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Sample records for interacting semiconductor quantum

  1. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.

  2. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; ...

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions atmore » longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  3. Ultrashort Pulse Interaction with Intersubband Transitions of Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsantonis, Ioannis; Stathatos, Elias; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2015-09-01

    We study coherent ultrashort pulse propagation in a two-subband system in a symmetric semiconductor quantum well structure, performing calculations beyond the rotating wave approximation and the slowly varying envelope approximation and taking into account the effects of electron-electron interactions. The interaction of the quantum well structure with the electromagnetic fields is studied with modified, nonlinear, Bloch equations. These equations are combined with the full-wave Maxwell equations for the study of pulse propagation. We present results for the pulse propagation and the population inversion dynamics in the quantum well structure for different electron sheet densities.

  4. Parametric interactions in presence of different size colloids in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vanshpal, R. Sharma, Uttam; Dubey, Swati

    2015-07-31

    Present work is an attempt to investigate the effect of different size colloids on parametric interaction in semiconductor quantum plasma. Inclusion of quantum effect is being done in this analysis through quantum correction term in classical hydrodynamic model of homogeneous semiconductor plasma. The effect is associated with purely quantum origin using quantum Bohm potential and quantum statistics. Colloidal size and quantum correction term modify the parametric dispersion characteristics of ion implanted semiconductor plasma medium. It is found that quantum effect on colloids is inversely proportional to their size. Moreover critical size of implanted colloids for the effective quantum correction is determined which is found to be equal to the lattice spacing of the crystal.

  5. Interaction of graphene quantum dots with bulk semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mohapatra, P. K.; Singh, B. P.; Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, J.

    2015-05-15

    Highly luminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized through thermolysis of glucose. The average lateral size of the synthesized GQDs is found to be ∼5 nm. The occurrence of D and G band at 1345 and 1580 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectrum confirms the presence of graphene layers. GQDs are mostly consisting of 3 to 4 graphene layers as confirmed from the AFM measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a distinct broadening of the spectrum when GQDs are on the semiconducting bulk surface compared to GQDs in water. The time resolved PL measurement shows a significant shortening in PL lifetime due to the substrate interaction on GQDs compared to the GQDs in solution phase.

  6. Quantum coherence in the interaction of light with a two-level atom and semiconductor microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenso, Daniel Bekele

    We have studied quantum statistical properties including squeezing and entanglement, and conditional measurements in a two level atom, semiconductor quantum well and quantum dots interacting with light and a degenerate parametric oscillator. For a two-level atom in a coherently driven cavity and damped by a broad-band squeezed vacuum, we have studied atomic inversion, fluorescent spectrum, and the intensity correlations of the transmitted and fluorescent photons in the bad cavity limit using the Fokker-Planck equation. For semiconductor quantum well with a single exciton mode in a microcavity driven by squeezed vacuum in the low exciton density regime, we have studied the intensity, spectrum, and intensity correlations for the fluorescent light by solving the quantum Langevin equations. We have also derived an expression for the Q-function of the field and using this function we have studied the intracavity photon number distribution and the quadrature fluctuations for the field. For identical semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) interacting with a quantized cavity field, using quantum mechanical as well as semiclassical treatment, we have investigated the time evolution of the states of the QDs, the photon number distribution and the quadratures variances for the cavity field. Specifically, we consider two QDs initially prepared in a Bell and three QDs in a GHZ entangled excitonic states and the field in coherent, squeezed coherent, squeezed vacuum or thermal states at the initial time. By considering the light from a degenerate parametric oscillator, we have also discussed conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics and show that they provide novel ways to characterize quantum fluctuations.

  7. Probing interband coulomb interactions in semiconductor nanostructures with 2D double-quantum coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Velizhanin, Kirill A; Piryatinski, Andrei

    2011-05-12

    Employing the interband exciton scattering model, we have derived a closed set of equations determining the 2D double-quantum coherence signal sensitive to the interband Coulomb interactions (i.e., many-body Coulomb interactions leading to the couplings between exciton and biexciton bands) in semiconductor nanostructures such as nanocrystals, quantum wires, wells, and carbon nanotubes. Our general analysis of 2D double-quantum coherence resonances has demonstrated that the interband Coulomb interactions lead to new cross-peaks whose appearance can be interpreted as a result of exciton and biexciton state mixing. The presence of the strongly coupled resonant states and weakly coupled background of off-resonant states can significantly simplify cross-peak analysis by eliminating the congested background spectrum. Our simulations of the 2D double-quantum coherence signal in PbSe NCs have validated this approach.

  8. LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. ); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2006-01-01

    For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

  9. Quantum Transport in Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    SRS i 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Transport in Semiconductors 5. FUNDING NUMBER söMtos-rizk-ooss 6. AUTHOR(S) D. K. Ferry ©fte ELECTE...OF ABSTRACT UL NSN 7540-01-280-5500 O 1 9 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Presented by ANSI Std «9-18 298-102 Final Report Quantum Transport in... Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices This final report describes a program of research investigating quantum effects which become important in

  10. Coherent Pump-Probe Interactions and Terahertz Intersubband Gain in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in intersubband-transition-based infrared semiconductor quantum well (QW) lasers because of their potential applications. In the mid-infrared range, both electrically-injected quantum cascade lasers [1] and optically-pumped multiple QW lasers [2] have been experimentally realized. In these studies, optical gain is due to population inversion between the lasing subbands. It was also proposed that stimulated Raman scattering in QW systems can produce net infrared optical gain [3j. In such a nonlinear optical scheme, the appearance of optical gain that may lead to intersubband Raman lasers does not rely on the population inversion. Since, in tile resonant Raman process (Raman gain is the largest in this case), the pump field induces population redistribution among subbands in the QW s ystem, it seems that a realistic estimate of the optical gain has to include this effect. Perturbative calculations used in the previous work [3] may overestimate the Raman gain. In this paper we present a nonperturbative calculation of terahertz gain of optically-pumped semiconductor step quantum wells. Limiting optical transitions within the conduction band of QW, we solve the pump-field-induced nonequilibrium distribution function for each subband of the QW system from a set of coupled rate equations. Both intrasubband and intersubband relaxation processes in the quantum well system are included. Taking into account the coherent interactions between pump and THz (signal) waves, we we derive the susceptibility of the QW system for the THz field. For a GaAs/AlGaAs step QW, we calculate the Thz gain spectrum for different pump frequencies and intensities. Under moderately strong pumping (approximately 0.3 MW/sq cm), a significant THz gain (approximately 300/m) is predicted. It is also shown that the coherent wave interactions (resonant stimulated Raman processes) contribute significantly to the THz gain.

  11. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    DOE PAGES

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; ...

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biologicalmore » functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.« less

  12. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  13. Quantum ratchet in two-dimensional semiconductors with Rashba spin-orbit interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Yee Sin; Ma, Zhongshui; Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Ratchet is a device that produces direct current of particles when driven by an unbiased force. We demonstrate a simple scattering quantum ratchet based on an asymmetrical quantum tunneling effect in two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (R2DEG). We consider the tunneling of electrons across a square potential barrier sandwiched by interface scattering potentials of unequal strengths on its either sides. It is found that while the intra-spin tunneling probabilities remain unchanged, the inter-spin-subband tunneling probabilities of electrons crossing the barrier in one direction is unequal to that of the opposite direction. Hence, when the system is driven by an unbiased periodic force, a directional flow of electron current is generated. The scattering quantum ratchet in R2DEG is conceptually simple and is capable of converting a.c. driving force into a rectified current without the need of additional symmetry breaking mechanism or external magnetic field. PMID:25598490

  14. Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS " Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices" 6. AUTHOR(S) ,DftftLo3-91-6-oo 7 David K. Ferry 7. PERFORMING...OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL NZIN 1540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) PrinCrlt>• oy ANSI SIC Z39-18 QUANTUM ... TRANSPORT IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Final Report on DAAL03-91-G-0067 (28461-EL) David K. Ferry, Principal Investigator Department of Electrical Engineering

  15. Quantum Confined Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    45 34 SEM image of the quantum dots. The bar on the right hand side corresponds to 50 nm...structured type-II superlattice long-wave infrared photodiodes with high quantum efficiency ,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 053519 (2006). 10 Distribution...active region. To achieve a wide depletion width (~5 µm) with low applied bias, and thus a good absorption quantum efficiency , the majority carrier

  16. Monte Carlo Analysis of Quantum Transport and Fluctuations in Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-18

    methods to quantum transport within the Liouville formulation. The second part concerns with fluctuations of carrier velocities and energies both in...interactions) on the transport properties. Keywords: Monte Carlo; Charge Transport; Quantum Transport ; Fluctuations; Semiconductor Physics; Master Equation...The present report contains technical matter related to the research performed on two different subjects. The first part concerns with quantum

  17. Complex Förster energy transfer interactions between semiconductor quantum dots and a redox-active osmium assembly.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael H; Huston, Alan L; Scott, Amy M; Efros, Alexander L; Melinger, Joseph S; Gemmill, Kelly Boeneman; Trammell, Scott A; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2012-06-26

    The ability of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to engage in diverse energy transfer processes with organic dyes, light-harvesting proteins, metal complexes, and redox-active labels continues to stimulate interest in developing them for biosensing and light-harvesting applications. Within biosensing configurations, changes in the rate of energy transfer between the QD and the proximal donor, or acceptor, based upon some external (biological) event form the principle basis for signal transduction. However, designing QD sensors to function optimally is predicated on a full understanding of all relevant energy transfer mechanisms. In this report, we examine energy transfer between a range of CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and a redox-active osmium(II) polypyridyl complex. To facilitate this, the Os complex was synthesized as a reactive isothiocyanate and used to label a hexahistidine-terminated peptide. The Os-labeled peptide was ratiometrically self-assembled to the QDs via metal affinity coordination, bringing the Os complex into close proximity of the nanocrystal surface. QDs displaying different emission maxima were assembled with increasing ratios of Os-peptide complex and subjected to detailed steady-state, ultrafast transient absorption, and luminescence lifetime decay analyses. Although the possibility exists for charge transfer quenching interactions, we find that the QD donors engage in relatively efficient Förster resonance energy transfer with the Os complex acceptor despite relatively low overall spectral overlap. These results are in contrast to other similar QD donor-redox-active acceptor systems with similar separation distances, but displaying far higher spectral overlap, where charge transfer processes were reported to be the dominant QD quenching mechanism.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy of Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-07

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Optical studies of semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs), metal nanoparticles (MNPs), and their hybrid nanomaterials are...Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy of Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles The views, opinions and/or findings...Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles Report Title Optical studies of semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs), metal nanoparticles (MNPs), and their

  19. Quantum optics with interacting polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portolan, Stefano; Savasta, Salvatore

    The excitonic polariton concept was introduced already in 1958 by J. J. Hopfield. Although its description was based on a full quantum theory including light quantization, the investigations of the optical properties of excitons developed mainly independently of quantum optics. In this chapter we shall review exciton polariton quantum optical effects by means of some recent works and results that have appeared in the literature in both bulk semiconductors and in cavity embedded quantum wells. The first manifestation of excitonic quantum-optical coherent dynamics was observed experimentally 20 years later, in 1978, exploiting resonant hyper-parametric scattering. On the other hand, the possibility of generating entangled photon pairs by means of this resonant process was theoretically pointed out only lately in 1999, whereas the experimental evidence for the generation of ultraviolet polarization-entangled photon pairs by means of biexciton resonant parametric emission in a single crystal of semiconductor CuCl was reported only in 2004. The demonstrations of parametric amplification and parametric emission in semiconductor microcavities, together with the possibility of ultrafast optical manipulation and ease of integration of these micro-devices, have increased the interest in possible realization of nonclassical cavity-polariton states. In 2005 an experiment that probes polariton quantum correlations by exploiting quantum complementarity was proposed and realized. These results unequivocally proved that quantum optical effects at single photon level, arising from the interaction of light with electronic excitations of semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures, were possible within these solid state systems, despite being far from isolated systems. The theoretical predictions that we review are based on a microscopic quantum theory of the nonlinear optical response of interacting electron systems relying on the dynamics controlled truncation scheme extended

  20. Charge state hysteresis in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A. Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A. S.

    2014-11-03

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which accounts for the observed hysteretic behaviour by extending the established description for transport in double dots coupled to two reservoirs. We demonstrate that this type of device operates like a single-electron memory latch.

  1. Quantum theory of electroabsorption in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Tepliakov, Nikita V; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2016-01-25

    We develop a simple quantum-mechanical theory of interband absorption by semiconductor nanocrystals exposed to a dc electric field. The theory is based on the model of noninteracting electrons and holes in an infinitely deep quantum well and describes all the major features of electroabsorption, including the Stark effect, the Franz-Keldysh effect, and the field-induced spectral broadening. It is applicable to nanocrystals of different shapes and dimensions (quantum dots, nanorods, and nanoplatelets), and will prove useful in modeling and design of electrooptical devices based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  2. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities of semiconductor quantum dot - metal nanoparticle hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzis, A. F.; Kosionis, S. G.; Boviatsis, J.; Paspalakis, E.

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study nonlinear optical effects of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle coupled via long-range Coulomb interaction. We solve the relevant density matrix equations in steady state and use proper perturbation theory to obtain closed-form analytical expressions for the nonlinear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the entire coupled system, up to fifth order. We also investigate the influence of the material of the semiconductor and the impact of the interparticle distance on the form of the spectra of the nonlinear susceptibilities.

  3. Sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Uskov, A V

    2004-05-15

    The sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback is analyzed with a Lang-Kobayashi approach applied to a standard quantum-dot laser model. The carriers are injected into a quantum well and are captured by, or escape from, the quantum dots through either carrier-carrier or phonon-carrier interaction. Because of Pauli blocking, the capture rate into the dots depends on the carrier occupancy level in the dots. Here we show that different carrier capture dynamics lead to a strong modification of the damping of the relaxation oscillations. Regions of increased damping display reduced sensitivity to optical feedback even for a relatively large alpha factor.

  4. Intrinsic spin dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valín-Rodríguez, Manuel

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the characteristic spin dynamics corresponding to semiconductor quantum dots within the multiband envelope function approximation (EFA). By numerically solving an 8 × 8 k·p Hamiltonian we treat systems based on different III-V semiconductor materials. It is shown that, even in the absence of an applied magnetic field, these systems show intrinsic spin dynamics governed by intraband and interband transitions leading to characteristic spin frequencies ranging from THz to optical frequencies.

  5. Spin dynamics and spin noise in the presence of randomly varying spin-orbit interaction in a semiconductor quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Pratik; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2012-05-30

    Using ensemble Monte Carlo simulation, we have studied hot carrier spin dynamics and spin noise in a multi-subband GaAs quantum wire in the presence of a randomly varying Rashba spin-orbit interaction. The random variation reduces the carrier ensemble's spin dephasing time due to the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism, but otherwise makes no qualitative difference to the temporal spin relaxation characteristics. However, it makes a qualitative difference to the spatial spin relaxation characteristics which change from monotonic and smooth to non-monotonic and chaotic because of a complex interplay between carriers in different subbands. As far as spin fluctuation and spin noise are concerned, the random variation has no major effect except that the low-frequency noise power spectral density increases slightly when the magnitude of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction field is varied randomly while holding the direction constant.

  6. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering.

  7. Probing different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction with semiconductor quantum dots and few cavity photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargart, F.; Roy-Choudhury, K.; John, T.; Portalupi, S. L.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Hughes, S.; Michler, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we present an extensive experimental and theoretical investigation of different regimes of strong field light-matter interaction for cavity-driven quantum dot (QD) cavity systems. The electric field enhancement inside a high-Q micropillar cavity facilitates exceptionally strong interaction with few cavity photons, enabling the simultaneous investigation for a wide range of QD-laser detuning. In case of a resonant drive, the formation of dressed states and a Mollow triplet sideband splitting of up to 45 μeV is measured for a mean cavity photon number < {n}c> ≤slant 1. In the asymptotic limit of the linear AC Stark effect we systematically investigate the power and detuning dependence of more than 400 QDs. Some QD-cavity systems exhibit an unexpected anomalous Stark shift, which can be explained by an extended dressed 4-level QD model. We provide a detailed analysis of the QD-cavity systems properties enabling this novel effect. The experimental results are successfully reproduced using a polaron master equation approach for the QD-cavity system, which includes the driving laser field, exciton-cavity and exciton-phonon interactions.

  8. Manipulating Spin-Orbit Interaction in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohda, Makoto; Bergsten, Tobias; Nitta, Junsaku

    2008-03-01

    Spin-orbit interaction (SOI), where the orbital motion of electrons is coupled with the orientation of electron spins, originates from a relativistic effect. Generally, in nonrelativistic momentum, p = \\hbar k≪ m0c, the SOI is negligible. However, in a semiconductor heterostructure, the small energy-band gap (Eg ≪ m0c2) and the electron wave modulated by the atomic core potential markedly enhance the SOI. Since the SOI acts as an effective magnetic field, it may offer novel functionalities for controlling the spin degree of freedom such as the electrical spin generation and the electrical control of the spin precession in a semiconductor heterojunction. Here, we review recent experimental studies on the manipulation of the SOI in a semiconductor two-dimensional electron gas. We first present a theoretical overview of the Rashba SOI, which lifts the spin degeneracy due to structural inversion asymmetry. We then present experimental results on the quantum well (QW) thickness dependences of the Rashba SOI in InP/InGaAs/InAlAs asymmetric QWs by analyzing the weak antilocalization. Finally, we show quantum interference effects due to the spin precession in a small array of mesoscopic InGaAs rings, which is an experimental demonstration of the time-reversal Aharonov-Casher effect and the electromagnetic dual to the Al’tshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect.

  9. Silicon Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Quantum Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordberg, Eric

    This thesis presents stable quantum dots in a double gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) system with an open-lateral geometry. In recent years, semiconductor lateral quantum dots have emerged as an appealing approach to quantum computing. Silicon offers the potential for very long electron spin decoherence times in these dots. Several important steps toward a functioning silicon-based electron spin qubit are presented, including stable Coulomb blockade within a quantum dot, a tunable double quantum dot, and integrated charge sensing. A fabrication process has been created to make low-disorder constrictions on relatively high mobility Si-MOS material and to facilitate essentially arbitrary gate geometries. Within this process, changes in mobility and charge defect densities are measured for critical process steps. This data was used to guide the fabrication of devices culminating, in this work, with a clean, stable quantum dot in a double-gated MOS system. Stable Coulomb-blockade behavior showing single-period conductance oscillations was observed in MOS quantum dots. Measured capacitances within each device and capacitances calculated via modeling are compared, showing that the measured Coulomb-blockade is consistent with a lithographically defined quantum dot, as opposed to a disorder dot within a single constriction. A tunable double dot is also observed. Laterally coupled charge sensing of quantum dots is highly desirable because it enables measurement even when conduction through the quantum dot itself is suppressed. Such charge sensing is demonstrated in this system. The current through a point contact constriction located near a quantum dot shows sharp 2% changes corresponding to charge transitions between the dot and a nearby lead. The coupling capacitance between the charge sensor and the quantum dot is extracted and agrees well with a capacitance model of the integrated sensor and quantum dot system.

  10. Nonlinear Optical Interactions in Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-16

    aU internal audits for TACAN Corporation. 7 V. Coupling A, C. N. R. S., Physique du Solide et Energie Solaire We have an ongoing interaction with Dr...underway at TACAN Corporation. We regularly discuss optical pumping and four - wave parametric mixing in multiple quantum well material and plan to

  11. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  12. Monitoring Cellular Interactions during T Cell Activation at the Single Molecule Level Using Semiconductor Quantum-Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-10

    correlation spectroscopy (FCS); (5) testing the lipid raft hypothesis by single molecule imaging of targeted peptide-coated quantum dots; and (6) molecular cloning and fusion of avidin to immunological synapse (IS) components.

  13. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-10-31

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  14. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future. PMID:24191178

  15. Quantum Phenomena in Semiconductor Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    observed by changing the magnetic field through the loop, which changes the phase of the wavefunction, due to the Aharonov - Bohm effect. The...fields (<IT), in order to determine the dependence of the Aharonov - Bohm (AB) effect on channel width and field. The Quantum Hall Effect was studied at...interference may be observed through the addition of an extra phase difference between the two waves. The Aharonov - Bohm effect gives rise to such a phase

  16. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  17. Optical Nonlinearities and Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Klimov, V.; McBranch, D.; Schwarz, C.

    1998-08-10

    Low-dimensional semiconductors have attracted great interest due to the potential for tailoring their linear and nonlinear optical properties over a wide-range. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC's) represent a class of quasi-zero-dimensional objects or quantum dots. Due to quantum cordhement and a large surface-to-volume ratio, the linear and nonlinear optical properties, and the carrier dynamics in NC's are significantly different horn those in bulk materials. napping at surface states can lead to a fast depopulation of quantized states, accompanied by charge separation and generation of local fields which significantly modifies the nonlinear optical response in NC's. 3D carrier confinement also has a drastic effect on the energy relaxation dynamics. In strongly confined NC's, the energy-level spacing can greatly exceed typical phonon energies. This has been expected to significantly inhibit phonon-related mechanisms for energy losses, an effect referred to as a phonon bottleneck. It has been suggested recently that the phonon bottleneck in 3D-confined systems can be removed due to enhanced role of Auger-type interactions. In this paper we report femtosecond (fs) studies of ultrafast optical nonlinearities, and energy relaxation and trap ping dynamics in three types of quantum-dot systems: semiconductor NC/glass composites made by high temperature precipitation, ion-implanted NC's, and colloidal NC'S. Comparison of ultrafast data for different samples allows us to separate effects being intrinsic to quantum dots from those related to lattice imperfections and interface properties.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of Semiconductor Quantum Well Structures and Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Saini, Subbash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this talk I will cover two aspects of modeling and simulation efforts at NASA Ames Research Center. In the quantum well structure simulation, we typically start from the quantum mechanical calculation of the quantum well structures for the confined/and unconfined eigen states and functions. A bandstructure calculation of the k*p type is then performed for the confined valence states. This information is then used to computer the optical gain and refractive index of the quantum well structures by solving the linearized multiband semiconductor Bloch equations with the many-body interactions included. In our laser simulation, we typically solve the envelope equations for the laser field in space-time domain, coupled with a reduced set of material equations using the microscopic calculation of the first step. Finally I will show some examples of both aspects of simulation and modeling.

  19. Guiding effect of quantum wells in semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V Ya; Dikareva, Natalia V; Dubinov, A A; Zvonkov, B N; Karzanova, Maria V; Kudryavtsev, K E; Nekorkin, S M; Yablonskii, A N

    2013-05-31

    The guiding effect of InGaAs quantum wells in GaAs- and InP-based semiconductor lasers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The results demonstrate that such waveguides can be effectively used in laser structures with a large refractive index difference between the quantum well material and semiconductor matrix and a large number of quantum wells (e.g. in InP-based structures). (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  20. Quantum walks of interacting fermions on a cycle graph

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum walks have been employed widely to develop new tools for quantum information processing recently. A natural quantum walk dynamics of interacting particles can be used to implement efficiently the universal quantum computation. In this work quantum walks of electrons on a graph are studied. The graph is composed of semiconductor quantum dots arranged in a circle. Electrons can tunnel between adjacent dots and interact via Coulomb repulsion, which leads to entanglement. Fermionic entanglement dynamics is obtained and evaluated. PMID:27681057

  1. Quantum-confined Stark effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Chen, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Quantum-confined Stark effects (QCSE) on excitons, i.e., the influence of a uniform electric field on the confined excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (QD's), have been studied by using a numerical matrix-diagonalization scheme. The energy levels and the wave functions of the ground and several excited states of excitons in CdS and CdS1-xSex quantum dots as functions of the size of the quantum dot and the applied electric field have been obtained. The electron and hole distributions and wave function overlap inside the QD's have also been calculated for different QD sizes and electric fields. It is found that the electron and hole wave function overlap decreases under an electric field, which implies an increased exciton recombination lifetime due to QCSE. The energy level redshift and the enhancement of the exciton recombination lifetime are due to the polarization of the electron-hole pair under the applied electric field.

  2. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Sapsford, Kim E.; Pons, Thomas; Medintz, Igor L.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are a recently developed class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping to create a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest for biosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow size-tunable photoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching and chemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for several predominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, as generalized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when working with QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s) and appropriate strategies for attaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  3. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey Farias, G. A.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-07

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  4. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  5. Universal quantum computation in a semiconductor quantum wire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-11-01

    Universal quantum computation (UQC) using Majorana fermions on a two-dimensional topological superconducting (TS) medium remains an outstanding open problem. This is because the quantum gate set that can be generated by braiding of the Majorana fermions does not include any two-qubit gate and also no single-qubit π/8 phase gate. In principle, it is possible to create these crucial extra gates using quantum interference of Majorana fermion currents. However, it is not clear if the motion of the various order parameter defects (vortices, domain walls, etc.), to which the Majorana fermions are bound in a TS medium, can be quantum coherent. We show that these obstacles can be overcome using a semiconductor quantum wire network in the vicinity of an s-wave superconductor, by constructing topologically protected two-qubit gates and any arbitrary single-qubit phase gate in a topologically unprotected manner, which can be error corrected using magic-state distillation. Thus our strategy, using a judicious combination of topologically protected and unprotected gate operations, realizes UQC on a quantum wire network with a remarkably high error threshold of 0.14 as compared to 10-3 to 10-4 in ordinary unprotected quantum computation.

  6. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Devices: Theory and Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Quantum transport effects including electron or hole tunneling through potential barriers and buildup in quantum wells are important in predicting...semiconductor device. A new extension of the classical hydrodynamic model to include quantum transport effects was derived. This "smooth" quantum

  7. Bulk Rashba Semiconductors and Related Quantum Phenomena.

    PubMed

    Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Ogawa, Naoki

    2017-03-29

    Bithmuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = Cl, Br and I) are model examples of bulk Rashba semiconductors, exhibiting a giant Rashba-type spin splitting among their both valence and conduction bands. Extensive spectroscopic and transport experiments combined with the state-of-the-art first-principles calculations have revealed many unique quantum phenomena emerging from the bulk Rashba effect in these systems. The novel features such as the exotic inter- and intra-band optical transitions, enhanced magneto-optical response, divergent orbital dia-/para-magnetic susceptibility and helical spin textures with a nontrivial Berry's phase in the momentum space are among the salient discoveries, all arising from this effect. Also, it is theoretically proposed and indications have been experimentally reported that bulk Rashba semiconductors such as BiTeI have the capability of becoming a topological insulator under the application of a hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overview these studies and show that BiTeX are an ideal platform to explore the next aspects of quantum matter, which could ultimately be utilized to create spintronic devices with novel functionalities.

  8. Optical Studies of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yükselici, H.; Allahverdi, Ç.; Aşıkoğlu, A.; Ünlü, H.; Baysal, A.; Çulha, M.; İnce, R.; İnce, A.; Feeney, M.; Athalin, H.

    Optical absorption (ABS), steady-state photoluminescence (PL), resonant Raman, and photoabsorption (PA) spectroscopies are employed to study quantum-size effects in II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) grown in glass samples. We observe a size-dependent shift in the energetic position of the first exciton peak and have examined the photoinduced evolution of the differential absorption spectra. The Raman shifts of the phonon modes are employed to monitor stoichiometric changes in the composition of the QDs during growth. Two sets of glass samples were prepared from color filters doped with CdS x Se1 - x and Zn x Cd1 - x Te. We analyze the optical properties of QDs through the ABS, PL, resonant Raman, and PA spectroscopies. The glass samples were prepared from commercially available semiconductor doped filters by a two-step thermal treatment. The average size of QDs is estimated from the energetic position of the first exciton peak in the ABS spectrum. A calculation based on a quantized-state effective mass model in the strong confinement regime predicts that the average radius of QDs in the glass samples ranges from 2.9 to 4.9 nm for CdTe and from 2.2 to 9.3 nm for CdS0. 08Se0. 92. We have also studied the nonlinear optical properties of QDs by reviewing the results of size-dependent photoinduced modulations in the first exciton band of CdTe QDs studied by PA spectroscopy.

  9. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  10. Semiconductor quantum dots for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Samia, Anna C S; Chen, Xiaobo; Burda, Clemens

    2003-12-24

    The applicability of semiconductor QDs in photodynamic therapy (PDT) was evaluated by studying the interaction between CdSe QDs with a known silicon phthalocyanine PDT photosensitizer, Pc4. The study revealed that the QDs could be used to sensitize the PDT agent through a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, or interact directly with molecular oxygen via a triplet energy-transfer process (TET). Both mechanisms result in the generation of reactive singlet oxygen species that can be used for PDT cancer therapy.

  11. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  12. Quantum coherence induces pulse shape modification in a semiconductor optical amplifier at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczik, Mirco; Owschimikow, Nina; Korn, Julian; Lingnau, Benjamin; Kaptan, Yücel; Bimberg, Dieter; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy; Woggon, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Coherence in light–matter interaction is a necessary ingredient if light is used to control the quantum state of a material system. Coherent effects are firmly associated with isolated systems kept at low temperature. The exceedingly fast dephasing in condensed matter environments, in particular at elevated temperatures, may well erase all coherent information in the material at timescales shorter than a laser excitation pulse. Here we show for an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots that even in the presence of ultrafast dephasing, for suitably designed condensed matter systems quantum-coherent effects are robust enough to be observable at room temperature. Our conclusions are based on an analysis of the reshaping an ultrafast laser pulse undergoes on propagation through a semiconductor quantum dot amplifier. We show that this pulse modification contains the signature of coherent light–matter interaction and can be controlled by adjusting the population of the quantum dots via electrical injection. PMID:24336000

  13. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Cundiff, Steven T.

    2016-05-03

    This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program was to implement optical 2-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy and apply it to electronic excitations, including excitons, in semiconductors. Specifically of interest are quantum wells that exhibit disorder due to well width fluctuations and quantum dots. In both cases, 2-D spectroscopy will provide information regarding coupling among excitonic localization sites.

  14. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  15. Quantum coherence in semiconductor nanostructures for improved lasers and detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Modine, Normand Arthur; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm

    2006-02-01

    The potential for implementing quantum coherence in semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical modeling suggests that coherent dynamics should be possible in self-assembled quantum dots. Our experimental efforts have optimized InGaAs and InAs self-assembled quantum dots on GaAs for demonstrating coherent phenomena. Optical investigations have indicated the appropriate geometries for observing quantum coherence and the type of experiments for observing quantum coherence have been outlined. The optical investigation targeted electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in order to demonstrate an all optical delay line.

  16. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  18. Bias-induced photoluminescence quenching of single colloidal quantum dots embedded in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Dorn, August; Nair, Gautham P; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate reversible quenching of the photoluminescence from single CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots embedded in thin films of the molecular organic semiconductor N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD) in a layered device structure. Our analysis, based on current and charge carrier density, points toward field ionization as the dominant photoluminescence quenching mechanism. Blinking traces from individual quantum dots reveal that the photoluminescence amplitude decreases continuously as a function of increasing forward bias even at the single quantum dot level. In addition, we show that quantum dot photoluminescence is quenched by aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) in chloroform solutions as well as in thin solid films of Alq3 whereas TPD has little effect. This highlights the importance of chemical compatibility between semiconductor nanocrystals and surrounding organic semiconductors. Our study helps elucidate elementary interactions between quantum dots and organic semiconductors, knowledge needed for designing efficient quantum dot organic optoelectronic devices.

  19. A Quantum Dot with Spin-Orbit Interaction--Analytical Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, B.; Roy, B.

    2009-01-01

    The practical applicability of a semiconductor quantum dot with spin-orbit interaction gives an impetus to study analytical solutions to one- and two-electron quantum dots with or without a magnetic field.

  20. Ionization balance in semiconductor quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Janet L.

    1994-01-01

    The commonly assumed quasiequilibrium particle distribution with the same quasi-Fermi-level for all quantum-dot carriers in the same energy (conduction or valence) band is found not to be valid for a wide range of temperatures at the inversion populations and bound energy separations (greater than a LO phonon energy) used in the literature. Bound state occupation factors obtained from the steady state solution of rate equations describing the ionization balance in room-temperature 100-Å-radius GaAs quantum dots whose centers are separated by 400 Å are found to be very different from the quasiequilibrium distribution used in an example from the literature. In such quantum dots, bound state transitions result from collisions between charged particles via the Coulomb interaction, and from interband and intraband radiative processes. The critical free electron concentration above which collisional processes can establish a quasiequilibrium in the conduction band is found to exceed 1019 cm-3. Our numerical solution is in good agreement with Pitaevskii's model from atomic physics of an electron random walk in energy as modeled by a Fokker-Planck equation. In our simple model, electrons are captured into a bound conduction band state via three-body recombination and phonon emission, and drop into lower energy bound states via a series of collisional deexcitations before combining with a valence band hole. Solution of the rate equations is standard in numerical studies of stimulated emission in atomic plasmas, but our present discussion is, to our knowledge, the first in the literature on semiconductor quantum-dot lasers.

  1. Ligands Slow Down Pure-Dephasing in Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Kilina, Svetlana V; Tretiak, Sergei; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-09-22

    It is well-known experimentally and theoretically that surface ligands provide additional pathways for energy relaxation in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). They increase the rate of inelastic charge-phonon scattering and provide trap sites for the charges. We show that, surprisingly, ligands have the opposite effect on elastic electron-phonon scattering. Our simulations demonstrate that elastic scattering slows down in CdSe QDs passivated with ligands compared to that in bare QDs. As a result, the pure-dephasing time is increased, and the homogeneous luminescence line width is decreased in the presence of ligands. The lifetime of quantum superpositions of single and multiple excitons increases as well, providing favorable conditions for multiple excitons generation (MEG). Ligands reduce the pure-dephasing rates by decreasing phonon-induced fluctuations of the electronic energy levels. Surface atoms are most mobile in QDs, and therefore, they contribute greatly to the electronic energy fluctuations. The mobility is reduced by interaction with ligands. A simple analytical model suggests that the differences between the bare and passivated QDs persist for up to 5 nm diameters. Both low-frequency acoustic and high-frequency optical phonons participate in the dephasing processes in bare QDs, while low-frequency acoustic modes dominate in passivated QDs. The theoretical predictions regarding the pure-dephasing time, luminescence line width, and MEG can be verified experimentally by studying QDs with different surface passivation.

