intervention.

  8. Patient-specific dosimetry in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Chalkia, M T; Stefanoyiannis, A P; Chatziioannou, S N; Round, W H; Efstathopoulos, E P; Nikiforidis, G C

    2015-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) belong to a relatively rare class of neoplasms. Nonetheless, their prevalence has increased significantly during the last decades. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a relatively new treatment approach for inoperable or metastasised NETs. The therapeutic effect is based on the binding of radiolabelled somatostatin analogue peptides with NETs' somatostatin receptors, resulting in internal irradiation of tumours. Pre-therapeutic patient-specific dosimetry is essential to ensure that a treatment course has high levels of safety and efficacy. This paper reviews the methods applied for PRRT dosimetry, as well as the dosimetric results presented in the literature. Focus is given on data concerning the therapeutic somatostatin analogue radiopeptides (111)In-[DTPA(0),D-Phe(1)]-octreotide ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide), (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]-octreotide ((90)Y-DOTATOC) and (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3),Thr(8)]-octreotide ((177)Lu-DOTATATE). Following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee formalism, dosimetric analysis demonstrates large interpatient variability in tumour and organ uptake, with kidneys and bone marrow being the critical organs. The results are dependent on the image acquisition and processing protocol, as well as the dosimetric imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  9. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Giacalone, Joseph C.; Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; Songstad, Allison E.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person’s cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed. PMID:26683869

  10. Influence of IABP-Induced Abdominal Occlusions on Aortic Hemodynamics: A Patient-Specific Computational Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Renzulli, Attilio; Fragomeni, Gionata

    Intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is used as temporary mechanical assistance in case of cardiovascular diseases, even if different hemodynamic problems and, thus, clinical complications may happen, such as the decrease of visceral perfusion. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study was carried out to investigate the effects of different IABP-induced abdominal occlusions on patient-specific aortic flow. Two possible sizes (25 and 34 cm) and two locations (2 and 3 cm) of the balloon were compared, modeling four abdominal occlusions and numerically reproducing IAB inflation/deflation behavior. The results highlighted that the perfusion in renal, mesenteric, and iliac arteries decreases when the abdominal occlusion increases with balloon inflation. The study illustrates also how the balloon size affects the flow in aorta vessels in both locations, and that the positioning is of little relevance for the 34 cm balloon, whereas it influences the aortic flow very much in case of 25 cm IAB. This analysis demonstrates how the IAB-induced occlusion may vary the abdominal circulation; therefore, the correct size and positioning are emphasized for patient's outcome.

  11. Patient-Specific Modeling of Interventricular Hemodynamics in Single Ventricle Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Vijay; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    Single ventricle (SV) congenital heart defects, in which babies are born with only functional ventricle, lead to significant morbidity and mortality with over 30% of patients developing heart failure prior to adulthood. Newborns with SV physiology typically undergo three palliative surgeries, in which the SV becomes the systemic pumping chamber. Depending on which ventricle performs the systemic function, patients are classified as having either a single left ventricle (SLV) or a single right ventricle (SRV), with SRV patients at higher risk of failure. As the native right ventricles are not designed to meet systemic demands, they undergo remodeling leading to abnormal hemodynamics. The hemodynamic characteristics of SLVs compared with SRVs is not well established. We present a validated computational framework for performing patient-specific modeling of ventricular flows, and apply it across 6 SV patients (3SLV + 3SRV), comparing hemodynamic conditions between the two subgroups. Simulations are performed with a stabilized finite element method coupled with an immersed boundary method for modeling heart valves. We discuss identification of hemodynamic biomarkers of ventricular remodeling for early risk assessment of failure. This research is supported in part by the Stanford Child Health Research Institute and the Stanford NIH-NCATS-CTSA through Grant UL1 TR001085 and due to U.S. National Institute of Health through NIH NHLBI R01 Grants 5R01HL129727-02 and 5R01HL121754-03.

  12. Patient-Specific Model-Based Investigation of Speech Intelligibility and Movement during Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Åström, Mattias; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I.; Zrinzo, Ludvic U.; Martinez-Torres, Irene; Limousin, Patricia; Wårdell, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used to treat motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical aspects of the electric field in relation to effects on speech and movement during DBS in the subthalamic nucleus. Methods Patient-specific finite element models of DBS were developed for simulation of the electric field in 10 patients. In each patient, speech intelligibility and movement were assessed during 2 electrical settings, i.e. 4 V (high) and 2 V (low). The electric field was simulated for each electrical setting. Results Movement was improved in all patients for both high and low electrical settings. In general, high-amplitude stimulation was more consistent in improving the motor scores than low-amplitude stimulation. In 6 cases, speech intelligibility was impaired during high-amplitude electrical settings. Stimulation of part of the fasciculus cerebellothalamicus from electrodes positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus was recognized as a possible cause of the stimulation-induced dysarthria. Conclusion Special attention to stimulation-induced speech impairments should be taken in cases when active electrodes are positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:20460952

  13. Patient-specific structural effects on hemodynamics in the ischemic lower limb artery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengcheng; Liu, Xin; Song, Qi; Chen, Guishan; Wang, Defeng; Zhang, Heye; Yan, Li; liu, Dan; Huang, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    Lower limb peripheral artery disease is a prevalent chronic non-communicable disease without obvious symptoms. However, the effect of ischemic lower limb peripheral arteries on hemodynamics remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the variation of the hemodynamics caused by patient-specific structural artery characteristics. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed on seven lower limb (including superficial femoral, deep femoral and popliteal) artery models that were reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging. We found that increased wall shear stress (WSS) was mainly caused by the increasing severity of stenosis, bending, and branching. Our results showed that the increase in the WSS value at a stenosis at the bifurcation was 2.7 Pa. In contrast, the isolated stenosis and branch caused a WSS increase of 0.7 Pa and 0.5 Pa, respectively. The WSS in the narrow popliteal artery was more sensitive to a reduction in radius. Our results also demonstrate that the distribution of the velocity and pressure gradient are highly structurally related. At last, Ultrasound Doppler velocimeter measured result was presented as a validation. In conclusion, the distribution of hemodynamics may serve as a supplement for clinical decision-making to prevent the occurrence of a morbid or mortal ischemic event. PMID:27976693

  14. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, T.; Beuing, O.; Jachau, K.; Thévenin, D.; Janiga, G.; Berg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches—when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac—are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations. PMID:27721898

  15. 3D Modeling of Patient-Specific Geometries of Portal Veins Using MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; George, Stephanie; Martin, Diego R.; Tannenbaum, Allen R.; Giddens, Don P.

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized. PMID:17946691

  16. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Burfeindt, Matthew J; Zastrow, Earl; Hagness, Susan C; Van Veen, Barry D; Medow, Joshua E

    2011-05-07

    We present a numerical study of an array-based microwave beamforming approach for non-invasive hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain tumors. The transmit beamformer is designed to achieve localized heating-that is, to achieve constructive interference and selective absorption of the transmitted electromagnetic waves at the desired focus location in the brain while achieving destructive interference elsewhere. The design process takes into account patient-specific and target-specific propagation characteristics at 1 GHz. We evaluate the effectiveness of the beamforming approach using finite-difference time-domain simulations of two MRI-derived child head models from the Virtual Family (IT'IS Foundation). Microwave power deposition and the resulting steady-state thermal distribution are calculated for each of several randomly chosen focus locations. We also explore the robustness of the design to mismatch between the assumed and actual dielectric properties of the patient. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of the beamformer to suppress hot spots caused by pockets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Our results show that microwave beamforming has the potential to create localized heating zones in the head models for focus locations that are not surrounded by large amounts of CSF. These promising results suggest that the technique warrants further investigation and development.

  17. A Patient-Specific Three-Dimensional Hemodynamic Model of the Circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Hamed; Ashrafizadeh, Ali; Mojra, Afsaneh

    2017-09-14

    Circle of Willis (CoW) is one of the most important cerebral arteries in the human body and various attempts have been made to study the hemodynamic of blood flow in this vital part of the brain. In the present study, blood flow in a patient specific CoW is numerically modeled to predict disease-prone regions of the CoW. Medical images and computer aided design software are used to construct a realistic three-dimensional model of the CoW for this particular case. The arteries are considered as elastic conduits and the interactions between arterial walls and the blood flow are taken into account. Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic model is used to describe the behavior of arterial walls and blood is considered as a non-Newtonian fluid obeying the Carreau model. An available experimental-based pulsatile velocity profile is used at the entrance of the CoW. The finite element-based commercial software, ADINA, is used to solve the governing equations. Blood pressure and velocity and arterial wall shear stress are calculated in different regions of the CoW. A simplified form of the model is also compared with the available published data. Results affirmed that the proposed computational model has the potential to capture the hemodynamic characteristics of the CoW. The computational results can be used to determine disease-prone locations for a given CoW.

  18. Patient-specific analysis of blood stasis in the left atrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Oscar; Gonzalo, Alejandro; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Rossini, Lorenzo; Hsiao, Albert; McVeigh, Elliot; Kahn, Andrew M.; Del Alamo, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia in which the left atrium (LA) beats rapidly and irregularly. Patients with AF are at increased risk of thromboembolic events (TE), particularly stroke. Anticoagulant therapy can reduce the risk of TE in AF, but it can also increase the risks of adverse events such as internal bleeding. The current lack of tools to predict each patient's risk of LA thrombogenesis makes it difficult to decide whether to anticoagulate patients with AF. The aim of this work is to evaluate blood stasis in patient-specific models of the LA, because stasis is a known thrombogenesis risk factor. To achieve our aim, we performed direct numerical simulations of left atrial flow using an immersed boundary solver developed at the UC3M, coupled to a 0D model for the pulmonary circulation. The LA geometry is obtained from time-resolved CT scans and the parameters of the 0D model are found by fitting pulmonary vein flow data obtained by 4D phase contrast MRI. Blood stasis is evaluated from the flow data by computing blood residence time together with other kinematic indices of the velocity field (e.g. strain and kinetic energy). We focus on the flow in the left atrial appendage, including a sensitivity analysis of the effect of the parameters of the 0D model. Funded by the Spanish MECD, the Clinical and Translational Research Institute at UCSD and the American Heart Association.

  19. Generating patient specific pseudo-CT of the head from MR using atlas-based regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjölund, J.; Forsberg, D.; Andersson, M.; Knutsson, H.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy planning and attenuation correction of PET images require simulation of radiation transport. The necessary physical properties are typically derived from computed tomography (CT) images, but in some cases, including stereotactic neurosurgery and combined PET/MR imaging, only magnetic resonance (MR) images are available. With these applications in mind, we describe how a realistic, patient-specific, pseudo-CT of the head can be derived from anatomical MR images. We refer to the method as atlas-based regression, because of its similarity to atlas-based segmentation. Given a target MR and an atlas database comprising MR and CT pairs, atlas-based regression works by registering each atlas MR to the target MR, applying the resulting displacement fields to the corresponding atlas CTs and, finally, fusing the deformed atlas CTs into a single pseudo-CT. We use a deformable registration algorithm known as the Morphon and augment it with a certainty mask that allows a tailoring of the influence certain regions are allowed to have on the registration. Moreover, we propose a novel method of fusion, wherein the collection of deformed CTs is iteratively registered to their joint mean and find that the resulting mean CT becomes more similar to the target CT. However, the voxelwise median provided even better results; at least as good as earlier work that required special MR imaging techniques. This makes atlas-based regression a good candidate for clinical use.

  20. Patient-specific system for prognosis of surgical treatment outcomes of human cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Kalinin, Aleksey A.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Kossovich, Elena L.; Kossovich, Leonid Y.; Menishova, Liyana R.; Polienko, Asel V.

    2015-03-01

    Object of study: Improvement of life quality of patients with high stroke risk ia the main goal for development of system for patient-specific modeling of cardiovascular system. This work is dedicated at increase of safety outcomes for surgical treatment of brain blood supply alterations. The objects of study are common carotid artery, internal and external carotid arteries and bulb. Methods: We estimated mechanical properties of carotid arteries tissues and patching materials utilized at angioplasty. We studied angioarchitecture features of arteries. We developed and clinically adapted computer biomechanical models, which are characterized by geometrical, physical and mechanical similarity with carotid artery in norm and with pathology (atherosclerosis, pathological tortuosity, and their combination). Results: Collaboration of practicing cardiovascular surgeons and specialists in the area of Mathematics and Mechanics allowed to successfully conduct finite-element modeling of surgical treatment taking into account various features of operation techniques and patching materials for a specific patient. Numerical experiment allowed to reveal factors leading to brain blood supply decrease and atherosclerosis development. Modeling of carotid artery reconstruction surgery for a specific patient on the basis of the constructed biomechanical model demonstrated the possibility of its application in clinical practice at approximation of numerical experiment to the real conditions.

  1. Seizure prediction in intracranial EEG: a patient-specific rule-based approach.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Ardalan; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report our development of a patient-specific rule-based seizure prediction system. Five univariate and one bivariate nonlinear measures were extracted from non-overlapping 10-second segments of intracranial EEG (iEEG) data recorded using both depth electrodes in the brain and subdural electrodes over the cortical surface. Nonlinear features representing the specific characteristic properties of EEG signal were then integrated spatio-temporally in a way to predict to predict seizure with high sensitivity. The present system was tested on 58 hours of iEEG data containing ten seizures recorded in two patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy. Within a prediction horizon of 30 and 60 minutes, our method showed an average sensitivity of 90% and 96.5% with an average false prediction rate of 0.06/h and 0.055/h, respectively. The present results suggest that such a rule-based system can become potentially a useful approach for predicting seizures prior to onset.

  2. Patient-Specific Simulation of Cardiac Blood Flow From High-Resolution Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Henriksson, Lilian; Persson, Anders; Karlsson, Matts; Ebbers, Tino

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac hemodynamics can be computed from medical imaging data, and results could potentially aid in cardiac diagnosis and treatment optimization. However, simulations are often based on simplified geometries, ignoring features such as papillary muscles and trabeculae due to their complex shape, limitations in image acquisitions, and challenges in computational modeling. This severely hampers the use of computational fluid dynamics in clinical practice. The overall aim of this study was to develop a novel numerical framework that incorporated these geometrical features. The model included the left atrium, ventricle, ascending aorta, and heart valves. The framework used image registration to obtain patient-specific wall motion, automatic remeshing to handle topological changes due to the complex trabeculae motion, and a fast interpolation routine to obtain intermediate meshes during the simulations. Velocity fields and residence time were evaluated, and they indicated that papillary muscles and trabeculae strongly interacted with the blood, which could not be observed in a simplified model. The framework resulted in a model with outstanding geometrical detail, demonstrating the feasibility as well as the importance of a framework that is capable of simulating blood flow in physiologically realistic hearts.

  3. Surface mesh to voxel data registration for patient-specific anatomical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Júlia E. E.; Giessler, Paul; Keszei, András.; Herrler, Andreas; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) models are frequently used for training, planning, and performing medical procedures. The Regional Anaesthesia Simulator and Assistant (RASimAs) project has the goal of increasing the application and effectiveness of regional anesthesia (RA) by combining a simulator of ultrasound-guided and electrical nerve-stimulated RA procedures and a subject-specific assistance system through an integration of image processing, physiological models, subject-specific data, and virtual reality. Individualized models enrich the virtual training tools for learning and improving regional anaesthesia (RA) skills. Therefore, we suggest patient-specific VPH models that are composed by registering the general mesh-based models with patient voxel data-based recordings. Specifically, the pelvis region has been focused for the support of the femoral nerve block. The processing pipeline is composed of different freely available toolboxes such as MatLab, the open Simulation framework (SOFA), and MeshLab. The approach of Gilles is applied for mesh-to-voxel registration. Personalized VPH models include anatomical as well as mechanical properties of the tissues. Two commercial VPH models (Zygote and Anatomium) were used together with 34 MRI data sets. Results are presented for the skin surface and pelvic bones. Future work will extend the registration procedure to cope with all model tissue (i.e., skin, muscle, bone, vessel, nerve, fascia) in a one-step procedure and extrapolating the personalized models to body regions actually being out of the captured field of view.

  4. Patient-Specific Simulations Reveal Significant Differences in Mechanical Stimuli in Venous and Arterial Coronary Grafts.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Abhay B; Kahn, Andrew M; Marsden, Alison L

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimuli are key to understanding disease progression and clinically observed differences in failure rates between arterial and venous grafts following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. We quantify biologically relevant mechanical stimuli, not available from standard imaging, in patient-specific simulations incorporating non-invasive clinical data. We couple CFD with closed-loop circulatory physiology models to quantify biologically relevant indices, including wall shear, oscillatory shear, and wall strain. We account for vessel-specific material properties in simulating vessel wall deformation. Wall shear was significantly lower (p = 0.014*) and atheroprone area significantly higher (p = 0.040*) in venous compared to arterial grafts. Wall strain in venous grafts was significantly lower (p = 0.003*) than in arterial grafts while no significant difference was observed in oscillatory shear index. Simulations demonstrate significant differences in mechanical stimuli acting on venous vs. arterial grafts, in line with clinically observed graft failure rates, offering a promising avenue for stratifying patients at risk for graft failure.

  5. Patient-specific CFD simulation of intraventricular haemodynamics based on 3D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Bavo, A M; Pouch, A M; Degroote, J; Vierendeels, J; Gorman, J H; Gorman, R C; Segers, P

    2016-09-09

    The goal of this paper is to present a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model with moving boundaries to study the intraventricular flows in a patient-specific framework. Starting from the segmentation of real-time transesophageal echocardiographic images, a CFD model including the complete left ventricle and the moving 3D mitral valve was realized. Their motion, known as a function of time from the segmented ultrasound images, was imposed as a boundary condition in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework. The model allowed for a realistic description of the displacement of the structures of interest and for an effective analysis of the intraventricular flows throughout the cardiac cycle. The model provides detailed intraventricular flow features, and highlights the importance of the 3D valve apparatus for the vortex dynamics and apical flow. The proposed method could describe the haemodynamics of the left ventricle during the cardiac cycle. The methodology might therefore be of particular importance in patient treatment planning to assess the impact of mitral valve treatment on intraventricular flow dynamics.