  2. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  3. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  4. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  5. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  6. Realizing ferromagnetic coupling in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wensheng; Liu, Qinghua; Wang, Chao; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yao, Tao; He, Jingfu; Sun, Zhihu; Pan, Zhiyun; Hu, Fengchun; Wu, Ziyu; Xie, Zhi; Wei, Shiqiang

    2014-01-22

    Manipulating the ferromagnetic interactions in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) is a central theme to the development of next-generation spin-based information technologies, but this remains a great challenge because of the intrinsic antiferromagnetic coupling between impurity ions therein. Here, we propose an effective approach capable of activating ferromagnetic exchange in ZnO-based DMSQDs, by virtue of a core/shell structure that engineers the energy level of the magnetic impurity 3d levels relative to the band edge. This idea has been successfully applied to Zn(0.96)Co(0.04)O DMSQDs covered by a shell of ZnS or Ag2S. First-principles calculations further indicate that covering a ZnS shell around the Co-doped ZnO core drives a transition of antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic interaction, which occurs within an effective depth of 1.2 nm underneath the surface in the core. This design opens up new possibility for effective manipulation of exchange interactions in doped oxide nanostructures for future spintronics applications.

  7. Valley Polarization in Size-Tunable Monolayer Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guohua; Czaplewski, David A.; Jung, Il Woong; Lenferink, Erik J.; Stanev, Teodor K.; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    Controlling the size of semiconductor nanostructures allows manipulation of the optical and electrical properties of band carriers. We show that laterally-confined monolayer MoS2 quantum dots can be created through top-down nanopatterning of an atomically-thin two-dimensional semiconductor. Semiconductor-compatible nanofabrication processing allows for these low-dimensional materials to be integrated into complex systems that harness their controllable optical properties. Size-dependent exciton energy shifts and linewidths are observed, demonstrating the influence of quantum confinement. The patterned dots exhibit the same valley polarization characteristics as in a continuous MoS2 sheet, suggesting that monolayer semiconductor quantum dots could have potential for advancing quantum information applications. This work is supported by ISEN, the DOE-BES (DE-SC0012130), the NSF MRSEC program (DMR-1121262), and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, DOE-BES (DE-AC02-06CH11357). N.P.S. is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  8. Semiconductor quantum dots in bioanalysis: crossing the valley of death.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Susumu, Kimihiro; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have evolved beyond scientific novelties and are transitioning into bona fide analytical tools. We describe the burgeoning role of QDs in many different fields of bioanalyses and highlight the advantages afforded by their unique physical and optical properties.

  9. Strain-Gradient Position Mapping of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, P.-L.; Yeo, I.; Gloppe, A.; Nguyen, H. A.; Tumanov, D.; Dupont-Ferrier, E.; Malik, N. S.; Dupuy, E.; Claudon, J.; Gérard, J.-M.; Auffèves, A.; Arcizet, O.; Richard, M.; Poizat, J.-Ph.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a nondestructive method to determine the position of randomly distributed semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) integrated in a solid photonic structure. By setting the structure in an oscillating motion, we generate a large stress gradient across the QDs plane. We then exploit the fact that the QDs emission frequency is highly sensitive to the local material stress to map the position of QDs deeply embedded in a photonic wire antenna with an accuracy ranging from ±35 nm down to ±1 nm . In the context of fast developing quantum technologies, this technique can be generalized to different photonic nanostructures embedding any stress-sensitive quantum emitters.

  10. Semiconductor Quantum Dots in Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Frasco, Manuela F.; Chaniotakis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are nanometre-scale semiconductor crystals with unique optical properties that are advantageous for the development of novel chemical sensors and biosensors. The surface chemistry of luminescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked recognition molecules such as peptides, nucleic acids or small-molecule ligands. This review overviews the design of sensitive and selective nanoprobes, ranging from the type of target molecules to the optical transduction scheme. Representative examples of quantum dot-based optical sensors from this fast-moving field have been selected and are discussed towards the most promising directions for future research. PMID:22423206

  11. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  12. Patterned semiconductor inverted quantum dot photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. J.

    2016-03-01

    A novel inverted quantum dot structure is presented, which consists of an InGaAs quantum well that has been periodically perforated and then filled with the higher bandgap GaAs barrier material. This structure exhibits a unique quantized energy structure something like a planar atomic bond structure and formation of allowed and forbidden energy bands instead of highly localized, fully discrete states. We describe the growth, processing and characteristics of inverted quantum dot structures and outline interesting and potentially important effects arising from the introduction of nanoscale features (<50 nm) in the active medium.

  13. Ultrafast dynamics of many-body processes and fundamental quantum mechanical phenomena in semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Shah, Jagdeep

    2000-01-01

    The large dielectric constant and small effective mass in a semiconductor allows a description of its electronic states in terms of envelope wavefunctions whose energy, time, and length scales are mesoscopic, i.e., halfway between those of atomic and those of condensed matter systems. This property makes it possible to demonstrate and investigate many quantum mechanical, many-body, and quantum kinetic phenomena with tabletop experiments that would be nearly impossible in other systems. This, along with the ability to custom-design semiconductor nanostructures, makes semiconductors an ideal laboratory for experimental investigations. We present an overview of some of the most exciting results obtained in semiconductors in recent years using the technique of ultrafast nonlinear optical spectrocopy. These results show that Coulomb correlation plays a major role in semiconductors and makes them behave more like a strongly interacting system than like an atomic system. The results provide insights into the physics of strongly interacting systems that are relevant to other condensed matter systems, but not easily accessible in other materials. PMID:10716981

  14. Exciton Relaxation and Electron Transfer Dynamics of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cunming

    Quantum dots (QDs), also referred to as colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, exhibit unique electronic and optical properties arising from their three-dimensional confinement and strongly enhanced coulomb interactions. Developing a detailed understanding of the exciton relaxation dynamics within QDs is important not only for sake of exploring the fundamental physics of quantum confinement processes, but also for their applications. Ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, as a powerful tool to explore the relaxation dynamics of excitons, was employed to characterize the hot single/multiexciton relaxation dynamics at the first four exciton states of CdSe/CdZnS QDs. We observed for the first time that the hot hole can relax through two possible pathways: Intraband multiple phonon coupling and intrinsic defect trapping, with a lifetime of ˜7 ps. Additionally, an ultra-short component of ˜ 8 ps, directly associated with the Auger recombination of highly energetic exciton states, was discovered. After exploring the exciton relaxation inside QDs, ultrafast TA spectroscopy was further applied to study the electron transferring outside from QDs. By using a brand-new photocatalytic system consisting of CdSe QDs and Ni-dihydrolipoic acid (Ni-DHLA) catalyst, which has represented a robust photocatalysis of H2 from water, the photoinduced electron transfer (ET) dynamics between QD and the catalyst, one of most important steps during H2 generation, was studied. We found smaller bare CdSe QDs exhibit a better ET performance and CdS shelling on the bare QDs leads to worsen the ET. The calculations of effective mass approximation (EMA) and Marcus theory show the ET process is mainly dominated by driving force, electronic coupling strength and reorganization energy between QD and the catalyst.

  15. Screening effect on the exciton mediated nonlinear optical susceptibility of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Jessica E Q; Lyra, Marcelo L; Lima, R P A

    2014-11-17

    We study the exciton contribution to the third-order optical susceptibility of one-dimensional semiconductor quantum dots and show that the screening of the electron-hole interaction has a strong influence on the nonlinear optical properties in the weak confinement regime. Based on a density matrix formulation, we estimate the spectrum of the third-order optical susceptibility and its contribution to the refraction index and absorption coefficient. In particular, we show that the multipeaked spectrum of the nonlinear susceptibility, which results from the hydrogenoid character of the exciton eigenstates for a purely Coulombian electron-hole coupling, is reverted towards a single peaked structure as the interaction becomes strongly screened, thus leading to a substantial enhancement of the nonlinear optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots.

  16. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  17. Quantum Hall effect in semiconductor systems with quantum dots and antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltukov, Ya. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The integer quantum Hall effect in systems of semiconductor quantum dots and antidots is studied theoretically as a factor of temperature. It is established that the conditions for carrier localization in quantum-dot systems favor the observation of the quantum Hall effect at higher temperatures than in quantum-well systems. The obtained numerical results show that the fundamental plateau corresponding to the transition between the ground and first excited Landau levels can be retained up to a temperature of T ∼ 50 K, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the case of quantum wells. Implementation of the quantum Hall effect at such temperatures requires quantum-dot systems with controllable characteristics, including the optimal size and concentration and moderate geometrical and composition fluctuations. In addition, ordered arrangement is desirable, hence quantum antidots are preferable.

  18. Charge-tunable quantum plasmons in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Schimpf, Alina M; Thakkar, Niket; Gunthardt, Carolyn E; Masiello, David J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2014-01-28

    Nanomaterials exhibiting plasmonic optical responses are impacting sensing, information processing, catalysis, solar, and photonics technologies. Recent advances have expanded the portfolio of plasmonic nanostructures into doped semiconductor nanocrystals, which allow dynamic manipulation of carrier densities. Once interpreted as intraband single-electron transitions, the infrared absorption of doped semiconductor nanocrystals is now commonly attributed to localized surface plasmon resonances and analyzed using the classical Drude model to determine carrier densities. Here, we show that the experimental plasmon resonance energies of photodoped ZnO nanocrystals with controlled sizes and carrier densities diverge from classical Drude model predictions at small sizes, revealing quantum plasmons in these nanocrystals. A Lorentz oscillator model more adequately describes the data and illustrates a closer link between plasmon resonances and single-electron transitions in semiconductors than in metals, highlighting a fundamental contrast between these two classes of plasmonic materials.

  19. Controlling Carrier Dynamics using Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Matthew C.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2016-06-01

    The articles included in this special issue of Chemical Physics explore the use of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals to control the flow of energy and/or charge. Colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures are an emerging class of functional materials being developed for novel opto-electronic applications. In the last few years numerous examples in the literature have emerged where novel nanostructures have been tailored such as to achieve a specific function thus moving the field from the stage of discovery of novel behaviors to that of control of nanostructure properties. In addition to the internal structure of the NCs their assemblies can be tailored to achieve emergent properties and add additional control parameters that determine the final opto-electronic properties. These principles are explored via variations in shape, size, surface ligands, heterostructuring, morphology, composition, and assemblies and are demonstrated through measurements of excited state processes, such as Auger recombination; photoluminescence; charge separation and charge transport.

  20. Static gain saturation in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Meuer, Christian; Kim, Jungho; Laemmlin, Matthias; Liebich, Sven; Capua, Amir; Eisenstein, Gadi; Kovsh, Alexey R; Mikhrin, Sergey S; Krestnikov, Igor L; Bimberg, Dieter

    2008-05-26

    Measurements of saturated amplified spontaneous emission-spectra of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers demonstrate efficient replenishment of the quantum-dot ground state population from excited states. This saturation behavior is perfectly modeled by a rate equation model. We examined experimentally the dependence of saturation on the drive current and the saturating optical pump power as well as on the pump wavelength. A coherent noise spectral hole is observed with which we assess dynamical properties and propose optimization of the SOA operating parameters for high speed applications.

  1. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  2. Computational models for the berry phase in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, S.; Melnik, R. V. N.; Sebetci, A.

    2014-10-01

    By developing a new model and its finite element implementation, we analyze the Berry phase low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures, focusing on quantum dots (QDs). In particular, we solve the Schrödinger equation and investigate the evolution of the spin dynamics during the adiabatic transport of the QDs in the 2D plane along circular trajectory. Based on this study, we reveal that the Berry phase is highly sensitive to the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit lengths.

  3. Excitability in a quantum dot semiconductor laser with optical injection.

    PubMed

    Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Rasskazov, O; Melnik, S; Hartnett, M; Greene, G; McInerney, J G; Rachinskii, D; Huyet, G

    2007-04-13

    We experimentally analyze the dynamics of a quantum dot semiconductor laser operating under optical injection. We observe the appearance of single- and double-pulse excitability at one boundary of the locking region. Theoretical considerations show that these pulses are related to a saddle-node bifurcation on a limit cycle as in the Adler equation. The double pulses are related to a period-doubling bifurcation and occur on the same homoclinic curve as the single pulses.

  4. Computational models for the berry phase in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, S. Melnik, R. V. N.; Sebetci, A.

    2014-10-06

    By developing a new model and its finite element implementation, we analyze the Berry phase low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures, focusing on quantum dots (QDs). In particular, we solve the Schrödinger equation and investigate the evolution of the spin dynamics during the adiabatic transport of the QDs in the 2D plane along circular trajectory. Based on this study, we reveal that the Berry phase is highly sensitive to the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit lengths.

  5. Semiconductor quantum dot toxicity in a mouse in vivo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozrova, Svetlana V.; Baryshnikova, Maria A.; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are increasingly widely used in clinical medicine. Their most promising potential applications are cancer diagnosis, including in vivo tumour imaging and targeted drug delivery. In this connection, the main questions are whether or not QDs are toxic for humans and, if they are, what concentration is relatively harmless. We have carried out in vivo experiments with CdSe/ZnS fluorescent semiconductor core/shell QDs, which are currently the most widely used in research.

  6. Low temperature nano-spin filtering using a diluted magnetic semiconductor core-shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Saikat; Sen, Pratima; Andrews, Joshep Thomas; Sen, Pranay Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The spin polarized electron transport properties and spin polarized tunneling current have been investigated analytically in a diluted magnetic semiconductor core-shell quantum dot in the presence of applied electric and magnetic fields. Assuming the electron wave function to satisfy WKB approximation, the electron energy eigenvalues have been calculated. The spin polarized tunneling current and the spin dependent tunneling coefficient are obtained by taking into account the exchange interaction and Zeeman splitting. Numerical estimates made for a specific diluted magnetic semiconductor, viz., Zn1-xMnxSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dot establishes the possibility of a nano-spin filter for a particular biasing voltage and applied magnetic field. Influence of applied voltage on spin polarized electron transport has been investigated in a CSQD.

  7. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-17

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  8. Biexciton quantum yield of single semiconductor nanocrystals from photon statistics

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Zhao, Jing; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2012-01-01

    Biexciton properties strongly affect the usability of a light emitter in quantum photon sources and lasers but are difficult to measure for single fluorophores at room temperature due to luminescence intermittency and bleaching at the high excitation fluences usually required. Here, we observe the biexciton (BX) to exciton (X) to ground photoluminescence cascade of single colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) under weak excitation in a g(2) photon correlation measurement and show that the normalized amplitude of the cascade feature is equal to the ratio of the BX to X fluorescence quantum yields. This imposes a limit on the attainable depth of photon antibunching and provides a robust means to study single emitter biexciton physics. In NC samples, we show that the BX quantum yield is considerably inhomogeneous, consistent with the defect sensitivity expected of the Auger nonradiative recombination mechanism. The method can be extended to study X,BX spectral and polarization correlations. PMID:21288042

  9. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions. PMID:26983379

  10. Quantum model for mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beugeling, W.; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots in GaAs/InGaAs structures have been proposed as a candidate system for realizing quantum computing. The short coherence time of the electronic quantum state that arises from coupling to the nuclei of the substrate is dramatically increased if the system is subjected to a magnetic field and to repeated optical pulsing. This enhancement is due to mode locking: oscillation frequencies resonant with the pulsing frequencies are enhanced, while off-resonant oscillations eventually die out. Because the resonant frequencies are determined by the pulsing frequency only, the system becomes immune to frequency shifts caused by the nuclear coupling and by slight variations between individual quantum dots. The effects remain even after the optical pulsing is terminated. In this work, we explore the phenomenon of mode locking from a quantum mechanical perspective. We treat the dynamics using the central-spin model, which includes coupling to 10-20 nuclei and incoherent decay of the excited electronic state, in a perturbative framework. Using scaling arguments, we extrapolate our results to realistic system parameters. We estimate that the synchronization to the pulsing frequency needs time scales in the order of 1 s .

  11. Quantum effects on compressional Alfven waves in compensated semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-03-15

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional Alfven wave in compensated electron-hole semiconductor plasmas is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime in this paper. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential, and the quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential in the momentum balance equations of the charge carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the compressional Alfven wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Typical values of the parameters for GaAs, GaSb, and GaN semiconductors are considered in analyzing the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave. Detailed analysis of the modulation instability in the long-wavelength regime is presented. For typical parameter ranges of the semiconductor plasmas and at the long-wavelength regime, it is found that the wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the effect of the Bohm potential may be neglected in comparison with the effect of the exchange-correlation potential in the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave.

  12. Uniform Doping in Quantum-Dots-Based Dilute Magnetic Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Shetty, Amitha; Pavan, A R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2016-07-07

    Effective manipulation of magnetic spin within a semiconductor leading to a search for ferromagnets with semiconducting properties has evolved into an important field of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Although a lot of research is focused on understanding the still controversial origin of magnetism, efforts are also underway to develop new materials with higher magnetic temperatures for spintronics applications. However, so far, efforts toward quantum-dots(QDs)-based DMS materials are plagued with problems of phase separation, leading to nonuniform distribution of dopant ions. In this work, we have developed a strategy to synthesize highly crystalline, single-domain DMS system starting from a small magnetic core and allowing it to diffuse uniformly inside a thick CdS semiconductor matrix and achieve DMS QDs. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy-scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM-EDX) indicates the homogeneous distribution of magnetic impurities inside the semiconductor QDs leading to superior magnetic property. Further, the versatility of this technique was demonstrated by obtaining ultra large particles (∼60 nm) with uniform doping concentration as well as demonstrating the high quality magnetic response.

  13. Analysis of quantum semiconductor heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthrie, Daniel K.

    1998-09-01

    The microelectronics industry is diligently working to achieve the goal of gigascale integration (GSI) by early in the 21st century. For the past twenty-five years, progress toward this goal has been made by continually scaling down device technology. Unfortunately, this trend cannot continue to the point of producing arbitrarily small device sizes. One possible solution to this problem that is currently under intensive study is the relatively new area of quantum devices. Quantum devices represent a new class of microelectronic devices that operate by utilizing the wave-like nature (reflection, refraction, and confinement) of electrons together with the laws of quantum mechanics to construct useful devices. One difficulty associated with these structures is the absence of measurement techniques that can fully characterize carrier transport in such devices. This thesis addresses this need by focusing on the study of carrier transport in quantum semiconductor heterostructures using a relatively new and versatile measurement technique known as ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). To achieve this goal, a systematic approach that encompasses a set of progressively more complex structures is utilized. First, the simplest BEES structure possible, the metal/semiconductor interface, is thoroughly investigated in order to provide a foundation for measurements on more the complex structures. By modifying the semiclassical model commonly used to describe the experimental BEES spectrum, a very complete and accurate description of the basic structure has been achieved. Next, a very simple semiconductor heterostructure, a Ga1-xAlxAs single-barrier structure, was measured and analyzed. Low-temperature measurements on this structure were used to investigate the band structure and electron-wave interference effects in the Ga1-xAlxAs single barrier structure. These measurements are extended to a simple quantum device by designing, measuring, and analyzing a set of

  14. Hot electron dynamics at semiconductor surfaces: Implications for quantum dot photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdale, William A., III

    Finding a viable supply of clean, renewable energy is one of the most daunting challenges facing the world today. Solar cells have had limited impact in meeting this challenge because of their high cost and low power conversion efficiencies. Semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, are promising materials for use in novel solar cells because they can be processed with potentially inexpensive solution-based techniques and because they are predicted to have novel optoelectronic properties that could enable the realization of ultra-efficient solar power converters. However, there is a lack of fundamental understanding regarding the behavior of highly-excited, or "hot," charge carriers near quantum-dot and semiconductor interfaces, which is of paramount importance to the rational design of high-efficiency devices. The elucidation of these ultrafast hot electron dynamics is the central aim of this Dissertation. I present a theoretical framework for treating the electronic interactions between quantum dots and bulk semiconductor surfaces and propose a novel experimental technique, time-resolved surface second harmonic generation (TR-SHG), for probing these interactions. I then describe a series of experimental investigations into hot electron dynamics in specific quantum-dot/semiconductor systems. A two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (2PPE) study of the technologically-relevant ZnO(1010) surface reveals ultrafast (sub-30fs) cooling of hot electrons in the bulk conduction band, which is due to strong electron-phonon coupling in this highly polar material. The presence of a continuum of defect states near the conduction band edge results in Fermi-level pinning and upward (n-type) band-bending at the (1010) surface and provides an alternate route for electronic relaxation. In monolayer films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots, chemical treatment with either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol results in strong and tunable electronic coupling between neighboring quantum dots

  15. Water-solubilization and functionalization of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tyrakowski, Christina M; Isovic, Adela; Snee, Preston T

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are highly fluorescent nanocrystals that have abundant potential for uses in biological imaging and sensing. However, the best materials are synthesized in hydrophobic surfactants that prevent direct aqueous solubilization. While several methods have been developed to impart water-solubility, an aqueous QD dispersion has no inherent useful purpose and must be functionalized further. Due to the colloidal nature of QD dispersions, traditional methods of chemical conjugation in water either have low yields or cause irreversible precipitation of the sample. Here, we describe several methods to water-solubilize QDs and further functionalize the materials with chemical and/or biological vectors.

  16. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas J [Chapel Hill, NC; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  17. Nanophotonics Based on Semiconductor-Photonic Crystal/Quantum Dot and Metal-/Semiconductor-Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Kiyoshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Ikeda, Naoki; Tsuya, Daiju; Koide, Yasuo; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Nobuhiko; Ohkouchi, Shunsuke; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsui, Takayuki; Miura, Atsushi; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi; Sato, Kazuo

    This paper reviews our recent activities on nanophotonics based on a photonic crystal (PC)/quantum dot (QD)-combined structure for an all-optical device and a metal/semiconductor composite structure using surface plasmon (SP) and negative refractive index material (NIM). The former structure contributes to an ultrafast signal processing component by virtue of new PC design and QD selective-area-growth technologies, while the latter provides a new RGB color filter with a high precision and optical beam-steering device with a wide steering angle.

  18. Potential energy surface of excited semiconductors: Graphene quantum dot and BODIPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colherinhas, Guilherme; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-01

    Binding energy (BE) is an important descriptor in chemistry, which determines thermodynamics and phase behavior of a given substance. BE between two molecules is not directly accessible from the experiment. It has to be reconstructed from cohesive energies, vaporization heats, etc. We report BE for the excited states of two semiconductor molecules - boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) and graphene quantum dot (GQD) - with water. We show, for the first time, that excitation increases BE twofold at an optimal separation (energy minimum position), whereas higher separations lead to higher differences. Interestingly, the effects of excitation are similar irrespective of the dominant binding interactions (van der Waals or electrostatic) in the complex. This new knowledge is important for simulations of the excited semiconductors by simplified interaction functions.

  19. Excitability in optically injected semiconductor lasers: Contrasting quantum- well- and quantum-dot-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, B.; Bonatto, C.; Huyet, G.; Hegarty, S. P.

    2011-02-01

    Excitability is a generic prediction for an optically injected semiconductor laser. However, the details of the phenomenon differ depending on the type of device in question. For quantum-well lasers very complicated multipulse trajectories can be found, while for quantum-dot lasers the situation is much simpler. Experimental observations show the marked differences in the pulse shapes while theoretical considerations reveal the underlying mechanism responsible for the contrast, identifying the increased stability of quantum-dot lasers to perturbations as the root.

  20. Excitability in optically injected semiconductor lasers: contrasting quantum-well- and quantum-dot-based devices.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, B; Bonatto, C; Huyet, G; Hegarty, S P

    2011-02-01

    Excitability is a generic prediction for an optically injected semiconductor laser. However, the details of the phenomenon differ depending on the type of device in question. For quantum-well lasers very complicated multipulse trajectories can be found, while for quantum-dot lasers the situation is much simpler. Experimental observations show the marked differences in the pulse shapes while theoretical considerations reveal the underlying mechanism responsible for the contrast, identifying the increased stability of quantum-dot lasers to perturbations as the root.

  1. Subtle Chemistry of Colloidal, Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B. K.; Luther, J. M.; Beard, M. C.

    2012-06-26

    Nanoscale colloidal semiconductor structures with at least one dimension small enough to experience quantum confinement effects have captured the imagination and attention of scientists interested in controlling various chemical and photophysical processes. Aside from having desirable quantum confinement properties, colloidal nanocrystals are attractive because they are often synthesized in low-temperature, low-cost, and potentially scalable manners using simple benchtop reaction baths. Considerable progress in producing a variety of shapes, compositions, and complex structures has been achieved. However, there are challenges to overcome in order for these novel materials to reach their full potential and become new drivers for commercial applications. The final shape, composition, nanocrystal-ligand structure, and size can depend on a delicate interplay of precursors, surface ligands, and other compounds that may or may not participate in the reaction. In this Perspective, we discuss current efforts toward better understanding how the reactivity of the reagents can be used to produce unique and complex nanostructures.

  2. EPR and Ferromagnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Jürgen; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2003-08-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra in modulation-doped CdMnTe quantum wells [

    F. J. Teran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 91, 077201 (2003)
    ], we develop a theory of collective spin excitations in quasi-two-dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductors. Our theory explains the anomalously large Knight shift found in these experiments as a consequence of collective coupling between Mn-ion local moments and itinerant-electron spins. We use this theory to discuss the physics of ferromagnetism in (II,Mn)VI quantum wells and to speculate on the temperature at which it is likely to be observed in n-type modulation-doped systems.

  3. Quantum of optical absorption in two-dimensional semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Bechtel, Hans A; Plis, Elena; Martin, Michael C; Krishna, Sanjay; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2013-07-16

    The optical absorption properties of free-standing InAs nanomembranes of thicknesses ranging from 3 nm to 19 nm are investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Stepwise absorption at room temperature is observed, arising from the interband transitions between the subbands of 2D InAs nanomembranes. Interestingly, the absorptance associated with each step is measured to be ∼1.6%, independent of thickness of the membranes. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretically predicted absorptance quantum, AQ = πα/nc for each set of interband transitions in a 2D semiconductor, where α is the fine structure constant and nc is an optical local field correction factor. Absorptance quantization appears to be universal in 2D systems including III-V quantum wells and graphene.

  4. Polaron mass of charge carriers in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, A. Yu. Proshina, O. V.

    2015-10-15

    A theory of the interaction of charge carriers with optical phonons in a quantum well is developed with consideration for interface optical phonons. The dependence of the polaron effective mass on the quantum-well dimensions and dielectric characteristics of barriers is analyzed in detail. It is shown that, in narrow quantum wells, a quasi-two-dimensional polaron can be formed. In this case, however, the interaction parameters are defined by the charge-carrier effective mass in the quantum well and by the frequencies of interface optical phonons. If barriers are made of a nonpolar material, the polaron effective mass depends on the quantum-well width. As the quantum-well width is increased, a new mechanism of enhancement of the electron–phonon interaction develops. The mechanism is implemented, if the optical phonon energy is equal to the energy of one of the electronic transitions. This condition yields an unsteady dependence of the polaron effective mass on the quantum-well width.

  5. Optical Control of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Spin Qubits with Microcavity Exciton-Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Shruti; McMahon, Peter L.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-03-01

    Topological surface codes demand the least stringent threshold conditions and are most promising for implementing large quantum algorithms. Based on the resource requirements to reach fault tolerance, we develop a hardware platform for large scale quantum computation with semiconductor quantum dot (QD) electron spin qubits. The current proposals for implementation of two-qubit gates and quantum non demolition (QND) readout in a QuDOS (Quantum Dots with Optically Controlled Spins) architecture suffer from large error rates. In our scheme, the optical manipulation of the QD spin qubits is carried out using their Coulomb exchange interaction with optically excited, spin-polarized, laterally confined quantum well (LcQW) exciton-polaritons. The small mass of polaritons protects them from interaction with their solid-state environment (phonons) and enables strong coupling between spin qubits separated by a few microns. Furthermore, the excitation manifold of the QD is well separated from that of the LcQW polaritons, preventing a spin-flip event during readout. We will outline schemes for implementing fast, high-fidelity, single qubit gate, two-qubit geometric phase gate and single-shot QND measurement and analyze important decoherence mechanisms. The work being presented was carried out at Stanford University. Currently the author is at University of Sherbrooke, Canada.

  6. Progress of the quantum nano-optics of semiconductors group at Optical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Ricky; Gehl, Michael R.; Zandbergen, Sander; Keiffer, Patrick; Sears, Jasmine; Khitrova, Galina

    2014-09-01

    The history of semiconductor quantum optics group in the College of Optical Sciences will be discussed. The work from planar microcavities including VCSELs, photonic crystal cavities leading to the observation of strong-coupling between an L3 cavity and a quantum dot, and now metallic cavities coupled to quantum wells and quantum dots will be described.

  7. Quantum spintronics: engineering and manipulating atom-like spins in semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Awschalom, David D; Bassett, Lee C; Dzurak, Andrew S; Hu, Evelyn L; Petta, Jason R

    2013-03-08

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in isolating and controlling quantum coherence using charges and spins in semiconductors. Quantum control has been established at room temperature, and electron spin coherence times now exceed several seconds, a nine-order-of-magnitude increase in coherence compared with the first semiconductor qubits. These coherence times rival those traditionally found only in atomic systems, ushering in a new era of ultracoherent spintronics. We review recent advances in quantum measurements, coherent control, and the generation of entangled states and describe some of the challenges that remain for processing quantum information with spins in semiconductors.

  8. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  9. Dielectric confinement influenced screened Coulomb potential for a semiconductor quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonyan, K. H.; Margaryan, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A formalism of the Thomas-Fermi method has been applied for studying the screening effect due to quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor cylindrical quantum wire embedded in the barrier environment. With taking into account of strongly low dielectric properties of the barrier material, an applicability of the quantum wire effective interaction potential of the confined charge carriers has been revealed. Both screened quasi- one-dimensional interaction potential and effective screening length analytical expressions are derived in the first time. It is shown that in the long wavelength moderate limit dielectric confinement effect enhances strength of the screening potential depending on the both radius of the wire and effective screening length, whereas in the long wavelength strong limit the screening potential solely is determined by barrier environment dielectric properties.

  10. Exciton-plasmon and spin-plasmon interactions in hybrid semiconductor-metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorov, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Coulomb and electromagnetic interactions between excitons and plasmons in nanocrystals cause several effects: energy transfer between nanoparticles, plasmon enhancement, Lamb shifts of exciton lines, Fano interference. In a complex composed of semiconductor quantum dot and metal nanoparticle, plasmons interact with spin-polarized excitons. This interaction leads to the formation of coupled spin-plasmon excitations and to spin-dependent Fano resonances. If an exciton-plasmon system includes chiral elements (chiral molecules or nanocrystals), the exciton-plasmon interaction is able to create new plasmonic lines in circular dichroism spectra.

  11. Theory of quantum control of spin-photon dynamics and spin decoherence in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wang

    Single electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and single photon wavepacket propagating in an optical waveguide are investigated as carriers of quantum bit (qubit) for information processing. Cavity quantum electrodynamics of the coupled system composed of charged QD, microcavity and waveguide provides a quantum interface for the interplay of stationary spin qubits and flying photon qubits via cavity assisted optical control. This interface forms the basis for a wide range of essential functions of a quantum network, including transferring, swapping, and entangling qubits at distributed quantum nodes as well as a deterministic source and an efficient detector of a single photon wavepacket with arbitrarily specified shape. The cavity assisted optical process also made possible ultrafast initialization and QND readout of the spin qubit in QD. In addition, the strong optical nonlinearity of dot-cavity-waveguide coupled system enables phase gate and entanglement operation for flying single photon qubits in waveguides. The coherence of the electron spin is the wellspring of these quantum applications being investigated. At low temperature and strong magnetic field, the dominant cause of electron spin decoherence is the coupling with the interacting lattice nuclear spins. We present a quantum solution to the coupled dynamics of the electron with the nuclear spin bath. The decoherence is treated in terms of quantum entanglement of the electron with the nuclear pair-flip excitations driven by the various nuclear interactions. A novel nuclear interaction, mediated by virtue spin-flips of the single electron, plays an important role in single spin free-induction decay (FID). The spin echo not only refocuses the dephasing by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble dynamics but also eliminates the decoherence by electron-mediated nuclear interaction. Thus, the decoherence times for single spin FID and ensemble spin echo are significantly different. The quantum theory of

  12. QCAD simulation and optimization of semiconductor double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Kalashnikova, Irina; Muller, Richard Partain; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Young, Ralph Watson

    2013-12-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly silicon double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum qubits. The simulator has three di erentiating features: (i) its core contains nonlinear Poisson, e ective mass Schrodinger, and Con guration Interaction solvers that have massively parallel capability for high simulation throughput, and can be run individually or combined self-consistently for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices; (ii) the core solvers show superior convergence even at near-zero-Kelvin temperatures, which is critical for modeling quantum computing devices; (iii) it couples with an optimization engine Dakota that enables optimization of gate voltages in DQDs for multiple desired targets. The Poisson solver includes Maxwell- Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, supports Dirichlet, Neumann, interface charge, and Robin boundary conditions, and includes the e ect of dopant incomplete ionization. The solver has shown robust nonlinear convergence even in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, and has been extensively used to quickly obtain the semiclassical electrostatic potential in DQD devices. The self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solver has achieved robust and monotonic convergence behavior for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices at very low temperatures by using a predictor-correct iteration scheme. The QCAD simulator enables the calculation of dot-to-gate capacitances, and comparison with experiment and between solvers. It is observed that computed capacitances are in the right ballpark when compared to experiment, and quantum con nement increases capacitance when the number of electrons is xed in a quantum dot. In addition, the coupling of QCAD with Dakota allows to rapidly identify which device layouts are more likely leading to few-electron quantum dots. Very efficient QCAD simulations on a large number of fabricated and proposed Si DQDs have made it possible to provide fast feedback for design

  13. Tunable optical delay via carrier induced exciton dephasing in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Susanta; Guo, Yan; Wang, Hailin

    2006-04-03

    We report the experimental realization of a tunable optical delay by exploiting unique incoherent nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors. The tunable optical delay takes advantage of the strong Coulomb interactions between excitons and free carriers and uses optical injection of free carriers to broaden and bleach an exciton absorption resonance. Fractional delay exceeding 200% has been obtained for an 8 ps optical pulse propagating near the heavy-hole excitonic transition in a GaAs quantum well structure. Tunable optical delay based on optical injection of free carriers avoids strong absorption of the pump beam and is also robust against variations in the frequency of the pump beam.