  6. Numerical simulation of magnetic nano drug targeting in a patient-specific coeliac trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghi, Andrea; Russo, Flavia; Gori, Fabio

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic nano drug targeting, through the use of an external magnetic field, is a new technique for the treatment of several diseases, which can potentially avoid the dispersion of drugs in undesired locations of the body. Nevertheless, due to the limitations on the intensity of the magnetic field applied, the hydrodynamic forces can reduce the effectiveness of the procedure. This technique is studied in this paper with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), focusing on the influence of the magnetic probe position, and the direction of the circulating electric current. A single rectangular coil is used to generate the external magnetic field. A patient-specific geometry of the coeliac trunk is reconstructed from DICOM images, with the use of VMTK. A new solver, coupling the Lagrangian dynamics of the nanoparticles with the Eulerian dynamics of the blood, is implemented in OpenFOAM to perform the simulations. The resistive pressure, the Womersley's profile for the inlet velocity and the magnetic field of a rectangular coil are implemented in the software as boundary conditions. The results show the influence of the position of the probe, as well as the limitations associated with the rectangular coil configuration.

  7. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. Surgical Guides (Patient-Specific Instruments) for Pediatric Tibial Bone Sarcoma Resection and Allograft Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis. PMID:23533326

  9. Patient specific flow dynamic simulations of flow in diseased coronary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Carlos; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2012-11-01

    Patient specific simulations of patients belonging to type I: protruding, type II: ascending, type III: descending, and type IV: diffuse have been performed to understand the effect of inlet forcing frequency and amplitude on the wall shear stress (WSS). Numerical simulations are performed with unsteady flow conditions in a laminar regime. The results have revealed that at low amplitudes, the sensitivity of WSS to forcing frequency is strongly dependent on the patient type for same degree of stenosis. For all the types, the maximum WSS is observed in post-stenotic or the distal region of the stenosis, and WSS has lowest magnitude at the peak location of the stenosis. For higher pulsatile amplitude (a > 1.0), WSS exhibits a strong sensitivity with forcing frequencies for all types. However, at higher forcing frequency the WSS exhibits nonlinear response to the inlet forcing frequency, which is strongly type dependent. The study clearly demonstrated differences between the intra-type flows are small compared to the inter-type flows.

  10. The normal-equivalent: a patient-specific assessment of facial harmony.

    PubMed

    Claes, P; Walters, M; Gillett, D; Vandermeulen, D; Clement, J G; Suetens, P

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based practice in oral and maxillofacial surgery would greatly benefit from an objective assessment of facial harmony or gestalt. Normal reference faces have previously been introduced, but they describe harmony in facial form as an average only and fail to report on harmonic variations found between non-dysmorphic faces. In this work, facial harmony, in all its complexity, is defined using a face-space, which describes all possible variations within a non-dysmorphic population; this was sampled here, based on 400 healthy subjects. Subsequently, dysmorphometrics, which involves the measurement of morphological abnormalities, is employed to construct the normal-equivalent within the given face-space of a presented dysmorphic face. The normal-equivalent can be seen as a synthetic identical but unaffected twin that is a patient-specific and population-based normal. It is used to extract objective scores of facial discordancy. This technique, along with a comparing approach, was used on healthy subjects to establish ranges of discordancy that are accepted to be normal, as well as on two patient examples before and after surgical intervention. The specificity of the presented normal-equivalent approach was confirmed by correctly attributing abnormality and providing regional depictions of the known dysmorphologies. Furthermore, it proved to be superior to the comparing approach. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Institutional Patient-specific IMRT QA Does Not Predict Unacceptable Plan Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Molineu, Andrea; Kerns, James R.; Faught, Austin M.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Pulliam, Kiley B.; Tonigan, Jackie; Alvarez, Paola; Stingo, Francesco; Followill, David S.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether in-house patient-specific intensity modulated radiation therapy quality assurance (IMRT QA) results predict Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC)-Houston phantom results. Methods and Materials: IROC Houston's IMRT head and neck phantoms have been irradiated by numerous institutions as part of clinical trial credentialing. We retrospectively compared these phantom results with those of in-house IMRT QA (following the institution's clinical process) for 855 irradiations performed between 2003 and 2013. The sensitivity and specificity of IMRT QA to detect unacceptable or acceptable plans were determined relative to the IROC Houston phantom results. Additional analyses evaluated specific IMRT QA dosimeters and analysis methods. Results: IMRT QA universally showed poor sensitivity relative to the head and neck phantom, that is, poor ability to predict a failing IROC Houston phantom result. Depending on how the IMRT QA results were interpreted, overall sensitivity ranged from 2% to 18%. For different IMRT QA methods, sensitivity ranged from 3% to 54%. Although the observed sensitivity was particularly poor at clinical thresholds (eg 3% dose difference or 90% of pixels passing gamma), receiver operator characteristic analysis indicated that no threshold showed good sensitivity and specificity for the devices evaluated. Conclusions: IMRT QA is not a reasonable replacement for a credentialing phantom. Moreover, the particularly poor agreement between IMRT QA and the IROC Houston phantoms highlights surprising inconsistency in the QA process.

  12. Mild Anastomotic Stenosis in Patient-Specific CABG Model May Enhance Graft Patency: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M.; Teague, Shawn D.; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A.; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40–60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes⋅cm−2) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes⋅cm−2). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency. PMID:24058488

  13. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M; Teague, Shawn D; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2)) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2)). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency.

  14. Patient-specific embryonic stem cells derived from human SCNT blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Woo Suk; Roh, Sung Il; Lee, Byeong Chun; Kang, Sung Keun; Kwon, Dae Kee; Kim, Sue; Kim, Sun Jong; Park, Sun Woo; Kwon, Hee Sun; Lee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Jung Bok; Kim, Jin Mee; Ahn, Curie; Paek, Sun Ha; Chang, Sang Sik; Koo, Jung Jin; Yoon, Hyun Soo; Hwang, Jung Hye; Hwang, Youn Young; Park, Ye Soo; Oh, Sun Kyung; Kim, Hee Sun; Park, Jong Hyuk; Moon, Shin Yong; Schatten, Gerald

    2005-06-17

    Patient-specific, immune-matched human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are anticipated to be of great biomedical importance for studies of disease and development and to advance clinical deliberations regarding stem cell transplantation. Eleven hESC lines were established by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of skin cells from patients with disease or injury into donated oocytes. These lines, nuclear transfer (NT)-hESCs, grown on human feeders from the same NT donor or from genetically unrelated individuals, were established at high rates, regardless of NT donor sex or age. NT-hESCs were pluripotent, chromosomally normal, and matched the NT patient's DNA. The major histocompatibility complex identity of each NT-hESC when compared to the patient's own showed immunological compatibility, which is important for eventual transplantation. With the generation of these NT-hESCs, evaluations of genetic and epigenetic stability can be made. Additional work remains to be done regarding the development of reliable directed differentiation and the elimination of remaining animal components. Before clinical use of these cells can occur, preclinical evidence is required to prove that transplantation of differentiated NT-hESCs can be safe, effective, and tolerated.

  15. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness.

    PubMed

    Voß, S; Glaßer, S; Hoffmann, T; Beuing, O; Weigand, S; Jachau, K; Preim, B; Thévenin, D; Janiga, G; Berg, P

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches-when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac-are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  16. Numerical simulations of the blood flow in the patient-specific arterial cerebral circle region.

    PubMed

    Reorowicz, Piotr; Obidowski, Damian; Klosinski, Przemyslaw; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Jozwik, Krzysztof

    2014-05-07

    The Cerebral Circle Region, also known as the Circle of Willis (CoW), is a loop of arteries that form arterial connections between supply arteries to distribute blood throughout the cerebral mass. Among the population, only 25% to 50% have a complete system of arteries forming the CoW. 3D time-varying simulations for three different patient-specific artery anatomies of CoW were performed in order to gain a better insight into the phenomena existing in the cerebral blood flow. The models reconstructed on the basis of computer tomography images start from the aorta and include the largest arteries that supply the CoW and the arteries of CoW. Velocity values measured during the ultrasound examination have been compared with the results of simulations. It is shown that the flow in the right anterior artery in some cases may be supplied from the left internal carotid artery via the anterior communicating artery. The investigations conducted show that the computational fluid dynamic tool, which provides high resolution in both time and space domains, can be used to support physicians in diagnosing patients of different ages and various anatomical arterial structures.

  17. Predicting false lumen thrombosis in patient-specific models of aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Menichini, Claudia; Cheng, Zhuo; Gibbs, Richard G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection causes splitting of the aortic wall layers, allowing blood to enter a ‘false lumen’ (FL). For type B dissection, a significant predictor of patient outcomes is patency or thrombosis of the FL. Yet, no methods are currently available to assess the chances of FL thrombosis. In this study, we present a new computational model that is capable of predicting thrombus formation, growth and its effects on blood flow under physiological conditions. Predictions of thrombus formation and growth are based on fluid shear rate, residence time and platelet distribution, which are evaluated through convection–diffusion–reaction transport equations. The model is applied to a patient-specific type B dissection for which multiple follow-up scans are available. The predicted thrombus formation and growth patterns are in good qualitative agreement with clinical data, demonstrating the potential applicability of the model in predicting FL thrombosis for individual patients. Our results show that the extent and location of thrombosis are strongly influenced by aortic dissection geometry that may change over time. The high computational efficiency of our model makes it feasible for clinical applications. By predicting which aortic dissection patient is more likely to develop FL thrombosis, the model has great potential to be used as part of a clinical decision-making tool to assess the need for early endovascular intervention for individual dissection patients. PMID:27807275

  18. Induced radioactivity in a patient-specific collimator used in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, Alessandra; Mauro, Egidio; Silari, Marco

    2010-07-01

    This paper discusses the activation of a patient-specific collimator, calculating dose rates, total activities and activities per unit mass of the mixture of radionuclides generated by proton irradiation in the energy range 100-250 MeV. Monte Carlo simulations were first performed for a generic case, using an approximate geometry and on the basis of assumptions on beam intensity and irradiation profile. A collimator used for a prostate cancer treatment was obtained from the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), Houston, USA, from which a number of samples were cut and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The results of the gamma spectrometry are compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulations performed using geometrical and irradiation data specific to the unit. The assumptions made for the simulations and their impact on the results are discussed. Dose rate measurements performed in a low-background area at CERN and routine radiation protection measurements at the MDACC are also reported. It is shown that it should generally be possible to demonstrate that the material can be regarded as non-radioactive after allowing a sufficient decay-time, typically of the order of a few months.

  19. Generating patient specific pseudo-CT of the head from MR using atlas-based regression.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, J; Forsberg, D; Andersson, M; Knutsson, H

    2015-01-21

    Radiotherapy planning and attenuation correction of PET images require simulation of radiation transport. The necessary physical properties are typically derived from computed tomography (CT) images, but in some cases, including stereotactic neurosurgery and combined PET/MR imaging, only magnetic resonance (MR) images are available. With these applications in mind, we describe how a realistic, patient-specific, pseudo-CT of the head can be derived from anatomical MR images. We refer to the method as atlas-based regression, because of its similarity to atlas-based segmentation. Given a target MR and an atlas database comprising MR and CT pairs, atlas-based regression works by registering each atlas MR to the target MR, applying the resulting displacement fields to the corresponding atlas CTs and, finally, fusing the deformed atlas CTs into a single pseudo-CT. We use a deformable registration algorithm known as the Morphon and augment it with a certainty mask that allows a tailoring of the influence certain regions are allowed to have on the registration. Moreover, we propose a novel method of fusion, wherein the collection of deformed CTs is iteratively registered to their joint mean and find that the resulting mean CT becomes more similar to the target CT. However, the voxelwise median provided even better results; at least as good as earlier work that required special MR imaging techniques. This makes atlas-based regression a good candidate for clinical use.

  20. A patient-specific, finite element model for noncommunicating hydrocephalus capable of large deformation.

    PubMed

    Lefever, Joel A; Jaime García, José; Smith, Joshua H

    2013-05-31

    A biphasic model for noncommunicating hydrocephalus in patient-specific geometry is proposed. The model can take into account the nonlinear behavior of brain tissue under large deformation, the nonlinear variation of hydraulic conductivity with deformation, and contact with a rigid, impermeable skull using a recently developed algorithm. The model was capable of achieving over a 700 percent ventricular enlargement, which is much greater than in previous studies, primarily due to the use of an anatomically realistic skull recreated from magnetic resonance imaging rather than an artificial skull created by offsetting the outer surface of the cerebrum. The choice of softening or stiffening behavior of brain tissue, both having been demonstrated in previous experimental studies, was found to have a significant effect on the volume and shape of the deformed ventricle, and the consideration of the variation of the hydraulic conductivity with deformation had a modest effect on the deformed ventricle. The model predicts that noncommunicating hydrocephalus occurs for ventricular fluid pressure on the order of 1300 Pa.

  1. Development of patient-specific molecular imaging phantoms using a 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Gear, J I; Long, C; Rushforth, D; Chittenden, S J; Cummings, C; Flux, G D

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate rapid prototyping technology for the production of patient-specific, cost-effective liquid fillable phantoms directly from patient CT data. Liver, spleen, and kidney volumes were segmented from patient CT data. Each organ was converted to a shell and filling holes and leg supports were added using computer aided design software and prepared for printing. Additional fixtures were added to the liver to allow lesion inserts to be fixed within the structure. Phantoms were printed from an ultraviolet curable photopolymer using polyjet technology on an Objet EDEN 500V 3D printer. The final print material is a clear solid acrylic plastic which is watertight, rigid, and sufficiently durable to withstand multiple assembly and scanning protocols. Initial scans of the phantoms have been performed with Tc-99m SPECT and F-18 PET/CT. The organ geometry showed good correspondence with anatomical references. The methodology developed can be generally applied to other anatomical or geometrical phantoms for molecular imaging.

  2. Concise Review: Patient-Specific Stem Cells to Interrogate Inherited Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Joseph C; Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; Songstad, Allison E; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-02-01

    Whether we are driving to work or spending time with loved ones, we depend on our sense of vision to interact with the world around us. Therefore, it is understandable why blindness for many is feared above death itself. Heritable diseases of the retina, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and retinitis pigmentosa, are major causes of blindness worldwide. The recent success of gene augmentation trials for the treatment of RPE65-associated Leber congenital amaurosis has underscored the need for model systems that accurately recapitulate disease. With the advent of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), researchers are now able to obtain disease-specific cell types that would otherwise be unavailable for molecular analysis. In the present review, we discuss how the iPSC technology is being used to confirm the pathogenesis of novel genetic variants, interrogate the pathophysiology of disease, and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments. Significance: Stem cell technology has created the opportunity to advance treatments for multiple forms of blindness. Researchers are now able to use a person's cells to generate tissues found in the eye. This technology can be used to elucidate the genetic causes of disease and develop treatment strategies. In the present review, how stem cell technology is being used to interrogate the pathophysiology of eye disease and accelerate the development of patient-centered treatments is discussed.

  3. Feasibility study of patient-specific surgical templates for the fixation of pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Salako, F; Aubin, C-E; Fortin, C; Labelle, H

    2002-01-01

    Surgery for scoliosis, as well as other posterior spinal surgeries, frequently uses pedicle screws to fix an instrumentation on the spine. Misplacement of a screw can lead to intra- and post-operative complications. The objective of this study is to design patient-specific surgical templates to guide the drilling operation. From the CT-scan of a vertebra, the optimal drilling direction and limit angles are computed from an inverse projection of the pedicle limits. The first template design uses a surface-to-surface registration method and was constructed in a CAD system by subtracting the vertebra from a rectangular prism and a cylinder with the optimal orientation. This template and the vertebra were built using rapid prototyping. The second design uses a point-to-surface registration method and has 6 adjustable screws to adjust the orientation and length of the drilling support device. A mechanism was designed to hold it in place on the spinal process. A virtual prototype was build with CATIA software. During the operation, the surgeon places either template on patient's vertebra until a perfect match is obtained before drilling. The second design seems better than the first one because it can be reused on different vertebra and is less sensible to registration errors. The next step is to build the second design and make experimental and simulations tests to evaluate the benefits of this template during a scoliosis operation.

  4. Effects of Degree of Surgical Correction for Flatfoot Deformity in Patient-Specific Computational Models.

    PubMed

    Spratley, E M; Matheis, E A; Hayes, C W; Adelaar, R S; Wayne, J S

    2015-08-01

    A cohort of adult acquired flatfoot deformity rigid-body models was developed to investigate the effects of isolated tendon transfer with successive levels of medializing calcaneal osteotomy (MCO). Following IRB approval, six diagnosed flatfoot sufferers were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their scans used to derive patient-specific models. Single-leg stance was modeled, constrained solely through physiologic joint contact, passive soft-tissue tension, extrinsic muscle force, body weight, and without assumptions of idealized mechanical joints. Surgical effect was quantified using simulated mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) X-rays, pedobarography, soft-tissue strains, and joint contact force. Radiographic changes varied across states with the largest average improvements for the tendon transfer (TT) + 10 mm MCO state evidenced through ML and AP talo-1st metatarsal angles. Interestingly, 12 of 14 measures showed increased deformity following TT-only, though all increases disappeared with inclusion of MCO. Plantar force distributions showed medial forefoot offloading concomitant with increases laterally such that the most corrected state had 9.0% greater lateral load. Predicted alterations in spring, deltoid, and plantar fascia soft-tissue strain agreed with prior cadaveric and computational works suggesting decreased strain medially with successive surgical repair. Finally, joint contact force demonstrated consistent medial offloading concomitant with variable increases laterally. Rigid-body modeling thus offers novel advantages for the investigation of foot/ankle biomechanics not easily measured in vivo.