  14. Density-Gradient Theory: A Macroscopic Approach to Quantum Confinement and Tunneling in Semiconductor Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    flow of electrons and holes in Germanium and other semiconductors. Bell Syst. Tech. J. 29, 560 (1950) 4. Maxwell, J.C.: On stresses in rarefied gases...especially by the phenomena of quantum confinement and quantum tunneling. The various mathematical descriptions of electron flow in biased semiconductors...patently inappropriate. 1.2 Quantum transport The three main “quantum” behaviors of an electron gas in a semiconductor—all of course well known—that

  15. Dynamics of Photoexcited State of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Dhara J.

    In this thesis, non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) of excited states in semiconductor quantum dots are investigated. Nanoscale systems provide important opportunities for theory and computation for research because the experimental tools often provide an incomplete picture of the structure and/or function of nanomaterials, and theory can often fill in missing features crucial in understanding what is being measured. The simulation of NAMD is an indispensable tool for understanding complex ultrafast photoinduced processes such as charge and energy transfer, thermal relaxation, and charge recombination. Based on the state-of-the-art ab initio approaches in both the energy and time domains, the thesis presents a comprehensive discussion of the dynamical processes in quantum dots, ranging from the initial photon absorption to the final emission. We investigate the energy relaxation and transfer rates in pure and surface passivated quantum dots of different sizes. The study establishes the fundamental mechanisms of the electron and hole relaxation processes with and without hole traps. We develop and implement more accurate and efficient methods for NAMD. These methods are advantageous over the traditional ones when one encounters classically forbidden transitions. We also explore the effect of decoherence and non-adiabatic couplings on the dynamics. The results indicate significant influence on the accuracy and related computational cost of the simulated dynamics.

  16. Non-blinking semiconductor colloidal quantum dots for biology, optoelectronics and quantum optics.

    PubMed

    Spinicelli, Piernicola; Mahler, Benoit; Buil, Stéphanie; Quélin, Xavier; Dubertret, Benoit; Hermier, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-14

    Twinkle, twinkle: The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. There are various approaches for obtaining non-blinking nanocrystals, one of which is to grow a thick coat of CdS on the CdSe core (see picture). Applications of this method in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing are discussed.The blinking of semiconductor colloidal nanocrystals is the main inconvenience of these bright nanoemitters. For some years, research on this phenomenon has demonstrated the possibility to progress beyond this problem by suppressing this fluorescence intermittency in various ways. After a brief overview on the microscopic mechanism of blinking, we review the various approaches used to obtain non-blinking nanocrystals and discuss the commitment of this crucial improvement to applications in the fields of optoelectronic devices, biologic labelling and quantum information processing.

  17. Binding energies of trions and biexcitons in two-dimensional semiconductors from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyniszewski, M.; Mostaani, E.; Drummond, N. D.; Fal'ko, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    Excitonic effects play a particularly important role in the optoelectronic behavior of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. To facilitate the interpretation of experimental photoabsorption and photoluminescence spectra we provide statistically exact diffusion quantum Monte Carlo binding-energy data for Mott-Wannier models of excitons, trions, and biexcitons in 2D semiconductors. We also provide contact pair densities to allow a description of contact (exchange) interactions between charge carriers using first-order perturbation theory. Our data indicate that the binding energy of a trion is generally larger than that of a biexciton in 2D semiconductors. We provide interpolation formulas giving the binding energy and contact density of 2D semiconductors as functions of the electron and hole effective masses and the in-plane polarizability.

  18. Injection Locking of a Semiconductor Double Quantum Dot Micromaser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.-Y.; Stehlik, J.; Gullans, M. J.; Taylor, J. M.; Petta, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Emission linewidth is an important figure of merit for masers and lasers. We recently demonstrated a semiconductor double quantum dot (DQD) micromaser where photons are generated through single electron tunneling events. Charge noise directly couples to the DQD energy levels, resulting in a maser linewidth that is more than 100 times larger than the Schawlow-Townes prediction. Here we demonstrate a linewidth narrowing of more than a factor 10 by locking the DQD emission to a coherent tone that is injected to the input port of the cavity. We measure the injection locking range as a function of cavity input power and show that it is in agreement with the Adler equation. The position and amplitude of distortion sidebands that appear outside of the injection locking range are quantitatively examined. Our results show that this unconventional maser, which is impacted by strong charge noise and electron-phonon coupling, is well described by standard laser models. PMID:28127226

  19. Magnetically engineered semiconductor quantum dots as multimodal imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lihong; Ding, Ke; Kershaw, Stephen V; Kempson, Ivan M; Rogach, Andrey L; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-10-08

    Light-emitting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) combined with magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents within a single nanoparticle platform are considered to perform as multimodal imaging probes in biomedical research and related clinical applications. The principles of their rational design are outlined and contemporary synthetic strategies are reviewed (heterocrystalline growth; co-encapsulation or assembly of preformed QDs and magnetic nanoparticles; conjugation of magnetic chelates onto QDs; and doping of QDs with transition metal ions), identifying the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. Some of the opportunities and benefits that arise through in vivo imaging using these dual-mode probes are highlighted where tumor location and delineation is demonstrated in both MRI and fluorescence modality. Work on the toxicological assessments of QD/magnetic nanoparticles is also reviewed, along with progress in reducing their toxicological side effects for eventual clinical use. The review concludes with an outlook for future biomedical imaging and the identification of key challenges in reaching clinical applications.

  20. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Biodiagnostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kairdolf, Brad A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.; Young, Andrew N.; Nie, Shuming

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future. PMID:23527547

  1. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Biodiagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairdolf, Brad A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Stokes, Todd H.; Wang, May D.; Young, Andrew N.; Nie, Shuming

    2013-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting particles on the nanometer scale that have emerged as a new class of fluorescent labels for chemical analysis, molecular imaging, and biomedical diagnostics. Compared with traditional fluorescent probes, QDs have unique optical and electronic properties such as size-tunable light emission, narrow and symmetric emission spectra, and broad absorption spectra that enable the simultaneous excitation of multiple fluorescence colors. QDs are also considerably brighter and more resistant to photobleaching than are organic dyes and fluorescent proteins. These properties are well suited for dynamic imaging at the single-molecule level and for multiplexed biomedical diagnostics at ultrahigh sensitivity. Here, we discuss the fundamental properties of QDs; the development of next-generation QDs; and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, dynamic cellular imaging, and medical diagnostics. For in vivo and clinical imaging, the potential toxicity of QDs remains a major concern. However, the toxic nature of cadmium-containing QDs is no longer a factor for in vitro diagnostics, so the use of multicolor QDs for molecular diagnostics and pathology is probably the most important and clinically relevant application for semiconductor QDs in the immediate future.

  2. Interaction Induced Electron Self-Interference in a Semiconductor: The Phonon Staircase Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenrow, J. A.; El Sayed, K.; Stanton, C. J.

    1997-06-01

    The exact quantum mechanics of a model semiconductor system of an electron with a discrete and equidistant energy spectrum interacting with a single phonon mode is presented. An electron initially excited into a coherent superposition of states interacts with phonons thereby creating a self-interference in time which reduces the emission of phonons to isolated bursts. This self-interference effect gives rise to steplike behavior in the relaxation kinetics of the electron and phonons. We show that this ``phonon staircase'' effect is a consequence of a correlated initial electron distribution and the violation of energy conservation in the electron-phonon interaction on short time scales.

  3. Quantum nonlinear resonance and quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in mesoscopic semiconductor rings

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G.P.; Bulgakov, E.N.; Campbell, D.K.; Krive, I.V.

    1997-10-01

    We consider Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a mesoscopic semiconductor ring threaded by both a constant magnetic flux and a time-dependent, resonant magnetic field with one or two frequencies. Working in the ballistic regime, we establish that the theory of {open_quotes}quantum nonlinear resonance{close_quotes} applies, and thus that this system represents a possible solid-state realization of {open_quotes}quantum nonlinear resonance{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}quantum chaos.{close_quotes} In particular, we investigate the behavior of the time-averaged electron energy at zero temperature in the regimes of (i) an isolated quantum nonlinear resonance and (ii) the transition to quantum chaos, when two quantum nonlinear resonances overlap. The time-averaged energy exhibits sharp resonant behavior as a function of the applied constant magnetic flux, and has a staircase dependence on the amplitude of the external time-dependent field. In the chaotic regime, the resonant behavior exhibits complex structure as a function of flux and frequency. We compare and contrast the quantum chaos expected in these mesoscopic {open_quotes}solid-state atoms{close_quotes} with that observed in Rydberg atoms in microwave fields, and discuss the prospects for experimental observation of the effects we predict. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Nonequilibrium thermal effects on exciton time correlations in coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, J. C.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Quiroga, L.

    2013-12-04

    Theoretical guides to test 'macroscopic realism' in solid-state systems under quantum control are highly desirable. Here, we report on the evolution of a Leggett-Garg inequality (LGI), a combination of two-time correlations, in an out-of-equilibrium set up consisting of two interacting excitons confined in separate semiconductor quantum dots which are coupled to independent baths at different temperatures (T{sub 1} ≠ T{sub 2}). In a Markovian steady-state situation we found a rich variety of dynamical behaviors in different sectors of the average temperature (T{sub M} = (T{sub 1}+T{sub 2})/2) vs. coupling strength to the reservoirs (Γ) space parameter. For high T{sub M} and Γ values the LGI is not violated, as expected. However, by decreasing T{sub M} or Γ a sector of parameters appears where the LGI is violated at thermal equilibrium (T{sub 1} = T{sub 2}) and the violation starts decreasing when the system is moved out of the equilibrium. Surprisingly, at even lower T{sub M} values, for any Γ, there is an enhancement of the LGI violation by exposing the system to a temperature gradient, i.e. quantum correlations increase in a nonequilibrium thermal situation. Results on LGI violations in a steady-state regime are compared with other non-locality-dominated quantum correlation measurements, such as concurrence and quantum discord, between the two excitons under similar temperature gradients.

  5. Excimer laser induced diffusion in magnetic semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howari, H.; Sands, D.; Nicholls, J. E.; Hogg, J. H. C.; Stirner, T.; Hagston, W. E.

    2000-08-01

    Studies of pulsed laser annealing (PLA) of CdTe/CdMnTe quantum well structures are made in order to examine depth dependent effects in laser irradiated semiconductors. Since diffusion coefficients are strongly dependent on the temperature, depth resolution is achieved because the diffusion of Mn from the barriers into the quantum wells is depth dependent. Multiple quantum well (MQW) structures of CdTe/CdMnTe were annealed with single pulses from an XeCl laser at 308 nm. At a threshold of 90 mJ cm-2 two new emission bands are observed that are attributed to the diffusion of Mn from barrier layers to QWs. The diffusion associated with these bands, measured as the integrated product of the diffusion constant and time, is found to be 300 and 30 Å2. Calculations of the temperature, reached within the surface following PLA, using an analytical solution of the heat diffusion equation coupled with known high temperature diffusion coefficients predict the diffusion to decrease by one order of magnitude within one period at the top of the MQW stack. It is suggested that at the threshold surface melting occurs and that these emission bands arise from the QWs immediately beneath the melt front. The diffusion of Mn ions into the QWs is confirmed by magneto-optical data. A further emission band occurs at this same threshold with a Mn concentration above that of the concentration in the barrier layers of the MQW stack. This emission is attributed tentatively to the segregation of the Mn ion within the molten region following recrystallization.

  6. An impedance analysis of double-stream interaction in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. W.; Durney, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic waves propagating through a drifting semiconductor plasma are studied from a macroscopic point of view in terms of double-stream interaction. The possible existing waves (helicon waves, longitudinal waves, ordinary waves, and pseudolongitudinal waves) which depend upon the orientation of the dc external magnetic field are derived. A powerful impedance concept is introduced to investigate the wave behavior of longitudinal (space charge) waves or pseudolongitudinal waves in a semiconductor plasma. The impedances due to one- and two-carrier stream interactions were calculated theoretically.

  7. Coherent quantum depletion of an interacting atom condensate.

    PubMed

    Kira, M

    2015-03-13

    Sufficiently strong interactions promote coherent quantum transitions in spite of thermalization and losses, which are the adversaries of delicate effects such as reversibility and correlations. In atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), strong atom-atom interactions can eject atoms from the BEC to the normal component, yielding quantum depletion instead of temperature depletion. A recent experiment has already been verified to overcome losses. Here I show that it also achieves coherent quantum-depletion dynamics in a BEC swept fast enough from weak to strong atom-atom interactions. The elementary coherent process first excites the normal component into a liquid state that evolves into a spherical shell state, where the atom occupation peaks at a finite momentum to shield 50% of the BEC atoms from annihilation. The identified coherent processes resemble ultrafast semiconductor excitations expanding the scope of BEC explorations to many-body non-equilibrium studies.

  8. Fast gain and phase recovery of semiconductor optical amplifiers based on submonolayer quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Bastian Owschimikow, Nina; Kaptan, Yücel; Kolarczik, Mirco; Switaiski, Thomas; Woggon, Ulrike; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rosales, Ricardo; Strittmatter, André; Bimberg, Dieter; Pohl, Udo W.

    2015-11-16

    Submonolayer quantum dots as active medium in opto-electronic devices promise to combine the high density of states of quantum wells with the fast recovery dynamics of self-assembled quantum dots. We investigate the gain and phase recovery dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier based on InAs submonolayer quantum dots in the regime of linear operation by one- and two-color heterodyne pump-probe spectroscopy. We find an as fast recovery dynamics as for quantum dot-in-a-well structures, reaching 2 ps at moderate injection currents. The effective quantum well embedding the submonolayer quantum dots acts as a fast and efficient carrier reservoir.

  9. An NMR quantum computer of the semiconductor CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Goto, A.; Hashi, K.; Ohki, S.

    2002-12-01

    We propose a method to implement a quantum computer by solid-state NMR. We can use the J-coupling for the quantum gate in CdTe. Both Cd and Te have two isotopes with spin 1/2, then we can have 4-qubits. The decoherence by dipole interaction may be minimized by preparing the isotope superlattice grown in the order of— 111Cd- 123Te- 113Cd- 125Te—in the [111] direction and by applying the magnetic field in the direction of [100], the magic angle of the dipole interaction. The optical pumping technique can be used in CdTe to make the initialization of the qubits.

  10. Instantaneous amplitude and frequency dynamics of coherent wave mixing in semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Chemla, D.S.

    1993-06-30

    This article reviews recent investigations of nonlinear optical processes in semiconductors. Section II discusses theory of coherent wave mixing in semiconductors, with emphasis on resonant excitation with only one exciton state. Section III reviews recent experimental investigations of amplitude and phase of coherent wave-mixing resonant with quasi-2d excitons in GaAs quantum wells.

  11. Quantum dynamical phenomena of independent electrons in semiconductor superlattices subject to a uniform electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, A.M.

    1994-07-27

    This report discusses the following topics: Bloch oscillations and other dynamical phenomena of electrons in semiconductor superlattices; solvable dynamical model of an electron in a one-dimensional aperiodic lattice subject to a uniform electric field; and quantum dynamical phenomena of electrons in aperiodic semiconductor superlattices.

  12. Design considerations for semiconductor nanowire-plasmonic nanoparticle coupled systems for high quantum efficiency nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mokkapati, Sudha; Saxena, Dhruv; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-09

    The optimal geometries for reducing the radiative recombination lifetime and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency of III-V semiconductor nanowires by coupling them to plasmonic nanoparticles are established. The quantum efficiency enhancement factor due to coupling to plasmonic nanoparticles reduces as the initial quality of the nanowire increases. Significant quantum efficiency enhancement is observed for semiconductors only within about 15 nm from the nanoparticle. It is also identified that the modes responsible for resonant enhancement in the quantum efficiency of an emitter in the nanowire are geometric resonances of surface plasmon polariton modes supported at the nanowire/nanoparticle interface.

  13. Electrostatic Surface Waves on Semi-Bounded Quantum Electron-Hole Semiconductor Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    The electrostatic surface waves on semi-bounded quantum electron-hole semiconductor plasmas are studied within the framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model, including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, quantum statistical pressures of the plasma species, as well as exchange and correlation effects. The dispersion characteristics of surface electrostatic oscillations are investigated by using the typical values of GaAs, GaSb and GaN semiconductors. Numerical results show the existence of one low-frequency branch due to the mass difference between the electrons and holes in addition to one high-frequency branch due to charge-separation effects.

  14. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    SciTech Connect

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductor scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.

  15. Fabrication and optical studies of semiconductor quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huicheng

    In an effort to investigate modulation doping and 2-dimensional electron gas in wide gap semiconductors and diluted magnetic semiconductors, we carried out systematic studies of n-type modulation doped ZnSe/Zn0.86Cd0.14Se and ZnSe/Zn0.825Cd 0.14Mn0.035Se single quantum well structures. The roles of spacers between doped barriers and undoped wells, as well as doping levels with regard to screening of excitons, were investigated. Low temperature photoluminescence studies were performed under magnetic fields up to 30 tesla. In the presence of a magnetic field, distinct features evolved from the broad luminescence band. These are attributed to interband transitions between electrons occupying Landau levels to photoexcited holes. An analysis of the Landau-level occupation as a function of magnetic field yields the electron sheet density. Modulation doping was also studied in the context of lasing characteristics, such as doping the barriers in the active region of ZnSe/ZnCdSe quantum well laser structures. With the aid of n-type modulation doping, the optical gain (∝ (fc - fv)) enhanced by the modifications of the Fermi-Dirac distribution functions for electrons and holes in the conduction and valence bands. Resulting threshold conditions were obtained to be 1/2 ˜ 1/3 of those without modulation doping in the active regions. The biexcitonic stimulated emission, ˜10 meV below the main excitonic emission, was also observed in undoped samples, but not in the modulation doped structures due to the instability of excitons caused by the two dimensional electron gas in the well. We also studied the lasing modes in broad-area, equilateral triangular laser cavities, which take advantage of total internal reflection at the cleaved facets of the cavity for circulating modes. A new approach is proposed to study optical modes in equilateral triangular cavities in an analytical form. The modes were obtained by examining the simplest optical paths inside the cavity, which yields

  16. An interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Bruch, Anton; von Oppen, Felix

    We consider the effect of electron-electron interactions on the performance of an adiabatic quantum motor based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. We model such a device by electrons in a 1d wire coupled to a slowly moving periodic potential associated with the classical mechanical degree of freedom of the motor. This periodic degree of freedom is set into motion by a bias voltage applied to the 1d electron channel. We investigate the Thouless motor with interacting leads modeled as Luttinger liquids. We show that interactions enhance the energy gap opened by the periodic potential and thus the robustness of the Thouless motor against variations in the chemical potential. We show that the motor degree of freedom can be described as a mobile impurity in a Luttinger liquid obeying Langevin dynamics with renormalized coefficients due to interactions, for which we give explicit expressions.

  17. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  18. Antiferromagnetic order in a semiconductor quantum well with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinescu, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    An argument is made on the existence of a low-temperature itinerant antiferromagnetic (AF) spin alignment, rather than persistent helical (PH), in the ground state of a two dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor quantum well with linear spin-orbit Rashba-Dresselhaus interaction at equal coupling strengths, α. This result is obtained on account of the opposite-spin single-particle state degeneracy at k = 0 that makes the spin instability possible. A theory of the resulting magnetic phase is formulated within the Hartree-Fock approximation of the Coulomb interaction. In the AF state the direction of the fractional polarization is obtained to be aligned along the displacement vector of the single-particle states.

  19. Quantum correlation between the junction-voltage fluctuation and the photon-number fluctuation in a semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. H.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-number fluctuation of the external field from a semiconductor laser - which was reduced to below the standard quantum limit - is shown to be correlated with the measured junction-voltage noise. The spectral density of the sum of the photon-number fluctuation and junction-voltage fluctuation falls below the squeezed photon-number fluctuation. This confirms the theoretical predictions that this correlation, which originates in the dipole interaction between the internal field and electron-hole pairs, extends into the quantum regime.

  20. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  1. On exchange interaction between shallow impurity centers in diluted semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Pavel; Gor'kov, Lev

    2003-03-01

    We generalize the method developed in [1,2] to obtain asymptotically exact expressions for the exchange splitting in semiconductors of the levels of carriers localized on shallow impurities at small impurity concentrations (large inter-center separations). Our approach takes into account degeneracy inherent to shallow centers in most semiconductors. We also consider the effects of spin-orbital interaction and of an external magnetic field. [1] L.P. Gor'kov and L.P. Pitaevskii, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 151, 822 (1963) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 8, 788 (1964)]. [2] C. Herring and M. Flicker, Phys. Rev. 134, A362 (1964)].

  2. II-VI semiconductor quantum dot quantum wells: a tight-binding study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Conde, J.; Bhattacharjee, A. K.

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the electronic structure, exciton states and optical spectra of spherical semiconductor quantum dot quantum wells (QDQW's) by means of a symmetry-adapted tight-binding (TB) method. We have investigated two classes of QDQW's: CdS/HgS/CdS, based on a CdS core which acts as a barrier, with a thin HgS well layer intercalated between the core and a clad layer of CdS. The second class of QDQW's is based on ZnS cores covered with CdS layers which act in this case as a well. The calculated values of the absorption onset show a good agreement with the experimental data. Large photoluminescence Stokes shifts are also predicted.

  3. Continuous-time quantum walk of two interacting fermions on a cycle graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2016-12-01

    We study a continuous-time quantum walk of interacting fermions on a cycle graph. By finding analytical solutions and simulating the dynamics of two fermions we observe a diverse structure of entangled states of indistinguishable fermions. The relation between entanglement of distinguishable qutrits and indistinguishable electrons is observed. Restrictions imposed by the symmetry of a cycle graph are derived. Possible realization of a quantum walk in an array of semiconductor quantum dots is discussed.

  4. Hybrid em wave - polar semiconductor interaction: A polaronic study

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, Ayushi Dubey, Swati; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    Present paper considers incidence of a most realistic hybrid pump wave on a weakly polar semiconductor having a very small coupling constant. Possibility of optical parametric interaction has been explored in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. The effect of doping concentrations and transverse magnetostatic field on threshold characteristics of optical parametric interaction in polar semiconductor plasma has been studied, using hydrodynamic model of semiconductors, in the far infrared regime. Numerical estimations have been carried out by using data of weakly polar III-V GaAs semiconductor and influence of control parameters on electron-LO phonon interaction has been analyzed. A particular range of physical parameters is found to be suitable for minimum threshold. The choice of nonlinear medium and favorable range of operating parameters are crucial aspects in design and fabrication of parametric amplifiers and oscillators. The hybrid mode of the pump is found to be favorable for the onset of the said process and realization of a low cost amplifier.

  5. Nonradiative resonance energy transfer between semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Samosvat, D. M. Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-07-15

    A microscopic analysis of the mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in a system of two semiconductor QDs caused by Coulomb interaction of donor and acceptor electrons is performed. The energy transfer rate is calculated for QDs based on III–V compounds using the Kane model. Conditions are analyzed under which energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor is possible. The mixing in of the p states of the valence band to the s states of the conduction band is found to give rise to additional contributions to the matrix element of energy transfer. It is shown that these additional contributions play a considerable role in the energy transfer process at distances between QDs close to contact distances or much greater. The influence of the exchange interaction on the energy transfer mechanism is analyzed, and it is shown that this interaction should be taken into account for a quantitative description of the energy transfer when QDs are separated by a distance close to the contact distance.

  6. Control of excitonic population inversion in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paspalakis, Emmanuel; Evangelou, Sofia; Terzis, Andreas F.

    2013-06-01

    We study the potential for controlled population inversion in a coupled system comprised of a semiconductor quantum dot and a metal nanoparticle. We show that the widely used method of population inversion by a π pulse can be modified for small interparticle distances. This modification depends strongly on the pulse duration. We also present analytical solutions of the nonlinear density matrix equations, for specific pulse envelopes, which lead to efficient excitonic population inversion in the quantum dot for several distances between the semiconductor quantum dot and the metal nanoparticle.

  7. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Nguyen T.; Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ , bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  8. Quantum Effects in the Thermoelectric Power Factor of Low-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hung, Nguyen T; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate the interplay between the confinement length L and the thermal de Broglie wavelength Λ to optimize the thermoelectric power factor of semiconducting materials. An analytical formula for the power factor is derived based on the one-band model assuming nondegenerate semiconductors to describe quantum effects on the power factor of the low-dimensional semiconductors. The power factor is enhanced for one- and two-dimensional semiconductors when L is smaller than Λ of the semiconductors. In this case, the low-dimensional semiconductors having L smaller than their Λ will give a better thermoelectric performance compared to their bulk counterpart. On the other hand, when L is larger than Λ, bulk semiconductors may give a higher power factor compared to the lower dimensional ones.

  9. Hyperfine interaction and magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Nguyen, T. D.; Veeraraghavan, G.; Mermer, Ö.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Qiu, S.; Scherf, U.

    2006-07-01

    We explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect. We deduce a simple fitting formula from the hyperfine Hamiltonian that relates the saturation field of the OMAR traces to the hyperfine coupling constant. We compare the fitting results to literature values for this parameter. Furthermore, we apply an excitonic pair mechanism model based on hyperfine interaction, previously suggested by others to explain various magnetic-field effects in organics, to the OMAR data. Whereas this model can explain a few key aspects of the experimental data, we uncover several fundamental contradictions as well. By varying the injection efficiency for minority carriers in the devices, we show experimentally that OMAR is only weakly dependent on the ratio between excitons formed and carriers injected, likely excluding any excitonic effect as the origin of OMAR.

  10. Modeling of Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices (The Physics and Operation of Ultra-Submicron Length Semiconductor Devices).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    folded into Landau orbits, in which the essentially one-dimensional transport along the orbit hinders the scattering process." Only those trajectories...tunneling, which can also occur in semiconductors under very high electric fields (where it is often referred to as Zener tunneling) has been worked out over...quantum mechanical effect is the dynamic change of the den- sity of states, such as in Landau quantization, and this can be incorporated within (1) by

  11. Diode-Laser Pumped Far-Infrared Local Oscillator Based on Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolokolov, K.; Li, J.; Ning, C. Z.; Larrabee, D. C.; Tang, J.; Khodaparast, G.; Kono, J.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Tetrahertz Field: A Technology Gap; 2) Existing THZ Sources and Shortcomings; 3) Applications of A THZ Laser; 4) Previous Optical Pumped LW Generations; 5) Optically Pumped Sb based Intersubband Generation Whys; 6) InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 7) Raman Enhanced Optical Gain; 8) Pump Intensity Dependence of THZ Gain; 9) Pump-Probe Interaction Induced Raman Shift; 10) THZ Laser Gain in InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 11) Diode-Laser Pumped Difference Frequency Generation (InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs); 12) 6.1 Angstrom Semiconductor Quantum Wells; 13) InAs/GaSb/AlSb Nanostructures; 14) InAs/AlSb Double QWs: DFG Scheme; 15) Sb-Based Triple QWs: Laser Scheme; and 16) Exciton State Pumped THZ Generation. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  12. Nonlinear optics response of semiconductor quantum wells under high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chemla, D.S.

    1993-07-01

    Recent investigations on the nonlinear optical response of semiconductor quantum wells in a strong perpendicular magnetic field, H, are reviewed. After some introductory material the evolution of the linear optical properties of GaAs QW`s as a function of H is discussed; an examination is made of how the magneto-excitons (MX) extrapolate continuously between quasi-2D QW excitons (X) when H = 0, and pairs of Landau levels (LL) when H {yields} {infinity}. Next, femtosecond time resolved investigations of their nonlinear optical response are presented; the evolution of MX-MX interactions with increasing H is stressed. Finally, how, as the dimensionality is reduced by application of H, the number of scattering channels is limited and relaxation of electron-hole pairs is affected. How nonlinear optical spectroscopy can be exploited to access the relaxation of angular momentum within magneto-excitons is also discussed.

  13. Valence electronic structure of semiconductor quantum dot and wide band gap oxide interfaces by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timp, Brooke Andrea

    Energy level alignment is an important factor in efficient charge transfer at an interface between two semiconductors. This topic is explored in model systems that are relevant to quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles adsorbed on single crystal wide band gap oxide substrates, using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Cadmium selenide quantum dots are assembled on a ZnO (10 1¯ 0) surface using 3-mercaptopropionic acid linkers. The valence band maximum of the CdSe quantum dots is found to be located at 1.1 +/- 0.1 eV above the valence band maximum of ZnO, nearly independent of the size of the quantum dots (2.1-4.2 nm). This finding suggests that, upon adsorption, there is strong electronic interaction between CdSe quantum dots and the ZnO surface. As a result, varying the quantum dot size mainly tunes the alignment of the conduction band minimum of CdSe with respect to that of the ZnO surface. Sub-monolayer films of PbSe quantum dots are prepared on single crystal substrates, ZnO (10 1 0 ) and TiO2 (110), and exposed to ligand solutions, either hydrazine or 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) in acetonitrile. Interfacial energy alignment is measured as a function of quantum dot size, substrate and ligand treatment. The affect of the ligand treatments on the energy alignment is substrate-dependent. The valence band maximum of the dots is size-independent on ZnO due to strong electronic interactions with the substrate; in particular, EDT-treated films show significant enhancement of quantum dot valence band intensity due to electronic coupling with the ZnO surface. In contrast, the quantum dot valence band maximum is size-dependent and shows a smaller shift between ligand treatments for films on TiO2, suggesting weaker quantum dot-substrate interactions. In most cases the measured alignment predicts that electron injection from a photoexcited PbSe quantum dot to either ZnO or TiO2 will necessitate the involvement of higher-lying levels

  14. Million Atom Pseudopotential Manybody Theory of Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex

    2003-03-01

    Semiconductor Quantum Dots that are of sufficient structural quality (good crystallinity, surface passivation, size uniformity) to produce ultra sharp spectroscopic lines worthy of a detailed theoretical effort tend to be rather BIG, containing thousands to million atoms. Yet, in this size regime, the only theoretical methods available are effective-mass based, particle-in-a-box approaches, that neglect multi-band and inter-valley coupling, leading to significant qualitative errors.(A. Zunger,Phys. Stat. Sol. (a) 190), 467 (2002). While LDA-based methods are capable of solving the Single-Particle problem even for ˜1,000 atom dots, the all important many-body problem can be currently addressed only for considerably smaller dots. I will present here a computational alternative which addresses both the single-particle and the Manybody parts of the problem for 10^3 to 10^6 atom dots .The method is applicable both to ``free Standing" (e.g. colloidal) dots of CdSe, InP, InAs and Si, as well as to the strained, ``self-assembled" epitaxial dots of, e.g., InGaAs/GaAs. It is based on a ``Linear Combination of Bulk Bands" (LCBB) approach that expands the dot states in terms of plane wave based (pseudopotential) Bloch states throughout the Brillouin zone. The manybody part is treated via Configuration Interaction. I will illustrate how this method addresses some of the recent striking experimental observations on semiconductor quantum dots:(i) Scaling laws for band gaps and exchange interactions (ii) Rapid Auger transitions in colloidal dots (iii) Coulomb Blocade and Spin Blockade in colloidal dots (iv) Charged Excitons (e.g. Trions) in Self-assembled dots, and (v) excitonic Fine-Structure in self assembled dots.

  15. Quantum Interactive Proofs with Short Messages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-22

    state tomography, quantumde Finetti theorem, quantum computation Salman Beigi, Peter Shor, John Watrousw Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT...through the use of quantum state tomography, along with the finite quantum de Finetti theorem for the first variant. Note: this appeard in the...along with the finite quantum de Finetti theorem for the first variant. 1 Introduction The interactive proof system model extends the notion of

  16. Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Fan, Hongyou; Brener, Igal; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Li, Binsong

    2015-09-01

    QD-solids comprising self-assembled semiconductor nanocrystals such as CdSe are currently under investigation for use in a wide array of applications including light emitting diodes, solar cells, field effect transistors, photodetectors, and biosensors. The goal of this LDRD project was develop a fundamental understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle interactions and the different regimes of charge and energy transport in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids. Interparticle spacing was tuned through the application of hydrostatic pressure in a diamond anvil cell, and the impact on interparticle interactions was probed using x-ray scattering and a variety of static and transient optical spectroscopies. During the course of this LDRD, we discovered a new, previously unknown, route to synthesize semiconductor quantum wires using high pressure sintering of self-assembled quantum dot crystals. We believe that this new, pressure driven synthesis approach holds great potential as a new tool for nanomaterials synthesis and engineering.

  17. Quantum kinetic theory of optically injected electrical and spin currents in bulk semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prepelita, Oleg; Sipe, J. E.

    2002-03-01

    We consider the relaxation of coherently controlled currents and spin currents in bulk semiconductors. The currents are injected by simultaneous irradiation with two laser beams; the magnitude of both currents is controlled by the relative phases of these two fields [1,2]. At low injected carrier densities the relaxation of the currents occurs because of the interaction of carriers with the equilibrium optical phonons. Using a quantum master equation approach, Boltzmann type microscopic equations for the averages of the electron-hole subsystem were obtained. From these microscopic equations a simple system of linear differential equations for the evolution of the macroscopic electrical current and spin current in semiconductors can be obtained and easily solved, thus vastly simplifying the calculation of current and spin current relaxation. The developed theory was applied to bulk GaAs. 1.A. Hache, Y. Kostoulas, J. L. P. Hughes, J. E. Sipe, and H. M. van Driel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 306 (1997). 2.R. D. R. Bhat and J. E. Sipe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5432 (2000).