  5. Patient-specific simulation of the intrastromal ring segment implantation in corneas with keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Lago, M A; Rupérez, M J; Monserrat, C; Martínez-Martínez, F; Martínez-Sanchis, S; Larra, E; Díez-Ajenjo, M A; Peris-Martínez, C

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was the simulation of the implantation of intrastromal corneal-ring segments for patients with keratoconus. The aim of the study was the prediction of the corneal curvature recovery after this intervention. Seven patients with keratoconus diagnosed and treated by implantation of intrastromal corneal-ring segments were enrolled in the study. The 3D geometry of the cornea of each patient was obtained from its specific topography and a hyperelastic model was assumed to characterize its mechanical behavior. To simulate the intervention, the intrastromal corneal-ring segments were modeled and placed at the same location at which they were placed in the surgery. The finite element method was then used to obtain a simulation of the deformation of the cornea after the ring segment insertion. Finally, the predicted curvature was compared with the real curvature after the intervention. The simulation of the ring segment insertion was validated comparing the curvature change with the data after the surgery. Results showed a flattening of the cornea which was in consonance with the real improvement of the corneal curvature. The mean difference obtained was of 0.74 mm using properties of healthy corneas. For the first time, a patient-specific model of the cornea has been used to predict the outcomes of the surgery after the intrastromal corneal-ring segments implantation in real patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical guides (patient-specific instruments) for pediatric tibial bone sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bellanova, Laura; Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2013-01-01

    To achieve local control of malignant pediatric bone tumors and to provide satisfactory oncological results, adequate resection margins are mandatory. The local recurrence rate is directly related to inappropriate excision margins. The present study describes a method for decreasing the resection margin width and ensuring that the margins are adequate. This method was developed in the tibia, which is a common site for the most frequent primary bone sarcomas in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerized tomography (CT) were used for preoperative planning to define the cutting planes for the tumors: each tumor was segmented on MRI, and the volume of the tumor was coregistered with CT. After preoperative planning, a surgical guide (patient-specific instrument) that was fitted to a unique position on the tibia was manufactured by rapid prototyping. A second instrument was manufactured to adjust the bone allograft to fit the resection gap accurately. Pathologic evaluation of the resected specimens showed tumor-free resection margins in all four cases. The technologies described in this paper may improve the surgical accuracy and patient safety in surgical oncology. In addition, these techniques may decrease operating time and allow for reconstruction with a well-matched allograft to obtain stable osteosynthesis.

  7. Validation of the Mobius system for patient-specific quality assurance using introduced intentional errors.

    PubMed

    Au, Ivy Win Long; Ciurlionis, Laura; Campbell, Neil; Goodwin, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Mobius3D and MobiusFX are model-based verification tools for treatment plan dose calculation and treatment delivery. The software facilitates patient-specific quality assurance by extracting data from linear accelerator treatment log files and performing a 3D dose calculation on the original patient CT dataset using an independent collapsed cone algorithm. In this study, we evaluate the ability of the Mobius system to detect linear accelerator-related errors compared with existing measurement-based systems, namely the ArcCHECK(®) and 3DVH(®) systems. Three original treatment plans and 47 plans with introduced delivery errors, for a total of 50 plan deliveries, were investigated. The results from this study demonstrated comparable gamma passing rates and error detectability between the Mobius and ArcCHECK(®) systems while the 3DVH system generally exhibited a lower sensitivity. This work also demonstrated the ability of the Mobius system to detect delivery errors of down to 2° collimator rotation, 1 mm MLC bank offset and 10 mm collimator jaw offset.

  8. Patient-Specific Simulations Reveal Significant Differences in Mechanical Stimuli in Venous and Arterial Coronary Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Abhay B.; Kahn, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli are key to understanding disease progression and clinically observed differences in failure rates between arterial and venous grafts following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. We quantify biologically relevant mechanical stimuli, not available from standard imaging, in patient-specific simulations incorporating non-invasive clinical data. We couple CFD with closed-loop circulatory physiology models to quantify biologically relevant indices, including wall shear, oscillatory shear, and wall strain. We account for vessel-specific material properties in simulating vessel wall deformation. Wall shear was significantly lower (p = 0.014*) and atheroprone area significantly higher (p = 0.040*) in venous compared to arterial grafts. Wall strain in venous grafts was significantly lower (p = 0.003*) than in arterial grafts while no significant difference was observed in oscillatory shear index. Simulations demonstrate significant differences in mechanical stimuli acting on venous vs. arterial grafts, in line with clinically observed graft failure rates, offering a promising avenue for stratifying patients at risk for graft failure. PMID:27447176

  9. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole.

  10. Comprehensive approach to utilization review based on patient-specific costing data.

    PubMed

    Potvin, K A; Leclair, M C

    1995-01-01

    The Ottawa General Hospital (OGH) is one of a growing number of institutions that has implemented a cost accounting system. The ability to track costs on a patient-specific basis provides an exciting avenue for reviewing the use of resources. With the accumulation of a complete fiscal year of data, the hospital recently embarked on a review process to identify opportunities for more detailed review with practitioners. This will support the OGH's surgical approach of targeting cuts, rather than making across-the-board reductions. The objective is to allow the hospital to maintain the highest levels of quality and service as the eroding funding situation allows. This paper describes the comprehensive approach taken by the review team to identify populations of patients that were relatively homogeneous and yet showed the greatest practice pattern variances between physicians. The method described provides a template for others to summarize large amounts of data and stratify patient groups for more detailed analysis of the patient care delivery process.

  11. Traumatic fracture of a polymethyl methacrylate patient-specific cranioplasty implant.

    PubMed

    Ko, Andrew L; Nerva, John D; Chang, Jason J J; Chesnut, Randall M

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of a traumatic fracture of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) patient-specific implant (PSI) for cranioplasty. A 14-year-old boy with a history of right decompressive hemicraniectomy and reconstructive cranioplasty with a PMMA PSI presented after an unhelmeted bicycle accident with somnolence, confusion, seizures, left hemiparesis, and an obviously deformed cranium. Computed tomography scan showed a comminuted, depressed fracture of the implant and cerebral contusions. The implant was seen to be shattered, resulting in displaced, overriding fragments and significant damage to underlying brain. The patient remained neurologically stable. To minimize the number of operations, intervention was delayed while a polyetheretherketone PSI was fabricated. During surgery, it was noted that the fractured pieces of the implant had caused dural lacerations, and some pieces were embedded in brain parenchyma. The fractured PMMA was removed, and the new implant was placed. The patient remained hemiparetic and was later transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility. PMMA PSIs are commonly used for large defects and generally have good outcomes with low rates of revision. The case report described involves a shattered PMMA PSI after a traumatic impact, which resulted in hemiparesis. The question arises if this type of complication can be easily avoided with the addition of titanium onlay to restrict displacement in the event of fracture. This onlay represents a minor change of technique that could prevent migration of fracture fragments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel patient-specific model to compute coronary fractional flow reserve.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Eui-Chul; Park, Jin-Seo; Kim, Gook-Tae; Kim, Jun-Woo; Kim, Keun-Hong; Shin, Eun-Seok; Shim, Eun Bo

    2014-09-01

    The fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a widely used clinical index to evaluate the functional severity of coronary stenosis. A computer simulation method based on patients' computed tomography (CT) data is a plausible non-invasive approach for computing the FFR. This method can provide a detailed solution for the stenosed coronary hemodynamics by coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with the lumped parameter model (LPM) of the cardiovascular system. In this work, we have implemented a simple computational method to compute the FFR. As this method uses only coronary arteries for the CFD model and includes only the LPM of the coronary vascular system, it provides simpler boundary conditions for the coronary geometry and is computationally more efficient than existing approaches. To test the efficacy of this method, we simulated a three-dimensional straight vessel using CFD coupled with the LPM. The computed results were compared with those of the LPM. To validate this method in terms of clinically realistic geometry, a patient-specific model of stenosed coronary arteries was constructed from CT images, and the computed FFR was compared with clinically measured results. We evaluated the effect of a model aorta on the computed FFR and compared this with a model without the aorta. Computationally, the model without the aorta was more efficient than that with the aorta, reducing the CPU time required for computing a cardiac cycle to 43.4%.

  13. Effect of Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Positioning: A Patient-Specific Numerical Model.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matteo; Marom, Gil; Ghosh, Ram P; Fernandez, Harold A; Taylor, James R; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a life-saving and effective alternative to surgical valve replacement in high-risk, elderly patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. Despite its early promise, certain limitations and adverse events, such as suboptimal placement and valve migration, have been reported. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the effect of various TAVR deployment locations on the procedural outcome by assessing the risk for valve migration. The deployment of a balloon-expandable Edwards SAPIEN valve was simulated via finite element analysis in a patient-specific calcified aortic root, which was reconstructed from CT scans of a retrospective case of valve migration. The deployment location was parametrized in three configurations and the anchorage was quantitatively assessed based on the contact between the stent and the native valve during the deployment and recoil phases. The proximal deployment led to lower contact area between the native leaflets and the stent which poses higher risk for valve migration. The distal and midway positions resulted in comparable outcomes, with the former providing a slightly better anchorage. The approach presented might be used as a predictive tool for procedural planning in order to prevent prosthesis migration and achieve better clinical outcomes.

  14. Patient-specific model-based investigation of speech intelligibility and movement during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Martinez-Torres, Irene; Limousin, Patricia; Wårdell, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely used to treat motor symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomical aspects of the electric field in relation to effects on speech and movement during DBS in the subthalamic nucleus. Patient-specific finite element models of DBS were developed for simulation of the electric field in 10 patients. In each patient, speech intelligibility and movement were assessed during 2 electrical settings, i.e. 4 V (high) and 2 V (low). The electric field was simulated for each electrical setting. Movement was improved in all patients for both high and low electrical settings. In general, high-amplitude stimulation was more consistent in improving the motor scores than low-amplitude stimulation. In 6 cases, speech intelligibility was impaired during high-amplitude electrical settings. Stimulation of part of the fasciculus cerebellothalamicus from electrodes positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus was recognized as a possible cause of the stimulation-induced dysarthria. Special attention to stimulation-induced speech impairments should be taken in cases when active electrodes are positioned medial and/or posterior to the center of the subthalamic nucleus. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Tuning of patient-specific deformable models using an adaptive evolutionary optimization strategy.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Franck P; Villard, Pierre-Frédéric; Lutton, Evelyne

    2012-10-01

    We present and analyze the behavior of an evolutionary algorithm designed to estimate the parameters of a complex organ behavior model. The model is adaptable to account for patient's specificities. The aim is to finely tune the model to be accurately adapted to various real patient datasets. It can then be embedded, for example, in high fidelity simulations of the human physiology. We present here an application focused on respiration modeling. The algorithm is automatic and adaptive. A compound fitness function has been designed to take into account for various quantities that have to be minimized. The algorithm efficiency is experimentally analyzed on several real test cases: 1) three patient datasets have been acquired with the "breath hold" protocol, and 2) two datasets corresponds to 4-D CT scans. Its performance is compared with two traditional methods (downhill simplex and conjugate gradient descent): a random search and a basic real-valued genetic algorithm. The results show that our evolutionary scheme provides more significantly stable and accurate results.

  16. Numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions in a compliant patient-specific arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Decorato, Iolanda; Kharboutly, Zaher; Vassallo, Tommaso; Penrose, Justin; Legallais, Cécile; Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate numerically the fluid-structure interactions (FSI) in a patient-specific arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and analyze the degree of complexity that such a numerical simulation requires to provide clinically relevant information. The reference FSI simulation takes into account the non-Newtonian behavior of blood, as well as the variation in mechanical properties of the vascular walls along the AVF. We have explored whether less comprehensive versions of the simulation could still provide relevant results. The non-Newtonian blood model is necessary to predict the hemodynamics in the AVF because of the predominance of low shear rates in the vein. An uncoupled fluid simulation provides informative qualitative maps of the hemodynamic conditions in the AVF; quantitatively, the hemodynamic parameters are accurate within 20% maximum. Conversely, an uncoupled structural simulation with non-uniform wall properties along the vasculature provides the accurate distribution of internal wall stresses, but only at one instant of time within the cardiac cycle. The FSI simulation advantageously provides the time-evolution of both the hemodynamic and structural stresses. However, the higher computational cost renders a clinical use still difficult in routine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Quantification of hepatic flow distribution using particle tracking for patient specific virtual Fontan surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguang; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Troianowski, Guillaume; Shadden, Shawn; Mohhan Reddy, V.; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    The Fontan surgery is the third and final stage in a palliative series to treat children with single ventricle heart defects. In the extracardiac Fontan procedure, the inferior vena cava (IVC) is connected to the pulmonary arteries via a tube-shaped Gore-tex graft. Clinical observations have shown that the absence of a hepatic factor, carried in the IVC flow, can cause pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Although it is clear that hepatic flow distribution is an important determinant of Fontan performance, few studies have quantified its relation to Fontan design. In this study, we virtually implanted three types of grafts (T-junction, offset and Y-graft) into 5 patient specific models of the Glenn (stage 2) anatomy. We then performed 3D time-dependent simulations and systematically compared the IVC flow distribution, energy loss, and pressure levels in different surgical designs. A robustness test is performed to evaluate the sensitivity of hepatic distribution to pulmonary flow split. Results show that the Y-graft design effectively improves the IVC flow distribution, compared to traditional designs and that surgical designs could be customized on a patient-by-patient basis.

  18. An accurate, fast and robust method to generate patient-specific cubic Hermite meshes.

    PubMed

    Lamata, Pablo; Niederer, Steven; Nordsletten, David; Barber, David C; Roy, Ishani; Hose, D Rod; Smith, Nic

    2011-12-01

    In-silico continuum simulations of organ and tissue scale physiology often require a discretisation or mesh of the solution domain. Cubic Hermite meshes provide a smooth representation of anatomy that is well-suited for simulating large deformation mechanics. Models of organ mechanics and deformation have demonstrated significant potential for clinical application. However, the production of a personalised mesh from patient's anatomy using medical images remains a major bottleneck in simulation workflows. To address this issue, we have developed an accurate, fast and automatic method for deriving patient-specific cubic Hermite meshes. The proposed solution customises a predefined template with a fast binary image registration step and a novel cubic Hermite mesh warping constructed using a variational technique. Image registration is used to retrieve the mapping field between the template mesh and the patient images. The variational warping technique then finds a smooth and accurate projection of this field into the basis functions of the mesh. Applying this methodology, cubic Hermite meshes are fitted to the binary description of shape with sub-voxel accuracy and within a few minutes, which is a significant advance over the existing state of the art methods. To demonstrate its clinical utility, a generic cubic Hermite heart biventricular model is personalised to the anatomy of four patients, and the resulting mechanical stability of these customised meshes is successfully demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling patient-specific therapeutic strategy in the guideline-based management of a chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Séroussi, Brigitte; Bouaud, Jacques; Chatellier, Gilles

    2003-01-01

    Like any chronic disease, hypertension is complex to manage. Despite the availability of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in most countries, a lot of hypertensive patients remain inadequately managed. One difficulty lies in the synchronization of a patient's own therapeutic history with the guideline strategy. We propose a formal model to represent guideline-based therapeutic strategies as bi-dimensional matrices. We built the knowledge base as a two-level decision tree to be read during an hypertextual navigation. The first level is used to identify a patient-specific clinical situation on the basis of key elements of clinical examination (complication of hypertension, associated diseases). The second level aims at dynamically refining the theoretical strategy, a priori established in the guideline for the corresponding clinical situation, by the specific therapeutic history of the patient. Finally, depending on the patient's response to the ongoing treatment, the system provides a recommendation consistent with the guideline strategy, whatever the patient's past treatments. A first evaluation of the system on simulated cases has been well accepted by general practitioners.

  20. Patient-specific modeling of individual sickle cell behavior under transient hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a highly complex genetic blood disorder in which red blood cells (RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphology changes and decreased deformability. We employ a kinetic model for cell morphological sickling that invokes parameters derived from patient-specific data. This model is used to investigate the dynamics of individual sickle cells in a capillary-like microenvironment in order to address various mechanisms associated with SCD. We show that all RBCs, both hypoxia-unaffected and hypoxia-affected ones, regularly pass through microgates under oxygenated state. However, the hypoxia-affected cells undergo sickling which significantly alters cell dynamics. In particular, the dense and rigid sickle RBCs are obstructed thereby clogging blood flow while the less dense and deformable ones are capable of circumnavigating dead (trapped) cells ahead of them by choosing a serpentine path. Informed by recent experiments involving microfluidics that provide in vitro quantitative information on cell dynamics under transient hypoxia conditions, we have performed detailed computational simulations of alterations to cell behavior in response to morphological changes and membrane stiffening. Our model reveals that SCD exhibits substantial heterogeneity even within a particular density-fractionated subpopulation. These findings provide unique insights into how individual sickle cells move through capillaries under transient hypoxic conditions, and offer novel possibilities for designing effective therapeutic interventions for SCD. PMID:28288152

  1. Patient-specific modeling of individual sickle cell behavior under transient hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a highly complex genetic blood disorder in which red blood cells (RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphology changes and decreased deformability. We employ a kinetic model for cell morphological sickling that invokes parameters derived from patient-specific data. This model is used to investigate the dynamics of individual sickle cells in a capillary-like microenvironment in order to address various mechanisms associated with SCD. We show that all RBCs, both hypoxia-unaffected and hypoxia-affected ones, regularly pass through microgates under oxygenated state. However, the hypoxia-affected cells undergo sickling which significantly alters cell dynamics. In particular, the dense and rigid sickle RBCs are obstructed thereby clogging blood flow while the less dense and deformable ones are capable of circumnavigating dead (trapped) cells ahead of them by choosing a serpentine path. Informed by recent experiments involving microfluidics that provide in vitro quantitative information on cell dynamics under transient hypoxia conditions, we have performed detailed computational simulations of alterations to cell behavior in response to morphological changes and membrane stiffening. Our model reveals that SCD exhibits substantial heterogeneity even within a particular density-fractionated subpopulation. These findings provide unique insights into how individual sickle cells move through capillaries under transient hypoxic conditions, and offer novel possibilities for designing effective therapeutic interventions for SCD.

  2. Drug screening for ALS using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Naohiro; Kitaoka, Shiho; Tsukita, Kayoko; Naitoh, Motoko; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Adachi, Fumihiko; Kondo, Takayuki; Okita, Keisuke; Asaka, Isao; Aoi, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Morizane, Asuka; Takahashi, Jun; Ayaki, Takashi; Ito, Hidefumi; Yoshikawa, Katsuhiro; Yamawaki, Satoko; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Watanabe, Dai; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Takeshi; Makioka, Kouki; Okamoto, Koichi; Takuma, Hiroshi; Tamaoka, Akira; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Nonaka, Takashi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kawata, Akihiro; Yoshida, Minoru; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Yamanaka, Shinya; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2012-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a late-onset, fatal disorder in which the motor neurons degenerate. The discovery of new drugs for treating ALS has been hampered by a lack of access to motor neurons from ALS patients and appropriate disease models. We generate motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from familial ALS patients, who carry mutations in Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43). ALS patient-specific iPSC-derived motor neurons formed cytosolic aggregates similar to those seen in postmortem tissue from ALS patients and exhibited shorter neurites as seen in a zebrafish model of ALS. The ALS motor neurons were characterized by increased mutant TDP-43 protein in a detergent-insoluble form bound to a spliceosomal factor SNRPB2. Expression array analyses detected small increases in the expression of genes involved in RNA metabolism and decreases in the expression of genes encoding cytoskeletal proteins. We examined four chemical compounds and found that a histone acetyltransferase inhibitor called anacardic acid rescued the abnormal ALS motor neuron phenotype. These findings suggest that motor neurons generated from ALS patient-derived iPSCs may provide a useful tool for elucidating ALS disease pathogenesis and for screening drug candidates.

  3. 3D modeling of patient-specific geometries of portal veins using MR images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; George, Stephanie; Martin, Diego R; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we present an approach for developing patient-specific 3D models of portal veins to provide geometric boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the blood flow inside portal veins. The study is based on MRI liver images of individual patients to which we apply image registration and segmentation techniques and inlet and outlet velocity profiles acquired using PC-MRI in the same imaging session. The portal vein and its connected veins are then extracted and visualized in 3D as surfaces. Image registration is performed to align shifted images between each breath-hold when the MRI images are acquired. The image segmentation method first labels each voxel in the 3D volume of interest by using a Bayesian probability approach, and then isolates the portal veins via active surfaces initialized inside the vessel. The method was tested with two healthy volunteers. In both cases, the main portal vein and its connected veins were successfully modeled and visualized.

  4. Support of a patient-specific therapeutical acoustic stimulation in tinnitus by numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Haab, L; Scheerer, M; Ruckert, J; Hannemann, R; Strauss, D J

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of tinnitus involves multiple hierarchical levels of auditory processing and appraisal of sensory saliency. Early tinnitus onset is most likely attributed to homeostatic plasticity in the periphery, while the chronification and decompensation are tightly linked to brain areas for the allocation of attentional resources, such as e.g., the thalamocortical feedback loops and the limbic system. Increased spontaneous firing after sensory deafferentation might be sufficient to generate a phantom perception, yet the question why not every peripheral hearing loss automatically elicits a tinnitus sensation is still to be addressed. Utilizing quantitative modeling of multiple hierarchical levels in the auditory pathway, we demonstrate the effects of lateral inhibition on increased spontaneous firing and the resulting elevation of firing regularity and synchronization of neural activity. The presented therapeutical approach is based on the idea of disrupting the heightened regularity of the neural population response in the tinnitus frequency range. This neural activity regularity depends on lateral dispersion of common noise and thus is susceptible for edge effects and might be influenced by a change in neural activity in bordering frequency ranges by fitted acoustical stimulation. We propose the use of patient specifically adapted tailor-made notched acoustic stimulation, utilizing modeling results for the optimal adjustment of the stimulation frequencies to archive a therapeutical edge-effect.

  5. Measuring the relative extent of pulmonary infiltrates by hierarchical classification of patient-specific image features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsevas, S.; Iakovidis, D. K.

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates are common radiological findings indicating the filling of airspaces with fluid, inflammatory exudates, or cells. They are most common in cases of pneumonia, acute respiratory syndrome, atelectasis, pulmonary oedema and haemorrhage, whereas their extent is usually correlated with the extent or the severity of the underlying disease. In this paper we propose a novel pattern recognition framework for the measurement of the extent of pulmonary infiltrates in routine chest radiographs. The proposed framework follows a hierarchical approach to the assessment of image content. It includes the following: (a) sampling of the lung fields; (b) extraction of patient-specific grey-level histogram signatures from each sample; (c) classification of the extracted signatures into classes representing normal lung parenchyma and pulmonary infiltrates; (d) the samples for which the probability of belonging to one of the two classes does not reach an acceptable level are rejected and classified according to their textural content; (e) merging of the classification results of the two classification stages. The proposed framework has been evaluated on real radiographic images with pulmonary infiltrates caused by bacterial infections. The results show that accurate measurements of the infiltration areas can be obtained with respect to each lung field area. The average measurement error rate on the considered dataset reached 9.7% ± 1.0%.

  6. Commissioning and validation of COMPASS system for VMAT patient specific quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimthong, J.; Kakanaporn, C.; Tuntipumiamorn, L.; Laojunun, P.; Iampongpaiboon, P.

    2016-03-01

    Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) of advanced treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is one of important QA in radiotherapy. The fast and reliable dosimetric device is required. The objective of this study is to commission and validate the performance of COMPASS system for dose verification of VMAT technique. The COMPASS system is composed of an array of ionization detectors (MatriXX) mounted to the gantry using a custom holder and software for the analysis and visualization of QA results. We validated the COMPASS software for basic and advanced clinical application. For the basic clinical study, the simple open field in various field sizes were validated in homogeneous phantom. And the advanced clinical application, the fifteen prostate and fifteen nasopharyngeal cancers VMAT plans were chosen to study. The treatment plans were measured by the MatriXX. The doses and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) reconstructed from the fluence measurements were compared to the TPS calculated plans. And also, the doses and DVHs computed using collapsed cone convolution (CCC) Algorithm were compared with Eclipse TPS calculated plans using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) that according to dose specified in ICRU 83 for PTV.

  7. Improved femoral component rotation in TKA using patient-specific instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Thomas J; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) was introduced in an attempt to reduce positional outliers of components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was hypothesized that PSI could help with the positioning of femoral components in optimal rotational alignment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of 94 patients following TKA was conducted. Of these, 46 operations were performed using PSI and 48 using conventional instrumentation. The rotation of the femoral components was determined in the MRI and deviations>3° were considered outliers. Data were analyzed for positional outliers, observer reliability, and a variance comparison between implant groups. There was excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability with low standard deviations for the determination of femoral component rotation. There were significantly more outliers in the conventional (22.9%) group than in the PSI group (2.2%, p=0.003). In this setup, PSI was effective in significantly reducing outliers of optimal rotational femoral component alignment during TKA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Patient specific implants (PSI) in reconstruction of orbital floor and wall fractures.

    PubMed

    Gander, Thomas; Essig, Harald; Metzler, Philipp; Lindhorst, Daniel; Dubois, Leander; Rücker, Martin; Schumann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the orbital wall and floor can be challenging due to the demanding three-dimensional anatomy and limited intraoperative overview. Misfitting implants and inaccurate surgical technique may lead to visual disturbance and unaesthetic results. A new approach using individually manufactured titanium implants (KLS Martin, Group, Germany) for daily routine is presented in the current paper. Preoperative CT-scan data were processed in iPlan 3.0.5 (Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany) to generate a 3D-reconstruction of the affected orbit using the mirrored non-affected orbit as template and the extent of the patient specific implant (PSI) was outlined and three landmarks were positioned on the planned implant in order to allow easy control of the implant's position by intraoperative navigation. Superimposition allows the comparison of the postoperative result with the preoperative planning. Neither reoperation was indicated due to malposition of the implant and the ocular bulb nor visual impairments could be assessed. PSI allows precise reconstruction of orbital fractures by using a complete digital workflow and should be considered superior to manually bent titanium mesh implants.

  9. Rapid prototyped patient specific implants for reconstruction of orbital wall defects.

    PubMed

    Stoor, Patricia; Suomalainen, Anni; Lindqvist, Christian; Mesimäki, Karri; Danielsson, Daniel; Westermark, Anders; Kontio, Risto K

    2014-12-01

    Defects of orbital walls can be reconstructed using implants. The authors report a safe and accurate method to reconstruct bone defects in the orbital area using patient specific implants. A detailed process description of computer aided design (CAD) reconstructive surgery (CRS) is introduced in this prospective study. The 3D volumetric virtual implant was design using MSCT data and PTCProEngineer™ 3D software. The intact orbital cavity of twelve patients was mirrored to the injured side. Specific ledges steered the implant into correct place. Postoperatively the position was assessed using image fusion. One implant (8%) was rejected due to chemical impurities, two (16%) had a false shape due to incorrect CAD. Data of thin bone did not transfer correctly to CAD and resulted in error. One implant (8%) was placed incorrectly. Duration of the CRS was in average 1.17 h, correspondingly 1.57 h using intraoperative bending technique. The CRS process has several critical stages, which are related to converting data and to incompatibility between software. The CRS process has several steps that need further studies. The data of thin bone may be lost and disturb an otherwise very precise technique. The risk of incorporating impurities into the implant must be carefully controlled.

  10. Automated Status Notification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Automated Status Notification System (ASNS) was born out of need. To prevent "hacker attacks," Lewis' telephone system needed to monitor communications activities 24 hr a day, 7 days a week. With decreasing staff resources, this continuous monitoring had to be automated. By utilizing existing communications hardware, a UNIX workstation, and NAWK (a pattern scanning and processing language), we implemented a continuous monitoring system.

  11. Automated Microfluidics for Genomics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Abstract--The Genomation Laboratory at the University of Washington is developing an automated fluid handling system called " Acapella " to prepare...Photonic Systems, Inc. (Redmond, WA), an automated submicroliter fluid sample preparation system called ACAPELLA is being developed. Reactions such...technology include minimal residual disease quantification and sample preparation for DNA. Preliminary work on the ACAPELLA is presented in [4][5]. This

  12. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  13. Automating Index Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    Automating Index Preparation* Pehong Chent Michael A. Harrison Computer Science Division University of CaliforniaI Berkeley, CA 94720 March 23, 1987...Abstract Index preparation is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper we indicate * how the indexing process can be automated in a way which...identified and analyzed. Specifically, we describe a framework for placing index commands in the document and a general purpose index processor which

  14. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  15. Patient-specific modeling of left ventricular electromechanics as a driver for haemodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Christoph M.; Crozier, Andrew; Neic, Aurel; Prassl, Anton J.; Karabelas, Elias; Ferreira da Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Joao F.; Campos, Fernando; Kuehne, Titus; Plank, Gernot

    2017-01-01

    Aims Models of blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) and aorta are an important tool for analysing the interplay between LV deformation and flow patterns. Typically, image-based kinematic models describing endocardial motion are used as an input to blood flow simulations. While such models are suitable for analysing the hemodynamic status quo, they are limited in predicting the response to interventions that alter afterload conditions. Mechano-fluidic models using biophysically detailed electromechanical (EM) models have the potential to overcome this limitation, but are more costly to build and compute. We report our recent advancements in developing an automated workflow for the creation of such CFD ready kinematic models to serve as drivers of blood flow simulations. Methods and results EM models of the LV and aortic root were created for four pediatric patients treated for either aortic coarctation or aortic valve disease. Using MRI, ECG and invasive pressure recordings, anatomy as well as electrophysiological, mechanical and circulatory model components were personalized. Results The implemented modeling pipeline was highly automated and allowed model construction and execution of simulations of a patient’s heartbeat within 1 day. All models reproduced clinical data with acceptable accuracy. Conclusion Using the developed modeling workflow, the use of EM LV models as driver of fluid flow simulations is becoming feasible. While EM models are costly to construct, they constitute an important and nontrivial step towards fully coupled electro-mechano-fluidic (EMF) models and show promise as a tool for predicting the response to interventions which affect afterload conditions. PMID:28011839

  16. Patient-specific modeling of left ventricular electromechanics as a driver for haemodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Christoph M; Crozier, Andrew; Neic, Aurel; Prassl, Anton J; Karabelas, Elias; Ferreira da Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Joao F; Campos, Fernando; Kuehne, Titus; Plank, Gernot

    2016-12-01

    Models of blood flow in the left ventricle (LV) and aorta are an important tool for analysing the interplay between LV deformation and flow patterns. Typically, image-based kinematic models describing endocardial motion are used as an input to blood flow simulations. While such models are suitable for analysing the hemodynamic status quo, they are limited in predicting the response to interventions that alter afterload conditions. Mechano-fluidic models using biophysically detailed electromechanical (EM) models have the potential to overcome this limitation, but are more costly to build and compute. We report our recent advancements in developing an automated workflow for the creation of such CFD ready kinematic models to serve as drivers of blood flow simulations. EM models of the LV and aortic root were created for four pediatric patients treated for either aortic coarctation or aortic valve disease. Using MRI, ECG and invasive pressure recordings, anatomy as well as electrophysiological, mechanical and circulatory model components were personalized. The implemented modeling pipeline was highly automated and allowed model construction and execution of simulations of a patient's heartbeat within 1 day. All models reproduced clinical data with acceptable accuracy. Using the developed modeling workflow, the use of EM LV models as driver of fluid flow simulations is becoming feasible. While EM models are costly to construct, they constitute an important and nontrivial step towards fully coupled electro-mechano-fluidic (EMF) models and show promise as a tool for predicting the response to interventions which affect afterload conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  17. Metrology automation reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Elizabeth E.

    1996-09-01

    At Motorola's MOS-12 facility automated measurements on 200- mm diameter wafers proceed in a hands-off 'load-and-go' mode requiring only wafer loading, measurement recipe loading, and a 'run' command for processing. Upon completion of all sample measurements, the data is uploaded to the factory's data collection software system via a SECS II interface, eliminating the requirement of manual data entry. The scope of in-line measurement automation has been extended to the entire metrology scheme from job file generation to measurement and data collection. Data analysis and comparison to part specification limits is also carried out automatically. Successful integration of automated metrology into the factory measurement system requires that automated functions, such as autofocus and pattern recognition algorithms, display a high degree of reliability. In the 24- hour factory reliability data can be collected automatically on every part measured. This reliability data is then uploaded to the factory data collection software system at the same time as the measurement data. Analysis of the metrology reliability data permits improvements to be made as needed, and provides an accurate accounting of automation reliability. This reliability data has so far been collected for the CD-SEM (critical dimension scanning electron microscope) metrology tool, and examples are presented. This analysis method can be applied to such automated in-line measurements as CD, overlay, particle and film thickness measurements.

  18. Automated Groundwater Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Glenn A.; Collard, Leonard, B.

    2005-10-31

    The Automated Intruder Analysis has been extended to include an Automated Ground Water Screening option. This option screens 825 radionuclides while rigorously applying the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) methodology. An extension to that methodology is presented to give a more realistic screening factor for those radionuclides which have significant daughters. The extension has the promise of reducing the number of radionuclides which must be tracked by the customer. By combining the Automated Intruder Analysis with the Automated Groundwater Screening a consistent set of assumptions and databases is used. A method is proposed to eliminate trigger values by performing rigorous calculation of the screening factor thereby reducing the number of radionuclides sent to further analysis. Using the same problem definitions as in previous groundwater screenings, the automated groundwater screening found one additional nuclide, Ge-68, which failed the screening. It also found that 18 of the 57 radionuclides contained in NCRP Table 3.1 failed the screening. This report describes the automated groundwater screening computer application.

  19. Elements of EAF automation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Dragna, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    Our article presents elements of Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) automation. So, we present and analyze detailed two automation schemes: the scheme of electrical EAF automation system; the scheme of thermic EAF automation system. The application results of these scheme of automation consists in: the sensitive reduction of specific consummation of electrical energy of Electric Arc Furnace, increasing the productivity of Electric Arc Furnace, increase the quality of the developed steel, increasing the durability of the building elements of Electric Arc Furnace.