  18. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGES

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; ...

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  19. Absorption of light by colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokutnyi, Sergey I.; Ovchinnikov, Oleg V.; Kondratenko, Tamara S.

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis absorption of colloidal cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by an aqueous synthesis in a gelatin matrix was investigated. Using the dipole approximation, taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the electron and hole in a QD and the polarization effects on the spherical boundary of QD and matrix, it was found the change of selection rules for optical transitions. It is shown that the optical absorption edge of QDs is formed by two optical transitions of electron between low-excited levels of size quantization of heavy hole (1S and 2S), located in QDs valence band and fundamental size-quantized states 1Se of conduction band. These transitions are identical in intensity. Estimations of average values of CdS QDs radius were realized using the developed formalism for UV-Vis absorption spectra. These data were compared with experimental values of this parameter, obtained using transmission electron microscope.

  20. Spin-Orbit Interaction in Metals, Elementary Semiconductors, and Semisonductor Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašović, D. R.; Vukajilović, F. R.

    1983-06-01

    The general analytic formulas for matrix elements of spin-orbit interaction in metals, elementary semiconductors, and binary semiconductor compounds which belongs to cubic crystal systems are obtained on the basis of Roothaan-Hartree-Fock atomic orbitals.

  1. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  2. Nonlinear structures: Cnoidal, soliton, and periodical waves in quantum semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tolba, R. E. El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.; Yahia, M. E.

    2016-01-15

    Properties and emerging conditions of various nonlinear acoustic waves in a three dimensional quantum semiconductor plasma are explored. A plasma fluid model characterized by degenerate pressures, exchange correlation, and quantum recoil forces is established and solved. Our analysis approach is based on the reductive perturbation theory for deriving the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation from the fluid model and solving it by using Painlevé analysis to come up with different nonlinear solutions that describe different pulse profiles such as cnoidal, soliton, and periodical pulses. The model is then employed to recognize the possible perturbations in GaN semiconductor.

  3. Terahertz quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures with the UCSB free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures takes on new dimensions in the presence of intense terahertz electric fields. Terahertz frequencies lift us into the regime where the scattering and relaxation is not so important and strong terahertz electric fields provided by the UCSB FEL`s explore non-linear dynamics far from the perturbative limit. New quantum transport channels that are assisted by the absorption or emission of a photon appear in current voltage characteristics. We will describe some of these experiments, the new phenomena they expose and the potential impact on future terahertz semiconductor electronics.

  4. Interaction Induced Electron Self-Interference in a Semiconductor: The Phonon Staircase Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kenrow, J.A.; El Sayed, K.; Stanton, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    The exact quantum mechanics of a model semiconductor system of an electron with a discrete and equidistant energy spectrum interacting with a single phonon mode is presented. An electron initially excited into a coherent superposition of states interacts with phonons thereby creating a self-interference {ital in time} which reduces the emission of phonons to isolated bursts. This self-interference effect gives rise to steplike behavior in the relaxation kinetics of the electron and phonons. We show that this {open_quotes}phonon staircase{close_quotes} effect is a consequence of a correlated initial electron distribution and the violation of energy conservation in the electron-phonon interaction on short time scales. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Quantum effect on parametric dispersion in presence of nonuniform size colloids in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanshpal, R.; Dubey, S.; Ghosh, S.

    2012-05-01

    Quantum effect on parametric dispersion characteristics in ion implanted semiconductors in presence of nonuniform size colloids is analytically investigated in the present report. Nonuniform size colloids are managed through polynomial distribution function in the analysis. Here the used quantum hydrodynamic model is described by a set of hydrodynamic equations (typically continuity and momentum transfer) that include quantum effects via Bohm potential. Bohm potential modified second order optical susceptibility is obtained through nonlinear induced current density in presence of electrons and negatively charged nonuniform size colloids. It is found that parametric dispersion characteristics are greatly influenced by the quantum modifications. The parametric dispersion of the generated signal mode reduces due to the presence of Bohm potential. The required pump intensity at which one achieves maximum dispersion shifts towards higher value in presence of quantum term. Moreover present study also establishes that quantum effect on colloids is inversely proportional to their size; smaller colloids induce more quantum modifications.

  6. Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xintao; He, Peiru; Hankiewicz, E. M.; Winkler, R.; Vignale, Giovanni; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2013-07-01

    Spin-orbit (SO) interactions give a spin-dependent correction r̂so to the position operator, referred to as the anomalous position operator. We study the contributions of r̂so to the spin Hall effect (SHE) in quasi-two-dimensional (2D) semiconductor quantum wells with strong band-structure SO interactions that cause spin precession. The skew scattering and side-jump scattering terms in the SHE vanish, but we identify two additional terms in the SHE, due to r̂so, which have not been considered in the literature so far. One term reflects the modification of spin precession due to the action of the external electric field (the field drives the current in the quantum well), which produces, via r̂so, an effective magnetic field perpendicular to the plane of the quantum well. The other term reflects a similar modification of spin precession due to the action of the electric field created by random impurities, and appears in a careful formulation of the Born approximation. We refer to these two effects collectively as anomalous spin precession and we note that they contribute to the SHE to the first order in the SO coupling constant even though they formally appear to be of second order. In electron systems with weak momentum scattering, the contribution of the anomalous spin precession due to the external electric field equals 1/2 the usual side-jump SHE, while the additional impurity-dependent contribution depends on the form of the band-structure SO coupling. For band-structure SO coupling linear in wave vector, the two anomalous spin precession contributions cancel. For band-structure SO coupling cubic in wave vector, however, they do not cancel, and the anomalous spin precession contribution to the SHE can be detected in a high-mobility 2D electron gas with strong SO coupling. In 2D hole systems, both anomalous spin precession contributions vanish identically.

  7. Quantum filter of spin polarized states: Metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic/semiconductor device

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Development of a new spintronics device. • Development of quantum spin polarized filters. • Development of theory of quantum spin polarized filter. - Abstract: Recently we proposed a model for the Quantum Spin-Polarized State Filter (QSPSF). The magnetic moments are transported selectively in this model, detached from the electric charge carriers. Thus, transfer of a spin-polarized state between two conductors was predicted in a system of two levels coupled by exchange interaction. The strength of the exchange interaction between the two conductive layers depends on the thickness of the dielectric layer separating them. External magnetic fields modulate spin-polarized state transfer, due to Zeeman level shift. Therefore, a linearly growing magnetic field generates a series of current peaks in a nearby coil. Thus, our spin-state filter should contain as least three nanolayers: (1) conductive or ferromagnetic; (2) dielectric; and (3) conductive or semiconductive. The spectrum of spin-polarized states generated by the filter device consists of a series of resonance peaks. In a simple case the number of lines equals S, the total spin angular momentum of discrete states in one of the coupled nanolayers. Presently we report spin-polarized state transport in metal–dielectric–ferromagnetic (MDF) and metal–dielectric–semiconductor (MDS) three-layer sandwich devices. The exchange-resonance spectra in such devices are quite specific, differing also from spectra observed earlier in other three-layer devices. The theoretical model is used to interpret the available experimental results. A detailed ab initio analysis of the magnetic-field dependence of the output magnetic moment averaged over the surface of the device was carried out. The model predicts the resonance structure of the signal, although at its present accuracy it cannot predict the positions of the spectral peaks.

  8. Evaluating charge noise acting on semiconductor quantum dots in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Stockklauser, A.; Jarausch, D.-D.; Frey, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Wallraff, A.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2014-08-11

    We evaluate the charge noise acting on a GaAs/GaAlAs based semiconductor double quantum dot dipole-coupled to the voltage oscillations of a superconducting transmission line resonator. The in-phase (I) and the quadrature (Q) components of the microwave tone transmitted through the resonator are sensitive to charging events in the surrounding environment of the double dot with an optimum sensitivity of 8.5×10{sup −5} e/√(Hz). A low frequency 1/f type noise spectrum combined with a white noise level of 6.6×10{sup −6} e{sup 2}/Hz above 1 Hz is extracted, consistent with previous results obtained with quantum point contact charge detectors on similar heterostructures. The slope of the 1/f noise allows to extract a lower bound for the double-dot charge qubit dephasing rate which we compare to the one extracted from a Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian approach. The two rates are found to be similar emphasizing that charge noise is the main source of dephasing in our system.

  9. Quantum effect on modulational instability of laser radiation in a semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, M. R.

    2010-01-15

    Modulational instability of a high power laser radiation in a homogeneous unmagnetized piezoelectric semiconductor plasma has been investigated analytically. The fluid equations of quantum hydrodynamics coupled with the Maxwell's equations have been employed to find the nonlinear response of electrons in the piezoelectric semiconductor. The analysis is carried out through the derivation of the nonlinear dispersion relation for the four-wave modulational instability. An expression for the growth rate of the instability including the quantum effect due to Bohm potential has been obtained from the nonlinear dispersion relation. The quantum effect is observed to play a vital role in the four-wave scattering process. For a particular set of parameters, the quantum effect enhances the growth rate of the modulational instability by 37% compared to the growth rate predicted by the classical theory.

  10. Wake potential with exchange-correlation effects in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Hussain, A.

    2015-09-15

    Using the non-relativistic quantum hydrodynamic model, wake potential has been studied in a magnetized semiconductor quantum plasma in the presence of upper hybrid wave which is excited via externally injected electron beam. The quantum effect contains electron exchange and correlation potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and Bohm potential. It is found that the contribution of quantum mechanical electron exchange and correlation potential significantly modifies the amplitude and the effective length of the oscillatory wake potential. In the electron-hole plasma systems, electron exchange-correlation effects tend to increase the magnitude of the wake potential and are much effective at the distances of the order of Debye-length. The application of the work in context of the semiconductor plasmas have also been analyzed graphically.

  11. Quantum dot-metallic nanorod sensors via exciton-plasmon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatef, Ali; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Boulais, Étienne; Meunier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    We investigate quantum nanosensors based on hybrid systems consisting of semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanorods in the near-infrared regime. These sensors can detect biological and chemical substances based on their impact on the coherent exciton-plasmon coupling and molecular resonances supported by such systems when they interact with a laser field. We demonstrate that the ultrahigh sensitivity of such molecular resonances on environmental conditions allows dramatic and nearly instantaneous changes in the total field experienced by the semiconductor quantum dot via minuscule variations of the local refractive indices of the quantum dot or nanorod. The proposed nanosensors can utilize quantum effects to control the sense (or direction) of the changes in the quantum dot emission, allowing us to have bistable switching from dark to bright states or vice versa via adsorption (or detachment) of biomolecules. These sensors can also offer detection of ultra-small variations in the local dielectric constant of the quantum dots or metallic nanorods via coherent induction of time delays in the effective field experienced by the quantum dots when the hybrid systems interact with time-dependent laser fields. This leads to unprecedented bulk refractive index sensitivities. Our results show that one can utilize quantum phase to control the coherent exciton-plasmon dynamics in these sensors such that introduction of a biomolecule can increase or decrease the time delay. These results offer novel ways to detect single biomolecules via application of quantum coherence to convert their impact into spectacular optical events.

  12. Optical Control of One and Two Hole Spins in Interacting Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    extended the delay by one and then two laser rep - etition periods of 12.3 ns to measure the decay of the phase oscillations. Figure 3d shows the...fast, single-qubit gates using a sequence of short laser pulses. We then take the important next step towards scalability of quantum information by...optically controlling two interacting hole spins in separate dots. A semiconductor qubit offers powerful advantages for quantum information, including

  13. Nanoassemblies Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Dye Molecules:. Single Objects Detection and Related Interface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkevich, E.; von Borczyskowski, C.; Kowerko, D.

    2013-05-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy of QD-dye nanoassemblies is shown that single functionalized dye molecules (perylene-bisimides and meso-pyridyl porphyrins) can be considered as extremely sensitive probes for studying exciton and relaxation processes in semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots.

  14. Electron-hole correlations in semiconductor quantum dots with tight-binding wave fuctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seungwon, L.; Jonsson, L.; Wilkins, J.; Bryant, G.; Klimeck, G.

    2001-01-01

    The electron-hole states of semiconductor quantum dots are investigated within the framework of empirical tight-binding descriptions for Si, as an example of an indirect-gap material, and InAs and CdSe as examples of typical III-V and II-VI direct-gap materials.

  15. Experimental investigation of chirp properties induced by signal amplification in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Motoharu; Ohta, Hiroaki; Seki, Ryota

    2015-03-15

    We experimentally show the dynamic frequency chirp properties induced by signal amplification in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) for the first time. We also compare the red and blue chirp peak values and temporal chirp changes while changing the gain and injected signal powers of the QD-SOA with those of a common SOA.

  16. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, R S; Wang, W C; Lu, M L; Chen, Y F; Lin, H C; Chen, K H; Chen, L C

    2013-08-07

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed.

  17. Emission polarization control in semiconductor quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, E; Martínez, L J; Nowak, A K; van der Meulen, H P; Calleja, J M; Tejedor, C; Prieto, I; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; García, J M; Postigo, P A

    2010-06-07

    We study the optical emission of single semiconductor quantum dots weakly coupled to a photonic-crystal micro-cavity. The linearly polarized emission of a selected quantum dot changes continuously its polarization angle, from nearly perpendicular to the cavity mode polarization at large detuning, to parallel at zero detuning, and reversing sign for negative detuning. The linear polarization rotation is qualitatively interpreted in terms of the detuning dependent mixing of the quantum dot and cavity states. The present result is relevant to achieve continuous control of the linear polarization in single photon emitters.

  18. Categorical quantum mechanics II: Classical-quantum interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2016-08-01

    This is the second part of a three-part overview, in which we derive the category-theoretic backbone of quantum theory from a process ontology, treating quantum theory as a theory of systems, processes and their interactions. In this part, we focus on classical-quantum interaction. Classical and quantum systems are treated as distinct types, of which the respective behavioral properties are specified in terms of processes and their compositions. In particular, classicality is witnessed by ‘spiders’ which fuse together whenever they connect. We define mixedness and show that pure processes are extremal in the space of all processes, and we define entanglement and show that quantum theory indeed exhibits entanglement. We discuss the classification of tripartite qubit entanglement and show that both the GHZ-state and the W-state come from spider-like families of processes, which differ only in how they behave when they are connected by two or more wires. We define measurements and provide fully comprehensive descriptions of several quantum protocols involving classical data flow. Finally, we give a notion of ‘genuine quantumness’, from which special processes called ‘phase spiders’ arise, and get a first glimpse of quantum nonlocality.

  19. Coherently driven semiconductor quantum dot at a telecommunication wavelength.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Kumagai, Naoto; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2008-09-01

    We proposed and demonstrate use of optical driving pulses at a telecommunication wavelength for exciton-based quantum gate operation. The exciton in a self-assembled quantum dot is coherently manipulated at 1.3 microm through Rabi oscillation. The telecom-band exciton-qubit system incorporates standard optical fibers and fiber optic devices. The coherent manipulation of the two-level system compatible with flexible and stable fiber network paves the way toward practical optical implementation of quantum information processing devices.

  20. Observation of quantum oscillation of work function in ultrathin-metal/semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Takhar, Kuldeep; Meer, Mudassar; Khachariya, Dolar; Ganguly, Swaroop; Saha, Dipankar

    2015-09-15

    Quantization in energy level due to confinement is generally observed for semiconductors. This property is used for various quantum devices, and it helps to improve the characteristics of conventional devices. Here, the authors have demonstrated the quantum size effects in ultrathin metal (Ni) layers sandwiched between two large band-gap materials. The metal work function is found to oscillate as a function of its thickness. The thermionic emission current bears the signature of the oscillating work function, which has a linear relationship with barrier heights. This methodology allows direct observation of quantum oscillations in metals at room temperature using a Schottky diode and electrical measurements using source-measure-units. The observed phenomena can provide additional mechanism to tune the barrier height of metal/semiconductor junctions, which are used for various electronic devices.

  1. Anisotropy of the electron g factor in quantum wells based on cubic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, P. S.

    2013-09-15

    A new mechanism for the spin splitting of electron levels in asymmetric quantum wells based on GaAs-type semiconductors relative to rotations of the magnetic field in the well plane is suggested. It is demonstrated that the anisotropy of the Zeeman splitting (linear in a magnetic field) arises in asymmetric quantum wells due to the interface spin-orbit terms in the electron Hamiltonian. In the case of symmetric quantum wells, it is shown that the anisotropy of the Zeeman splitting is a cubic function of the magnitude of the magnetic field, depends on the direction of the magnetic field in the interface plane as the fourth-order harmonic, and is governed by the spin-orbit term of the fourth order by the kinematic momentum in the electron Hamiltonian of a bulk semiconductor.

  2. Effect of doping on amplitude modulation of space-charge wave in semiconductor quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sreyasi; Ghosh, Basudev

    2017-04-01

    To describe the modulational instability of space-charge waves in an n-type compensated semiconductor plasma, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation has been derived by using quantum hydrodynamical model and standard multiple scale perturbation technique. It has been shown that compensation factor (i.e. relative proportion of donor, acceptor and intrinsic carrier concentrations) and quantum diffraction parameter play important role in generating bright and dark envelope solitons within the semiconductor. Instability growth rate is also found to depend sensitively on the compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter. From the linear dispersion relation it has been found that inclusion of quantum parameter gives rise to two new wave modes of purely quantum origin. Further the effect of compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter on the linear dispersion characteristics has been analyzed. It has also been found that due to parabolicity of conduction band the group velocity of space-charge wave becomes dependent on compensation factor and quantum diffraction parameter.

  3. Photoinduced 2-way electron transfer in composites of metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Navendu; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2016-07-01

    In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation between the QDs and NCs in a giant BSA-capped system, a higher electron transfer rate in this composite suggests that unlike other smaller capping agents, which act more like insulators, BSA allows much better electron conduction, as indicated previously.In order to explore the potential of nanocomposites comprising semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoclusters (NCs) in photovoltaic and catalytic applications, the interaction between CdTe QDs and gold NCs, Au10 and Au25, stabilized by histidine, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutathione, is studied by an ultrafast transient absorption (TA) technique. Temporal and spectral studies of the transients reveal photoinduced 2-way electron transfer between the two constituents of the nanocomposites, where Au NCs, which generally act as electron donors when used as photosensitizers, perform the role of the efficient electron acceptor. Interestingly, it is found that the electron transfer dynamics in these composites is governed not by the distance of separation of the constituents but by the nature of the surface capping ligands. Despite a large separation

  4. Toxicological studies of semiconductor quantum dots on immune cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Ricken, James Bryce; Rios, Lynette; Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Greene, Adrienne Celeste; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2008-11-01

    Nanoengineered materials hold a vast promise of enabling revolutionary technologies, but also pose an emerging and potentially serious threat to human and environmental health. While there is increasing knowledge concerning the risks posed by engineered nanomaterials, significant inconsistencies exist within the current data based on the high degree of variability in the materials (e.g., synthesis method, coatings, etc) and biological test systems (e.g., cell lines, whole organism, etc). In this project, we evaluated the uptake and response of two immune cell lines (RAW macrophage and RBL mast cells) to nanocrystal quantum dots (Qdots) with different sizes and surface chemistries, and at different concentrations. The basic experimental design followed a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial model: two Qdot sizes (Qdot 520 and 620), two surface chemistries (amine 'NH{sub 2}' and carboxylic acid 'COOH'), and three concentrations (0, 1 nM, and 1 {micro}M). Based on this design, the following Qdots from Evident Technologies were used for all experiments: Qdot 520-COOH, Qdot 520-NH{sub 2}, Qdot 620-COOH, and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2}. Fluorescence and confocal imaging demonstrated that Qdot 620-COOH and Qdot 620-NH{sub 2} nanoparticles had a greater level of internalization and cell membrane association in RAW and RBL cells, respectively. From these data, a two-way interaction between Qdot size and concentration was observed in relation to the level of cellular uptake in RAW cells, and association with RBL cell membranes. Toxicity of both RBL and RAW cells was also significantly dependent on the interaction of Qdot size and concentration; the 1 {micro}M concentrations of the larger, Qdot 620 nanoparticles induced a greater toxic effect on both cell lines. The RBL data also demonstrate that Qdot exposure can induce significant toxicity independent of cellular uptake. A significant increase in TNF-{alpha} and decrease in IL-10 release was observed in RAW cells, and suggested that Qdot exposure

  5. Nonresonant Transient Refractive Index Spectroscopy in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, D. K.; Leontyev, A. V.; Shmelev, A. G.; Nikiforov, V. G.; Lobkov, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report transient refractive index change in semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in polymethylmethacrylate matrix via pump-probe experiment. At lower pump intensities the detected signal consists of the pulse autocorrelation-shaped part and another part delayed by 300 fs. The latter's relative intensity depends on the pump level. However in CdS monocrystal the detected signal was found to lack this second feature completely.

  6. Quantum Mechanical Balance Equation Approach to Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    inexpensive way to analyze and design the semiconductor devices before expensive device processing. Since traditional equivalent circuit models and...are described, along with representative simulation results for various devices, such as Si- MESFET , Si-MOSFET and GaAs- MESFET . ^CQTJM^1^^0^ 8... determined by how accurately carrier transport is described. Generally, the more sophisticated the approach, the heavier the computational burden

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of the dual-mode regime in quantum-well and quantum-dot semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice; Disanto, Filippo

    2014-03-10

    Monte Carlo markovian models of a dual-mode semiconductor laser with quantum well (QW) or quantum dot (QD) active regions are proposed. Accounting for carriers and photons as particles that may exchange energy in the course of time allows an ab initio description of laser dynamics such as the mode competition and intrinsic laser noise. We used these models to evaluate the stability of the dual-mode regime when laser characteristics are varied: mode gains and losses, non-radiative recombination rates, intraband relaxation time, capture time in QD, transfer of excitation between QD via the wetting layer... As a major result, a possible steady-state dual-mode regime is predicted for specially designed QD semiconductor lasers thereby acting as a CW microwave or terahertz-beating source whereas it does not occur for QW lasers.

  8. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  9. All quantum dot mode-locked semiconductor disk laser emitting at 655 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Bek, R. Kersteen, G.; Kahle, H.; Schwarzbäck, T.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2014-08-25

    We present a semiconductor disk laser mode-locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with emission in the red spectral range. Both the gain and the absorber structure are fabricated by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy in an anti-resonant design using quantum dots as active material. A v-shaped cavity is used to tightly focus onto the SESAM, producing pulses with a duration of about 1 ps at a repetition rate of 852 MHz.

  10. Emergence of resonant mode-locking via delayed feedback in quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Tykalewicz, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Erneux, T; Kelleher, B; Viktorov, E A

    2016-02-22

    With conventional semiconductor lasers undergoing external optical feedback, a chaotic output is typically observed even for moderate levels of the feedback strength. In this paper we examine single mode quantum dot lasers under strong optical feedback conditions and show that an entirely new dynamical regime is found consisting of spontaneous mode-locking via a resonance between the relaxation oscillation frequency and the external cavity repetition rate. Experimental observations are supported by detailed numerical simulations of rate equations appropriate for this laser type. The phenomenon constitutes an entirely new mode-locking mechanism in semiconductor lasers.

  11. Theory of fine structure of correlated exciton states in self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojnar, Anna H.; Kadantsev, Eugene S.; Korkusiński, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2011-12-01

    A theory of the fine structure of correlated exciton states in self-assembled parabolic semiconductor quantum dots in a magnetic field perpendicular to the quantum dot plane is presented. The correlated exciton wave function is expanded in configurations consisting of products of electron and heavy-hole 2D harmonic oscillator states (HO) in a magnetic field and the electron spin Sz=±1/2 and a heavy-hole spin τz=±3/2 states. Analytical expressions for the short- and long-range electron-hole exchange Coulomb interaction matrix elements are derived in the HO and spin basis for arbitrary magnetic field. This allows the incorporation of short- and long-range electron-hole exchange, direct electron-hole interaction, and quantum dot anisotropy in the exact diagonalization of the exciton Hamiltonian. The fine structure of ground and excited correlated exciton states as a function of a number of confined shells, quantum dot anisotropy, and magnetic field is obtained using exact diagonalization of the many-body Hamiltonian. The effects of correlations are shown to significantly affect the energy splitting of the two bright exciton states.

  12. Design and synthesis of organic semiconductors with strong noncovalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Neil Maxwell

    2008-10-01

    The development of organic molecules as active components of electronic and optoelectronic devices has seen unprecedented progress in the past decade. This attention is primarily due to the potential impact on large-area and low-cost fabrication of devices, integrated circuits, flexible displays, and in particular, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Organic semiconductors that pack face-to-face in the solid state are of particular interest since they are known to self-assemble into 1-D nanostructures due to strong pi-pi interactions. Engineering linear/planar molecules to pack face-to-face is challenging because the interacting forces between organic molecules are relatively weak. Three approaches were used to induce face-to-face packing in organic semiconductors: (1) several derivatives of hexaazatrinaphthylene, (HATNA), were designed which vary in their degree of hydrogen bonding, rigidity, and electron deficiency. Hydrogen bonded moieties induced strong interaction between cores that formed robust nanowires when subjected to nonpolar solvents. While no device data was measured for these materials, substituents location was found to have a profound effect on the electronic properties; (2) Inspired by S···S interactions found in tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and electrostatic interactions found in 1,2,5-thiadiazole derivatives, a hybrid of these two molecules was developed (BT-TTF-1). Short intermolecular S···S, S···N, and S···C contacts define the solid state structure of BT-TTF-1 single crystals which pi-stack along the [100]. Theoretical insight into the nature of the interactions revealed that the close contacts are electrostatic in origin rather than the result of London dispersion forces. Thermal evaporation yields a network of poorly connected crystals which significantly limits the mobility. Solvent-cast single-crystal nanowire transistors showed mobilities as large as 0.36 cm2/Vs with excellent device characteristics underscoring the

  13. Nanomembrane-based materials for Group IV semiconductor quantum electronics.

    PubMed

    Paskiewicz, D M; Savage, D E; Holt, M V; Evans, P G; Lagally, M G

    2014-02-27

    Strained-silicon/relaxed-silicon-germanium alloy (strained-Si/SiGe) heterostructures are the foundation of Group IV-element quantum electronics and quantum computation, but current materials quality limits the reliability and thus the achievable performance of devices. In comparison to conventional approaches, single-crystal SiGe nanomembranes are a promising alternative as substrates for the epitaxial growth of these heterostructures. Because the nanomembrane is truly a single crystal, in contrast to the conventional SiGe substrate made by compositionally grading SiGe grown on bulk Si, significant improvements in quantum electronic-device reliability may be expected with nanomembrane substrates. We compare lateral strain inhomogeneities and the local mosaic structure (crystalline tilt) in strained-Si/SiGe heterostructures that we grow on SiGe nanomembranes and on compositionally graded SiGe substrates, with micro-Raman mapping and nanodiffraction, respectively. Significant structural improvements are found using SiGe nanomembranes.

  14. Anomalous quantum efficiency for photoconduction and its power dependence in metal oxide semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Wang, W. C.; Lu, M. L.; Chen, Y. F.; Lin, H. C.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, L. C.

    2013-07-01

    The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed.The quantum efficiency and carrier lifetime that decide the photoconduction (PC) efficiencies in the metal oxide semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have been investigated. The experimental result surprisingly shows that the SnO2, TiO2, WO3, and ZnO NWs reveal extraordinary quantum efficiencies in common, which are over one to three orders of magnitude lower than the theoretical expectation. The surface depletion region (SDR)-controlled photoconductivity is proposed to explain the anomalous quantum efficiency and its power dependence. The inherent difference between the metal oxide nanostructures such as carrier lifetime, carrier concentration, and dielectric constant leading to the distinct PC performance and behavior are also discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01635h

  15. Magnetic Exchange Interactions in Long Range Ordered Diluted Organometallic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Naveen; Manning, Lane; Furis, Madalina

    2015-03-01

    Exchange Interactions in diluted organometallic crystalline thin films of Phthalocyanines made of a mixture of organo-soluble derivatives of metal-free (H2Pc) molecule and MnPc is investigated. The tuning of optical and magnetic properties in organometallics is driven by their emergence in optoelectronic applications involving flexible electronics. Thin films with metal to metal-free Pc ratios ranging from 1: 1 to 1:10 were fabricated using solution processing that produces macroscopic grains. In the case of Mn-Pc, our previos measurements showed enhanced hybridization of ligand π-electronic states with the Mn d-orbitals as well as indirect exchange interaction similar to that of RKKY type exchange. The evolution of Zeeman splitting of specific MCD-active states resulted in enhanced effective π-electrons g-factors, analogous to diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) systems. Recent Variable temperature Magnetic Circular Dichroism (VTVH-MCD) measurements has now revealed that the exchange interaction is Antiferromagnetic. Recent MCD data for mixed derivatives will be presented along with their temperature dependance that further probes this exchange interaction. NSF award 1056589

  16. Quantum theory of the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne Heung

    This thesis examines the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor systems. A theory is developed to study the electron-hole generation-recombination process of type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions based on a 3 x 3 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (three-band model) and an 8 x 8 k·p matrix Hamiltonian (eight-band model). A novel electron-hole generation and recombination process, which is called activationless generation-recombination process, is predicted. It is demonstrated that the current through the type-II semimetallic semiconductor heterojunctions is governed by the activationless electron-hole generation-recombination process at the heterointerfaces, and that the current-voltage characteristics are essentially linear. A qualitative agreement between theory and experiments is observed. The numerical results of the eight-band model are compared with those of the threeband model. Based on a lattice gas model, a theory is developed to study the influence of a random potential on the ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. It is demonstrated that ionization equilibrium conditions for bound electron-hole pairs change drastically in the presence of strong disorder. It is predicted that strong disorder promotes dissociation of excitons in III--V semiconductor heterostructures. A theory of polariton (photon dressed by phonon) spontaneous emission in a III--V semiconductor doped with semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells (QWs) is developed. For the first time, superradiant and subradiant polariton spontaneous emission phenomena in a polariton-QD (QW) coupled system are predicted when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie outside the polaritonic energy gap. It is also predicted that when the resonance energies of the two identical QDs (QWs) lie inside the polaritonic energy gap, spontaneous emission of polariton in the polariton

  17. Exciton fine structure and spin relaxation in semiconductor colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Wong, Cathy Y; Scholes, Gregory D

    2009-08-18

    Quantum dots (QDs) have discrete quantum states isolated from the environment, making QDs well suited for quantum information processing. In semiconductor QDs, the electron spins can be coherently oriented by photoexcitation using circularly polarized light, creating optical orientation. The optically induced spin orientation could serve as a unit for data storage and processing. Carrier spin orientation is also envisioned to be a key component in a related, though parallel, field of semiconductor spintronics. However, the oriented spin population rapidly loses its coherence by interaction with the environment, thereby erasing the prepared information. Since long-lasting spin orientation is desirable in both areas of investigation, spin relaxation is the central focus of investigation for optimization of device performance. In this Account, we discuss a topic peripherally related to these emerging areas of investigation: exciton fine structure relaxation (EFSR). The radiationless transition occurring in the exciton fine structure not only highlights a novel aspect of QD exciton relaxation but also has implications for carrier spin relaxation in QDs. We focus on examining the EFSR in connection with optical spin orientation and subsequent ultrafast relaxation of electron and hole spin densities in the framework of the exciton fine structure basis. Despite its significance, the study of exciton fine structure in colloidal QDs has been hampered by the experimental challenge arising from inhomogeneous line broadening that obscures the details of closely spaced fine structure states in the frequency domain. In this Account, we show that spin relaxation occurring in the fine structure of CdSe QDs can be probed by a time-domain nonlinear polarization spectroscopy, circumventing the obstacles confronted in the frequency-domain spectroscopy. In particular, by combining polarization sequences of multiple optical pulses with the unique optical selection rules of

  18. Magnetization studies of II-VI semiconductor columnar quantum dots with type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eginligil, M.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Chou, W.-C.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2009-03-01

    We report SQUID magnetization measurements of MBE-grown type-II, II-VI semiconductor quantum dot (QD) samples, with and without Mn incorporation. In all samples, the easy axis is out-of-plane, possibly due to columnar QD formation that arises from strain interaction between adjacent thin dot-containing layers. In addition, both types of QDs display a non-zero spontaneous magnetic ordering at 300 K. One set of samples consists of five-layers of (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe with a nominal (Zn,Mn)Te thickness of 3 nm, and ZnSe spacer thickness of 5 nm and 20 nm. These magnetic QD samples show magnetization vs. temperature behavior that can be interpreted in terms of two independent FM phases characterized by transition temperatures TC1 < TC2. A sample containing no Mn consists of 130 ZnTe/ZnSe layers, which forms Zn(Se,Te) QD layers separated by ZnSe spacers. Evidence of ferromagnetism is also seen in this structure, but the spontaneous magnetization is much weaker. For this sample only one phase is seen with TC above 300 K. Results will be discussed in terms of magneto-polaronic effects and defect-level induced ferromagnetism.

  19. Quantum Generation Dynamics of Coherent Phonon in Semiconductors: Transient and Nonlinear Fano Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yohei; Hino, Ken-Ichi; Hase, Muneaki; Maeshima, Nobuya

    The coherent phonon (CP) generation is one of the representative phenomena induced by ultrashort pulsed laser. In particular, in the initial stage of the CP generation in lightly n-doped Si, the vestige of Fano resonance (FR) manifested in a flash was observed in time-resolved spectroscopy experiments, in which it was speculated that this phenomenon results from the birth of transient polaronic quasiparticles composed of electrons and phonons strongly interacting each other. This study is aimed at constructing a fully-quantum-mechanical model for the CP generation and tracking the origin of the transient FR. We calculate two physical quantities in both of polar and non-polar semiconductors such as GaAs and undoped Si. One is a retarded longitudinal susceptibility which allows one to calculate a transient induced photoemission spectrum. The other is the Fourier-transform of LO-phonon displacement into frequency domain. We have succeeded in showing that the transient FR is exclusively caused in Si in harmony with the experiments, though, not observed in GaAs.

  20. Aharonov-Bohm-type quantum interference effects in narrow gap semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2009-03-01

    We present experiments on quantum interference phenomena in semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction, using mesoscopic parallel ring arrays fabricated on InSb/InAlSb and InAs/AlGaSb heterostructures. Both external electric field effects and temperature dependence of the ring magnetoresistance are examined. Top-gate voltage-dependent oscillations in ring resistance in the absence of an external magnetic field are suggestive of Aharonov-Casher interference. At low magnetic fields the ring magnetoresistance is dominated by oscillations with h/2e periodicity characteristic of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations, whereas the h/e periodicity characteristic of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations persists to high magnetic fields. Fourier spectra (FS) reveal AB amplitudes on the same order as AAS amplitudes at low fields, and in some samples reveal a splitting of the AB peaks, which has been interpreted as a signature of Berry's phase. The FS are also used to quantify the temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes (NSF DMR-0618235, DOE DE-FG02-08ER46532, NSF DMR-0520550).

  1. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Nevedomskiy, V. N. Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V.; Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R.

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  2. Quantum Confined Semiconductors - In-House Interim Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    15. SUBJECT TERMS quantum dots, graphene thin film, nanoparticles, fourier spectroscopy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...carried out with the expressions of Varshni and Fan revealed limited accuracy of the Varshni fitting parameters. Evidence is presented that...biological labeling, and photovoltaics !-4 PbS quannun dots (QDs) attract ongoing research activities. Particularly, the technologically relevant

  3. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    2006-09-01

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  4. Theory of Electron Spectroscopies in Strongly Correlated Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo

    Quantum dots may display fascinating features of strong correlation such as finite-size Wigner crystallization. We here review a few electron spectroscopies and predict that both inelastic light scattering and tunneling imaging experiments are able to capture clear signatures of crystallization.

  5. Third generation photovoltaics based on multiple exciton generation in quantum confined semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Beard, Matthew C; Luther, Joseph M; Semonin, Octavi E; Nozik, Arthur J

    2013-06-18

    Improving the primary photoconversion process in a photovoltaiccell by utilizing the excess energy that is otherwise lost as heat can lead to an increase in the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE). Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with at least one dimension small enough to produce quantum confinement effects provide new ways of controlling energy flow not achievable in thin film or bulk semiconductors. Researchers have developed various strategies to incorporate these novel structures into suitable solar conversion systems. Some of these methods could increase the PCE past the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit of ∼33%, making them viable "third generation photovoltaic" (TGPV) cell architectures. Surpassing the SQ limit for single junction solar cells presents both a scientific and a technological challenge, and the use of semiconductor NCs to enhance the primary photoconversion process offers a promising potential solution. The NCs are synthesized via solution phase chemical reactions producing stable colloidal solutions, where the reaction conditions can be modified to produce a variety of shapes, compositions, and structures. The confinement of the semiconductor NC in one dimension produces quantum films, wells, or discs. Two-dimensional confinement leads to quantum wires or rods (QRs), and quantum dots (QDs) are three-dimensionally confined NCs. The process of multiple exciton generation (MEG) converts a high-energy photon into multiple electron-hole pairs. Although many studies have demonstrated that MEG is enhanced in QDs compared with bulk semiconductors, these studies have either used ultrafast spectroscopy to measure the photon-to-exciton quantum yields (QYs) or theoretical calculations. Implementing MEG in a working solar cell has been an ongoing challenge. In this Account, we discuss the status of MEG research and strategies towards implementing MEG in working solar cells. Recently we showed an external quantum efficiency for photocurrent of greater

  6. Nonlinear wave interactions in quantum magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Ali, S.; Stenflo, L.; Marklund, M.

    2006-11-15

    Nonlinear interactions involving electrostatic upper-hybrid (UH), ion-cyclotron (IC), lower-hybrid (LH), and Alfven waves in quantum magnetoplasmas are considered. For this purpose, the quantum hydrodynamical equations are used to derive the governing equations for nonlinearly coupled UH, IC, LH, and Alfven waves. The equations are then Fourier analyzed to obtain nonlinear dispersion relations, which admit both decay and modulational instabilities of the UH waves at quantum scales. The growth rates of the instabilities are presented. They can be useful in applications of our work to diagnostics in laboratory and astrophysical settings.

  7. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  8. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Thorbeck, Ted; Zimmerman, Neil M.

    2015-08-15

    A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots) which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  9. Alloyed Mn-Cu-In-S nanocrystals: a new type of diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinghui; Deng, Ruiping; Ji, Xiangling; Pan, Daocheng

    2012-06-01

    A new type of Mn-Cu-In-S diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots was synthesized and reported for the first time. The quantum dots, with no highly toxic elements, not only show the same classic diluted magnetic behavior as Mn-doped CdSe, but also exhibit tunable luminescent properties in a relatively large window from 542 to 648 nm. An absolute photoluminescence quantum yield up to 20% was obtained after the shell growth of ZnS. This kind of magnetic/luminescent bi-functional Mn-Cu-In-S/ZnS core/shell quantum dot might serve as promising nanoprobes for use in dual-mode optical and magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

  10. Advanced semiconductor quantum well devices for infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir V.

    High performance mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) light emitting diodes (LEDs) are needed for chemical sensing, analysis and medical imaging. Efficient long wavelength infrared (LWIR) photodetectors are highly desirable for remote sensing and space exploration. The goal of this work is to investigate new mid-infrared LEDs and to optimize existing LWIR quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs). Type-II "W" InAs/InGaSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells were incorporated as optically active layers in MWIR LEDs. Influence of MBE crystal growth conditions on the density of Shockley-Read-Hall centers in the "W" quantum wells was studied and the optimal growth conditions were identified. A qualitative physical model was developed to describe relative importance of the radiative and non-radiative processes for various temperature ranges. MWIR LED structures lattice-matched to InAs and GaSb substrates were grown. Devices on InAs substrates were found to be at least twice as efficient as devices grown on GaSb. LEDs on InAs had 4.5 mum emission wavelength and 26.5 muW/A external efficiency. Possibility to operate GaAs/AIGaAs QWIP under normal-to-surface light incidence was studied. Metal nano-particle surface coating was developed and processes responsible for, light coupling into the QWIP were investigated. QWIP structure itself was optimized to eliminate Si-diffusion-assisted dark current enhancement by employing a new doping profile in the quantum wells. Devices with the new doping profile had an order of magnitude lower dark current and 20% higher photoresponse than commercially available QWIPs.

  11. Voltage controlled optics of a monolayer semiconductor quantum emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Vamivakas, Nick; University of Rochester Team

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional atomically thin materials are being actively investigated for next generation optoelectronic devices. Particularly exciting are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) since these materials exhibit a band gap, and support valley specific exciton mediated optical transitions. In this work we report the observation of single photon emission in the TMDC tungsten diselenide. We present magneto-optical spectroscopy results and demonstrate voltage controlled photoluminescence of these localized quantum emitters.

  12. All-optical depletion of dark excitons from a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Schwartz, I.; Cogan, D.; Gershoni, D.; Gantz, L.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-05-11

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered to be the leading venue for fabricating on-demand sources of single photons. However, the generation of long-lived dark excitons imposes significant limits on the efficiency of these sources. We demonstrate a technique that optically pumps the dark exciton population and converts it to a bright exciton population, using intermediate excited biexciton states. We show experimentally that our method considerably reduces the dark exciton population while doubling the triggered bright exciton emission, approaching thereby near-unit fidelity of quantum dot depletion.

  13. Nonlinear photonic diode behavior in energy-graded core-shell quantum well semiconductor rod.

    PubMed

    Ko, Suk-Min; Gong, Su-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2014-09-10

    Future technologies require faster data transfer and processing with lower loss. A photonic diode could be an attractive alternative to the present Si-based electronic diode for rapid optical signal processing and communication. Here, we report highly asymmetric photonic diode behavior with low scattering loss, from tapered core-shell quantum well semiconductor rods that were fabricated to have a large gradient in their bandgap energy along their growth direction. Local laser illumination of the core-shell quantum well rods yielded a huge contrast in light output intensities from opposite ends of the rod.

  14. Global optimization of semiconductor quantum well profile for maximal optical rectification by variational calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanovic, Jelena; Milanovic, Vitomir; Ikonic, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan

    2002-07-01

    A procedure is proposed for finding the optimal profile of a semiconductor quantum well to obtain maximal value of the optical rectification coefficient. It relies on the variational calculus, i.e. the optimal control theory, combined with the method of simulated annealing, and should deliver a globally optimized profile, unconstrained to any particular class of functional forms. For the purpose of illustration, the procedure is applied to the optimized design of AlxGa1-xAs based quantum wells, for rectification of ℎω = 116 meV (CO2 laser) radiation. The optimal smooth profile may eventually be discretized to make the structure fabrication easier.

  15. Large ordered arrays of single photon sources based on II-VI semiconductor colloidal quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Dang, Cuong; Urabe, Hayato; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shouheng; Nurmikko, Arto

    2008-11-24

    In this paper, we developed a novel and efficient method of deterministically organizing colloidal particles on structured surfaces over macroscopic areas. Our approach utilizes integrated solution-based processes of dielectric encapsulation and electrostatic-force-mediated self-assembly, which allow precisely controlled placement of sub-10nm sized particles at single particle resolution. As a specific demonstration, motivated by application to single photon sources, highly ordered 2D arrays of single II-VI semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (QDs) were created by this method. Individually, the QDs display triggered single photon emission at room temperature with characteristic photon antibunching statistics, suggesting a pathway to scalable quantum optical radiative systems.

  16. Effect of charge imbalance parameter on LEKW in ion-implanted quantum semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandhya; Yadav, Nishchhal; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    In this study we present an analytical investigation on the propagation characteristics of electro-kinetic wave modified through quantum correction term and charge imbalance parameter using quantum hydrodynamic model for an ion-implanted semiconductor plasma. The dispersion relation has been analyzed in two distinct velocity regimes. We found that as the number of negative charges resides on the colloids increases, their role become increasing effective. The present investigation is important for understanding of wave and instability phenomena and can be put to various interesting applications.

  17. Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies

    DOE PAGES

    Heremans, F. Joseph; Yale, Christopher G.; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-05-24

    Deep-level defects are usually considered undesirable in semiconductors as they typically interfere with the performance of present-day electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the electronic spin states of certain atomic-scale defects have recently been shown to be promising quantum bits for quantum information processing as well as exquisite nanoscale sensors due to their local environmental sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in quantum control protocols of several of these spin defects, the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in diamond and a variety of forms of the neutral divacancy (VV0) complex in silicon carbide (SiC). These defects exhibit amore » spin-triplet ground state that can be controlled through a variety of techniques, several of which allow for room temperature operation. Microwave control has enabled sophisticated decoupling schemes to extend coherence times as well as nanoscale sensing of temperature along with magnetic and electric fields. On the other hand, photonic control of these spin states has provided initial steps toward integration into quantum networks, including entanglement, quantum state teleportation, and all-optical control. Electrical and mechanical control also suggest pathways to develop quantum transducers and quantum hybrid systems. In conclusion, the versatility of the control mechanisms demonstrated should facilitate the development of quantum technologies based on these spin defects.« less

  18. Control of spin defects in wide-bandgap semiconductors for quantum technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heremans, F. Joseph; Yale, Christopher G.; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-05-24

    Deep-level defects are usually considered undesirable in semiconductors as they typically interfere with the performance of present-day electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the electronic spin states of certain atomic-scale defects have recently been shown to be promising quantum bits for quantum information processing as well as exquisite nanoscale sensors due to their local environmental sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in quantum control protocols of several of these spin defects, the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in diamond and a variety of forms of the neutral divacancy (VV0) complex in silicon carbide (SiC). These defects exhibit a spin-triplet ground state that can be controlled through a variety of techniques, several of which allow for room temperature operation. Microwave control has enabled sophisticated decoupling schemes to extend coherence times as well as nanoscale sensing of temperature along with magnetic and electric fields. On the other hand, photonic control of these spin states has provided initial steps toward integration into quantum networks, including entanglement, quantum state teleportation, and all-optical control. Electrical and mechanical control also suggest pathways to develop quantum transducers and quantum hybrid systems. In conclusion, the versatility of the control mechanisms demonstrated should facilitate the development of quantum technologies based on these spin defects.

  19. Kinetics of pulse-induced photoluminescence from a semiconductor quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Turkov, Vadim K; Litvin, Aleksandr P; Baimuratov, Anvar S; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2012-12-03

    Optical methods, which allow the determination of the dominant channels of energy and phase relaxation, are the most universal techniques for the investigation of semiconductor quantum dots. In this paper, we employ the kinetic Pauli equation to develop the first generalized model of the pulse-induced photoluminescence from the lowest-energy eigenstates of a semiconductor quantum dot. Without specifying the shape of the excitation pulse and by assuming that the energy and phase relaxation in the quantum dot may be characterized by a set of phenomenological rates, we derive an expression for the observable photoluminescence cross section, valid for an arbitrary number of the quantum dot's states decaying with the emission of secondary photons. Our treatment allows for thermal transitions occurring with both decrease and increase in energy between all the relevant eigenstates at room or higher temperature. We show that in the general case of N states coupled to each other through a bath, the photoluminescence kinetics from any of them is determined by the sum of N exponential functions, whose exponents are proportional to the respective decay rates. We illustrate the application of the developed model by considering the processes of resonant luminescence and thermalized luminescence from the quantum dot with two radiating eigenstates, and by assuming that the secondary emission is excited with either a Gaussian or exponential pulse. Analytic expressions describing the signals of secondary emission are analyzed, in order to elucidate experimental situations in which the relaxation constants may be reliably extracted from the photoluminescence spectra.

  20. Optical absorption in semiconductor quantum dots coupling to dispersive phonons of infinite modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiwen; Wang, Qin; Zheng, Hang

    2012-10-01

    Optical absorption spectrum of semiconductor quantum dot is investigated by means of an analytical approach based on the Green's function for different forms of coupling strength in an unified method by using the standard model with valence and conduction band levels coupled to dispersive quantum phonons of infinite modes. The analytical expression of the optical absorption coefficient in semiconductor quantum dots is obtained and by this expression the line shape and the peak position of the absorption spectrum are procured. The relation between the properties of absorption spectrum and the forms of coupling strength is clarified, which can be referenced for choosing the proper form of the coupling strength or spectral density to control the features of absorption spectrum of quantum dot. The coupling and confinement induced energy shift and intensity decrease in the absorption spectrum are determined precisely for a wide range of parameters. The results show that the activation energy of the optical absorption is reduced by the effect of exciton-phonon coupling and photons with lower frequencies could also be absorbed in absorption process. With increase of the coupling constant, the line shape of optical absorption spectrum broadens and the peak position moves to lower photon energy with a rapid decrease in intensity at the same time. Both the coupling induced red shift and the confinement induced blue shift conduce to decrease in the intensity of absorption spectrum. Furthermore, this method may have application potential to other confined quantum systems.

  1. Monte-Carlo simulations of photoinduced fluorescence enhancement in semiconductor quantum dot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenosono, Shinya

    2005-03-01

    Photoinduced fluorescence enhancement (PFE) in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) arrays is simulated by a Monte-Carlo method based on the distributed tunneling model. PFE, a property of a QD ensemble, is directly related to the blinking behavior of single QDs. The origin of PFE is attributed not to an increase in the emission intensity during the 'on' period, but to the prolongation of average 'on' time.

  2. Clamping of the Linewidth Enhancement Factor in Narrow Quantum-Well GRINSCH Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, D.; Chow, W.W.; Hader, J.; Koch, S.W.; Moloney, J.V.; Stohls, J.

    1999-01-20

    The linewidth enhancement factor in single quantum-well GRINSCH semiconductor lasers is investigated theoretically and experimentally. For thin wells a small linewidth enhancement factor is obtained which clamps with increasing carrier density, in contrast to the monotonous increase observed for thicker wells. Microscopic many-body calculations reproduce the experimental observations attributing the clamping to a subtle interplay between excitation dependent gain shifts and carrier population distributions.

  3. Theory of electron g-tensor in bulk and quantum-well semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Wayne H.; Flatte', Michael E.

    2004-03-01

    We present quantitative calculations for the electron g-tensors in bulk and quantum-well semiconductors based on a generalized P.p envelope function theory solved in a fourteen-band restricted basis set. The dependences of g-tensor on structure, magnetic field, carrier density, temperature, and spin polarization have been explored and will be described. It is found that at temperatures of a few Kelvin and fields of a few Tesla, the g-tensors for bulk semiconductors develop quasi-steplike dependences on carrier density or magnetic field due to magnetic quantization, and this effect is even more pronounced in quantum-well semiconductors due to the additional electric quantization along the growth direction. The influence of quantum confinement on the electron g-tensors in QWs is studied by examining the dependence of electron g-tensors on well width. Excellent agreement between these calculated electron g-tensors and measurements [1-2] is found for GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. This work was supported by DARPA/ARO. [1] A. Malinowski and R. T. Harley, Phys. Rev. B 62, 2051 (2000);[2] Le Jeune et al., Semicond. Sci. Technol. 12, 380 (1997).

  4. Interacting quantum fields and the chronometric principle

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I. E.

    1976-01-01

    A form of interaction in quantum field theory is described that is physically intrinsic rather than superimposed via a postulated nonlinearity on a hypothetical free field. It derives from the extension to general symmetries of the distinction basic for the chronometric cosmology between the physical (driving) and the observed energies, together with general precepts of quantum field theory applicable to nonunitary representations. The resulting interacting field is covariant, causal, involves real particle production, and is devoid of nontrivial ultraviolet divergences. Possible physical applications are discussed. PMID:16592353

  5. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Fionn D. Lee, D. K. K.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Spencer, J. S.

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible.

  6. Interaction of Semiconductor Obstacle with Electromagnetic Wave Propagating in Circular Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-08

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 1 February 2007 - 01-Feb-08 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interaction of Semiconductor Obstacle with Electromagnetic...goals, the modeling of the circular waveguide section containing semiconductor obstacle will be performed. To calculate the average electric field in...the semiconductor obstacle the finite difference time domain method will be used. Although, the lowest critical frequency in the circular waveguide

  7. Quantum centipedes: collective dynamics of interacting quantum walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Luck, J. M.; Mallick, K.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the quantum centipede made of N fermionic quantum walkers on the one-dimensional lattice interacting by means of the simplest of all hard-bound constraints: the distance between two consecutive fermions is either one or two lattice spacings. This composite quantum walker spreads ballistically, just as the simple quantum walk. However, because of the interactions between the internal degrees of freedom, the distribution of its center-of-mass velocity displays numerous ballistic fronts in the long-time limit, corresponding to singularities in the empirical velocity distribution. The spectrum of the centipede and the corresponding group velocities are analyzed by direct means for the first few values of N. Some analytical results are obtained for arbitrary N by exploiting an exact mapping of the problem onto a free-fermion system. We thus derive the maximal velocity describing the ballistic spreading of the two extremal fronts of the centipede wavefunction, including its non-trivial value in the large-N limit.

  8. Fundamental interaction between Au quantum dots and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Molleshree; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and metal nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted a great deal of attention in biology community due to their application as fluorescent labels and sensors. The optical properties of QDs and NPs allow them to be effective imaging agents. However, QDs have the potential to be used as more than just sensors and labels. Their biological sensing abilities include identifying target DNA through a linker followed by color change and electrical signaling. If this property can be combined with the direct binding of QDs with DNA, many other applications in bio-nanotechnological field are possible. In this paper, we investigate the interaction between colloidal Au QDs and 30-base sequence single strand DNA. Our preliminary results indicate that the DNA strand tend to form different structures in the presence of Au QDs. Furthermore, small as well as large agglomerated Au particles appear to be linked along the DNA strand.

  9. Profiling the local carrier concentration across a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Walrath, J. C.; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    2015-05-11

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to measure a profile of the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. The relative roles of free carrier trapping and/or dopant expulsion are discussed.

  10. Spin-Photon Entanglement in Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Towards Solid-State-Based Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    `In this chapter, we introduced and analyze techniques that allow truly secure secret key sharing over long distances, using public, open channels, where the laws of quantum mechanics ensure the security of the long distance key sharing - an idea generally referred to as the essence of a quantum repeater. We describe several proof-of-principle experiments where technology based on self-assembled quantum dots is used as the backbone of a future quantum repeater.'

  11. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-22

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  12. Irregular Aharonov-Bohm effect for interacting electrons in a ZnO quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Tapash; Manaselyan, Aram; Barseghyan, Manuk

    2017-02-01

    The electronic states and optical transitions of a ZnO quantum ring containing few interacting electrons in an applied magnetic field are found to be very different from those in a conventional semiconductor system, such as a GaAs ring. The strong Zeeman interaction and the Coulomb interaction of the ZnO system, two important characteristics of the electron system in ZnO, exert a profound influence on the electron states and on the optical properties of the ring. In particular, our results indicate that the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in a ZnO quantum ring strongly depends on the electron number. In fact, for two electrons in the ZnO ring, the AB oscillations become aperiodic, while for three electrons (interacting) the AB oscillations completely disappear. Therefore, unlike in conventional quantum ring topology, here the AB effect (and the resulting persistent current) can be controlled by varying the electron number.

  13. Nonequilibrium Quantum Systems: Fluctuations and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasi, Yigit

    We explore some aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of classical and quantum systems. Two chapters are devoted to fluctuation theorems which were originally derived for classical systems. The main challenge in formulating them in quantum mechanics is the fact that fundamental quantities of interest, like work, are defined via the classical concept of a phase space trajectory. We utilize the decoherent histories conceptual framework, in which classical trajectories emerge in quantum mechanics as a result of coarse graining, and provide a first-principles analysis of the nonequilibrium work relation of Jarzynski and Crooks's fluctuation theorem for a quantum system interacting with a general environment based on the quantum Brownian motion (QBM) model. We indicate a parameter range at low temperatures where the theorems might fail in their original form. Fluctuation theorems of Jarzynski and Crooks for systems obeying classical Hamiltonian dynamics are derived under the assumption that the initial conditions are sampled from a canonical ensemble, even though the equilibrium state of an isolated system is typically associated with the microcanonical ensemble. We address this issue through an exact analysis of the classical Brownian motion model. We argue that a stronger form of ensemble equivalence than usually discussed in equilibrium statistical mechanics is required for these theorems to hold in the infinite environment limit irrespective of the ensemble used, and proceed to prove it for this model. An exact expression for the probability distribution of work is obtained for finite environments. Intuitively one expects a system to relax to an equilibrium state when brought into contact with a thermal environment. Yet it is important to have rigorous results that provide conditions for equilibration and characterize the equilibrium state. We consider the dynamics of open quantum systems using the Langevin and master equations and rigorously show that

  14. Electric field control of spin splitting in III-V semiconductor quantum dots without magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick

    2015-10-01

    We provide an alternative means of electric field control for spin manipulation in the absence of magnetic fields by transporting quantum dots adiabatically in the plane of two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the spin splitting energy of moving quantum dots is possible due to the presence of quasi-Hamiltonian that might be implemented to make the next generation spintronic devices of post CMOS technology. Such spin splitting energy is highly dependent on the material properties of semiconductor. It turns out that this energy is in the range of meV and can be further enhanced with increasing pulse frequency. In particular, we show that quantum oscillations in phonon mediated spin-flip behaviors can be observed. We also confirm that no oscillations in spin-flip behaviors can be observed for the pure Rashba or pure Dresselhaus cases.

  15. Density functional theory studies of core-shell semiconductor nanoparticle quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brent; Hendy, Shaun; Tilley, Richard

    2008-03-01

    In going from the macroscale to the nanoscale, quantum-mechanical effects become increasingly important and may mean that nanostructures of a material exhibit very different properties from the corresponding bulk. This is especially noticeable in the case of the optical properties of semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots), which display a number of remarkable features (including very distinct peaks, and tunability across a broad range of wavelengths), due to quantum confinement. Our work involves modeling Si-Ge core-shell nanoparticles using large-scale computer simulations based on the density functional and time-dependent density functional theories. These simulations in particular provide us with predictions of the geometric structures and optical absorption spectra of nanoparticles in an accurate and computationally efficient way, and allow us to study the systematic trends in these properties as the composition and size of the nanoparticle change.

  16. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  17. Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion models for transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    De Falco, Carlo; Gatti, Emilio; Lacaita, Andrea L.; Sacco, Riccardo . E-mail: riccardo.sacco@mate.polimi.it

    2005-04-10

    In this paper, we propose a unified framework for Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion (QCDD) models in nanoscale semiconductor device simulation. QCDD models are presented as a suitable generalization of the classical drift-diffusion (DD) system, each particular model being identified by the constitutive relation for the quantum-correction to the electric potential. We examine two special, and relevant, examples of QCDD models; the first one is the modified DD model named Schroedinger-Poisson-drift-diffusion, and the second one is the quantum-drift-diffusion (QDD) model. For the decoupled solution of the two models, we introduce a functional iteration technique that extends the classical Gummel algorithm widely used in the iterative solution of the DD system. We discuss the finite element discretization of the various differential subsystems, with special emphasis on their stability properties, and illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms and models on the numerical simulation of nanoscale devices in two spatial dimensions.

  18. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosionis, Spyridon G.; Terzis, Andreas F.; Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  19. Optical response of a quantum dot-metal nanoparticle hybrid interacting with a weak probe field.

    PubMed

    Kosionis, Spyridon G; Terzis, Andreas F; Sadeghi, Seyed M; Paspalakis, Emmanuel

    2013-01-30

    We study optical effects in a hybrid system composed of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle that interacts with a weak probe electromagnetic field. We use modified nonlinear density matrix equations for the description of the optical properties of the system and obtain a closed-form expression for the linear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the total system. We then investigate the dependence of the susceptibility on the interparticle distance as well as on the material parameters of the hybrid system. We find that the susceptibility of the quantum dot exhibits optical transparency for specific frequencies. In addition, we show that there is a range of frequencies of the applied field for which the susceptibility of the semiconductor quantum dot leads to gain. This suggests that in such a hybrid system quantum coherence can reverse the course of energy transfer, allowing flow of energy from the metallic nanoparticle to the quantum dot. We also explore the susceptibility of the metal nanoparticle and show that it is strongly influenced by the presence of the quantum dot.

  20. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-09-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov-Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations.

  1. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-01-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov–Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations. PMID:24067870

  2. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-01-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov-Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations.

  3. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E.; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization. PMID:26067215

  4. Silicon Metal-oxide-semiconductor Quantum Dots for Single-electron Pumping.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandro; Tanttu, Tuomo; Hudson, Fay E; Sun, Yuxin; Möttönen, Mikko; Dzurak, Andrew S

    2015-06-03

    As mass-produced silicon transistors have reached the nano-scale, their behavior and performances are increasingly affected, and often deteriorated, by quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling through single dopants, scattering via interface defects, and discrete trap charge states. However, progress in silicon technology has shown that these phenomena can be harnessed and exploited for a new class of quantum-based electronics. Among others, multi-layer-gated silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) technology can be used to control single charge or spin confined in electrostatically-defined quantum dots (QD). These QD-based devices are an excellent platform for quantum computing applications and, recently, it has been demonstrated that they can also be used as single-electron pumps, which are accurate sources of quantized current for metrological purposes. Here, we discuss in detail the fabrication protocol for silicon MOS QDs which is relevant to both quantum computing and quantum metrology applications. Moreover, we describe characterization methods to test the integrity of the devices after fabrication. Finally, we give a brief description of the measurement set-up used for charge pumping experiments and show representative results of electric current quantization.

  5. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots in the low carrier density regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urayama, Junji

    2002-09-01

    Self-assembled quantum dots are nanoscopic clusters of semiconductor atoms that exhibit atom-like properties because of their three dimensional quantum confining potentials. The quantum confinement offered by quantum dots is expected to reap benefits for many optoelectronic applications. In fact, high performance lasers and detectors based on quantum dots are already being developed. For these applications as well as for those with new functionalities, one of the most critical factors affecting performance will be relaxation processes of the carriers. Thus in order to fully exploit the benefits of self-assembled quantum dots, one must have a clear understanding of the physical mechanisms that govern carrier dynamics. Ultrafast carrier dynamics which occur on the time scales of femtoseconds and picoseconds among the quantum dots at low densities are the topics of this thesis. A femtosecond differential transmission pump-probe technique is employed to time-resolve directly the carrier distribution among an ensemble of multilayer self-assembled quantum dots. Measurements show that in multilayer structures where the barrier region is very thin, electronic coupling occurs in a time scale of hundreds of femtoseconds among the confined excited states. In a slightly longer time scale on the order of just a few picoseconds, electrons and holes relax from the high-lying states down to the low-lying dot states. When electrons and holes are captured non-geminately or separately into the excited states of different dots, the electrons experience a phonon bottleneck or the suppression of the interlevel relaxation. This bottleneck signal decays with a time constant of approximately 750 picoseconds and is attributed to thermal excitation. Temperature-dependent measurements analyzed with an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation indicate that thermal reemission and non-radiative recombination play a strong role in the carrier dynamics above 100 Kelvin. Collectively these results

  6. Constraint algebra for interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubini, S.; Roncadelli, M.

    1988-04-01

    We consider relativistic constrained systems interacting with external fields. We provide physical arguments to support the idea that the quantum constraint algebra should be the same as in the free quantum case. For systems with ordering ambiguities this principle is essential to obtain a unique quantization. This is shown explicitly in the case of a relativistic spinning particle, where our assumption about the constraint algebra plus invariance under general coordinate transformations leads to a unique S-matrix. On leave from Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Università di Pavia and INFN, I-27100 Pavia, Italy.

  7. Epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor two-dimensional systems: platforms for quantum circuits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Javad

    2016-10-01

    Theory suggests that the interface between a one-dimensional semiconductor (Sm) with strong spin-orbit coupling and a superconductor (S) hosts Majorana modes with nontrivial topological properties. A key challenge in fabrication of such hybrid devices is forming highly transparent contacts between the active electrons in the semiconductor and the superconducting metal. Recently, it has been shown that a near perfect interface and a highly transparent contact can be achieved using epitaxial growth of aluminum on InAs nanowires. In this work, we present the first two-dimensional epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor material system that can serve as a platform for topological superconductivity. We show that our material system, Al-InAs, satisfies all the requirements necessary to reach into the topological superconducting regime by individual characterization of the semiconductor two dimensional electron system, superconductivity of Al and performance of S-Sm-S junctions. This exciting development might lead to a number of useful applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computing.

  8. Polaron effects in asymmetric semiconductor quantum-well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Xiu-Qin; Liu, Zi-Xin; Pan, Shao-Hua; Li, Xing-Yi

    1997-02-01

    In this paper, polaron effects in asymmetric quantum-well structures (QW's) are investigated by using second-order perturbation theory and the modified Lee-Low-Pines (LLP) variational method. By applying the Green"s-function method, explicit analytical expressions for the electron extended-state wave functions and the density of states in a general step QW's are given. Within the framework of second-order perturbation theory, the ground-state polaron binding energy and effective mass in step and asymmetric single QW"s are studied as due to the interface optical phonons, confined bulklike LO and half-space LO phonons. The full energy spectrum is included in our calculations. The effects of the finite electronic confinement potential and the subband nonparabolicity are also considered. The relative importance of the different phonon modes is analyzed. By means of the modified LLP variational method, the binding energy of a polaron confined to asymmetric single QW's is also investigated. Our results show that in ordinary asymmetric QW"s, the asymmetry of the QW's has a significant influence on the polaron effect, which has a close relationship to the interface phonon dispersion. When the well width and one side barrier height of asymmetric single QW"s are fixed and identical with those of symmetric QW's, the polaron binding energy in asymmetric QW"s is always smaller than that in symmetric QW's. We have also found that it is necessary to include the continuum energy spectrum as intermediate states in the perturbation calculations in order to obtain the correct results; the subband nonparabolicity has a small influence on the polaron effect. Comparing our results obtained by using two different methods, good agreement is found.

  9. Phase Recovery Acceleration of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers by Optical Pumping to Quantum-Well Wetting Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2013-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) by means of the optical pump injection to the quantum-well (QW) wetting layer (WL). We compare the ultrafast gain and phase recovery responses of QD SOAs in either the electrical or the optical pumping scheme by numerically solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The ultrafast gain recovery responses on the order of sub-picosecond are nearly the same for the two pumping schemes. The ultrafast phase recovery is not significantly accelerated by increasing the electrical current density, but greatly improved by increasing the optical pumping power to the QW WL. Because the phase recovery time of QD SOAs with the optical pumping scheme can be reduced down to several picoseconds, the complete phase recovery can be achieved when consecutive pulse signals with a repetition rate of 100 GHz is injected.

  10. Photoemission and Masing in a Cavity-Coupled Semiconductor Double Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor circuit QED devices are exciting platforms for studying the coupled dynamics of single charges, photons, and phonons. I will describe a newly discovered maser, which is driven by single electron tunneling events that result in gigahertz frequency photon emission. Semiconductor double quantum dots, sometimes referred to as electrically tunable ``artificial molecules,'' serve as the gain medium and are placed inside of a high quality factor microwave cavity. Maser action is verified by comparing the statistics of the emitted microwave field above and below the maser threshold. Furthermore, by driving the cavity with a seed tone, it is possible to injection lock the maser, greatly reducing the emission linewidth. The frequency range over which the maser can be injection locked closely follows predictions from Adler's equation. Research was performed in collaboration with Yinyu Liu, Jiri Stehlik, Christopher Eichler, Michael Gullans, and Jacob Taylor. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, ARO, DARPA, and the NSF.