  20. Patient-specific implants with custom cutting blocks better approximate natural knee kinematics than standard TKA without custom cutting blocks.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shantanu; Bunn, Adam; Bugbee, William D; Colwell, Clifford W; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2015-12-01

    Nearly 14% to 39% TKA patients report dissatisfaction causing incomplete return of function. We proposed that the kinematics of knees implanted with patient-specific prostheses using patient-specific cutting guides would be closer to normal. Eighteen matched cadaver lower limbs were randomly assigned to two groups: group A was implanted with patient-specific implants using patient-specific cutting guides; group B, the contralateral knee, was implanted with a standard design using intramedullary alignment cutting guides. Knee kinematics were measured on a dynamic closed-kinetic-chain Oxford knee rig, simulating a deep knee bend and in a passive rig testing varus-valgus laxity. The difference from normal kinematics was lower for group A compared to group B for active femoral rollback, active tibiofemoral adduction, and for passive varus-valgus laxity. Our results support the hypothesis that knees with patient-specific implants generate kinematics more closely resembling normal knee kinematics than standard knee designs. Restoring normal kinematics may improve function and patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient-specific modelling of whole heart anatomy, dynamics and haemodynamics from four-dimensional cardiac CT images

    PubMed Central

    Mihalef, Viorel; Ionasec, Razvan Ioan; Sharma, Puneet; Georgescu, Bogdan; Voigt, Ingmar; Suehling, Michael; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need for patient-specific and holistic modelling of the heart to support comprehensive disease assessment and intervention planning as well as prediction of therapeutic outcomes. We propose a patient-specific model of the whole human heart, which integrates morphology, dynamics and haemodynamic parameters at the organ level. The modelled cardiac structures are robustly estimated from four-dimensional cardiac computed tomography (CT), including all four chambers and valves as well as the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. The patient-specific geometry serves as an input to a three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver that derives realistic haemodynamics, constrained by the local anatomy, along the entire heart cycle. We evaluated our framework with various heart pathologies and the results correlate with relevant literature reports. PMID:22670200

  2. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was carried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three different depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon intensity

  3. Three-dimensional gamma criterion for patient-specific quality assurance of spot scanning proton beams.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chang; Poole, Kendra L; Teran, Anthony V; Luckman, Scott; Mah, Dennis

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of full three-dimensional (3D) gamma algorithm for spot scanning proton fields, also referred to as pencil beam scanning (PBS) fields. The difference between the full 3D gamma algorithm and a simplified two-dimensional (2D) version was presented. Both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms are used for dose evaluations of clinical proton PBS fields. The 3D gamma algorithm was implemented in an in-house software program without resorting to 2D interpolations perpendicular to the proton beams at the depths of measurement. Comparison between calculated and measured dose points was car-ried out directly using Euclidian distance in 3D space and the dose difference as a fourth dimension. Note that this 3D algorithm faithfully implemented the original concept proposed by Low et al. (1998) who described gamma criterion using 3D Euclidian distance and dose difference. Patient-specific proton PBS plans are separated into two categories, depending on their optimization method: single-field optimization (SFO) or multifield optimized (MFO). A total of 195 measurements were performed for 58 SFO proton fields. A MFO proton plan with four fields was also calculated and measured, although not used for treatment. Typically three dif-ferent depths were selected from each field for measurements. Each measurement was analyzed by both 3D and 2D gamma algorithms. The resultant 3D and 2D gamma passing rates are then compared and analyzed. Comparison between 3D and 2D gamma passing rates of SFO fields showed that 3D algorithm does show higher passing rates than its 2D counterpart toward the distal end, while little difference is observed at depths away from the distal end. Similar phenomenon in the lateral penumbra was well documented in photon radiation therapy, and in fact brought about the concept of gamma criterion. Although 2D gamma algorithm has been shown to suffice in addressing dose comparisons in lateral penumbra for photon

  4. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C.-M. Charlie

    2013-08-01

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  5. Feasibility of replacing patient specific cutouts with a computer-controlled electron multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Eldib, Ahmed; Jin, Lihui; Li, Jinsheng; Ma, C-M Charlie

    2013-08-21

    A motorized electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) was developed as an add-on device to the Varian linac for delivery of advanced electron beam therapy. It has previously been shown that electron beams collimated by an eMLC have very similar penumbra to those collimated by applicators and cutouts. Thus, manufacturing patient specific cutouts would no longer be necessary, resulting in the reduction of time taken in the cutout fabrication process. Moreover, cutout construction involves handling of toxic materials and exposure to toxic fumes that are usually generated during the process, while the eMLC will be a pollution-free device. However, undulation of the isodose lines is expected due to the finite size of the eMLC. Hence, the provided planned target volume (PTV) shape will not exactly follow the beam's-eye-view of the PTV, but instead will make a stepped approximation to the PTV shape. This may be a problem when the field edge is close to a critical structure. Therefore, in this study the capability of the eMLC to achieve the same clinical outcome as an applicator/cutout combination was investigated based on real patient computed tomographies (CTs). An in-house Monte Carlo based treatment planning system was used for dose calculation using ten patient CTs. For each patient, two plans were generated; one with electron beams collimated using the applicator/cutout combination; and the other plan with beams collimated by the eMLC. Treatment plan quality was compared for each patient based on dose distribution and dose-volume histogram. In order to determine the optimal position of the leaves, the impact of the different leaf positioning strategies was investigated. All plans with both eMLC and cutouts were generated such that 100% of the target volume receives at least 90% of the prescribed dose. Then the percentage difference in dose between both delivery techniques was calculated for all the cases. The difference in the dose received by 10% of the volume of the

  6. Patient specific respiratory motion modeling using a limited number of 3D lung CT images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xueli; Gao, Xin; Xia, Wei; Liu, Yangchuan; Liang, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    To build a patient specific respiratory motion model with a low dose, a novel method was proposed that uses a limited number of 3D lung CT volumes with an external respiratory signal. 4D lung CT volumes were acquired for patients with in vitro labeling on the upper abdominal surface. Meanwhile, 3D coordinates of in vitro labeling were measured as external respiratory signals. A sequential correspondence between the 4D lung CT and the external respiratory signal was built using the distance correlation method, and a 3D displacement for every registration control point in the CT volumes with respect to time can be obtained by the 4D lung CT deformable registration. A temporal fitting was performed for every registration control point displacements and an external respiratory signal in the anterior-posterior direction respectively to draw their fitting curves. Finally, a linear regression was used to fit the corresponding samples of the control point displacement fitting curves and the external respiratory signal fitting curve to finish the pulmonary respiration modeling. Compared to a B-spline-based method using the respiratory signal phase, the proposed method is highly advantageous as it offers comparable modeling accuracy and target modeling error (TME); while at the same time, the proposed method requires 70% less 3D lung CTs. When using a similar amount of 3D lung CT data, the mean of the proposed method's TME is smaller than the mean of the PCA (principle component analysis)-based methods' TMEs. The results indicate that the proposed method is successful in striking a balance between modeling accuracy and number of 3D lung CT volumes.

  7. A patient specific 4D MRI liver motion model based on sparse imaging and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorda, Y. H.; Bartels, L. W.; van Stralen, Marijn; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2013-03-01

    Introduction: Image-guided minimally invasive procedures are becoming increasingly popular. Currently, High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of lesions in mobile organs, such as the liver, is in development. A requirement for such treatment is automatic motion tracking, such that the position of the lesion can be followed in real time. We propose a 4D liver motion model, which can be used during planning of this procedure. During treatment, the model can serve as a motion predictor. In a similar fashion, this model could be used for radiotherapy treatment of the liver. Method: The model is built by acquiring 2D dynamic sagittal MRI data at six locations in the liver. By registering these dynamics to a 3D MRI liver image, 2D deformation fields are obtained at every location. The 2D fields are ordered according to the position of the liver at that specific time point, such that liver motion during an average breathing period can be simulated. This way, a sparse deformation field is created over time. This deformation field is finally interpolated over the entire volume, yielding a 4D motion model. Results: The accuracy of the model is evaluated by comparing unseen slices to the slice predicted by the model at that specific location and phase in the breathing cycle. The mean Dice coefficient of the liver regions was 0.90. The mean misalignment of the vessels was 1.9 mm. Conclusion: The model is able to predict patient specific deformations of the liver and can predict regular motion accurately.

  8. Patient-specific Immune States before Surgery are Strong Correlates of Surgical Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fragiadakis, Gabriela K.; Gaudillière, Brice; Ganio, Edward A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Tingle, Martha; Nolan, Garry P.; Angst, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recovery after surgery is highly variable. Risk-stratifying patients based on their predicted recovery profile will afford individualized perioperative management strategies. Recently, application of mass cytometry in patients undergoing hip arthroplasty revealed strong immune correlates of surgical recovery in blood samples collected shortly after surgery. However, the ability to interrogate a patient’s immune state before surgery and predict recovery is highly desirable in perioperative medicine. Methods To evaluate a patient’s pre-surgical immune state, cell-type specific intracellular signaling responses to ex-vivo ligands (LPS, IL-6, IL-10, IL-2/GM-CSF) were quantified by mass cytometry in pre-surgical blood samples. Selected ligands modulate signaling processes perturbed by surgery. Twenty-three cell surface and 11 intracellular markers were used for the phenotypic and functional characterization of major immune cell subsets. Evoked immune responses were regressed against patient-centered outcomes contributing to protracted recovery including functional impairment, postoperative pain, and fatigue. Results Evoked signaling responses varied significantly and defined patient-specific pre-surgical immune states. Eighteen signaling responses correlated significantly with surgical recovery parameters (|R|=0.37–0.70; FDR<0.01). Signaling responses downstream of the TLR4 receptor in CD14+ monocytes were particularly strong correlates, accounting for 50% of observed variance. Pre-surgical immune correlates mirrored correlates previously described in post-surgical samples. Conclusion Convergent findings in pre- and post-surgical analyses provide validation of reported immune correlates and suggest a critical role of the TLR4 signaling pathway in monocytes for the clinical recovery process. The comprehensive assessment of patients’ preoperative immune state is promising for predicting important recovery parameters and may lead to clinical tests using

  9. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    PubMed Central

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Cai, Weixing; Rottmann, Joerg; Li, Ruijiang; Williams, Christopher; Wagar, Matthew; Berbeco, Ross; Ionascu, Dan; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we develop and perform initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and use these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparing to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT- and 4DCT- based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms, and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. PMID:25905722

  10. Patient-specific model of brain deformation: application to medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol; Kikinis, Ron; Warfield, Simon K

    2007-01-01

    This contribution presents finite element computation of the deformation field within the brain during craniotomy-induced brain shift. The results were used to illustrate the capabilities of non-linear (i.e. accounting for both geometric and material non-linearities) finite element analysis in non-rigid registration of pre- and intra-operative magnetic resonance images of the brain. We used patient-specific hexahedron-dominant finite element mesh, together with realistic material properties for the brain tissue and appropriate contact conditions at boundaries. The model was loaded by the enforced motion of nodes (i.e. through prescribed motion of a boundary) at the brain surface in the craniotomy area. We suggest using explicit time-integration scheme for discretised equations of motion, as the computational times are much shorter and accuracy, for practical purposes, the same as in the case of implicit integration schemes. Application of the computed deformation field to register (i.e. align) the pre-operative images with the intra-operative ones indicated that the model very accurately predicts the displacements of the tumour and the lateral ventricles even for limited information about the brain surface deformation. The prediction accuracy improves when information about deformation of not only exposed (during craniotomy) but also unexposed parts of the brain surface is used when prescribing loading. However, it appears that the accuracy achieved using information only about the deformation of the exposed surface, that can be determined without intra-operative imaging, is acceptable. The presented results show that non-linear biomechanical models can complement medical image processing techniques when conducting non-rigid registration. Important advantage of such models over the previously used linear ones is that they do not require unrealistic assumptions that brain deformations are infinitesimally small and brain stress-strain relationship is linear.

  11. An anatomically based patient-specific finite element model of patella articulation: towards a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J W; Hunter, P J

    2005-08-01

    A 3D anatomically based patient-specific finite element (FE) model of patello-femoral (PF) articulation is presented to analyse the main features of patella biomechanics, namely, patella tracking (kinematics), quadriceps extensor forces, surface contact and internal patella stresses. The generic geometries are a subset from the model database of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) (http://www.physiome.org.nz) Physiome Project with soft tissue derived from the widely used visible human dataset, and the bones digitised from an anatomically accurate physical model with muscle attachment information. The models are customised to patient magnetic resonance images using a variant of free-form deformation, called 'host-mesh' fitting. The continuum was solved using the governing equation of finite elasticity, with the multibody problem coupled through contact mechanics. Additional constraints such as tissue incompressibility are also imposed. Passive material properties are taken from the literature and implemented for deformable tissue with a non-linear micro-structurally based constitutive law. Bone and cartilage are implemented using a 'St-Venant Kirchoff' model suitable for rigid body rotations. The surface fibre directions have been estimated from anatomy images of cadaver muscle dissections and active muscle contraction was based on a steady-state calcium-tension relation. The 3D continuum model of muscle, tendon and bone is compared with experimental results from the literature, and surgical simulations performed to illustrate its clinical assessment capabilities (a Maquet procedure for reducing patella stresses and a vastus lateralis release for a bipartite patella). Finally, the model limitations, issues and future improvements are discussed.

  12. On the use of biomathematical models in patient-specific IMRT dose QA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of biomathematical models such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) as new quality assurance (QA) metrics.Methods: Five different types of error (MLC transmission, MLC penumbra, MLC tongue and groove, machine output, and MLC position) were intentionally induced to 40 clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient plans (20 H and N cases and 20 prostate cases) to simulate both treatment planning system errors and machine delivery errors in the IMRT QA process. The changes in TCP and NTCP for eight different anatomic structures (H and N: CTV, GTV, both parotids, spinal cord, larynx; prostate: CTV, rectal wall) were calculated as the new QA metrics to quantify the clinical impact on patients. The correlation between the change in TCP/NTCP and the change in selected DVH values was also evaluated. The relation between TCP/NTCP change and the characteristics of the TCP/NTCP curves is discussed.Results:{Delta}TCP and {Delta}NTCP were summarized for each type of induced error and each structure. The changes/degradations in TCP and NTCP caused by the errors vary widely depending on dose patterns unique to each plan, and are good indicators of each plan's 'robustness' to that type of error.Conclusions: In this in silico QA study the authors have demonstrated the possibility of using biomathematical models not only as patient-specific QA metrics but also as objective indicators that quantify, pretreatment, a plan's robustness with respect to possible error types.

  13. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  14. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Cramb, Jim; Siva, Shankar; Wanigaratne, Derrick M; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7%, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2% of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  15. Thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors using endoluminal ultrasound: parametric and patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Matthew S.; Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate endoluminal ultrasound applicator configurations for volumetric thermal ablation and hyperthermia of pancreatic tumors using 3D acoustic and biothermal finite element models. Materials and Methods Parametric studies compared endoluminal heating performance for varying applicator transducer configurations (planar, curvilinear-focused, or radial-diverging), frequencies (1–5 MHz), and anatomical conditions. Patient-specific pancreatic head and body tumor models were used to evaluate feasibility of generating hyperthermia and thermal ablation using an applicator positioned in the duodenal or stomach lumen. Temperature and thermal dose were calculated to define ablation (>240 EM43°C) and moderate hyperthermia (40–45 °C) boundaries, and to assess sparing of sensitive tissues. Proportional-integral control was incorporated to regulate maximum temperature to 70–80 °C for ablation and 45 °C for hyperthermia in target regions. Results Parametric studies indicated that 1–3 MHz planar transducers are most suitable for volumetric ablation, producing 5–8 cm3 lesion volumes for a stationary 5 minute sonication. Curvilinear-focused geometries produce more localized ablation to 20–45 mm depth from the GI tract and enhance thermal sparing (Tmax<42 °C) of the luminal wall. Patient anatomy simulations show feasibility in ablating 60.1–92.9% of head/body tumor volumes (4.3–37.2 cm3) with dose <15 EM43°C in the luminal wall for 18–48 min treatment durations, using 1–3 applicator placements in GI lumen. For hyperthermia, planar and radial-diverging transducers could maintain up to 8 cm3 and 15 cm3 of tissue, respectively, between 40–45 °C for a single applicator placement. Conclusions Modeling studies indicate the feasibility of endoluminal ultrasound for volumetric thermal ablation or hyperthermia treatment of pancreatic tumor tissue. PMID:27097663

  16. Methodologies for Development of Patient Specific Bone Models from Human Body CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, Vikas Narayan; Mulay, Arati Vinayak; Ahuja, Bharatkumar Bhagatraj

    2016-06-01

    This work deals with development of algorithm for physical replication of patient specific human bone and construction of corresponding implants/inserts RP models by using Reverse Engineering approach from non-invasive medical images for surgical purpose. In medical field, the volumetric data i.e. voxel and triangular facet based models are primarily used for bio-modelling and visualization, which requires huge memory space. On the other side, recent advances in Computer Aided Design (CAD) technology provides additional facilities/functions for design, prototyping and manufacturing of any object having freeform surfaces based on boundary representation techniques. This work presents a process to physical replication of 3D rapid prototyping (RP) physical models of human bone from various CAD modeling techniques developed by using 3D point cloud data which is obtained from non-invasive CT/MRI scans in DICOM 3.0 format. This point cloud data is used for construction of 3D CAD model by fitting B-spline curves through these points and then fitting surface between these curve networks by using swept blend techniques. This process also can be achieved by generating the triangular mesh directly from 3D point cloud data without developing any surface model using any commercial CAD software. The generated STL file from 3D point cloud data is used as a basic input for RP process. The Delaunay tetrahedralization approach is used to process the 3D point cloud data to obtain STL file. CT scan data of Metacarpus (human bone) is used as the case study for the generation of the 3D RP model. A 3D physical model of the human bone is generated on rapid prototyping machine and its virtual reality model is presented for visualization. The generated CAD model by different techniques is compared for the accuracy and reliability. The results of this research work are assessed for clinical reliability in replication of human bone in medical field.