  11. Hidden quantum mirage by negative refraction in semiconductor P-N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-Hui; Zhu, Jia-Ji; Yang, Wen; Lin, Hai-Qing; Chang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    We predict a robust quantum interference phenomenon in a semiconductor P-N junction: with a local pump on one side of the junction, the response of a local probe on the other side behaves as if the disturbance emanates not from the pump but instead from its mirror image about the junction. This phenomenon follows from the matching of Fermi surfaces of the constituent materials, thus it is robust against the details of the junction (e.g., width, potential profile, and even disorder), in contrast to the widely studied anomalous focusing caused by negative refraction. The recently fabricated P-N junctions in 2D semiconductors provide ideal platforms to explore this phenomenon and its applications to dramatically enhance charge and spin transport as well as carrier-mediated long-range correlation.

  12. Control over hysteresis curves and thresholds of optical bistability in different semiconductor double quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, R. Hamedi; M, R. Mehmannavaz; Hadi, Afshari

    2015-08-01

    The effects of optical field on the phenomenon of optical bistability (OB) are investigated in a K-type semiconductor double quantum well (SDQW) under various parametric conditions. It is shown that the OB threshold can be manipulated by increasing the intensity of coupling field. The dependence of the shift of OB hysteresis curve on probe wavelength detuning is then explored. In order to demonstrate controllability of the OB in this SDQW, we compare the OB features of three different configurations which could arise in this SDQW scheme, i.e., K-type, Y-type, and inverted Y-type systems. The controllability of this semiconductor nanostructure medium makes the presented OB scheme more valuable for applications in all-optical switches, information storage, and logic circuits of all optical information processing. Project supported by the Lithuanian Research Council (Grant No. VP1-3.1-ŠM-01-V-03-001).

  13. Quantum confinement in semiconductor nanofilms: Optical spectra and multiple exciton generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-04-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Si and SnO2 nanocrystalline films in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement, observed in the optical spectra of nanofilms for the first time ever. The film thickness ranged from 3.9 to 12.2 nm, depending on the material. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with infinite walls. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are independent on the film thickness and equal to 0.17mo (Si) and 0.21mo (SnO2), with mo the mass of the free electron. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO (valence band), was also thickness-independent: 8.00 (Si) and 7.00 (SnO2). The transitions observed in absorption all start at the level n and correspond to Δn = 1, 2, 3, …. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with increased excitation energy. In effect, nanolayers of Si, an indirect-gap semiconductor, behave as a direct-gap semiconductor, as regards the transverse-quantized level system. A prototype Si-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated photoelectron quantum yields achieving 2.5, showing clear evidence of multiple exciton generation, for the first time ever in a working nanofilm device.

  14. Anisotropy-Induced Quantum Interference and Population Trapping between Orthogonal Quantum Dot Exciton States in Semiconductor Cavity Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen; Agarwal, Girish S.

    2017-02-01

    We describe how quantum dot semiconductor cavity systems can be engineered to realize anisotropy-induced dipole-dipole coupling between orthogonal dipole states in a single quantum dot. Quantum dots in single-mode cavity structures as well as photonic crystal waveguides coupled to spin states or linearly polarized excitons are considered. We demonstrate how the dipole-dipole coupling can control the radiative decay rate of excitons and form pure entangled states in the long time limit. We investigate both field-free entanglement evolution and coherently pumped exciton regimes, and show how a double-field pumping scenario can completely eliminate the decay of coherent Rabi oscillations and lead to population trapping. In the Mollow triplet regime, we explore the emitted spectra from the driven dipoles and show how a nonpumped dipole can take on the form of a spectral triplet, quintuplet, or a singlet, which has applications for producing subnatural linewidth single photons and more easily accessing regimes of high-field quantum optics and cavity-QED.

  15. Noncovalent Interactions by Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Dubecký, Matúš; Mitas, Lubos; Jurečka, Petr

    2016-05-11

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is a family of stochastic methods for solving quantum many-body problems such as the stationary Schrödinger equation. The review introduces basic notions of electronic structure QMC based on random walks in real space as well as its advances and adaptations to systems with noncovalent interactions. Specific issues such as fixed-node error cancellation, construction of trial wave functions, and efficiency considerations that allow for benchmark quality QMC energy differences are described in detail. Comprehensive overview of articles covers QMC applications to systems with noncovalent interactions over the last three decades. The current status of QMC with regard to efficiency, applicability, and usability by nonexperts together with further considerations about QMC developments, limitations, and unsolved challenges are discussed as well.

  16. Photo- and electroluminescence from semiconductor colloidal quantum dots in organic matrices: QD-OLED

    SciTech Connect

    Vitukhnovskii, A. G. Vaschenko, A. A.; Bychkovskii, D. N.; Dirin, D. N.; Tananaev, P. N.; Vakshtein, M. S.; Korzhonov, D. A.

    2013-12-15

    The results are reported of an experimental study of samples of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with luminescent layers fabricated on the basis of two types of CdSe/CdS/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with average CdSe core diameters of 3.2 and 4.1 nm and the same overall diameters of 6.5 nm. The dependences of the LED efficiency on the applied voltage are determined. Assumptions are made about ways of optimizing the design of high-efficiency LEDs.

  17. Time-domain model of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers for wideband optical signals.

    PubMed

    Puris, D; Schmidt-Langhorst, C; Lüdge, K; Majer, N; Schöll, E; Petermann, K

    2012-11-19

    We present a novel theoretical time-domain model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier, that allows to simulate subpicosecond pulse propagation including power-based and phase-based effects. Static results including amplified spontaneous emission spectra, continuous wave amplification, and four-wave mixing experiments in addition to dynamic pump-probe simulations are presented for different injection currents. The model uses digital filters to describe the frequency dependent gain and microscopically calculated carrier-carrier scattering rates for the interband carrier dynamics. It can be used to calculate the propagation of multiple signals with different wavelengths or one wideband signal with high bitrate.

  18. ZnCdSe/ZnSe quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mossawi, Muwaffaq Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Gain of CdZnSe quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is studied theoretically using non-Markovian gain model including many-body effects. The calculations are done at three mole fractions. Spontaneous emission and noise figure of the amplifier are studied. The effect of shot noise is included. High gain, polarization independence, and low noise figure are characterize these QD-SOAs. A multi-mode gain appears for Zn0.69Cd0.31Se structure while the structure Zn0.6Cd0.4Se give a low noise.

  19. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible semiconductor quantum dot-micelles.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Bunge, Scott D.; Gabaldon, John; Fan, Hongyou; Scullin, Chessa; Leve, Erik W.; Wilson, Michael C.; Tallant, David Robert; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-04-01

    We report a simple, rapid approach to synthesize water-soluble and biocompatible fluorescent quantum dot (QD) micelles by encapsulation of monodisperse, hydrophobic QDs within surfactant/lipid micelles. Analyses of UV-vis and photo luminescence spectra, along with transmission electron microscopy, indicate that the water-soluble semiconductor QD micelles are monodisperse and retain the optical properties of the original hydrophobic QDs. The QD micelles were shown to be biocompatible and exhibited little or no aggregation when taken up by cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

  20. Degenerate four-wave mixing from layered semiconductor clusters in the quantum size regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Rhee, Bum Ku; McGinnis, Brian P.; Sandroff, Claude J.

    1986-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the third-order nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) in layered semiconductor clusters exhibiting pronounced quantum size effects at room temperature. BiI3 clusters prepared in colloidal form in acetonitrile had a thickness of ≂7 Å and lateral dimensions between 60 and 90 Å. Using degenerate four-wave mixing, we observed that the conjugate pulses from the small and the large gratings had comparable intensities, verifying the electronic origin of the nonlinearity. The nonlinear susceptibility was found to be 2.3×10-11 esu for a colloid with a cluster volume fraction of 10-5.

  1. Imaging of free carriers in semiconductors via optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzapesa, F. P. Brambilla, M.; Dabbicco, M.; Scamarcio, G.; Columbo, L. L.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2014-01-27

    To monitor the density of photo-generated charge carriers on a semiconductor surface, we demonstrate a detectorless imaging system based on the analysis of the optical feedback in terahertz quantum cascade lasers. Photo-excited free electron carriers are created in high resistivity n-type silicon wafers via low power (≅40 mW/cm{sup 2}) continuous wave pump laser in the near infrared spectral range. A spatial light modulator allows to directly reconfigure and control the photo-patterned intensity and the associated free-carrier density distribution. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  2. Large and tunable negative refractive index via electromagnetically induced chirality in a semiconductor quantum well nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sh.-C.; Zhang, Sh.-Y.; Xu, Y.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Large and tunable negative refractive index (NRI) via electromagnetically induced chirality is demonstrated in a semiconductor quantum wells (SQWs) nanostructure by using the reported experimental parameters in J.F. Dynes et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 157403 (2005). It is found: the large and controllable NRI with alterable frequency regions is obtained when the coupling laser field and the relative phase are modulated, which will increase the flexibility and possibility of implementing NRI in the SQWs nanostructure. The scheme rooted in the experimental results may lead a new avenue to NRI material in solid-state nanostructure.

  3. Effect of quantum parameter – H on space-charge wave spectra in n-type semiconductor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S. Muley, Apurva

    2015-07-31

    The present paper deals with the propagation characteristics of very fundamental wave i.e. space – charge wave while propagating through quantum semiconductor plasma. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model to derive the most general dispersion relation in terms of quantum parameter – H. We have found that in presence of an external electrostatic field, the wave spectra (dispersion as well as gain characteristics) not only modified due to presence of quantum effect but also two novel modes of propagation are introduced due to this effect. Hence it may be concluded that to miniaturize the opto-electronic devices, one should use highly doped semiconductor medium at comparatively lower temperature so that the quantum effects predominate.

  4. Interaction of electrons with optical phonons localized in a quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Pozela, J. Pozela, K.; Juciene, V.; Suziedelis, A.; Shkolnik, A. S.; Mikhrin, S. S.; Mikhrin, V. S.

    2009-12-15

    The scattering rate of electrons in a quantum well by localized polar optical and interface phonons is considered. The dependence of the force of the electron-phonon interaction on the frequency of optical phonons in materials of the heterostructure forming the electron and phonon quantum wells is determined. It is shown that, by varying the composition of semiconductors forming the quantum well and its barriers, it is possible to vary the scattering rates of electrons by a factor of several times. The scattering rates of electrons by polar optical phonons are calculated depending on the fractions In{sub x} and In{sub y} in the composition of semiconductors forming the In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}As/In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As quantum wells. Dependences of the mobility and saturated drift velocity of electrons in high electric fields and quantum wells In{sub y}Ga{sub 1-y}As on the composition of the In{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}As barriers introduced into quantum wells are determined experimentally. The electron mobility increases, while the saturated drift velocity decreases as the fraction of In{sub x} in the composition of barriers is increased.

  5. Manipulating coherence resonance in a quantum dot semiconductor laser via electrical pumping.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christian; Lingnau, Benjamin; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy

    2014-06-02

    Excitability and coherence resonance are studied in a semiconductor quantum dot laser under short optical self-feedback. For low pump levels, these are observed close to a homoclinic bifurcation, which is in correspondence with earlier observations in quantum well lasers. However, for high pump levels, we find excitability close to a boundary crisis of a chaotic attractor. We demonstrate that in contrast to the homoclinic bifurcation the crisis and thus the excitable regime is highly sensitive to the pump current. The excitability threshold increases with the pump current, which permits to adjust the sensitivity of the excitable unit to noise as well as to shift the optimal noise strength, at which maximum coherence is observed. The shift adds up to more than one order of magnitude, which strongly facilitates experimental realizations.

  6. Single Molecule Quantum-Confined Stark Effect Measurements of Semiconductor Nanoparticles at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We measured the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) of several types of fluorescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and nanorods at the single molecule level at room temperature. These measurements demonstrate the possible utility of these nanoparticles for local electric field (voltage) sensing on the nanoscale. Here we show that charge separation across one (or more) heterostructure interface(s) with type-II band alignment (and the associated induced dipole) is crucial for an enhanced QCSE. To further gain insight into the experimental results, we numerically solved the Schrödinger and Poisson equations under self-consistent field approximation, including dielectric inhomogeneities. Both calculations and experiments suggest that the degree of initial charge separation (and the associated exciton binding energy) determines the magnitude of the QCSE in these structures. PMID:23075136

  7. Photon antibunching and nonlinear effects for a quantum dot coupled to a semiconductor cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, F.; Whittaker, D. M.

    2010-09-01

    The models presented simulate pumping techniques that can be used on modern semiconductor devices which are capable of coupling a quantum dot and cavity mode in order to determine a more efficient method of producing a single-photon emitter while taking into consideration typical parameters which are achievable given today’s standards of coupling strength. Cavity quantum electrodynamics are incorporated in the calculations as we compare various pumping schemes for the system that either use on-resonant laser excitation or nonresonant excitation due to a wetting layer. In particular, we look to study how antibunching effects change for each method as the cavity finesse is increased toward the strong coupling regime. Experimentally these studies are equivalent to nonlinear pump-probe measurements, where a strong pump, either resonant or nonresonant, is used to excite the coupled system, and the resulting state is characterized using a weak, resonant probe beam.

  8. Charge Sensed Pauli Blockade in a Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor Lateral Double Quantum Dot

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khoi T.; Lilly, Michael P.; Nielsen, Erik; Bishop, Nathan; Rahman, Rajib; Young, Ralph; Wendt, Joel; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Stevens, Jeffery; Lu, Tzu-Ming; Muller, Richard; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2013-12-11

    We report Pauli blockade in a multielectron silicon metal–oxide–semiconductor double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor. The current is rectified up to a blockade energy of 0.18 ± 0.03 meV. The blockade energy is analogous to singlet–triplet splitting in a two electron double quantum dot. Built-in imbalances of tunnel rates in the MOS DQD obfuscate some edges of the bias triangles. A method to extract the bias triangles is described, and a numeric rate-equation simulation is used to understand the effect of tunneling imbalances and finite temperature on charge stability (honeycomb) diagram, in particular the identification of missing and shifting edges. A bound on relaxation time of the triplet-like state is also obtained from this measurement.

  9. Investigation of red blood cell antigens with highly fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Patrícia Maria Albuquerque; Santos, Beate Saegesser; de Menezes, Frederico Duarte; de Carvalho Ferreira, Ricardo; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo Roberto Moura; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-01-01

    We report a new methodology for red blood cell antigen expression determination by a simple labeling procedure employing luminescent semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent and stable core shell cadmium sulfide/cadmium hydroxide colloidal particles are obtained, with a predominant size of 9 nm. The core-shell quantum dots are functionalized with glutaraldehyde and conjugated to a monoclonal anti-A antibody to target antigen-A in red blood cell membranes. Erythrocyte samples of blood groups A+, A2+, and O+ are used for this purpose. Confocal microscopy images show that after 30 min of conjugation time, type A+ and A2+ erythrocytes present bright emission, whereas the O+ group cells show no emission. Fluorescence intensity maps show different antigen expressions for the distinct erythrocyte types. The results obtained strongly suggest that this simple labeling procedure may be employed as an efficient tool to investigate quantitatively the distribution and expression of antigens in red blood cell membranes.

  10. Charge sensed Pauli blockade in a metal-oxide-semiconductor lateral double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khoi T; Lilly, Michael P; Nielsen, Erik; Bishop, Nathan; Rahman, Rajib; Young, Ralph; Wendt, Joel; Dominguez, Jason; Pluym, Tammy; Stevens, Jeffery; Lu, Tzu-Ming; Muller, Richard; Carroll, Malcolm S

    2013-01-01

    We report Pauli blockade in a multielectron silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot with an integrated charge sensor. The current is rectified up to a blockade energy of 0.18 ± 0.03 meV. The blockade energy is analogous to singlet-triplet splitting in a two electron double quantum dot. Built-in imbalances of tunnel rates in the MOS DQD obfuscate some edges of the bias triangles. A method to extract the bias triangles is described, and a numeric rate-equation simulation is used to understand the effect of tunneling imbalances and finite temperature on charge stability (honeycomb) diagram, in particular the identification of missing and shifting edges. A bound on relaxation time of the triplet-like state is also obtained from this measurement.

  11. Pitfalls in the theory of carrier dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots: Single-particle basis versus the many-particle configuration basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettau, T.; Leymann, H. A. M.; Wiersig, J.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze quantum dot models used in current research for misconceptions that arise from the choice of basis states for the carriers. The examined models originate from semiconductor quantum optics, but the illustrated conceptional problems are not limited to this field. We demonstrate how the choice of basis states can imply a factorization scheme that leads to an artificial dependency between two, actually independent, quantities. Furthermore, we consider an open quantum dot-cavity system and show how the dephasing, generated by the dissipator in the von Neumann Lindblad equation, depends on the choice of basis states that are used to construct the collapse operators. We find that the Rabi oscillations of the s -shell exciton are either dephased by the dissipative decay of the p -shell exciton or remain unaffected, depending on the choice of basis states. In a last step we resolve this discrepancy by taking the full system-reservoir interaction Hamiltonian into account.

  12. Synthesis and enhanced fluorescence of Ag doped CdTe semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ding, Si-Jing; Liang, Shan; Nan, Fan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jia-Hong; Zhou, Li; Yu, Xue-Feng; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-02-07

    Doping with intentional impurities is an intriguing way to tune the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. However, the synthesis of some specific doped semiconductor nanocrystals remains a challenge and the doping mechanism in this strongly confined system is still not clearly understood. In this work, we report, for the first time, the synthesis of stable and water-soluble Ag-doped CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) via a facile aqueous approach. Experimental characterization demonstrated the efficient doping of the Ag impurities into the CdTe SQDs with an appropriate reaction time. By doping 0.3% Ag impurities, the Stokes shift is decreased by 120 meV, the fluorescence intensity is enhanced more than 3 times, the radiative rate is enhanced 4.2 times, and the non-radiative rate is efficiently suppressed. These observations reveal that the fluorescence enhancement in Ag-doped CdTe SQDs is mainly attributed to the minimization of surface defects, filling of the trap states, and the enhancement of the radiative rate by the silver dopants. Our results suggest that the silver doping is an efficient method for tuning the optical properties of the CdTe SQDs.

  13. Controlling the interaction of light with polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Christoph; Paquin, Francis; Treat, Neil D; Bruno, Annalisa; Reynolds, Luke X; Haque, Saif A; Stavrinou, Paul N; Silva, Carlos; Stingelin, Natalie

    2013-09-20

    In this study, a generally applicable strategy is described to manipulate the optical properties of a wide range of polymer semiconductors in the solid state. Blending these materials with a non-conjugated, polar polymer matrix is found to be the processing key to a drastic change and red-shift of the absorption characteristics.

  14. Mapping the effective mass of electrons in III-V semiconductor quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, M. H.; Papworth, A. J.; Beanland, R.; Bullough, T. J.; Chalker, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    The electron effective mass me* can be calculated from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) for III-V semiconductor materials. The mapping capabilities of a scanning transmission electron microscope, equipped with a GatanEnfina™ EELS system are exploited to produce maps showing the variation of me* with nanometer scale resolution for a range of semiconductors. The analysis was carried out on three material systems: a GaInNAs quantum well in a GaAs matrix; InAs quantum dots in a GaAs matrix, and bulk wurzitic GaN. Values of me* were measured as ˜0.07m0 for GaAs and 0.183m0 for GaN, both in excellent agreement with the literature. It has also been shown that the high frequency dielectric constant can be calculated using the Kramers-Kronig methodology. When the high frequency dielectric constant is incorporated into the calculations a much more accurate visual representation of me* is displayed in the maps.

  15. Transport in semiconductor nanowire superlattices described by coupled quantum mechanical and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Alvaro, M; Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Melnik, R V N; Prabhakar, S

    2013-08-21

    In this paper we develop a kinetic model for the analysis of semiconductor superlattices, accounting for quantum effects. The model consists of a Boltzmann-Poisson type system of equations with simplified Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisions, obtained from the general time-dependent Schrödinger-Poisson model using Wigner functions. This system for superlattice transport is supplemented by the quantum mechanical part of the model based on the Ben-Daniel-Duke form of the Schrödinger equation for a cylindrical superlattice of finite radius. The resulting energy spectrum is used to characterize the Fermi-Dirac distribution that appears in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision, thereby coupling the quantum mechanical and kinetic parts of the model. The kinetic model uses the dispersion relation obtained by the generalized Kronig-Penney method, and allows us to estimate radii of quantum wire superlattices that have the same miniband widths as in experiments. It also allows us to determine more accurately the time-dependent characteristics of superlattices, in particular their current density. Results, for several experimentally grown superlattices, are discussed in the context of self-sustained coherent oscillations of the current density which are important in an increasing range of current and potential applications.

  16. Magnetic field induced optical gain in a dilute nitride quaternary semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-10-01

    Effects of magnetic field strength on the electronic and optical properties are brought out in a Ga0.661In0.339N0.0554As0.9446/GaAs quantum dot for the applications of desired wavelength in opto-electronic devices. The band alignment is obtained using band anticrossing model and the model solid theory. The magnetic field dependent electron-heavy hole transition energies with the dot radius in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are investigated. The magnetic field induced oscillator strength as a function of dot radius is studied. The resonant peak values of optical absorption coefficients and the changes of refractive index with the application of magnetic field strength in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot are obtained. The magnetic field induced threshold current density and the maximum optical gain are found in a GaInNAs/GaAs quantum dot. The results show that the optimum wavelength for fibre optical communication networks can be obtained with the variation of applied magnetic field strength and the outcomes may be useful for the design of efficient lasers based on the group III-N-V semiconductors.

  17. Instabilities in the optical response of a semiconductor quantum dot—metal nanoparticle heterodimer: self-oscillations and chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, Bintoro S.; Iskandar, Alexander A.; Malyshev, Victor A.; Knoester, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the nonlinear optical response of a heterodimer comprising a semiconductor quantum dot strongly coupled to a metal nanoparticle. The quantum dot is considered as a three-level ladder system with ground, one-exciton, and bi-exction states. As compared to the case of a two-level quantum dot model, adding the third (bi-exciton) state produces fascinating effects in the optical response of the hybrid system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the system may exhibit picosecond and sub-picosecond self-oscillations and quasi-chaotic behaviour under single-frequency continuous wave excitation. An isolated semiconductor quantum dot does not show such features. The effects originate from competing one-exciton and bi-exciton transitions in the semiconductor quantum dot, triggered by the self-action of the quantum dot via the metal nanoparticle. The key parameter that governs the phenomena mentioned is the ratio of the self-action strength and the bi-exciton shift. The self-oscillation regime can be achieved in practice, in particular, in a heterodimer comprised of a closely spaced ZnS/ZnSe core-shell quantum dot and a spherical silver nanoparticle. The results may have applications in nanodevices for generating trains of ultrashort optical pulses.

  18. Spin-orbit interaction induced current dip in a single quantum dot coupled to a spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavaras, G.

    2017-03-01

    Experiments on semiconductor quantum dot systems have demonstrated the coupling between electron spins in quantum dots and spins localized in the neighboring area of the dots. Here we show that in a magnetic field the electrical current flowing through a single quantum dot tunnel-coupled to a spin displays a dip at the singlet-triplet anticrossing point which appears due to the spin-orbit interaction. We specify the requirements for which the current dip is formed and examine the properties of the dip for various system parameters, such as energy detuning, spin-orbit interaction strength, and coupling to leads. We suggest a parameter range in which the dip could be probed.

  19. Investigation of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoz, Sabit

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, also referred to as quantum dots (QDs) which have advantages of low-cost, photostability, high molar extinction coefficients and size-dependent optical properties, have been the focus of great scientific and technological efforts in solar cells development. Due to the multi-electron generation effect, the theoretical maximum efficiency of quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) is much higher than that of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Thus QDSSCs have a clear potential to overtake the efficiency of other kinds of solar cells. Doped semiconductor QDs can not only retain nearly all advantages of intrinsic QDs, but also have additional absorption bands for improved efficiency. This approach is particularly important for wide band gap semiconductors, for example, zinc based QDs. Zinc based are desirable candidates as they are inexpensive, earth abundant and nontoxic. When doped, they can cover a broad range of visible spectrum. In my project, I aim at developing novel methods for the preparation of II-VI QDs and investigating the effects of doping on the properties and performances of QDSSCs. Cadmium selenide (CdSe), manganese doped cadmium selenide (Mn:CdSe), and manganese doped zinc sulfide (Mn:ZnS) QDs have been synthesized by laser ablation in water. The structural and luminescent properties of the QDs have been investigated. In addition, QDSSC performances of the samples have been measured using nanowire electrode made of ZnO and Zn2SnO 4. I have also successfully synthesized europium doped zinc sulfide (Eu:ZnS) and manganese doped cadmium sulfide (Mn:CdS) nanoparticles by wet chemical method, and analyzed structural, optical, and magnetic properties as well as the device performance of the nanoparticles.

  20. Tuning intermolecular non-covalent interactions for nanowires of organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lang; Gao, Jianhua; Fu, Yanyan; Dong, Huanli; Zhao, Huaping; Li, Hongxiang; Tang, Qingxin; Chen, Keqiu; Hu, Wenping

    2010-12-01

    Anthracene and its derivatives are used to demonstrate a simple way to cast assemble nanowires of organic semiconductors with tuning of intermolecular non-covalent interactions by molecular design. The tuning of intermolecular interactions could be achieved by (i) decreasing intermolecular hydrophobic interactions by linking hydrophilic side chains to anthracene rings, (ii) increasing intermolecular interaction for self-assembly with the assistance of hydrogen bonds, and (iii) enhancing molecular π-π interaction by increasing the conjugated dimension of the compounds.

  1. Tuning intermolecular non-covalent interactions for nanowires of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lang; Gao, Jianhua; Fu, Yanyan; Dong, Huanli; Zhao, Huaping; Li, Hongxiang; Tang, Qingxin; Chen, Keqiu; Hu, Wenping

    2010-12-01

    Anthracene and its derivatives are used to demonstrate a simple way to cast assemble nanowires of organic semiconductors with tuning of intermolecular non-covalent interactions by molecular design. The tuning of intermolecular interactions could be achieved by (i) decreasing intermolecular hydrophobic interactions by linking hydrophilic side chains to anthracene rings, (ii) increasing intermolecular interaction for self-assembly with the assistance of hydrogen bonds, and (iii) enhancing molecular π-π interaction by increasing the conjugated dimension of the compounds.

  2. Exotic quantum phase transitions of strongly interacting topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagle, Kevin; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke

    2015-03-01

    Using determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that an extended Hubbard model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice has two novel quantum phase transitions. The first is a quantum phase transition between the weakly interacting gapless Dirac fermion phase and a strongly interacting fully gapped and symmetric trivial phase, which cannot be described by the standard Gross-Neveu model. The second is a quantum critical point between a quantum spin Hall insulator with spin Sz conservation and the previously mentioned strongly interacting fully gapped phase. At the latter quantum critical point the single-particle excitations remain gapped, while spin and charge gaps both close. We argue that the first quantum phase transition is related to the Z16 classification of the topological superconductor 3He-B phase with interactions, while the second quantum phase transition is a topological phase transition described by a bosonic O (4 ) nonlinear sigma model field theory with a Θ term.

  3. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  4. Quantum efficiency of a single microwave photon detector based on a semiconductor double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement H.; Vavilov, Maxim G.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we consider a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting resonator that is driven by the microwave field of a superconducting transmission line. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and show that the resonator-coupled DQD is a sensitive microwave single photon detector. Using currently available experimental parameters of DQD-resonator coupling and dissipation, including the effects of 1 /f charge noise and phonon noise, we determine the parameter regime for which incident photons are completely absorbed and near-unit ≳98 % efficiency can be achieved. We show that this regime can be reached by using very high quality resonators with quality factor Q ≃105 .

  5. High Intensity Laser Interactions with Narrow Gap Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselback, Michael Peter

    1995-01-01

    Two-photon absorption in solids is a well known and thoroughly characterized nonlinear optical process. Higher order multi-photon absorption however, has received comparatively little study. In this dissertation, results of experiments with bulk, narrow gap semiconductors InSb and InAs are reported. By performing Z-scans and pump-probe measurements at different laser wavelengths and sample temperatures, various nonlinear optical processes are identified. Data obtained with InAs is consistent with photocarrier generation by three and four-photon absorption. It is believed this is the first direct evidence of four-photon absorption in a semiconductor. Leakage two-photon is observed with InSb at 15K. This novel effect arises from dynamic band un-blocking caused by laser heating of conduction electrons. All phenomena are excited with picosecond CO_2 laser pulses at irradiances below the material damage threshold. Physical models describing the observations are presented.

  6. Effect of electron-electron interaction on the magnetic moment and susceptibility of a parabolic GaAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boda, Aalu; Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Sankar, I. V.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The problem of a parabolically confined two-dimensional semiconductor GaAs quantum dot with two interacting electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field and the spin-Zeeman interaction is studied using a method of numerical diagonalization. The energy spectrum is calculated as a function of the magnetic field. The magnetic moment (M) and the magnetic susceptibility (χ) show zero temperature diamagnetic peaks due to the exchange induced singlet-triplet transitions. The position and the number of these peaks depend both on the confinement strength of the quantum dot and the strength of the electron-electron interaction (β) .

  7. Time domain terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor bulk and multiple quantum wells structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue

    A time-domain terahertz spectroscopic system with high source power (average power > 10 nW) and high signal-to- noise ratio (>104) was developed and used to study ultrafast electronic processes in semiconductor structures. The physics of the spectroscopy, the theoretical basis of the interferometry, the model of the electron-electromagnetic field interaction, and the principle of experimental data processing are presented. The first direct measurement of the intervalley scattering time in In 0.53Ga0.47As was performed. The intervalley scattering time constants obtained were τLΓ = 35 fs and τLΓ = 450 fs. The spectroscopic data showed that at low carrier density the carrier- carrier scattering is unimportant. The intervalley deformation potential was obtained from the measured intervalley scattering time constant τ LΓ. The transient conductivity was obtained using time-domain terahertz spectroscopy. The frequency dependent terahertz spectroscopy enabled us to uniquely determine the transient mobility and density. The transient electron mobility is ~5200 cm2/Vs, which is less than the Hall mobility. For large photocarrier densities, this discrepancy is attributed to the additional momentum relaxation associated with electron-hole scattering. Using pump pulses with wavelength of 810 run, the electron trapping time in low-temperature-grown GaAs was accurately determined. The measured trapping time is slightly larger than that observed from a band-edge pump- probe measurements. We argue that the terahertz technique provides the most reliable measure of carrier lifetime due to the unique interaction. The carrier dynamics of low-temperature-grown InGaAs bulk and InGaAs/InAlAs multiple quantum wells were investigated. We were able to differentiate the two dominant mechanisms in the electron decay process, trapping and recombination. A trapping time as fast as 1.3-2.6 ps was observed for photo-excited electrons. The effects of Be-doping and growth temperature on the

  8. Optical injection of quantum dash semiconductor lasers at 1550nm for tunable photonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochet, M.; Naderi, N. A.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2011-02-01

    In this manuscript, we will theoretically compute and experimentally investigate the dynamics of an optically injected nanostructure laser as a function of the injection strength and the optical detuning frequency. A model describing the optically-injected semiconductor laser is derived in dimensionless format that accounts for the large nonlinear gain component associated with nanostructure semiconductor lasers through the gain coefficient's derivative with respect to perturbations in the carrier and photon density. The nonlinear gain (carrier) relaxation rate and gain compression coefficient account for the perturbation in the slave laser's photon density, and are theoretically shown to have a strong impact on the level of stability exhibited by the optically-injected laser. The theoretical model is experimentally verified through the optical-injection of a quantum-dash Fabry-Perot laser at an operating wavelength of 1550 nm. The quantum-dash laser's large damping rate and sufficiently small linewidth enhancement factor are observed to inhibit period-doubling and chaotic operation under zero frequency-detuning conditions. Additionally, the optically injected quantum-dash laser is found to exhibit a large period-one operational state as the injection strength and the detuning frequency are varied, resulting in a highly tunable microwave frequency in the coupled system's equilibrium state. The enhanced and undamped relaxation oscillations of the period-one state are discussed as a building block for tunable photonic oscillators in various RF photonics applications. Finally a path towards realizing an optically-injected diode laser with a THz resonance frequency will be reviewed.

  9. Quantum states of charge carriers and longitudinal conductivity in double periodic n-type semiconductor lattice structures in electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Perov, A. A. Penyagin, I. V.

    2015-07-15

    Quantum states of charge carriers in double periodic semiconductor superlattices of n-type quantum dots with Rashba spin–orbit coupling in an electron gas have been calculated in the one-electron approximation in the presence of mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic fields. For these structures in weak constant electric field, the solution to the quasi-classical kinetic Boltzmann equation shows that the states of carriers in magnetic Landau minibands with negative differential conductivity are possible.

  10. III-V semiconductor Quantum Well systems: Physics of Gallium Arsenide two-dimensional hole systems and engineering of mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, YenTing

    This dissertation examines two types of III-V semiconductor quantum well systems: two-dimensional holes in GaAs, and mid-infrared Quantum Cascade lasers. GaAs holes have a much reduced hyperfine interaction with the nuclei due to the p-like orbital, resulting in a longer hole spin coherence time comparing to the electron spin coherence time. Therefore, holes' spins are promising candidates for quantum computing qubits, but the effective mass and the Lande g-factor, whose product determines the spin-susceptibility of holes, are not well known. In this thesis, we measure the effective hole mass through analyzing the temperature dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in a relatively strong interacting two-dimensional hole systems confined to a 20 nm-wide, (311)A GaAs quantum well. The holes in this system occupy two nearly-degenerate spin subbands whose effective mass we measure to be ˜ 0.2 me. We then apply a sufficiently strong parallel magnetic field to fully depopulate one of the spin subbands, and the spin susceptibility of the two-dimensional hole system is deduced from the depopulation field. We also confine holes in closely spaced bilayer GaAs quantum wells to study the interlayer tunneling spectrum as a function of interlayer bias and in-plane magnetic field, in hope of probing the hole's Fermi contour. Quantum Cascade lasers are one of the major mid-infrared light sources well suited for applications in health and environmental sensing. One of the important factors that affect Quantum Cascade laser performance is the quality of the interfaces between the epitaxial layers. What has long been neglected is that interface roughness causes intersubband scattering, and thus affecting the relation between the lifetimes of the upper and lower laser states, which determines if population inversion is possible. We first utilize strategically added interface roughness in the laser design to engineer the intersubband scattering lifetimes. We further

  11. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    The motion of domain walls due to the spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport is of considerable interest for the development of spintronic devices. We model the charge and spin transport through domain walls in ferromagnetic semiconductors for various systems. With an appropriate model Hamiltonian for the spin-dependent potential, we calculate wavefunctions inside the domain walls which are then used to calculate transmission and reflection coefficients, which are then in turn used to calculate current and spin torque. Starting with a simple approximation for the change in magnetization inside the domain wall, and ending with a sophisticated transfer matrix method, we model the common pi wall, the less-studied 2pi wall, and a system of two pi walls separated by a variable distance. We uncover an interesting width dependence on the transport properties of the domain wall. 2pi walls in particular, have definitive maximums in resistance and spin torque for certain domain wall widths that can be seen as a function of the spin mistracking in the system---when the spins are either passing straight through the domain wall (narrow walls) or adiabatically following the magnetization (wide walls), the resistance is low as transmission is high. In the intermediate region, there is room for the spins to rotate their magnetization, but not necessarily all the way through a 360 degree rotation, leading to reflection and resistance. We also calculate that there are widths for which the total velocity of a 2pi wall is greater than that of a same-sized pi wall. In the double-wall system, we model how the system reacts to changes in the separation of the domain walls. When the domain walls are far apart, they act as a spin-selective resonant double barrier, with sharp resonance peaks in the transmission profile. Brought closer and closer together, the number and sharpness of the peaks decrease, the spectrum smooths out, and the domain walls brought together have a

  12. Self Assembled Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Spin Based All Optical and Electronic Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-17

    associates 1. Carmen Stefanita 2. Ifthikar Ahmed 3. V. Avrutin 4. U Ozgur 5. T. Morisato (visiting from Japan) 6. M. Qian 7. A. Reber Graduate...Cahay, “ Monte Carlo simulation of spin transport in nanowires”, IEEE NTC Workshop on Quantum Device and Technology, Clarkson University, Pottsdam

  13. Quantum transformation limits in multiwave parametric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygin, M. Yu

    2016-10-01

    The possibility to realize multiple nonlinear optical processes in a single crystal as means to produce multicolor quantum states favours stability and compactness of optical settings. Hence, this approach can be advantageous compared to the traditional one based on cascaded arrangement of optical elements. However, it comes with an obstacle—the class of accessible quantum states is narrower than that of the cascade counterpart. In this letter, we study this task using an example of three coupled nonlinear optical processes, namely, one parametric down-conversion and two of sum-frequency generation. To this end, the singular value decomposition has been applied to find the cascade representation of the compound field evolution. We have found the link between the parameters of the multiwave processes and the relevant cascade parameters—beam-splitting and squeezing parameters, by means of which the generated quantum states have been characterized. The relation between the squeezing parameters that has been found in the course of this work shows that the squeezing resource, produced in the parametric down-conversion, is shared among the modes involved in the compound interactions. Moreover, we have shown that the degree of two-mode entanglement carried by the up-converted frequencies cannot exceed that of the down-converted frequencies.

  14. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    Semiconductor nanoparticles are tiny crystalline structures (typically range from 1 - 100 nm) whose shape in many cases can be dictated through tailored chemical synthesis with atomic scale precision. The small size of these nanoparticles often results in quantum confinement (spatial confinement of wave functions), which imparts the ability to manipulate band-gap energies thus allowing them to be optimally engineered for different applications (i.e., photovoltaics, photocatalysis, imaging). However, charge carriers excited within these nanoparticles are often involved in many different processes: trapping, trap migration, Auger recombination, non-radiative relaxation, radiative relaxation, oxidation / reduction, or multiple exciton generation. Broadband ultrafast transient absorption laser spectroscopy is used to spectrally resolve the fate of excited charge carriers in both wavelength and time, providing insight as to what synthetic developments or operating conditions will be necessary to optimize their efficiency for certain applications. This thesis outlines the effort of resolving the dynamics of excited charge carriers for several Cd and Si based nanoparticle systems using this experimental technique. The thesis is organized into five chapters and two appendices as indicated below. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the photophysics of semiconductor nanoparticles. It begins by defining what nanoparticles, semiconductors, charge carriers, and quantum confinement are. From there it details how the study of charge carrier dynamics within nanoparticles can lead to increased efficiency in applications such as photocatalysis. Finally, the experimental methodology associated with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is introduced and its power in mapping charge carrier dynamics is established. Chapter 2 (JPCC, 19647, 2011) introduces the first of the studied samples: water-solubilized 2D CdSe nanoribbons (NRs), which were synthesized in the Osterloh

  15. Metal oxide semiconductors for dye- and quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Concina, Isabella; Vomiero, Alberto

    2015-04-17

    This Review provides a brief summary of the most recent research developments in the synthesis and application of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors for dye sensitized and quantum dot sensitized solar cells. In these devices, the wide bandgap semiconducting oxide acts as the photoanode, which provides the scaffold for light harvesters (either dye molecules or quantum dots) and electron collection. For this reason, proper tailoring of the optical and electronic properties of the photoanode can significantly boost the functionalities of the operating device. Optimization of the functional properties relies with modulation of the shape and structure of the photoanode, as well as on application of different materials (TiO2, ZnO, SnO2) and/or composite systems, which allow fine tuning of electronic band structure. This aspect is critical because it determines exciton and charge dynamics in the photoelectrochemical system and is strictly connected to the photoconversion efficiency of the solar cell. The different strategies for increasing light harvesting and charge collection, inhibiting charge losses due to recombination phenomena, are reviewed thoroughly, highlighting the benefits of proper photoanode preparation, and its crucial role in the development of high efficiency dye sensitized and quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  16. Epitaxial growth of large-gap quantum spin Hall insulator on semiconductor surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Li, Ping; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Formation of topological quantum phase on a conventional semiconductor surface is of both scientific and technological interest. Here, we demonstrate epitaxial growth of 2D topological insulator, i.e., quantum spin Hall state, on Si(111) surface with a large energy gap, based on first-principles calculations. We show that the Si(111) surface functionalized with one-third monolayer of halogen atoms [Si(111)-3×3-X (X = Cl, Br, I)] exhibiting a trigonal superstructure provides an ideal template for epitaxial growth of heavy metals, such as Bi, which self-assemble into a hexagonal lattice with high kinetic and thermodynamic stability. Most remarkably, the Bi overlayer is atomically bonded to but electronically decoupled from the underlying Si substrate, exhibiting isolated quantum spin Hall state with an energy gap as large as ∼0.8 eV. This surprising phenomenon originates from an intriguing substrate-orbital-filtering effect, which critically selects the orbital composition around the Fermi level, leading to different topological phases. In particular, the substrate-orbital-filtering effect converts the otherwise topologically trivial freestanding Bi lattice into a nontrivial phase; and the reverse is true for Au lattice. The underlying physical mechanism is generally applicable, opening a new and exciting avenue for exploration of large-gap topological surface/interface states. PMID:25246584

  17. Density functional theory and beyond-opportunities for quantum methods in materials modeling semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sadasivan; Simka, Harsono; Haverty, Michael

    2008-02-13

    In the semiconductor industry, the use of new materials has been increasing with the advent of nanotechnology. As critical dimensions decrease, and the number of materials increases, the interactions between heterogeneous materials themselves and processing increase in complexity. Traditionally, applications of ab initio techniques are confined to electronic structure and band gap calculations of bulk materials, which are then used in coarse-grained models such as mesoscopic and continuum models. Density functional theory is the most widely used ab initio technique that was successfully extended to several applications. This paper illustrates applications of density functional theory to semiconductor processes and proposes further opportunities for use of such techniques in process development.

  18. Optical properties of semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Joong-Kon

    Thanks to the difference in energy gap between two semiconductors and to their different indices of refraction, semiconductor heterostructures can confine electrons as well as photons. This property makes it possible to build semiconductor-based optical resonators (microcavities) with a radiation dipole (a quantum well) in its midst to investigate the coupling between the optical modes of the microcavity with the exciton modes of the quantum well. Such an interaction, besides its intrinsic interest, is relevant to vertically-emitting semiconductor lasers, based on the quantum well- microcavity system. In this thesis, we will present experimental evidence of temperature and electric-field dependent exciton-cavity coupling in GaAs-GaAlAs microcavities.

  19. Resonantly enhanced optical nonlinearity in hybrid semiconductor quantum dot - metal nanoparticle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ming; Wang, Kai; Long, Hua; Yang, Guang; Lu, Peixiang; Hetsch, Frederik; Susha, Andrei S.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2012-02-01

    The optical nonlinearity of hybrid structures composed of CdTe quantum dots and periodical particle array of gold is studied using Z-scan method. The optical nonlinearity is dramatically affected by the interaction between exciton in CdTe quantum dots and surface plasmons in Au periodical particle array. When the Au surface plasmon is tuned to be in resonance with the exciton transition in CdTe quantum dots, the largest nonlinear refractive index and the smallest two-photon absorption coefficient, n2 = -0.53 cm2/GW and β = 25 cm/GW, which are about 8 times larger and 50 times smaller than that of bare CdTe quantum dots, can be achieved.

  20. Gate tunneling current and quantum capacitance in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with graphene gate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yanbin; Shekhawat, Aniruddh; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Ural, Ant

    2016-11-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with graphene as the metal gate electrode, silicon dioxide with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 20 nm as the dielectric, and p-type silicon as the semiconductor are fabricated and characterized. It is found that Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling dominates the gate tunneling current in these devices for oxide thicknesses of 10 nm and larger, whereas for devices with 5 nm oxide, direct tunneling starts to play a role in determining the total gate current. Furthermore, the temperature dependences of the F-N tunneling current for the 10 nm devices are characterized in the temperature range 77-300 K. The F-N coefficients and the effective tunneling barrier height are extracted as a function of temperature. It is found that the effective barrier height decreases with increasing temperature, which is in agreement with the results previously reported for conventional MOS devices with polysilicon or metal gate electrodes. In addition, high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements of these MOS devices are performed, which depict a local capacitance minimum under accumulation for thin oxides. By analyzing the data using numerical calculations based on the modified density of states of graphene in the presence of charged impurities, it is shown that this local minimum is due to the contribution of the quantum capacitance of graphene. Finally, the workfunction of the graphene gate electrode is extracted by determining the flat-band voltage as a function of oxide thickness. These results show that graphene is a promising candidate as the gate electrode in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  1. Many-body Effects in a Laterally Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Quantum Well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng; Li, Jian-Zhong; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many body effects on conduction and diffusion of electrons and holes in a semiconductor quantum well are studied using a microscopic theory. The roles played by the screened Hartree-Fock (SHE) terms and the scattering terms are examined. It is found that the electron and hole conductivities depend only on the scattering terms, while the two-component electron-hole diffusion coefficients depend on both the SHE part and the scattering part. We show that, in the limit of the ambipolax diffusion approximation, however, the diffusion coefficients for carrier density and temperature are independent of electron-hole scattering. In particular, we found that the SHE terms lead to a reduction of density-diffusion coefficients and an increase in temperature-diffusion coefficients. Such a reduction or increase is explained in terms of a density-and temperature dependent energy landscape created by the bandgap renormalization.

  2. Semiconductor quantum dot/albumin complex is a long-life and highly photostable endosome marker.

    PubMed

    Hanaki, Ken-ichi; Momo, Asami; Oku, Taisuke; Komoto, Atsushi; Maenosono, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2003-03-14

    For the purpose of selecting the efficient dispersion condition of hydrophilic semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in biological buffers, the dispersion of the QDs mixed with a serum albumin from 9 different species or an ovalbumin was compared by a fluorescence intensity analysis. The QDs mixed with sheep serum albumin (SSA) showed the highest fluorescence of all when the mixtures were dissolved in Dulbecco's MEM. QD/SSA complexes were accumulated in the endosome/lysosome of Vero cells and the fluorescence could be detected over a 5-day post-incubation period. The photostability of QD/SSA complexes associated with the endosomes was detectable, at least, 30 times as long as that of fluorescein-labeled dextran involved in endosomes. QD/SSA complex, therefore, can be used as a long-life and highly photostable endosome marker.

  3. Direct self-assembling and patterning of semiconductor quantum dots on transferable elastomer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Sara; Vespini, Veronica; Olivieri, Federico; Nasti, Giuseppe; Todino, Michele; Mandracchia, Biagio; Pagliarulo, Vito; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Functionalization of thin and stretchable polymer layers by nano- and micro-patterning of nanoparticles is a very promising field of research that can lead to many different applications in biology and nanotechnology. In this work, we present a new procedure to self-assemble semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) nanoparticles by a simple fabrication process on a freestanding flexible PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane. We used a Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate (PPLN) crystal to imprint a micrometrical pattern on the PDMS membrane that drives the QDs self-structuring on its surface. This process allows patterning QDs with different wavelength emissions in a single step in order to tune the overall emission spectrum of the composite, tuning the QDs mixing ratio.

  4. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism. PMID:27605471

  5. Suppressing the Fluorescence Blinking of Single Quantum Dots Encased in N-type Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Guofeng; Wang, Zao; Li, Zhijie; Chen, Ruiyun; Qin, Chengbing; Gao, Yan; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-09-01

    N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles are used to effectively suppress the fluorescence blinking of single near-infrared-emitting CdSeTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs), where the ITO could block the electron transfer from excited QDs to trap states and facilitate more rapid regeneration of neutral QDs by back electron transfer. The average blinking rate of QDs is significantly reduced by more than an order of magnitude and the largest proportion of on-state is 98%, while the lifetime is not considerably reduced. Furthermore, an external electron transfer model is proposed to analyze the possible effect of radiative, nonradiative, and electron transfer pathways on fluorescence blinking. Theoretical analysis based on the model combined with measured results gives a quantitative insight into the blinking mechanism.

  6. Optical Properties of Planar Nanostructures Based on Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakanov, A. G.; Toropov, N. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    The optical properties of a composite material consisting of a thin polymer film, which is activated by semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and silver nanoparticles, on a transparent dielectric substrate have been investigated. It is revealed that the presence of silver nanoparticles leads to an increase in the QD absorption (by a factor of 4) and in the fluorescence intensity (by a factor of 10), whereas the fluorescence time drops by a factor of about 10. Excitation of the composite medium by a pulsed laser is found to result in narrowing of the fluorescence band and a sublinear dependence of its intensity on the pulse energy. In the absence of silver nanoparticles, the fluorescence spectrum of QDs is independent of the excitation-pulse energy density, and the fluorescence intensity depends linearly on the pulse energy in the entire range of energy densities, up to 75 mJ/cm2.

  7. Control of Spin Helix Symmetry in Semiconductor Quantum Wells by Crystal Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammermeier, Michael; Wenk, Paul; Schliemann, John

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of spin-preserving symmetries due to the interplay of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in n -doped zinc-blende semiconductor quantum wells of general crystal orientation. It is shown that a conserved spin operator can be realized if and only if at least two growth direction Miller indices agree in modulus. The according spin-orbit field has in general both in-plane and out-of-plane components and is always perpendicular to the shift vector of the corresponding persistent spin helix. We also analyze higher-order effects arising from the Dresselhaus term, and the impact of our results on weak (anti)localization corrections.

  8. Strongly modified four-wave mixing in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-metal nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paspalakis, Emmanuel; Evangelou, Sofia; Kosionis, Spyridon G.; Terzis, Andreas F.

    2014-02-01

    We study the four-wave mixing effect in a coupled semiconductor quantum dot-spherical metal nanoparticle structure. Depending on the values of the pump field intensity and frequency, we find that there is a critical distance that changes the form of the spectrum. Above this distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum shows an ordinary three-peaked form and the effect of controlling its magnitude by changing the interparticle distance can be obtained. Below this critical distance, the four-wave mixing spectrum becomes single-peaked; and as the interparticle distance decreases, the spectrum is strongly suppressed. The behavior of the system is explained using the effective Rabi frequency that creates plasmonic metaresonances in the hybrid structure. In addition, the behavior of the effective Rabi frequency is explained via an analytical solution of the density matrix equations.

  9. Phonon-Induced Dephasing of Excitons in Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Multiple Exciton Generation, Fission, and Luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Angeline; Kim, Hyeon-Deuk; Habenicht, Bradley; Prezhdo, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    Phonon-induced dephasing processes that govern optical line widths, multiple exciton (ME) generation (MEG), and ME fission (MEF) in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Using Si QDs as an example, we propose that MEF occurs by phonon-induced dephasing and, for the first time, estimate its time scale to be 100 fs. In contrast, luminescence and MEG dephasing times are all sub-10 fs. Generally, dephasing is faster for higher-energy and higher-order excitons and increased temperatures. MEF is slow because it is facilitated only by low-frequency acoustic modes. Luminescence and MEG couple to both acoustic and optical modes of the QD, as well as ligand vibrations. The detailed atomistic simulation of the dephasing processes advances understanding of exciton dynamics in QDs and other nanoscale materials.

  10. Influence of quantum Hall effect on wave refraction in ferrite-semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2008-12-01

    Peculiarities of wave refraction are investigated in periodic structures consisting of alternating layers of ferromagnetic insulator and GaAs-AlGaAs-type semiconductor bilayers. It is shown that in quantum Hall effect conditions, the refractive indices and consequently the refraction angles of the propagating waves are quantized.Two different geometries of the refracting plane are considered: (I) parallel and (II) perpendicular to the quantizing magnetic field. It is shown that in the first case, negative refraction through the lateral surface of the structure is possible. A frequency region is found where the refraction is negative for all angles of incidence and regardless of the sign of permittivity tensor components. Analytical expressions for both phase and group refractive indices are obtained.In the second case, one of the propagating waves (in the birefringent regime) is backward. Despite this, and unlike in the case of non-quantizing magnetic fields, negative refraction is impossible.

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence and photostability of single semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2013-12-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and photostability were studied for several core/shell-type semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) of CdTe/CdS, In(Zn)P/ZnS and CdZnS/ZnS using a TRPL microscopy at a single QD level, of which results were compared to that of CdSe/ZnS QD. The CdTe/CdS and In(Zn)P/ZnS QDs show unstable PL at a single QD level on both bare and polymer-coated glass coverslips, so that they mostly lose emissions within a few seconds. The CdZnS/ZnS QD shows better emission stability than those of the former two QDs, but still less stable than the case of the CdSe/ZnS.

  12. Two-Color Coherent Control of Optical Bistability in Asymmetric Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-Hua; Hao, Xiang-Ying

    We investigate optical bistability in intersubband transitions of an asymmetric semiconductor quantum well structure that has equidistant transitions between three subbands of the system and is placed in a unidirectional cavity. The system is simultaneously coupled by a fundamental field and its second harmonic. The second harmonic field acts as a control field and significantly influences the optical bistability. In addition, the two-color coherent control of optical bistability by the relative phase of the fundamental and the second harmonic fields is shown. The influence of the electronic cooperation parameter on the OB behavior is also discussed. This investigation may be used for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process in the SQW solid-state system, which is much more practical than that in the atomic system because of its flexible design and the controllable interference strength.

  13. All-optical sampling based on quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Lina

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the all-optical signal processing system has become a hot research field of optical communication. This paper focused on the basic research of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and studied its practical application to all-optical sampling. A multi-level dynamic physical model of QD-SOA is established, and its ultrafast dynamic characteristics are studied through theoretical and simulation research. For further study, an all-optical sampling scheme based on the nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) effect of QD-SOA is also proposed. This paper analyzed the characteristics of optical switch window and investigated the influence of different control light pulses on switch performance. The presented optical sampling method has an important role in promoting the improvement of all-optical signal processing technology.

  14. Four-wave mixing analysis on injection-locked quantum dot semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2013-09-09

    We derive a simplified rate equation model for the four-wave mixing (FWM) analysis on quantum dot (QD) semiconductor lasers subject to optical injection. The regenerative and the amplitude modulation spectra of the FWM signals with different intrinsic laser parameters and external injection conditions are investigated. By curve fitting the regenerative and the amplitude modulation spectra obtained experimentally, the intrinsic parameters of a commercial single-mode QD laser under different injection conditions are extracted. The linewidth enhancement factor α at different injection levels and detunings are shown, where a reduction of up to 39% from its free-running value is demonstrated. By increasing the injection strength, the α can be further reduced to minimized the chirp in optical communications.

  15. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D. R.; Simmons, C. B.; ...

    2015-02-16

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. The qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. But, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the ‘sweet spot’. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving wemore » achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X–Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Moreover, both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.« less

  16. Microwave-driven coherent operation of a semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohun; Ward, D. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Gamble, John King; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2015-02-16

    An intuitive realization of a qubit is an electron charge at two well-defined positions of a double quantum dot. The qubit is simple and has the potential for high-speed operation because of its strong coupling to electric fields. But, charge noise also couples strongly to this qubit, resulting in rapid dephasing at all but one special operating point called the ‘sweet spot’. In previous studies d.c. voltage pulses have been used to manipulate semiconductor charge qubits but did not achieve high-fidelity control, because d.c. gating requires excursions away from the sweet spot. Here, by using resonant a.c. microwave driving we achieve fast (greater than gigahertz) and universal single qubit rotations of a semiconductor charge qubit. The Z-axis rotations of the qubit are well protected at the sweet spot, and we demonstrate the same protection for rotations about arbitrary axes in the X–Y plane of the qubit Bloch sphere. We characterize the qubit operation using two tomographic approaches: standard process tomography and gate set tomography. Moreover, both methods consistently yield process fidelities greater than 86% with respect to a universal set of unitary single-qubit operations.

  17. Large enhancements of thermopower and carrier mobility in quantum dot engineered bulk semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanfeng; Sahoo, Pranati; Makongo, Julien P A; Zhou, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chi, Hang; Uher, Ctirad; Pan, Xiaoqing; Poudeu, Pierre F P

    2013-05-22

    The thermopower (S) and electrical conductivity (σ) in conventional semiconductors are coupled adversely through the carriers' density (n) making it difficult to achieve meaningful simultaneous improvements in both electronic properties through doping and/or substitutional chemistry. Here, we demonstrate the effectiveness of coherently embedded full-Heusler (FH) quantum dots (QDs) in tailoring the density, mobility, and effective mass of charge carriers in the n-type Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)NiSn half-Heusler matrix. We propose that the embedded FH QD forms a potential barrier at the interface with the matrix due to the offset of their conduction band minima. This potential barrier discriminates existing charge carriers from the conduction band of the matrix with respect to their relative energy leading to simultaneous large enhancements of the thermopower (up to 200%) and carrier mobility (up to 43%) of the resulting Ti(0.1)Zr(0.9)Ni(1+x)Sn nanocomposites. The improvement in S with increasing mole fraction of the FH-QDs arises from a drastic reduction (up to 250%) in the effective carrier density coupled with an increase in the carrier's effective mass (m*), whereas the surprising enhancement in the mobility (μ) is attributed to an increase in the carrier's relaxation time (τ). This strategy to manipulate the transport behavior of existing ensembles of charge carriers within a bulk semiconductor using QDs is very promising and could pave the way to a new generation of high figure of merit thermoelectric materials.

  18. Boosting photoresponse in silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector using semiconducting quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Chandan; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Silicon based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors have faster photogeneration and carrier collection across the metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts, and CMOS integratibility compared to conventional p-n junction photodetectors. However, its operations are limited by low photogeneration, inefficient carrier-separation, and low mobility. Here, we show a simple and highly effective approach for boosting Si MSM photodetector efficiency by uniformly decorating semiconducting CdSe quantum dots on Si channel (Si-QD). Significantly higher photocurrent on/off ratio was achieved up to over 500 compared to conventional Si MSM photodetector (on/off ratio ~5) by increasing photogeneration and improving carrier separation. Furthermore, a substrate-biasing technique invoked wide range of tunable photocurrent on/off ratio in Si-QD photodetector (ranging from 2.7 to 562) by applying suitable combinations of source-drain and substrate biasing conditions. Strong photogeneration and carrier separation were achieved by employing Stark effect into the Si-QD hybrid system. These results highlight a promising method for enhancing Si MSM photodetector efficiency more than 100 times and simultaneously compatible with current silicon technologies. PMID:27886274

  19. Exciton Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells Driven by a Strong Intersubband Pump Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    Optical interband excitonic absorption of semiconductor quantum wells (QW's) driven by a coherent pump field is investigated based on semiconductor Bloch equations. The pump field has a photon energy close to the intersubband spacing between the first two conduction subbands in the QW's. An external weak optical field probes the interband transition. The excitonic effects and pump-induced population redistribution within the conduction subbands in the QW system are included. When the density of the electron-hole pairs in the QW structure is low, the pump field induces an Autler-Townes splitting of the exciton absorption spectrum. The split size and the peak positions of the absorption doublet depend not only on the pump frequency and intensity but also on the carrier density. As the density of the electron-hole pairs is increased, the split contrast (the ratio between the maximum and minimum values) is decreased because the exciton effect is suppressed at higher densities due to the many-body screening.

  20. Boosting photoresponse in silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector using semiconducting quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Chandan; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-11-01

    Silicon based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors have faster photogeneration and carrier collection across the metal-semiconductor Schottky contacts, and CMOS integratibility compared to conventional p-n junction photodetectors. However, its operations are limited by low photogeneration, inefficient carrier-separation, and low mobility. Here, we show a simple and highly effective approach for boosting Si MSM photodetector efficiency by uniformly decorating semiconducting CdSe quantum dots on Si channel (Si-QD). Significantly higher photocurrent on/off ratio was achieved up to over 500 compared to conventional Si MSM photodetector (on/off ratio ~5) by increasing photogeneration and improving carrier separation. Furthermore, a substrate-biasing technique invoked wide range of tunable photocurrent on/off ratio in Si-QD photodetector (ranging from 2.7 to 562) by applying suitable combinations of source-drain and substrate biasing conditions. Strong photogeneration and carrier separation were achieved by employing Stark effect into the Si-QD hybrid system. These results highlight a promising method for enhancing Si MSM photodetector efficiency more than 100 times and simultaneously compatible with current silicon technologies.

  1. Efficient Light-driven Long Distance Charge Separation and H2 Generation in Semiconductor Quantum Rods and Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tianquan

    Quantum confined semiconductor nanocrystals (0D quantum dots, 1D quantum rods and 2D quantum platlets) have been intensively investigated as light harvesting and charge separation materials for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications. The efficiency of these semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices depends on many fundamental processes, including light harvesting, carrier relaxation, exciton localization and transport, charge separation and charge recombination. The competition between these processes determines the overall solar energy conversion (solar to electricity or fuel) efficiency. Semiconductor nano-heterostructures, combining two or more material components, offer unique opportunities to control their charge separation properties by tailoring their compositions, dimensions and spatial arrangement. Further integration of catalysts (heterogeneous or homogeneous) to these materials form multifunctional nano-heterostructures. Using 0D, 1D and 2D CdSe/CdS/Pt heterostructures as model systems, we directly probe the above-mentioned fundamental exciton and carrier processes by transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. We are examining how to control these fundamental processes through the design of heterostructures to achieve long-lived charge separation and efficient H2 generation. In this talk, we will discuss a new model for exciton dissociation by charge transfer in quantum dots (i.e. Auger assisted electron transfer), mechanism of 1D and 2D exciton transport and dissociation in nanorods, and key factors limiting H2 generation efficiency in CdSe/CdS/Pt nanorod heterostructures.

  2. Investigation of quantum confinement in silicon and germanium semiconductor nanocrystals and their application in photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Gildardo Rios

    1997-09-01

    A series of coordinated optical experiments were instrumental in developing a fundamental understanding of the optical and electronic properties of indirect energy gap nanocrystals. This dissertation points out critical interpretations in this new field. Nanocrystals represent a novel form of crystalline materials which have captured much attention due to their enhanced optical and electronic properties. Most commonly used semiconductors have band gap energies in the infrared to near infrared regions which make them undesirable for many optoelectronic devices. However, in nanocrystals theoretical models confirm that quantum confinement effects provide energy levels which allow for visible photoluminescence (PL). Quantum confinement effects enable indirect band gap semiconductors to become efficient visible light emitters. Optical results presented in this dissertation indicate that in the case of Si and Ge nanocrystals when the structures are on the order of 2 and 2-10 nanometers respectively, quantum confined energy levels become available that allow for efficient blue luminescence. Furthermore, results on nanocrystalline Si and Ge and comparison with theoretical models clearly demonstrate that efficient photoluminescence (PL) results from quantum confinement effects where the critical features are the size and the shape of nanostructures, and the surface termination. Silicon and germanium nanocrystals enable many advanced optoelectronic devices such as flat panel displays and optical memories. In this dissertation, I will discuss how Si and Ge nanocrystals were used to fabricate low-cost and easily processed blue electroluminescent devices. The active EL material consists of Si or Ge nanocrystals embedded in various host matrices such as polyvinylcarbazole (PVK) and other organic polymers. Major advantages of this composite material system are the ease of producing high quality, thin, conformal EL films. Several device configurations were used that rely on

  3. Photoelectrochemical Conversion from Graphitic C3N4 Quantum Dot Decorated Semiconductor Nanowires.

    PubMed

    An, Tiance; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Yueyu; Quan, Yingzhou; Gong, Xingao; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zhang, Lijuan; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2016-05-25

    Despite the recent progress of developing graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as a metal-free photocatalyst, the synthesis of nanostructured g-C3N4 has still remained a complicated and time-consuming approach from its bulk powder, which substantially limits its photoelectrochemical (PEC) applications as well as the potential to form composites with other semiconductors. Different from the labor-intensive methods used before, such as exfoliation or assistant templates, herein, we developed a facile method to synthesize graphitic C3N4 quantum dots (g-CNQDs) directly grown on TiO2 nanowire arrays via a one-step quasi-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in a homemade system. The as-synthesized g-CNQDs uniformly covered over the surface of TiO2 nanowires and exhibited attractive photoluminescence (PL) properties. In addition, compared to pristine TiO2, the heterojunction of g-CNQD-decorated TiO2 nanowires showed a substantially enhanced PEC photocurrent density of 3.40 mA/cm(2) at 0 V of applied potential vs Ag/AgCl under simulated solar light (300 mW/cm(2)) and excellent stability with ∼82% of the photocurrent retained after over 10 h of continuous testing, attributed to the quantum and sensitization effects of g-CNQDs. Density functional theory calculations were further carried out to illustrate the synergistic effect of TiO2 and g-CNQD. Our method suggests that a variety of g-CNQD-based composites with other semiconductor nanowires can be synthesized for energy applications.

  4. Modified transverse phonon-helicon interaction in colloids laden semiconductor plasmas due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aartee Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    A detailed study of the quantum modification of acousto-helicon wave spectra due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure in colloids laden semiconductor plasma has been presented. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas to arrive at most general dispersion relation in presence of magnetic field. This dispersion relation has been analyzed in three different velocity regimes and the expressions for gain constants have been obtained. From the present study it has been concluded that the quantum effect and the magnetic field significantly modify the wave characteristics particularly in high doping regime in semiconductor plasma medium in presence of colloids in it.

  5. Quantum coherence and quantum phase transition in the XY model with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Ning-Ju; Xu, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jicheng; Zhang, Yixin; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the properties of geometric quantum coherence in the XY spin-1/2 chain with staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction via the quantum renormalization-group approach. It is shown that the geometric quantum coherence and its coherence susceptibility are effective to detect the quantum phase transition. In the thermodynamic limit, the geometric quantum coherence exhibits a sudden jump. The coherence susceptibilities versus the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction are infinite and vanishing, respectively, illustrating the distinct roles of the anisotropy parameter and the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in quantum phase transition. Moreover, we also explore the finite-size scaling behaviors of the coherence susceptibilities. For a finite-size chain, the coherence susceptibility versus the phase-transition parameter is always maximal at the critical point, indicating the dramatic quantum fluctuation. Besides, we show that the correlation length can be revealed by the scaling exponent for the coherence susceptibility versus the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction.

  6. Intraband Auger processes and simple models of the ionization balance in semiconductor quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Janet L.

    1994-04-01

    The importance of intraband Auger processes in determining the ionization balance in quantum dots is reported. The numerically inexpensive binary-encounter model for a Coulomb collision between identical particles is found to be a good estimator of the intraband Auger rates out of a quantum dot. Intraband and the conventional interband Auger processes differ in that the former involve only intraband transitions whereas the latter always involve a radiationless interband transition. As such, intraband Auger rates do not involve the evaluation of the very small overlap integral of a conduction band with a valence band Bloch wave function and are thus much larger than interband Auger rates, especially for large-band-gap semiconductors like GaAs. Though intraband Auger processes are not strong enough to establish a quasiequilibrium within the entire conduction band at the room-temperature free-carrier concentrations (1016 cm-3) and bound energy separations (greater than an LO phonon energy) commonly assumed in the quantum-dot literature, they are capable of placing almost as many bound carriers in states near the band edge as would be predicted erroneously by a quasiequilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution. Such large bound state occupations are important for quantum-dot laser design. A sufficient condition for a quasiequilibrium to exist within all of an energy (conduction or valence) band is found to be the existence of many inverse Auger processes faster than interband spontaneous emission, which occurs for total (bound plus free) electron concentrations greater than 5×1017 cm-3 at room temperature in 100 Å radius GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum dots whose centers are separated by 400 Å. The nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium populations in quantum dots can be understood from a simple model in which states connected by fast Auger or phonon processes are in Saha-Boltzmann equilibrium. All other states have occupation factors which are determined by the ratio of intraband

  7. A compact quantum correction model for symmetric double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Edward Namkyu; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-11-07

    A compact quantum correction model for a symmetric double gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated. The compact quantum correction model is proposed from the concepts of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM}) and the gate capacitance (C{sub g}) degradation. First of all, ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} induced by quantum mechanical (QM) effects is modeled. The C{sub g} degradation is then modeled by introducing the inversion layer centroid. With ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} and the C{sub g} degradation, the QM effects are implemented in previously reported classical model and a comparison between the proposed quantum correction model and numerical simulation results is presented. Based on the results, the proposed quantum correction model can be applicable to the compact model of DG MOSFET.