  17. Analysis of flow patterns in a patient-specific aortic dissection model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Tan, F P P; Riga, C V; Bicknell, C D; Hamady, M S; Gibbs, R G J; Wood, N B; Xu, X Y

    2010-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most common acute catastrophic event affecting the thoracic aorta. The majority of patients presenting with an uncomplicated type B dissection are treated medically, but 25% of these patients develop subsequent aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta. This study aimed at gaining more detailed knowledge of the flow phenomena associated with this condition. Morphological features and flow patterns in a dissected aortic segment of a presurgery type B dissection patient were analyzed based on computed tomography images acquired from the patient. Computational simulations of blood flow in the patient-specific model were performed by employing a correlation-based transitional version of Menter's hybrid k-epsilon/k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model implemented in ANSYS CFX 11. Our results show that the dissected aorta is dominated by locally highly disturbed, and possibly turbulent, flow with strong recirculation. A significant proportion (about 80%) of the aortic flow enters the false lumen, which may further increase the dilatation of the aorta. High values of wall shear stress have been found around the tear on the true lumen wall, perhaps increasing the likelihood of expanding the tear. Turbulence intensity in the tear region reaches a maximum of 70% at midsystolic deceleration phase. Incorporating the non-Newtonian behavior of blood into the same transitional flow model has yielded a slightly lower peak wall shear stress and higher maximum turbulence intensity without causing discernible changes to the distribution patterns. Comparisons between the laminar and turbulent flow simulations show a qualitatively similar distribution of wall shear stress but a significantly higher magnitude with the transitional turbulence model.

  18. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  19. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models.

    PubMed

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Mishra, P; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Li, R; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J H

    2015-05-07

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  20. SU-E-T-149: Brachytherapy Patient Specific Quality Assurance for a HDR Vaginal Cylinder Case

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiere, J; Napoli, J; Ndlovu, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Commonly Ir-192 HDR treatment planning system commissioning is only based on a single absolute measurement of source activity supplemented by tabulated parameters for multiple factors without independent verification that the planned distribution corresponds to the actual delivered dose. The purpose on this work is to present a methodology using Gafchromic film with a statistically valid calibration curve that can be used to validate clinical HDR vaginal cylinder cases by comparing the calculated plan dose distribution in a plane with the corresponding measured planar dose. Methods: A vaginal cylinder plan was created with Oncentra treatment planning system. The 3D dose matrix was exported to a Varian Eclipse work station for convenient extraction of a 2D coronal dose plane corresponding to the film position. The plan was delivered with a sheet of Gafchromic EBT3 film positioned 1mm from the catheter using an Ir-192 Nucletron HDR source. The film was then digitized with an Epson 10000 XL color scanner. Film analysis is performed with MatLab imaging toolbox. A density to dose calibration curve was created using TG43 formalism for a single dwell position exposure at over 100 points for statistical accuracy. The plan and measured film dose planes were registered using a known dwell position relative to four film marks. The plan delivered 500 cGy to points 2 cm from the sources. Results: The distance to agreement of the 500 cGy isodose between the plan and film measurement laterally was 0.5 mm but can be as much as 1.5 mm superior and inferior. The difference between the computed plan dose and film measurement was calculated per pixel. The greatest errors up to 50 cGy are near the apex. Conclusion: The methodology presented will be useful to implement more comprehensive quality assurance to verify patient-specific dose distributions.

  1. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, S.; Hurwitz, M.; Mishra, P.; Cai, W.; Rottmann, J.; Li, R.; Williams, C.; Wagar, M.; Berbeco, R.; Ionascu, D.; Lewis, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  2. Patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmouche, Rola; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert; Dansereau, Jean

    2013-03-01

    A method for the construction of a patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning via inter-patient registration is presented. Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of a generic model are registered to surface topography (TP) and X-ray data of a test patient. A partial model is first obtained via thin-plate spline registration between TP and X-ray data of the test patient. The MRIs from the generic model are then fit into the test patient using articulated model registration between the vertebrae of the generic model's MRIs in prone position and the test patient's X-rays in standing position. A non-rigid deformation of the soft tissues is performed using a modified thin-plate spline constrained to maintain bone rigidity and to fit in the space between the vertebrae and the surface of the torso. Results show average Dice values of 0:975 +/- 0:012 between the MRIs following inter-patient registration and the surface topography of the test patient, which is comparable to the average value of 0:976 +/- 0:009 previously obtained following intra-patient registration. The results also show a significant improvement compared to rigid inter-patient registration. Future work includes validating the method on a larger cohort of patients and incorporating soft tissue stiffness constraints. The method developed can be used to obtain a geometric model of a patient including bone structures, soft tissues and the surface of the torso which can be incorporated in a surgical simulator in order to better predict the outcome of scoliosis surgery, even if MRI data cannot be acquired for the patient.

  3. Patient-specific core decompression surgery for early-stage ischemic necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei; Yang, Pei; Dang, Xiao Qian; Li, Xiao Hui; Wang, Kun Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Core decompression is an efficient treatment for early stage ischemic necrosis of the femoral head. In conventional procedures, the pre-operative X-ray only shows one plane of the ischemic area, which often results in inaccurate drilling. This paper introduces a new method that uses computer-assisted technology and rapid prototyping to enhance drilling accuracy during core decompression surgeries and presents a validation study of cadaveric tests. Methods Twelve cadaveric human femurs were used to simulate early-stage ischemic necrosis. The core decompression target at the anterolateral femoral head was simulated using an embedded glass ball (target). Three positioning Kirschner wires were drilled into the top and bottom of the large rotor. The specimen was then subjected to computed tomography (CT). A CT image of the specimen was imported into the Mimics software to construct a three-dimensional model including the target. The best core decompression channel was then designed using the 3D model. A navigational template for the specimen was designed using the Pro/E software and manufactured by rapid prototyping technology to guide the drilling channel. The specimen-specific navigation template was installed on the specimen using positioning Kirschner wires. Drilling was performed using a guide needle through the guiding hole on the templates. The distance between the end point of the guide needle and the target was measured to validate the patient-specific surgical accuracy. Results The average distance between the tip of the guide needle drilled through the guiding template and the target was 1.92±0.071 mm. Conclusions Core decompression using a computer-rapid prototyping template is a reliable and accurate technique that could provide a new method of precision decompression for early-stage ischemic necrosis. PMID:28464029

  4. Multi-channel MRI segmentation of eye structures and tumors using patient-specific features

    PubMed Central

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro; Kamnitsas, Konstantinos; Maeder, Philippe; Glocker, Ben; Munier, Francis L.; Rueckert, Daniel; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma are fast spreading eye tumors usually diagnosed by using 2D Fundus Image Photography (Fundus) and 2D Ultrasound (US). Diagnosis and treatment planning of such diseases often require additional complementary imaging to confirm the tumor extend via 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this context, having automatic segmentations to estimate the size and the distribution of the pathological tissue would be advantageous towards tumor characterization. Until now, the alternative has been the manual delineation of eye structures, a rather time consuming and error-prone task, to be conducted in multiple MRI sequences simultaneously. This situation, and the lack of tools for accurate eye MRI analysis, reduces the interest in MRI beyond the qualitative evaluation of the optic nerve invasion and the confirmation of recurrent malignancies below calcified tumors. In this manuscript, we propose a new framework for the automatic segmentation of eye structures and ocular tumors in multi-sequence MRI. Our key contribution is the introduction of a pathological eye model from which Eye Patient-Specific Features (EPSF) can be computed. These features combine intensity and shape information of pathological tissue while embedded in healthy structures of the eye. We assess our work on a dataset of pathological patient eyes by computing the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, the lens and the tumor. In addition, we quantitatively show the superior performance of our pathological eye model as compared to the segmentation obtained by using a healthy model (over 4% DSC) and demonstrate the relevance of our EPSF, which improve the final segmentation regardless of the classifier employed. PMID:28350816

  5. Guidelines for patient-specific jawline definition with titanium implants in esthetic, deformity, and malformation surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mommaerts, Maurice Yves

    2016-01-01

    Context: Asymmetry and unfavorable esthetics of the jawline have become possible to correct in three dimensions using computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing. Aims: The aim of this study was to provide esthetic, technical, and operative guidelines for mandibular angle and border augmentation using patient-specific titanium implants made by selective laser melting. Settings and Design: University hospital - prospective registry. Subjects and Methods: Twelve patients and 17 implantation sites were documented and prospectively registered. Malformational, deformational, and purely esthetic indications were encountered. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive. Results: Patient satisfaction was high, probably because the patients had input into the planned dimensions and shape. A serious infection with implant removal occurred in one patient who had six previous surgeries at the same sites. Technical and surgical guidelines were developed including splitting implants into two segments when the mental nerve was at risk, using a three-dimensional (3D) puzzle connection, providing at least two screw holes per segment, using scaffolds at the bony contact side, using a “satin” finish at the periosteal side, referring to anatomical structures where possible, making provisions for transbuccal and transoral fixation, using a high vestibular incision, and using a double-layer closure. Esthetic guidelines are discussed but could not be upgraded. Conclusions: Mirroring techniques and 3D print accuracy up to 0.1 mm allow precise planning of jaw angle implants. Patients are pleased when given preoperative renderings for their consideration. Infections can be managed using technical and operative recommendations and careful patient selection. PMID:28299273

  6. Investigation of patient-specific characteristics associated with treatment outcomes for chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Amin, Priyal; Levin, Linda; Holmes, Sarah J; Picard, Jillian; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Identifying clinical characteristics of patients with chronic urticaria (CU) responsive to medication may help guide clinicians select treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate patient characteristics and medication use associated with urticaria control. A retrospective longitudinal chart review of adult patients with CU was conducted at a multisite allergy practice. Inclusion criteria required at least 4 CU office visits to allow for pre- and posttreatment assessment. Control corresponding to medication(s) used was assessed each visit. Univariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regression was performed. A total of 221 patients with CU were included; 140 (63%) achieved complete control. The average time to control was 1.4 ± 2.7 years, which required 1-3 classes of medications. Dermatographia odds ratio (OR) = 1.85 (95% CI 1.3-2.7) or other physical urticarias, OR = 1.51 (1-2.4) and neutrophilic infiltrates on skin biopsy were markers of poor control. Thyroid autoantibodies were associated with better control using an H1-antihistamine. Whereas 22% were controlled on a second-generation H1-receptor antagonist plus a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA), an additional 33% were controlled when cyclosporine was added. Use of a first or second H1-antagonist or LTRA was associated with a 3.5-16.9 times higher odds of complete CU control in those with dermatographia. The odds of achieving control for other forms of physical urticaria was greatest when colchicine was added (aOR = 32.6 [12.7-83.2]). Patient-specific CU characteristics associated with medication-disease control may be useful for selecting treatment regimens. A subset of CU patients remains poorly controlled that indicates an unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient-specific modeling of the trochlear morphologic anomalies by means of hyperbolic paraboloids.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, Pietro; Baroni, Guido; Confalonieri, Norberto; Manzotti, Alfonso

    2016-12-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic purposes are issuing pressing demands to improve the evaluation of the dysplasia condition of the femoral trochlea. The traditional clinical assessment of the dysplasia, based on Dejour classification, recognized 4 increasing (A, B, C, D) levels of severity. It has been extensively questioned in the literature that this classification methodology can be defective suggesting that quantitative measures can ensure more reliable criteria for the dysplasia severity assessment. This study reports on a novel technique to model the trochlear surface (TS), digitally reconstructed by 3D volumetric imaging, using three hyperbolic paraboloids (HP), one to describe the global trochlear aspect, two to represent the local aspects of the medial and lateral compartments, respectively. Results on a cohort of 43 patients, affected by aspecific anterior knee pain, demonstrate the consistency of the estimated model parameters with the morphologic aspect of the TS. The obtained small fitting error (on average lower than 0.80 mm) demonstrated that the ventral aspect of the trochlear morphology can be modeled with high accuracy by HPs. We also showed that HP modeling provides a continuous representation of morphologic variations in shape parameter space while we found that similar morphologic anomalies of the trochlear aspect are actually attributed to different severity grades in the Dejour classification. This finding is in agreement with recent works in the literature reporting that morphometric parameters can only optimistically be used to discriminate between the Grade A and the remaining three grades. In conclusion, we can assert that the proposed methodology is a further step toward modeling of anatomical surfaces that can be used to quantify deviations to normality on a patient-specific basis.

  8. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  9. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  10. Patient specific color texture mapping of CT-based anatomical surface models utilizing cryosection data.

    PubMed

    Knapp, D; Kerr, J P; Sellberg, M

    1997-01-01

    In traditional medical imaging modalities, color and texture information can add considerable information for diagnostics. Presently, multimodal images of a patient are unregistered and referenced independent of each other, or registered and fused into a single hybrid volume. Doctors and other medical professionals need to be able to visualize and interrogate, on a per-patient basis, a wide variety of 2D and 3D data representations that can be created from non-invasive imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT. In addition, any colorization that may be applied to the image data is strictly based on tissue density, radiation emission, or magnetic signature, and not on any physiological foundation. In order for "true-to-life" color information to be incorporated with non-invasive imaging techniques, and for it to be of consistent quality across the entire body, a single whole-body cryosection specimen with associated medical image data is needed. The National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project offers just such a specimen. Using the full-body medical image data along with the cryosection images of the Visible Human subject, a set of color lookup tables for all visually well defined structures and organs can be created. As a result, patient-specific colorization based on real tissue color and characteristics can be incorporated into traditional intensity-based imaging modalities. The primary goal of this work has been to create CT color lookup tables for all visually well-defined structures in the Visible Human male cryosection data set. The subsequent goal has been to develop a method for stripping textures from a volumetric data set for polygonal models and non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) models, also generated from the volumetric data.

  11. Haemodynamic impact of stent implantation for lateral tunnel Fontan stenosis: a patient-specific computational assessment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Elaine; McElhinney, Doff B; Restrepo, Maria; Valente, Anne M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2016-01-01

    The physiological importance of the lateral tunnel stenosis in the Fontan pathway for children with single ventricle physiology can be difficult to determine. The impact of the stenosis and stent implantation on total cavopulmonary connection resistance has not been characterized, and there are no clear guidelines for intervention. Methods and results A computational framework for haemodynamic assessment of stent implantation in patients with lateral tunnel stenosis was developed. Cardiac magnetic resonances images were reconstructed to obtain total cavopulmonary connection anatomies before stent implantation. Stents with 2-mm diameter increments were virtually implanted in each patient to understand the impact of stent diameter. Numerical simulations were performed in all geometries with patient-specific flow rates. Exercise conditions were simulated by doubling and tripling the lateral tunnel flow rate. The resulting total cavopulmonary connection vascular resistances were computed. A total of six patients (age: 14.4 ± 3.1 years) with lateral tunnel stenosis were included for preliminary analysis. The mean baseline resistance was 1.54 ± 1.08 WU · m(2) and dependent on the stenosis diameter. It was further exacerbated during exercise. It was observed that utilising a stent with a larger diameter lowered the resistance, but the resistance reduction diminished at larger diameters. Using a computational framework to assess the severity of lateral tunnel stenosis and the haemodynamic impact of stent implantation, it was observed that stenosis in the lateral tunnel pathway was associated with higher total cavopulmonary connection resistance than unobstructed pathways, which was exacerbated during exercise. Stent implantation could reduce the resistance, but the improvement was specific to the minimum diameter.

  12. Nanomedicine-based neuroprotective strategies in patient specific-iPSC and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shih-Fan; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Song, Wen-Shin; Chiang, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Hsin-I; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-03-04

    manipulations in patient specific-iPSCs and personalized medicine.

  13. Formative evaluation of a patient-specific clinical knowledge summarization tool

    PubMed Central

    Del Fiol, Guilherme; Mostafa, Javed; Pu, Dongqiuye; Medlin, Richard; Slager, Stacey; Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha R.; Weir, Charlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To iteratively design a prototype of a computerized clinical knowledge summarization (CKS) tool aimed at helping clinicians finding answers to their clinical questions; and to conduct a formative assessment of the usability, usefulness, efficiency, and impact of the CKS prototype on physicians’ perceived decision quality compared with standard search of UpToDate and PubMed. Materials and methods Mixed-methods observations of the interactions of 10 physicians with the CKS prototype vs. standard search in an effort to solve clinical problems posed as case vignettes. Results The CKS tool automatically summarizes patient-specific and actionable clinical recommendations from PubMed (high quality randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews) and UpToDate. Two thirds of the study participants completed 15 out of 17 usability tasks. The median time to task completion was less than 10 s for 12 of the 17 tasks. The difference in search time between the CKS and standard search was not significant (median = 4.9 vs. 4.5 min). Physician’s perceived decision quality was significantly higher with the CKS than with manual search (mean = 16.6 vs. 14.4; p = 0.036). Conclusions The CKS prototype was well-accepted by physicians both in terms of usability and usefulness. Physicians perceived better decision quality with the CKS prototype compared to standard search of PubMed and UpToDate within a similar search time. Due to the formative nature of this study and a small sample size, conclusions regarding efficiency and efficacy are exploratory. PMID:26612774

  14. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  15. Multi-channel MRI segmentation of eye structures and tumors using patient-specific features.

    PubMed

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro; Kamnitsas, Konstantinos; Maeder, Philippe; Glocker, Ben; Munier, Francis L; Rueckert, Daniel; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Sznitman, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma are fast spreading eye tumors usually diagnosed by using 2D Fundus Image Photography (Fundus) and 2D Ultrasound (US). Diagnosis and treatment planning of such diseases often require additional complementary imaging to confirm the tumor extend via 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this context, having automatic segmentations to estimate the size and the distribution of the pathological tissue would be advantageous towards tumor characterization. Until now, the alternative has been the manual delineation of eye structures, a rather time consuming and error-prone task, to be conducted in multiple MRI sequences simultaneously. This situation, and the lack of tools for accurate eye MRI analysis, reduces the interest in MRI beyond the qualitative evaluation of the optic nerve invasion and the confirmation of recurrent malignancies below calcified tumors. In this manuscript, we propose a new framework for the automatic segmentation of eye structures and ocular tumors in multi-sequence MRI. Our key contribution is the introduction of a pathological eye model from which Eye Patient-Specific Features (EPSF) can be computed. These features combine intensity and shape information of pathological tissue while embedded in healthy structures of the eye. We assess our work on a dataset of pathological patient eyes by computing the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, the lens and the tumor. In addition, we quantitatively show the superior performance of our pathological eye model as compared to the segmentation obtained by using a healthy model (over 4% DSC) and demonstrate the relevance of our EPSF, which improve the final segmentation regardless of the classifier employed.

  16. Patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging and three-dimensional discrete fourier transform convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to perform the dosimetry for {sup 131}I-labeled antibodies in soft tissues. Mathematical and physical phantoms were used to compare 3D-DFT with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations based on the EGS4 code. The mathematical and physical phantoms consisted of a sphere and cylinder, respectively, containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm. The radial dose profile obtained from MCT calculations and the 3D-DFT convolution method for the mathematical phantom were in close agreement. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the two methods was <0.1%, with a maximum difference <21%. Results obtained for the physical phantom gave a RMSE <0.1% and a maximum difference of <13%; isodose contours were in good agreement. SPECT data for two patients who had undergone {sup 131}I radioimmunotherapy (RIT) were used to compare absorbed-dose rates and isodose rate contours with the two methods of calculations. This yielded a RMSE <0.02% and a maximum difference of <13%. Our results showed that the 3D-DFT convolution method compared well with MCT calculations. The 3D-DFT approach is computationally much more efficient and, hence, the method of choice. This method is patient-specific and applicable to the dosimetry of soft-tissue tumors and normal organs. It can be implemented on personal computers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Nanomedicine-Based Neuroprotective Strategies in Patient Specific-iPSC and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shih-Fan; Liu, Wei-Hsiu; Song, Wen-Shin; Chiang, Kuan-Lin; Ma, Hsin-I; Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Ming-Teh

    2014-01-01

    manipulations in patient specific-iPSCs and personalized medicine. PMID:24599081

  18. CloudNeo: a cloud pipeline for identifying patient-specific tumor neoantigens.

    PubMed

    Bais, Preeti; Namburi, Sandeep; Gatti, Daniel M; Zhang, Xinyu; Chuang, Jeffrey H

    2017-10-01

    We present CloudNeo, a cloud-based computational workflow for identifying patient-specific tumor neoantigens from next generation sequencing data. Tumor-specific mutant peptides can be detected by the immune system through their interactions with the human leukocyte antigen complex, and neoantigen presence has recently been shown to correlate with anti T-cell immunity and efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor therapy. However computing capabilities to identify neoantigens from genomic sequencing data are a limiting factor for understanding their role. This challenge has grown as cancer datasets become increasingly abundant, making them cumbersome to store and analyze on local servers. Our cloud-based pipeline provides scalable computation capabilities for neoantigen identification while eliminating the need to invest in local infrastructure for data transfer, storage or compute. The pipeline is a Common Workflow Language (CWL) implementation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing using Polysolver or HLAminer combined with custom scripts for mutant peptide identification and NetMHCpan for neoantigen prediction. We have demonstrated the efficacy of these pipelines on Amazon cloud instances through the Seven Bridges Genomics implementation of the NCI Cancer Genomics Cloud, which provides graphical interfaces for running and editing, infrastructure for workflow sharing and version tracking, and access to TCGA data. The CWL implementation is at: https://github.com/TheJacksonLaboratory/CloudNeo. For users who have obtained licenses for all internal software, integrated versions in CWL and on the Seven Bridges Cancer Genomics Cloud platform (https://cgc.sbgenomics.com/, recommended version) can be obtained by contacting the authors. jeff.chuang@jax.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Automatized Patient-Specific Methodology for Numerical Determination of Biomechanical Corneal Response.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Gracia, M Á; Zurita, J; Piñero, D P; Calvo, B; Rodríguez-Matas, J F

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a novel methodology for building a three-dimensional patient-specific eyeball model suitable for performing a fully automatic finite element (FE) analysis of the corneal biomechanics. The reconstruction algorithm fits and smooths the patient's corneal surfaces obtained in clinic with corneal topographers and creates an FE mesh for the simulation. The patient's corneal elevation and pachymetry data is kept where available, to account for all corneal geometric features (central corneal thickness-CCT and curvature). Subsequently, an iterative free-stress algorithm including a fiber's pull-back is applied to incorporate the pre-stress field to the model. A convergence analysis of the mesh and a sensitivity analysis of the parameters involved in the numerical response is also addressed to determine the most influential features of the FE model. As a final step, the methodology is applied on the simulation of a general non-commercial non-contact tonometry diagnostic test over a large set of 130 patients-53 healthy, 63 keratoconic (KTC) and 14 post-LASIK surgery eyes. Results show the influence of the CCT, intraocular pressure (IOP) and fibers (87%) on the numerical corneal displacement (U(Num)) the good agreement of the U(Num) with clinical results, and the importance of considering the corneal pre-stress in the FE analysis. The potential and flexibility of the methodology can help improve understanding of the eye biomechanics, to help to plan surgeries, or to interpret the results of new diagnosis tools (i.e., non-contact tonometers).

  20. Evolution of design considerations in complex craniofacial reconstruction using patient-specific implants.

    PubMed

    Peel, Sean; Bhatia, Satyajeet; Eggbeer, Dominic; Morris, Daniel S; Hayhurst, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Previously published evidence has established major clinical benefits from using computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and additive manufacturing to produce patient-specific devices. These include cutting guides, drilling guides, positioning guides, and implants. However, custom devices produced using these methods are still not in routine use, particularly by the UK National Health Service. Oft-cited reasons for this slow uptake include the following: a higher up-front cost than conventionally fabricated devices, material-choice uncertainty, and a lack of long-term follow-up due to their relatively recent introduction. This article identifies a further gap in current knowledge - that of design rules, or key specification considerations for complex computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing/additive manufacturing devices. This research begins to address the gap by combining a detailed review of the literature with first-hand experience of interdisciplinary collaboration on five craniofacial patient case studies. In each patient case, bony lesions in the orbito-temporal region were segmented, excised, and reconstructed in the virtual environment. Three cases translated these digital plans into theatre via polymer surgical guides. Four cases utilised additive manufacturing to fabricate titanium implants. One implant was machined from polyether ether ketone. From the literature, articles with relevant abstracts were analysed to extract design considerations. In all, 19 frequently recurring design considerations were extracted from previous publications. Nine new design considerations were extracted from the case studies - on the basis of subjective clinical evaluation. These were synthesised to produce a design considerations framework to assist clinicians with prescribing and design engineers with modelling. Promising avenues for further research are proposed.

  1. A patient-specific Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chui, C S; Lovelock, M

    1998-06-01

    A patient-specific, CT-based, Monte Carlo dose-calculation method for photon beams has been developed to correctly account for inhomogeneity in the patient. The method employs the EGS4 system to sample the interaction of radiation in the medium. CT images are used to describe the patient geometry and to determine the density and atomic number in each voxel. The user code (MCPAT) provides the data describing the incident beams, and performs geometry checking and energy scoring in patient CT images. Several variance reduction techniques have been implemented to improve the computation efficiency. The method was verified with measured data and other calculations, both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. The method was also applied to a lung treatment, where significant differences in dose distributions, especially in the low-density region, were observed when compared with the results using an equivalent pathlength method. Comparison of the DVHs showed that the Monte Carlo calculated plan predicted an underdose of nearly 20% to the target, while the maximum doses to the cord and the heart were increased by 25% and 33%, respectively. These results suggested that the Monte Carlo method may have an impact on treatment designs, and also that it can be used as a benchmark to assess the accuracy of other dose calculation algorithms. The computation time for the lung case employing five 15-MV wedged beams, with an approximate field size of 13 X 13 cm and the dose grid size of 0.375 cm, was less than 14 h on a 175-MHz computer with a standard deviation of 1.5% in the high-dose region.

  2. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    PubMed

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  3. Effect of inlet velocity profiles on patient-specific computational fluid dynamics simulations of the carotid bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian C; Ries, Jared; Dhawan, Saurabh S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Taylor, W Robert; Oshinski, John N

    2012-05-01

    Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for researching the role of blood flow in disease processes. Modern clinical imaging technology such as MRI and CT can provide high resolution information about vessel geometry, but in many situations, patient-specific inlet velocity information is not available. In these situations, a simplified velocity profile must be selected. We studied how idealized inlet velocity profiles (blunt, parabolic, and Womersley flow) affect patient-specific CFD results when compared to simulations employing a "reference standard" of the patient's own measured velocity profile in the carotid bifurcation. To place the magnitude of these effects in context, we also investigated the effect of geometry and the use of subject-specific flow waveform on the CFD results. We quantified these differences by examining the pointwise percent error of the mean wall shear stress (WSS) and the oscillatory shear index (OSI) and by computing the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) between axial profiles of the mean WSS and OSI in the internal carotid artery bulb. The parabolic inlet velocity profile produced the most similar mean WSS and OSI to simulations employing the real patient-specific inlet velocity profile. However, anatomic variation in vessel geometry and the use of a nonpatient-specific flow waveform both affected the WSS and OSI results more than did the choice of inlet velocity profile. Although careful selection of boundary conditions is essential for all CFD analysis, accurate patient-specific geometry reconstruction and measurement of vessel flow rate waveform are more important than the choice of velocity profile. A parabolic velocity profile provided results most similar to the patient-specific velocity profile.

  4. Experimental validation of 3D printed patient-specific implants using digital image correlation and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Park, Jaejong; Carrau, Diana; Miller, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    With the dawn of 3D printing technology, patient-specific implant designs are set to have a paradigm shift. A topology optimization method in designing patient-specific craniofacial implants has been developed to ensure adequate load transfer mechanism and restore the form and function of the mid-face. Patient-specific finite element models are used to design these implants and to validate whether they are viable for physiological loading such as mastication. Validation of these topology optimized finite element models using mechanical testing is a critical step. Instead of inserting the implants into a cadaver or patient, we embed the implants into the computer-aided skull model of a patient and, fuse them together to 3D print the complete skull model with the implant. Masticatory forces are applied in the molar region to simulate chewing and measure the stress-strain trajectory. Until recently, strain gages have been used to measure strains for validation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method is a relatively new technique for full-field strain measurement which provides a continuous deformation field data. The main objective of this study is to validate the finite element model of patient-specific craniofacial implants against the strain data from the DIC obtained during the mastication simulation and show that the optimized shapes provide adequate load-transfer mechanism. Patient-specific models are obtained from CT scans. The principal maximum and minimum strains are compared. The computational and experimental approach to designing patient-specific implants proved to be a viable technique for mid-face craniofacial reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient-specific respiratory models using dynamic 3D MRI: preliminary volunteer results.

    PubMed

    Miquel, M E; Blackall, J M; Uribe, S; Hawkes, D J; Schaeffter, T

    2013-03-01

    Organ and tumour motion has a significant impact on the planning and delivery of radiotherapy treatment. At present imaging modality such as four-dimensional computer tomography (4DCT) cannot be used to measure the variability of motion between different respiratory cycles. To create reliable motion models, one needs to acquire volumetric data sets of the lungs with sufficient sampling of the breathing cycle. In this paper we investigate the use of highly parallel MRI to acquire such data. A 32 channel coil in conjunction with a balanced SSFP sequence and a SENSE factor of 6 were used to acquire volumetric data sets in five healthy volunteers. The acquisition was repeated for seven series of different breathing patterns. The data acquired was of sufficient spatial resolution (5 × 5 × 5 mm(3)) and image quality to carry out automated non-rigid registration. The acquisition rate (c.a. 2 volumes per second) allowed for a meaningful sampling of the different respiratory curves that were automatically obtained from the skin surface motion. This acquisition technique should provide images of high enough quality to create statistical respiratory models.

  6. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  7. SU-E-T-159: Evaluation of a Patient Specific QA Tool Based On TG119

    SciTech Connect

    Ashmeg, S; Zhang, Y; O'Daniel, J; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a 3D patient specific QA tool by analysis of the results produced from associated software in homogenous phantom and heterogonous patient CT. Methods: IMRT and VMAT plans of five test suites introduced by TG119 were created in ECLIPSE on a solid water phantom. The ten plans -of increasing complexity- were delivered to Delta4 to give a 3D measurement. The Delta4's “Anatomy” software uses the measured dose to back-calculate the energy fluence of the delivered beams, which is used for dose calculation in a patient CT using a pencilbeam algorithm. The effect of the modulated beams' complexity on the accuracy of the “Anatomy” calculation was evaluated. Both measured and Anatomy doses were compared to ECLIPSE calculation using 3% - 3mm gamma criteria.We also tested the effect of heterogeneity by analyzing the results of “Anatomy” calculation on a Brain VMAT and a 3D conformal lung cases. Results: In homogenous phantom, the gamma passing rates were found to be as low as 74.75% for a complex plan with high modulation. The mean passing rates were 91.47% ± 6.35% for “Anatomy” calculation and 99.46% ± 0.62% for Delta4 measurements.As for the heterogeneous cases, the rates were 96.54%±3.67% and 83.87%±9.42% for Brain VMAT and 3D lung respectively. This increased error in the lung case could be due to the use of the pencil beam algorithm as opposed to the AAA used by ECLIPSE.Also, gamma analysis showed high discrepancy along the beam edge in the “Anatomy” calculated results. This suggests a poor beam modeling in the penumbra region. Conclusion: The results show various sources of errors in “Anatomy” calculations. These include beam modeling in the penumbra region, complexity of a modulated beam (shown in homogenous phantom and brain cases) and dose calculation algorithms (3D conformal lung case)

  8. Patient specific optimization-based treatment planning for catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Chen, Xin; Wootton, Jeffery; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    A 3D optimization-based thermal treatment planning platform has been developed for the application of catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for treating advanced pelvic tumors. Optimal selection of applied power levels to each independently controlled transducer segment can be used to conform and maximize therapeutic heating and thermal dose coverage to the target region, providing significant advantages over current hyperthermia technology and improving treatment response. Critical anatomic structures, clinical target outlines, and implant/applicator geometries were acquired from sequential multi-slice 2D images obtained from HDR treatment planning and used to reconstruct patient specific 3D biothermal models. A constrained optimization algorithm was devised and integrated within a finite element thermal solver to determine a priori the optimal applied power levels and the resulting 3D temperature distributions such that therapeutic heating is maximized within the target, while placing constraints on maximum tissue temperature and thermal exposure of surrounding non-targeted tissue. This optimizationbased treatment planning and modeling system was applied on representative cases of clinical implants for HDR treatment of cervix and prostate to evaluate the utility of this planning approach. The planning provided significant improvement in achievable temperature distributions for all cases, with substantial increase in T90 and thermal dose (CEM43T90) coverage to the hyperthermia target volume while decreasing maximum treatment temperature and reducing thermal dose exposure to surrounding non-targeted tissues and thermally sensitive rectum and bladder. This optimization based treatment planning platform with catheter-based ultrasound applicators is a useful tool that has potential to significantly improve the delivery of hyperthermia in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy. The planning platform has been extended

  9. PATIENT-SPECIFIC AND SURGERY-SPECIFIC FACTORS THAT AFFECT RETURN TO SPORT AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Andrew; Rabuck, Stephen; Lynch, Brittany; Davin, Sarah; Irrgang, James

    2016-01-01

    Context Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is frequently performed to allow individuals to return to their pre-injury levels of sports participation, however, return to pre-injury level of sport is poor and re-injury rates are unacceptably high. Re-injury is likely associated with the timeframe and guidelines for return to sport (RTS). It is imperative for clinicians to recognize risk factors for re-injury and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are addressed prior to RTS. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize the current literature on the outcomes following return to sport after ACL reconstruction and to outline the biologic and patient-specific factors that should be considered when counseling an athlete on their progression through rehabilitation. Evidence Acquisition A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify RTS criteria and RTS rates after ACL reconstruction with consideration paid to graft healing, anatomic reconstruction, and risk factors for re-injury and revision. Results were screened for relevant original research articles and review articles, from which results were summarized. Study Design Clinical Review of the Literature Results Variable RTS rates are presented in the literature due to variable definitions of RTS ranging from a high threshold (return to competition) to low threshold (physician clearance for return to play). Re-injury and contralateral injury rates are greater than the risk for primary ACL injury, which may be related to insufficient RTS guidelines based on time from surgery, which do not allow for proper healing or resolution of post-operative impairments and elimination of risk factors associated with both primary and secondary ACL injuries. Conclusions RTS rates to pre-injury level of activity after ACLR are poor and the risk for graft injury or contralateral injury requiring an additional surgery is substantial. Resolving impairments while eliminating movement patterns associated with

  10. Clinical evaluation of an anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Pascal; Verlaan, Sarah; Graydon, Shaun; Ahnen, Linda; Klöck, Stephan; Lang, Stephanie

    2014-03-06

    The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy 3D quality assurance (QA) system (ScandiDos), which converts the measured detector dose into the dose distribution in the patient geometry was evaluated. It allows a direct comparison of the calculated 3D dose with the measured back-projected dose. In total, 16 static and 16 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) fields were planned using four different energies. Isocenter dose was measured with a pinpoint chamber in homogeneous phantoms to investigate the dose prediction by the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy algorithm for static fields. Dose distributions of VMAT fields were measured using GAFCHROMIC film. Gravitational gantry errors up to 10° were introduced into all VMAT plans to study the potential of detecting errors. Additionally, 20 clinical treatment plans were verified. For static fields, the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy predicted the isocenter dose accurately, with a deviation to the measured phantom dose of 1.1% ± 0.6%. For VMAT fields the predicted Delta(4DVH) Anatomy dose in the isocenter plane corresponded to the measured dose in the phantom, with an average gamma agreement index (GAI) (3 mm/3%) of 96.9± 0.4%. The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy detected the induced systematic gantry error of 10° with a relative GAI (3 mm/3%) change of 5.8% ± 1.6%. The conventional Delta(4PT) QA system detected a GAI change of 4.2%± 2.0%. The conventional Delta(4PT) GAI (3 mm/3%) was 99.8% ± 0.4% for the clinical treatment plans. The mean body and PTV-GAI (3 mm/5%) for the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy were 96.4% ± 2.0% and 97.7%± 1.8%; however, this dropped to 90.8%± 3.4% and 87.1% ± 4.1% for passing criteria of 3 mm/3%. The anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system predicts the dose distribution correctly for a homogeneous case. The limiting factor for the error detection is the large variability in the error-free plans. The dose calculation algorithm is inferior to that used in the TPS (Eclipse).

  11. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang Kai; Gersten, David; Yan Di

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle{sup 3} Trade-Mark-Sign format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 {+-} 0.59 mm and 0.05 {+-} 0.31 Degree-Sign , indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5 Degree-Sign were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 {+-} 0.21%, 0.99 {+-} 0.59%, and 1.18 {+-} 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There

  12. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  13. PATIENT-SPECIFIC AND SURGERY-SPECIFIC FACTORS THAT AFFECT RETURN TO SPORT AFTER ACL RECONSTRUCTION.

    PubMed

    Joreitz, Rick; Lynch, Andrew; Rabuck, Stephen; Lynch, Brittany; Davin, Sarah; Irrgang, James

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is frequently performed to allow individuals to return to their pre-injury levels of sports participation, however, return to pre-injury level of sport is poor and re-injury rates are unacceptably high. Re-injury is likely associated with the timeframe and guidelines for return to sport (RTS). It is imperative for clinicians to recognize risk factors for re-injury and to ensure that modifiable risk factors are addressed prior to RTS. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize the current literature on the outcomes following return to sport after ACL reconstruction and to outline the biologic and patient-specific factors that should be considered when counseling an athlete on their progression through rehabilitation. A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify RTS criteria and RTS rates after ACL reconstruction with consideration paid to graft healing, anatomic reconstruction, and risk factors for re-injury and revision. Results were screened for relevant original research articles and review articles, from which results were summarized. Clinical Review of the Literature. Variable RTS rates are presented in the literature due to variable definitions of RTS ranging from a high threshold (return to competition) to low threshold (physician clearance for return to play). Re-injury and contralateral injury rates are greater than the risk for primary ACL injury, which may be related to insufficient RTS guidelines based on time from surgery, which do not allow for proper healing or resolution of post-operative impairments and elimination of risk factors associated with both primary and secondary ACL injuries. RTS rates to pre-injury level of activity after ACLR are poor and the risk for graft injury or contralateral injury requiring an additional surgery is substantial. Resolving impairments while eliminating movement patterns associated with injury and allowing sufficient time for graft healing likely

  14. A priori patient-specific collision avoidance in radiotherapy using consumer grade depth cameras.

    PubMed

    Cardan, Rex A; Popple, Richard A; Fiveash, John

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate and evaluate a low cost, fast, and accurate avoidance framework for radiotherapy treatments. Furthermore, we provide an implementation which is patient specific and can be implemented during the normal simulation process. Four patients and a treatment unit were scanned with a set of consumer depth cameras to create a polygon mesh of each object. Using a fast polygon interference algorithm, the models were virtually collided to map out feasible treatment positions of the couch and gantry. The actual physical collision space was then mapped in the treatment room by moving the gantry and couch until a collision occurred with either the patient or hardware. The physical and virtual collision spaces were then compared to determine the accuracy of the system. To improve the collision predictions, a buffer geometry was added to the scanned gantry mesh and performance was assessed as a function of buffer thickness. Each patient was optically scanned during simulation in less than 1 min. The average time to virtually map the collision space for 64, 800 gantry/couch states was 5.40 ± 2.88 s. The system had an average raw accuracy and negative prediction rate (NPR) across all patients of 97.3% ± 2.4% and 96.9% ± 2.2% respectively. Using a polygon buffer of 6 cm over the gantry geometry, the NPR was raised to unity for all patients, signifying the detection of all collision events. However, the average accuracy fell from 95.3% ± 3.1% to 91.5% ± 3.6% between the 3 and 6 cm buffer as more false positives were detected. We successfully demonstrated a fast and low cost framework which can map an entire collision space a priori for a given patient during the time of simulation. All collisions can be avoided using polygon interference, but a polygon buffer may be required to account for geometric uncertainties of scanned objects. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. In vitro investigation of contrast flow jet timing in patient-specific intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Virendra R.; Britz, Garvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The direction and magnitude of intra-aneurysmal flow jet are significant risk factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the change of flow jet during an endovascular procedure has been used for prediction of aneurysm occlusion or whether an additional flow diverter (FD) is warranted. However, evaluation of flow jets is often unreliable due to a large variation of flow jet on the digital subtraction angiograms, and this flow pattern variation may result in incorrect clinical diagnosis Therefore, factors contributing to the variation in flow jet are examined at an in vitro setting, and the findings can help us to understand the nature of flow jet and devise a better plan to quantify the aneurysmal hemodynamics accurately. Methods Intra-aneurysmal flows in three patient-specific aneurysms between 11 and 25 mm were investigated in vitro, and a FD was deployed in each aneurysm model. X-ray imaging of these models were performed at injection rates between 0.2 and 2 mL/s. Pulsatile blood pump and aneurysm model were imaged together to determine the timing of flow jet. Results The contrast bolus arrives at the aneurysm early at high contrast injection rates. The flow patterns with slow injection rates exhibit strong inertia that is associated with the systole flow. Flow jets arrive at the aneurysms at the peak systole when the bolus is injected at 0.2 mL/s. The contrast-to-signal ratio is the highest at the injection rate of 0.5 mL/s. Effect of flow diversion can only be assessed at an injection rate greater than 0.5 mL/s. Conclusions Intra-aneurysmal flow jet is highly dependent on the injection rate of the contrast agent. For the internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, the systolic flows can be visualized at slow injection rates (<0.5 mL/s), while the diastolic flow jets are visible at higher injection rates (>1 mL/s). Dependence of flow jet on the contrast injection rate has serious clinical implications and needs to be considered during diagnostic procedures

  16. Rotation in total knee arthroplasty: no difference between patient-specific and conventional instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Parratte, Sébastien; Blanc, Guillaume; Boussemart, Thomas; Ollivier, Matthieu; Le Corroller, Thomas; Argenson, Jean-Noël

    2013-10-01

    It was our hypothesis that patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) can improve the accuracy of the rotational alignment in TKA based on the concept of the system and on the potential to clearly identify pre-operatively during planning the classical anatomical landmarks that serve as references to set-up the rotation both for the femur and tibia. In this prospective comparative randomized study, 40 patients (20 in each group) operated in our institution between September 2012 and January 2013 by the 2 senior authors were included. Randomization of patients into one of the two groups was done by the Hospital Informatics Department with the use of a systematic sampling method. All patients received the same cemented high-flex mobile bearing TKA. In the PSI group, implant position was compared to the planed position using previously validated dedicated software. The position of the implants (frontal and sagittal) was compared in the 2 groups on standard X-rays, and the rotational position was analysed on post-operative CT-scan. 90 % of the patients add <2° or mm of difference between the planned position of the implants and the obtained position, except for the tibial rotation where the variations were much higher. Mean HKA was 179° (171-185) in the PSI group with 4 outliers (2 varus: 171° and 172°:184° and 185°) and 178.3° with 2 outliers (171° and 176°) in the control group. No difference was observed between the two groups concerning the frontal and sagittal position of the implants on the ML and AP X-rays. No significant difference of femoral rotation was observed between the two groups with a mean of 0.4° in the PSI group and 0.2° in the control group (p: n.s). Mean tibial rotation was 8° of internal rotation in the PSI group and 15° of internal rotation in the standard group (p: n.s). Based on our results, we were unable to confirm our hypothesis as PSI cannot improve rotation in TKA. More work needs to be done to more clearly define the place of PSI

  17. Using patient-specific phantoms to evaluate deformable image registration algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Nick; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Adams, Jeffrey; Li, Shunshan; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J.; Zhong, Hualiang

    2014-01-01

    The quality of adaptive treatment planning depends on the accuracy of its underlying deformable image registration (DIR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of two DIR algorithms, B-spline–based deformable multipass (DMP) and deformable demons (Demons), implemented in a commercial software package. Evaluations were conducted using both computational and physical deformable phantoms. Based on a finite element method (FEM), a total of 11 computational models were developed from a set of CT images acquired from four lung and one prostate cancer patients. FEM generated displacement vector fields (DVF) were used to construct the lung and prostate image phantoms. Based on a fast-Fourier transform technique, image noise power spectrum was incorporated into the prostate image phantoms to create simulated CBCT images. The FEM-DVF served as a gold standard for verification of the two registration algorithms performed on these phantoms. The registration algorithms were also evaluated at the homologous points quantified in the CT images of a physical lung phantom. The results indicated that the mean errors of the DMP algorithm were in the range of 1.0 ~ 3.1 mm for the computational phantoms and 1.9 mm for the physical lung phantom. For the computational prostate phantoms, the corresponding mean error was 1.0–1.9 mm in the prostate, 1.9–2.4 mm in the rectum, and 1.8–2.1 mm over the entire patient body. Sinusoidal errors induced by B-spline interpolations were observed in all the displacement profiles of the DMP registrations. Regions of large displacements were observed to have more registration errors. Patient-specific FEM models have been developed to evaluate the DIR algorithms implemented in the commercial software package. It has been found that the accuracy of these algorithms is patient-dependent and related to various factors including tissue deformation magnitudes and image intensity gradients across the regions of interest. This may

  18. Patient-Specific Dosimetry and Radiobiological Modeling of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Grant - final report

    SciTech Connect

    George Sgouros, Ph.D.

    2007-03-20

    radionuclide therapy to obtain normal organ and tumor dose vs. response correlations. Completion of the aims outlined above will make it possible to perform patient-specific dosimetry that incorporates considerations likely to provide robust dose-response relationships. Such an advance will improve targeted radionuclide therapy by making it possible to adopt treatment planning methodologies.

  19. Improved tibial component rotation in TKA using patient-specific instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Heyse, Thomas J; Tibesku, Carsten O

    2015-05-01

    Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) was introduced in an attempt to reduce positional outliers of components in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It was hypothesized that PSI could help with the positioning of tibial components in optimal rotational alignment. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of 58 patients following TKA was conducted. Of these, 30 operations were performed using PSI and 28 using conventional instrumentation. The rotation of the tibial components was determined in MRI using three different reference lines: a tangent to the dorsal tibial condyles, the tibial epicondylar line, and the tibial tubercle. Deviations >9° were considered outliers. Also internal rotation >1° was considered an outlier. Data were analyzed statistically for positional outliers using the Chi-squared test. There was excellent inter- and intraobserver reliability with low standard deviations for the determination of tibial component rotation using the tangent to the dorsal condyles and the tibial epicondylar line as reference. Using the dorsal tangent as reference, there were eight components in excessive external rotation (28.6 %) and one component being in relative internal rotation (5.4°) in the conventional group, while there were two components in excessive external rotation in the PSI group (6.7 %). Using the tibial epicondyles as reference, there were seven components in excessive external rotation (21.4 %) and one component being in relative internal rotation (4.4°) in the conventional group; while there were two components in excessive external rotation in the PSI group (6.7 %). These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Measurements based on the tibial tubercle showed poor reproducibility in terms of intra- and interobserver reliability and was of little use in the context of the research question. In this setup, PSI was effective in significantly reducing outliers of optimal rotational tibial component alignment during TKA. Anatomy of

  20. Power subsystem automation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Moser, R. L.; Veatch, M.

    1983-01-01

    Generic power-system elements and their potential faults are identified. Automation functions and their resulting benefits are defined and automation functions between power subsystem, central spacecraft computer, and ground flight-support personnel are partitioned. All automation activities were categorized as data handling, monitoring, routine control, fault handling, planning and operations, or anomaly handling. Incorporation of all these classes of tasks, except for anomaly handling, in power subsystem hardware and software was concluded to be mandatory to meet the design and operational requirements of the space station. The key drivers are long mission lifetime, modular growth, high-performance flexibility, a need to accommodate different electrical user-load equipment, onorbit assembly/maintenance/servicing, and potentially large number of power subsystem components. A significant effort in algorithm development and validation is essential in meeting the 1987 technology readiness date for the space station.

  1. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-08-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  2. Automated telescope scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Mark D.

    1988-01-01

    With the ever increasing level of automation of astronomical telescopes the benefits and feasibility of automated planning and scheduling are becoming more apparent. Improved efficiency and increased overall telescope utilization are the most obvious goals. Automated scheduling at some level has been done for several satellite observatories, but the requirements on these systems were much less stringent than on modern ground or satellite observatories. The scheduling problem is particularly acute for Hubble Space Telescope: virtually all observations must be planned in excruciating detail weeks to months in advance. Space Telescope Science Institute has recently made significant progress on the scheduling problem by exploiting state-of-the-art artificial intelligence software technology. What is especially interesting is that this effort has already yielded software that is well suited to scheduling groundbased telescopes, including the problem of optimizing the coordinated scheduling of more than one telescope.

  3. Fully automated protein purification

    PubMed Central

    Camper, DeMarco V.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining highly purified proteins is essential to begin investigating their functional and structural properties. The steps that are typically involved in purifying proteins can include an initial capture, intermediate purification, and a final polishing step. Completing these steps can take several days and require frequent attention to ensure success. Our goal was to design automated protocols that will allow the purification of proteins with minimal operator intervention. Separate methods have been produced and tested that automate the sample loading, column washing, sample elution and peak collection steps for ion-exchange, metal affinity, hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. These individual methods are designed to be coupled and run sequentially in any order to achieve a flexible and fully automated protein purification protocol. PMID:19595984

  4. Trade-offs in producing patient-specific recommendations from a computer-based clinical guideline: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P L; Frawley, S J

    1995-01-01

    This case study explored 1) how much online clinical data is required to obtain patient-specific recommendations from a computer-based clinical practice guideline, 2) whether the availability of increasing amounts of online clinical data might allow a higher specificity of those recommendations, and 3) whether that increased specificity is necessarily desirable. The "quick reference guide" version of the guideline for acute postoperative pain management in adults, developed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, was analyzed. Patient-specific data items that might be used to tailor the computer's output for a particular case were grouped into rough categories depending on how likely they were to be available online and how readily they might be determined from online clinical data. The patient-specific recommendations were analyzed to determine to what degree the amount of text produced depended on the online availability of different categories of data. An examination of example recommendations, however, illustrated that high specificity may not always be desirable. The study provides a concrete illustration of how the richness of online clinical data can affect patient-specific recommendations, and describes a number of related design trade-offs in converting a clinical guideline into an interactive, computer-based form. PMID:7583647

  5. Patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells model pazopanib-mediated hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Yukti; Toh, Yi Chin; Xing, Jiangwa; Qu, Yinghua; Poh, Jonathan; Huan, Li; Tan, Hui Shan; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Yu, Hanry; Tan, Min-Han

    2017-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a major cause of liver damage and drug pipeline failure, and is difficult to study as patient-specific features are not readily incorporated in traditional hepatotoxicity testing approaches using population pooled cell sources. Here we demonstrate the use of patient-specific hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem cells for modeling idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity to pazopanib (PZ), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug associated with significant hepatotoxicity of unknown mechanistic basis. In vitro cytotoxicity assays confirmed that HLCs from patients with clinically identified hepatotoxicity were more sensitive to PZ-induced toxicity than other individuals, while a prototype hepatotoxin acetaminophen was similarly toxic to all HLCs studied. Transcriptional analyses showed that PZ induces oxidative stress (OS) in HLCs in general, but in HLCs from susceptible individuals, PZ causes relative disruption of iron metabolism and higher burden of OS. Our study establishes the first patient-specific HLC-based platform for idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity testing, incorporating multiple potential causative factors and permitting the correlation of transcriptomic and cellular responses to clinical phenotypes. Establishment of patient-specific HLCs with clinical phenotypes representing population variations will be valuable for pharmaceutical drug testing. PMID:28120901

  6. Creating and parameterizing patient-specific deep brain stimulation pathway-activation models using the hyperdirect pathway as an example

    PubMed Central

    Gunalan, Kabilar; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Howell, Bryan; Duchin, Yuval; Lempka, Scott F.; Patriat, Remi; Sapiro, Guillermo; Harel, Noam; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical therapy and computational models have played an important role in advancing the technology. Patient-specific DBS models are now common tools in both academic and industrial research, as well as clinical software systems. However, the exact methodology for creating patient-specific DBS models can vary substantially and important technical details are often missing from published reports. Objective Provide a detailed description of the assembly workflow and parameterization of a patient-specific DBS pathway-activation model (PAM) and predict the response of the hyperdirect pathway to clinical stimulation. Methods Integration of multiple software tools (e.g. COMSOL, MATLAB, FSL, NEURON, Python) enables the creation and visualization of a DBS PAM. An example DBS PAM was developed using 7T magnetic resonance imaging data from a single unilaterally implanted patient with Parkinson’s disease (PD). This detailed description implements our best computational practices and most elaborate parameterization steps, as defined from over a decade of technical evolution. Results Pathway recruitment curves and strength-duration relationships highlight the non-linear response of axons to changes in the DBS parameter settings. Conclusion Parameterization of patient-specific DBS models can be highly detailed and constrained, thereby providing confidence in the simulation predictions, but at the expense of time demanding technical implementation steps. DBS PAMs represent new tools for investigating possible correlations between brain pathway activation patterns and clinical symptom modulation. PMID:28441410