  8. Theoretical simulation of carrier capture and relaxation rates in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunhu; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Ling; Qi, Guoqun; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-06-14

    Based on Auger scattering mechanism, carrier-carrier scattering dynamics between the two-dimensional carrier reservoir (also called wetting layer, i.e., WL) and the confined quantum dot ground and first excited state in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) are investigated theoretically in this paper. The scattering rates for independent electron and hole densities are calculated. The results show an ultra-fast carrier capture (relaxation) rate up to 1 ps{sup −1}, and there is a complex dependence of the Coulomb scattering rates on the WL electron and hole densities. In addition, due to the different effective mass and the level distribution, the scattering rates for electron and hole are very different. Finally, in order to provide a direction to control (increase or decrease) the input current in realistic QD-SOA systems, a simple method is proposed to determine the trends of the carrier recovery rates with the WL carrier densities in the vicinity of the steady-state.

  9. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Jofre, M; Gardelein, A; Anzolin, G; Amaya, W; Capmany, J; Ursin, R; Peñate, L; Lopez, D; San Juan, J L; Carrasco, J A; Garcia, F; Torcal-Milla, F J; Sanchez-Brea, L M; Bernabeu, E; Perdigues, J M; Jennewein, T; Torres, J P; Mitchell, M W; Pruneri, V

    2011-02-28

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as 1.14×10⁻² while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication.

  10. Silver Nanoshell Plasmonically Controlled Emission of Semiconductor Quantum Dots in the Strong Coupling Regime.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Yuan, Meng; Gao, Yuhan; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2016-04-26

    Strong coupling between semiconductor excitons and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) giving rise to hybridized plexciton states in which energy is coherently and reversibly exchanged between the components is vital, especially in the area of quantum information processing from fundamental and practical points of view. Here, in photoluminescence spectra, rather than from common extinction or reflection measurements, we report on the direct observation of Rabi splitting of approximately 160 meV as an indication of strong coupling between excited states of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and LSP modes of silver nanoshells under nonresonant nanosecond pulsed laser excitation at room temperature. The strong coupling manifests itself as an anticrossing-like behavior of the two newly formed polaritons when tuning the silver nanoshell plasmon energies across the exciton line of the QDs. Further analysis substantiates the essentiality of high pump energy and collective strong coupling of many QDs with the radiative dipole mode of the metallic nanoparticles for the realization of strong coupling. Our finding opens up interesting directions for the investigation of strong coupling between LSPs and excitons from the perspective of radiative recombination under easily accessible experimental conditions.

  11. Laser-dressing of electronic quantum states in graded semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, A.

    2013-03-01

    It is known that a non-resonant laser field will modify the electronic states in a low-dimensional semiconductor very similarly to the laser-dressing of electrons in isolate atoms. Under intense laser field, the energy levels are functions of the laser parameter which depends on the intensity and frequency of the laser but also on the effective mass of the carriers. This aspect is qualitatively different as compared with the laser-dressing of atoms and it was poorly addressed in the literature until now. This work will demonstrate that in compositionally graded quantum wells the gradient of the effective mass will affect the laser dressing of electronic states in a non-trivial manner. The operatorial nature of the laser parameter leads to a surprising result: the electrons in different subbands will feel different laser-dressed confinement potentials. In particular, for a non-graded quantum well the expectation value of the laser parameter will depend on the effective masses of the electron in all distinct layers of the heterostructure.

  12. Remote sensing of sample temperatures in nuclear magnetic resonance using photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge of sample temperatures during nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements is important for acquisition of optimal NMR data and proper interpretation of the data. Sample temperatures can be difficult to measure accurately for a variety of reasons, especially because it is generally not possible to make direct contact to the NMR sample during the measurements. Here I show that sample temperatures during magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements can be determined from temperature-dependent photoluminescence signals of semiconductor quantum dots that are deposited in a thin film on the outer surface of the MAS rotor, using a simple optical fiber-based setup to excite and collect photoluminescence. The accuracy and precision of such temperature measurements can be better than ±5K over a temperature range that extends from approximately 50K (-223°C) to well above 310K (37°C). Importantly, quantum dot photoluminescence can be monitored continuously while NMR measurements are in progress. While this technique is likely to be particularly valuable in low-temperature MAS NMR experiments, including experiments involving dynamic nuclear polarization, it may also be useful in high-temperature MAS NMR and other forms of magnetic resonance.

  13. Photon-number discrimination using a semiconductor quantum dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, Eric J.; Rowe, Mary A.; Greene, Marion B.; Rosenberg, Danna; Harvey, Todd E.; Su, Mark Y.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate photon-number discrimination using a novel semiconductor detector that utilizes a layer of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) as an optically addressable floating gate in a GaAs/AlGaAs δ-doped field-effect transistor. When the QDOGFET (quantum dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor) is illuminated, the internal gate field directs the holes generated in the dedicated absorption layer of the structure to the QDs, where they are trapped. The positively charged holes are confined to the dots and screen the internal gate field, causing a persistent change in the channel current that is proportional to the total number of holes trapped in the QD ensemble. We use highly attenuated laser pulses to characterize the response of the QDOGFET cooled to 4 K. We demonstrate that different photon-number states produce well resolved changes in the channel current, where the responses of the detector reflect the Poisson statistics of the laser light. For a mean photon number of 1.1, we show that decision regions can be defined such that the QDOGFET determines the number (0, 1, 2, or >=3) of detected photons with a probability of accuracy >=83 % in a single-shot measurement.

  14. Remote sensing of sample temperatures in nuclear magnetic resonance using photoluminescence of semiconductor quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of sample temperatures during nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements is important for acquisition of optimal NMR data and proper interpretation of the data. Sample temperatures can be difficult to measure accurately for a variety of reasons, especially because it is generally not possible to make direct contact to the NMR sample during the measurements. Here I show that sample temperatures during magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR measurements can be determined from temperature-dependent photoluminescence signals of semiconductor quantum dots that are deposited in a thin film on the outer surface of the MAS rotor, using a simple optical fiber-based setup to excite and collect photoluminescence. The accuracy and precision of such temperature measurements can be better than ±5 K over a temperature range that extends from approximately 50 K (−223° C) to well above 310 K (37° C). Importantly, quantum dot photoluminescence can be monitored continuously while NMR measurements are in progress. While this technique is likely to be particularly valuable in low-temperature MAS NMR experiments, including experiments involving dynamic nuclear polarization, it may also be useful in high-temperature MAS NMR and other forms of magnetic resonance. PMID:24859817

  15. Fast optical source for quantum key distribution based on semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre, M.; Gardelein, A.; Anzolin, G.; Amaya, W.; Campmany, J.; Ursin, R.; Penate, L.; Lopez, D.; San Juan, J. L.; Carrasco, J. A.; Garcia, F.; Torcal-Milla, F. J.; Sanchez-Brea, L. M.; Bernabeu, E.; Perdigues, J. M.; Jennewein, T.; Torres, J. P.; Mitchell, M. W.; Pruneri, V.

    2011-02-01

    A novel integrated optical source capable of emitting faint pulses with different polarization states and with different intensity levels at 100 MHz has been developed. The source relies on a single laser diode followed by four semiconductor optical amplifiers and thin film polarizers, connected through a fiber network. The use of a single laser ensures high level of indistinguishability in time and spectrum of the pulses for the four different polarizations and three different levels of intensity. The applicability of the source is demonstrated in the lab through a free space quantum key distribution experiment which makes use of the decoy state BB84 protocol. We achieved a lower bound secure key rate of the order of 3.64 Mbps and a quantum bit error ratio as low as $1.14\\times 10^{-2}$ while the lower bound secure key rate became 187 bps for an equivalent attenuation of 35 dB. To our knowledge, this is the fastest polarization encoded QKD system which has been reported so far. The performance, reduced size, low power consumption and the fact that the components used can be space qualified make the source particularly suitable for secure satellite communication.

  16. Multiplexed molecular profiling of prostate cancer specimens using semiconductor quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yun; Numora, Takeo; Chung, Leland; Zhau, Haiyen; Nie, Shuming

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are light emitting semi-conductor nanocrystals with novel optical properties including superior photostability, narrow emission spectra with continuous excitation spectra. These properties make QDs especially suitable for multiplexed fluorescent labeling, live cell imaging, and in vivo animal imaging. The multiplexing potential has been recognized but real applications of biological/clinical significance are few. In this study, we used quantum dots to study epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), an important process involved in the bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Two prostate cancer cells lines with distinct molecular profiles, representing the two ends of the EMT process, were selected for this study. Four EMT-related biomarkers including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Vimentin, and RANKL were stained with QD-antibody conjugates with elongation factor 1alpha as the internal control. Morphological information of the QD-stained cells was obtained by digital-color imaging and quantitative information obtained by spectra analysis using a spectrometer. Two types of analysis were performed: abundance of each biomarker in the same cell line relative to the internal control; and the relative abundance of these markers between the two cell lines. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of QDs for multiplexed profiling of FFPE cells/tissue of clinical significance; however, the standardization and quantification still awaits optimization.

  17. Size Dependence of Two-Photon Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Shan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Quantum confinement plays an important role in the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). In this work, we combine experiment and modeling to systematically investigate the size dependence of the degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) of below-band-gap radiation in CdSe QDs. The TPA coefficient β at 800 nm of CdSe QDs of varying radii was measured using femtosecond white-light transient absorption spectroscopy by probing the pump-induced bleaching at the first exciton transition energy. β was also calculated using a model based on the multiband effective-mass approximation. Satisfactory agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. Our findings show the evolution of the TPA in the QDs from that of atom-like to bulk-like with increasing the radius R. The TPA coefficient (or the volume normalized TPA cross-section) increases with radius approximately linearly in the strong confinement regime due to the rapid increase of the joint density of states for the two-photon allowed transitions, and saturates for R > 5 nm (the exciton Bohr radius), approaching that of bulk CdSe.

  18. Designing Learning Environments to Teach Interactive Quantum Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puente, Sonia M. Gomez; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small…

  19. Interaction of Globular Plasma Proteins with Water-Soluble CdSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotsana; Rawat, Kamla; Sanwlani, Shilpa; Bohidar, H B

    2015-06-08

    The interactions between water-soluble semiconductor quantum dots [hydrophilic 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-coated CdSe] and three globular plasma proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and human serum albumin (HSA), are investigated. Acidic residues of protein molecules form electrostatic interactions with these quantum dots (QDs). To determine the stoichiometry of proteins bound to QDs, we used dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential techniques. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments revealed energy transfer from tryptophan residues in the proteins to the QD particles. Quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of protein molecules was noticed during this binding process (hierarchy HSA<β-Lg

  20. Quantum correction to classical gravitational interaction between two polarizable objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Puxun; Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-12-01

    When gravity is quantized, there inevitably exist quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations which induce quadrupole moments in gravitationally polarizable objects and produce a quantum correction to the classical Newtonian interaction between them. Here, based upon linearized quantum gravity and the leading-order perturbation theory, we study, from a quantum field-theoretic prospect, this quantum correction between a pair of gravitationally polarizable objects treated as two-level harmonic oscillators. We find that the interaction potential behaves like r-11 in the retarded regime and r-10 in the near regime. Our result agrees with what were recently obtained in different approaches. Our study seems to indicate that linearized quantum gravity is robust in dealing with quantum gravitational effects at low energies.

  1. Transport properties of silicon complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor quantum well field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naquin, Clint Alan

    Introducing explicit quantum transport into silicon (Si) transistors in a manner compatible with industrial fabrication has proven challenging, yet has the potential to transform the performance horizons of large scale integrated Si devices and circuits. Explicit quantum transport as evidenced by negative differential transconductances (NDTCs) has been observed in a set of quantum well (QW) n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (NMOS) transistors fabricated using industrial silicon complementary MOS processing. The QW potential was formed via lateral ion implantation doping on a commercial 45 nm technology node process line, and measurements of the transfer characteristics show NDTCs up to room temperature. Detailed gate length and temperature dependence characteristics of the NDTCs in these devices have been measured. Gate length dependence of NDTCs shows a correlation of the interface channel length with the number of NDTCs formed as well as with the gate voltage (VG) spacing between NDTCs. The VG spacing between multiple NDTCs suggests a quasi-parabolic QW potential profile. The temperature dependence is consistent with partial freeze-out of carrier concentration against a degenerately doped background. A folding amplifier frequency multiplier circuit using a single QW NMOS transistor to generate a folded current-voltage transfer function via a NDTC was demonstrated. Time domain data shows frequency doubling in the kHz range at room temperature, and Fourier analysis confirms that the output is dominated by the second harmonic of the input. De-embedding the circuit response characteristics from parasitic cable and contact impedances suggests that in the absence of parasitics the doubling bandwidth could be as high as 10 GHz in a monolithic integrated circuit, limited by the transresistance magnitude of the QW NMOS. This is the first example of a QW device fabricated by mainstream Si CMOS technology being used in a circuit application and establishes the feasibility

  2. Limitation of electron mobility from hyperfine interaction in ultraclean quantum wells and topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, S. A.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-07-01

    The study of electron transport and scattering processes limiting electron mobility in high-quality semiconductor structures is central to solid-state electronics. Here, we uncover an unavoidable source of electron scattering which is caused by fluctuations of nuclear spins. We calculate the momentum relaxation time of electrons in quantum wells governed by the hyperfine interaction between electrons and nuclei and show that this time depends greatly on the spatial correlation of nuclear spins. Moreover, the scattering processes accompanied by a spin flip are a source of the backscattering of Dirac fermions at conducting surfaces of topological insulators.

  3. Transition-metal dopants in tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors: Symmetry and exchange interactions from tight-binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortan, Victoria Ramaker

    It has become increasingly apparent that the future of electronic devices can and will rely on the functionality provided by single or few dopant atoms. The most scalable physical system for quantum technologies, i.e. sensing, communication and computation, are spins in crystal lattices. Diamond is an excellent host crystal offering long room temperature spin coherence times and there has been exceptional experimental work done with the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond demonstrating many forms of spin control. Transition metal dopants have additional advantages, large spin-orbit interaction and internal core levels, that are not present in the nitrogen vacancy center. This work explores the implications of the internal degrees of freedom associated with the core d levels using a tight-binding model and the Koster-Slater technique. The core d levels split into two separate symmetry states in tetrahedral bonding environments and result in two levels with different wavefunction spatial extents. For 4 d semiconductors, e.g. GaAs, this is reproduced in the tight-binding model by adding a set of d orbitals on the location of the transition metal impurity and modifying the hopping parameters from impurity to its nearest neighbors. This model does not work in the case of 3d semiconductors, e.g. diamond, where there is no physical reason to drastically alter the hopping from 3 d dopant to host and the difference in wavefunction extent is not as pronounced. In the case of iron dopants in gallium arsenide the split symmetry levels in the band gap are responsible for a decrease in tunneling current when measured with a scanning tunneling microscope due to interference between two elastic tunneling paths and comparison between wavefunction measurements and tight-binding calculations provides information regarding material parameters. In the case of transition metal dopants in diamond there is less distinction between the symmetry split d levels. When considering pairs of

  4. Fabrication and primary photoevents in self-assembled nanocomposites based on semiconductor quantum dots and tetrapyrrole chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkevich, Eduard I.; Shulga, A.; Blaudeck, Thomas; Cichos, F.; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2005-11-01

    The directed surface passivation of semiconductor CdSe, 0r CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD) by meso-pyridyl substituted porphyrins (H IIP) has been realized via a reversible non-covalent self-assembly interaction of H IIP meso-pyridyl nitrogens with ions of the ZnS shell or Cd atoms of the CdSe core in various solvents at ambient temperature. The formation of "QD-porphyrin" nanoassemblies leads to a QD photoluminescence (PL) quenching (intensity decrease and PL decay shortening) accompanied by a H IIP fluorescence enhancement. The analysis of experimental Foerster resonance energy transfer efficiencies EFRET (FRET) found via acceptor (H IIP) sensibilization and donor (QD) PL quenching shows that EFRET values obtained from fluorescence enhancement are of the order of 6 - 8 % for most QD studied and are thus much smaller as compared to the PL quenching efficiency. With respect to QD PL quenching efficiencies, smaller values of EFRET might be due to different competing reasons: the presence of two independent quenching processes in the nanoassemblies, energy transfer QD -> H IIP and photoinduced (electron/hole) charge transfer (CT) or time-dependent QD interface dynamics leading to a noticeable QD PL quenching. The analysis of spectroscopic and kinetic findings reveals that a limited number of "vacancies" accessible for porphyrin attachment is available on the QD surface. Simultaneous presence of porphyrin triads/pentads and QDs in a solution leads to the formation of higly organzed nanoassemblies.

  5. PREFACE: Singular interactions in quantum mechanics: solvable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Gianfausto; Exner, Pavel; Geyler, Vladimir

    2005-06-01

    editors study a toy model of a decay under the influence of a time-periodic δ potential. E Demiralp describes the spectrum of a spherical harmonic oscillator amended with a concentric family of δ-shell interactions. Another of the editors presents an isoperimetric problem for point interactions arranged at vertices of a polygon. W Huddell and R Hughes show how singular perturbations of a one-dimensional Dirac operator can be approximated by regular potentials, and J Brasche constructs a family of Hamiltonians in which the singular interaction has a more complicated support, namely a Brownian path. Finally, B Pavlov and I Antoniou apply the singular perturbation technique to another classical Hamiltonian, that of a generalized Friedrichs model; no matter that the unperturbed observable is called momentum in their paper. The three papers in the following group are distinguished by the fact that they consider systems which are fully or partially periodic. F Bentosela and M Tater analyse scattering on a crystalline `slab' modelled by point interactions distributed periodically on a finite number of parallel plates. E de Prunelé studies evolution of wavepackets in crystal models of different geometries, and M Avdonin et al discuss a simple model of a spin-dependent scattering on a one-dimensional array of quantum dots. The next group of papers is devoted to a topic which was untouched at the time of the aforementioned first edition, namely quantum graphs, which became a subject of interest after numerous applications of such systems to semiconductor, carbon and other nanostructures. Most contributions here deal with the `usual' model in which the Hamiltonian is a Schrödinger operator supported by the graph. P Kuchment describes spectral properties of such graphs, in particular periodic ones and those with decorations. S Albeverio and K Pankrashkin present a modification of Krein's formula which is suitable for constructing Hamiltonians of quantum graphs using boundary

  6. Extended coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization in dilute-magnetic-semiconductor quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Takuma

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the possibility that the coherence length of spatially oscillating electron-spin polarization is improved in dilute magnetic semiconductors. In usual nonmagnetic quantum wells, the spin polarization of the electrons injected from a ferromagnetic source electrode oscillates spatially because of the spin precession due to spin-orbit effective magnetic fields, i.e., the Rashba and Dresselhaus fields. However, the polarization is damped within an oscillation period by the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation. In paramagnetic dilute magnetic semiconductors, impurity spin polarization is induced under the electron-spin polarization, and this impurity polarization influences the electron-spin precession and possibly improves the spatial electron-spin coherence. The validity of this effect is demonstrated by a numerical simulation for a CdMnTe quantum well.

  7. Probing the semiconductor to semimetal transition in InAs/GaSb double quantum wells by magneto-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Thapa, S.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.; Zhang, Q.; Kono, J.; Lou, W. K.; Chang, K.; Hawkins, S. D.; Klem, J. F.; Pan, W.; Smirnov, D.; Jiang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    We perform a magnetoinfrared spectroscopy study of the semiconductor to semimetal transition of InAs/GaSb double quantum wells from the normal to the inverted state. We show that owing to the low carrier density of our samples, the magnetoabsorption spectra evolve from a single cyclotron resonance peak in the normal state to multiple absorption peaks in the inverted state with distinct magnetic field dependence. Using an eight-band Pidgeon-Brown model, we explain all the major absorption peaks observed in our experiment. We demonstrate that the semiconductor to semimetal transition can be realized by manipulating the quantum confinement, the strain, and the magnetic field. Our work paves the way for band engineering of optimal InAs/GaSb structures for realizing novel topological states as well as for device applications in the terahertz regime.

  8. Carrier dynamics in inhomogeneously broadened InAs/AlGaInAs/InP quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Karni, O. Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G.; Kuchar, K. J.; Capua, A.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Ivanov, V.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-03-24

    We report on a characterization of fundamental gain dynamics in recently developed InAs/InP quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. Multi-wavelength pump-probe measurements were used to determine gain recovery rates, following a powerful optical pump pulse, at various wavelengths for different bias levels and pump excitation powers. The recovery was dominated by coupling between the electronic states in the quantum-dots and the high energy carrier reservoir via capture and escape mechanisms. These processes determine also the wavelength dependencies of gain saturation depth and the asymptotic gain recovery level. Unlike quantum-dash amplifiers, these quantum-dots exhibit no instantaneous gain response, confirming their quasi zero-dimensional nature.

  9. Effect of Pure Dephasing and Phonon Scattering on the Coupling of Semiconductor Quantum Dots to Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlov, C.; Wodey, É.; Lyasota, A.; Calic, M.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2016-08-01

    Using site-controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) free of multiexcitonic continuum states, integrated with photonic crystal membrane cavities, we clarify the effects of pure dephasing and phonon scattering on exciton-cavity coupling in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, the observed QD-cavity copolarization and cavity mode feeding versus QD-cavity detuning are explained quantitatively by a model of a two-level system embedded in a solid-state environment.

  10. Magneto-optical response of layers of semiconductor quantum dots and nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboynikov, O.; Wijers, C. M. J.; Liu, J. L.; Lee, C. P.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a comparative theoretical study was made of the magneto-optical response of square lattices of nanoobjects (dots and rings). Expressions for both the polarizability of the individual objects as their mutual electromagnetic interactions (for a lattice in vacuum) was derived. The quantum-mechanical part of the derivation is based upon the commonly used envelope function approximation. The description is suited to investigate the optical response of these layers in a narrow region near the interband transitions onset, particularly when the contribution of individual level pairs can be separately observed. A remarkable distinction between clearly quantum-mechanical and classical electromagnetic behavior was found in the shape and volume dependence of the polarizability of the dots and rings. This optical response of a single plane of quantum dots and nanorings was explored as a function of frequency, magnetic field, and angle of incidence. Although the reflectance of these layer systems is not very strong, the ellipsometric angles are large. For these isolated dot-ring systems they are of the order of magnitude of degrees. For the ring systems a full oscillation of the optical Bohm-Ahronov effect could be isolated. Layers of dots do not display any remarkable magnetic field dependence. Both type of systems, dots and rings, exhibit an outspoken angular-dependent dichroism of quantum-mechanical origin.

  11. Time resolved single molecule spectroscopy of semiconductor quantum dot/conjugated organic hybrid nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoi, Michael Yemoh

    Single molecule studies on CdSe quantum dots functionalized with oligo-phenylene vinylene ligands (CdSe-OPV) provide evidence of strong electronic communication that facilitate charge and energy transport between the OPV ligands and the CdSe quantum dot core. This electronic interaction greatly modify, the photoluminescence properties of both bulk and single CdSe-OPV nanostructure thin film samples. Size-correlated wide-field fluorescence imaging show that blinking suppression in single CdSe-OPV is linked to the degree of OPV coverage (inferred from AFM height scans) on the quantum dot surface. The effect of the complex electronic environment presented by photoexcited OPV ligands on the excited state property of CdSe-OPV is measured with single photon counting and photon-pair correlation spectroscopy techniques. Time-tagged-time-resolved (TTTR) single photon counting measurements from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures, show excited state lifetimes an order of magnitude shorter relative to conventional ZnS/CdSe quantum dots. Second-order intensity correlation measurements g(2)(tau) from individual CdSe-OPV nanostructures point to a weak multi-excitonic character with a strong wavelength dependent modulation depth. By tuning in and out of the absorption of the OPV ligands we observe changes in modulation depth from g(2) (0) ≈ 0.2 to 0.05 under 405 and 514 nm excitation respectively. Defocused images and polarization anisotropy measurements also reveal a well-defined linear dipole emission pattern in single CdSe-OPV nanostructures. These results provide new insights into to the mechanism behind the electronic interactions in composite quantum dot/conjugated organic composite systems at the single molecule level. The observed intensity flickering , blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate and antibunching behaviour is well explained by a Stark interaction model. Charge transfer from photo-excitation of the OPV ligands to the surface of the Cd

  12. Optical properties of diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu:ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, N. G.; Bakr Mohamed, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    Herein quantum dots (QDs) of diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu:ZnS have been synthesized via a simple chemical synthesis method. A single phase solid solution is formed up to x = 0.1 which confirmed by using X-ray diffraction. Crystal structure and microstructure analyses were performed by Rietveld refinement. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra were recorded for pure and Cu doped ZnS QDs excited at 268 and 228 nm respectively. PL emission and excitation spectra were investigated in different wavelength regions within the range of 200-900 nm. PL results in the range of 220-300 nm emission band reveals that the band gap of pure ZnS QDs is about 4.43 eV which greater than that of bulk ZnS (3.7 eV). The band gap of Cu:ZnS QDs is tunable with Cu content (x) as well as the crystalline size, and it is peaked around 4.47 eV. PL emission in the range of 350-650 nm exhibits a green fluorescence band peaking around 552 nm for pure ZnS QDs, which confirms the characteristic feature of Zn2+ as luminescent centers in the lattice, while blue emission bands peaked around 471 nm for Cu:ZnS QDs that is attributed to the transition of electrons from conduction band of ZnS to the Cu impurity level. The blue shift of the absorption peak directly reflects the effect of quantum confinement. The PL results have been supported by X-ray phase analysis, high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM and SEM), compositional evaluation (EDX) and magnetic measurements (VSM).

  13. Colloquium: Persistent spin textures in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliemann, John

    2017-01-01

    Device concepts in semiconductor spintronics make long spin lifetimes desirable, and the requirements put on spin control by proposals for quantum information processing are even more demanding. Unfortunately, due to spin-orbit coupling electron spins in semiconductors are generically subject to rather fast decoherence. In two-dimensional quantum wells made of zinc-blende semiconductors, however, the spin-orbit interaction can be engineered to produce persistent spin structures with extraordinarily long spin lifetimes even in the presence of disorder and imperfections. Experimental and theoretical developments on this subject for both n -doped and p -doped structures are reviewed and possible device applications are discussed.

  14. Coherent control of optical bistability and multistability in a triple semiconductor quantum well nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheli, A.; Afshari, H.; Hamedi, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) behaviors for a triple semiconductor quantum well (SQW) structure driven coherently with two control fields, confined in a unidirectional ring cavity. The effect of different system parameters on OB and OM is explored. It is found that the threshold of onset of the OB can be controlled by manipulating the Rabi frequency of control fields. In this case, OB can be converted to OM. Then we investigate the effect of probe and control field detunings on OB behaviors. We found that the frequency detuning of probe field affects only the upper-lower branches of the OB curves but has no specific impact on OB threshold. By manipulating the first control field detuning, neither the OB threshold intensity nor upper-lower branches change. Finally, it is found that increasing the second control field detuning can reduce merely the OB threshold intensity, while no change happens in upper-lower OB branches. The results may be applicable in real experiments for realizing an all-optical switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  15. Spatiotemporal response of living cell structures in Dictyostelium discoideum with semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Helmick, Lam; Antúnez de Mayolo, Adriana; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Chao-Min; Watkins, Simon C; Wu, Chuanyue; LeDuc, Philip R

    2008-05-01

    The ability to monitor the spatial and temporal organization of molecules such as biopolymers within a cell is essential to enable the ability to understand the complexity and dynamics existing in biological processes. However, many limitations currently exist in specifically labeling proteins in living cells. In our study, we incorporate nanometer-sized semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) into living cells for spatiotemporal protein imaging of actin polymers in Dictyostelium discoideum without the necessity of using complicating transmembrane transport approaches. We first demonstrate cytoplasmic distribution of QDs within these living amoebae cells and then show molecular targeting through actin filament labeling. Also, we have developed a microfluidic system to control and visualize the spatiotemporal response of the cellular environment during cell motility, which allows us to demonstrate specific localization control of the QD-protein complexes in living cells. This study provides a valuable tool for the specific targeting and analysis of proteins within Dictyostelium without the encumbrance of transmembrane assisted methods, which has implication in fields including polymer physics, material science, engineering, and biology.

  16. Artificial Neuron Based on Integrated Semiconductor Quantum Dot Mode-Locked Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-inspired implementations have attracted strong interest as a power efficient and robust alternative to the digital model of computation with a broad range of applications. Especially, neuro-mimetic systems able to produce and process spike-encoding schemes can offer merits like high noise-resiliency and increased computational efficiency. Towards this direction, integrated photonics can be an auspicious platform due to its multi-GHz bandwidth, its high wall-plug efficiency and the strong similarity of its dynamics under excitation with biological spiking neurons. Here, we propose an integrated all-optical neuron based on an InAs/InGaAs semiconductor quantum-dot passively mode-locked laser. The multi-band emission capabilities of these lasers allows, through waveband switching, the emulation of the excitation and inhibition modes of operation. Frequency-response effects, similar to biological neural circuits, are observed just as in a typical two-section excitable laser. The demonstrated optical building block can pave the way for high-speed photonic integrated systems able to address tasks ranging from pattern recognition to cognitive spectrum management and multi-sensory data processing. PMID:27991574

  17. Artificial Neuron Based on Integrated Semiconductor Quantum Dot Mode-Locked Lasers.

    PubMed

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2016-12-19

    Neuro-inspired implementations have attracted strong interest as a power efficient and robust alternative to the digital model of computation with a broad range of applications. Especially, neuro-mimetic systems able to produce and process spike-encoding schemes can offer merits like high noise-resiliency and increased computational efficiency. Towards this direction, integrated photonics can be an auspicious platform due to its multi-GHz bandwidth, its high wall-plug efficiency and the strong similarity of its dynamics under excitation with biological spiking neurons. Here, we propose an integrated all-optical neuron based on an InAs/InGaAs semiconductor quantum-dot passively mode-locked laser. The multi-band emission capabilities of these lasers allows, through waveband switching, the emulation of the excitation and inhibition modes of operation. Frequency-response effects, similar to biological neural circuits, are observed just as in a typical two-section excitable laser. The demonstrated optical building block can pave the way for high-speed photonic integrated systems able to address tasks ranging from pattern recognition to cognitive spectrum management and multi-sensory data processing.

  18. Artificial Neuron Based on Integrated Semiconductor Quantum Dot Mode-Locked Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesaritakis, Charis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Bogris, Adonis; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2016-12-01

    Neuro-inspired implementations have attracted strong interest as a power efficient and robust alternative to the digital model of computation with a broad range of applications. Especially, neuro-mimetic systems able to produce and process spike-encoding schemes can offer merits like high noise-resiliency and increased computational efficiency. Towards this direction, integrated photonics can be an auspicious platform due to its multi-GHz bandwidth, its high wall-plug efficiency and the strong similarity of its dynamics under excitation with biological spiking neurons. Here, we propose an integrated all-optical neuron based on an InAs/InGaAs semiconductor quantum-dot passively mode-locked laser. The multi-band emission capabilities of these lasers allows, through waveband switching, the emulation of the excitation and inhibition modes of operation. Frequency-response effects, similar to biological neural circuits, are observed just as in a typical two-section excitable laser. The demonstrated optical building block can pave the way for high-speed photonic integrated systems able to address tasks ranging from pattern recognition to cognitive spectrum management and multi-sensory data processing.

  19. Ratiometric fluorescence, electrochemiluminescence, and photoelectrochemical chemo/biosensing based on semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Ratiometric fluorescent sensors, which can provide built-in self-calibration for correction of a variety of analyte-independent factors, have attracted particular attention for analytical sensing and optical imaging with the potential to provide a precise and quantitative analysis. A wide variety of ratiometric sensing probes using small fluorescent molecules have been developed. Compared with organic dyes, exploiting semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in ratiometric fluorescence sensing is even more intriguing, owing to their unique optical and photophysical properties that offer significant advantages over organic dyes. In this review, the main photophysical mechanism for generating dual-emission from QDs for ratiometry is discussed and categorized in detail. Typically, dual-emission can be obtained either with energy transfer from QDs to dyes or with independent dual fluorophores of QDs and dye/QDs. The recent discovery of intrinsic dual-emission from Mn-doped QDs offers new opportunities for ratiometric sensing. Particularly, the signal transduction of QDs is not restricted to fluorescence, and electrochemiluminescence and photoelectrochemistry from QDs are also promising for sensing, which can be made ratiometric for correction of interferences typically encountered in electrochemistry. All these unique photophysical properties of QDs lead to a new avenue of ratiometry, and the recent progress in this area is addressed and summarized here. Several interesting applications of QD-based ratiometry are presented for the determination of metal ions, temperature, and biomolecules, with specific emphasis on the design principles and photophysical mechanisms of these probes.

  20. Examining Forster Energy Transfer for Semiconductor Nanocrystaline Quantum Dot Donors and Acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Curutchet, C.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.; Scholes, G. D.

    2008-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer involving semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has received increased attention in recent years because their properties, such as high photostability and size-tunable optical properties, have made QDs attractive as Forster resonant energy transfer (FRET) probes or sensors. An intriguing question in FRET studies involving QDs has been whether the dipole approximation, commonly used to predict the electronic coupling, is sufficiently accurate. Accurate estimates of electronic couplings between two 3.9 nm CdSe QDs and between a QD and a chlorophyll molecule are reported. These calculations are based on transition densities obtained from atomistic semiempirical calculations and time-dependent density functional theory for the QD and the chlorophyll, respectively. In contrast to the case of donor-acceptor molecules, where the dipole approximation breaks down at length scales comparable to the molecular dimensions, we find that the dipole approximation works surprisingly well when donor and/or acceptor is a spherical QD, even at contact donor-acceptor separations. Our conclusions provide support for the use of QDs as FRET probes for accurate distance measurements.

  1. Bio serves nano: biological light-harvesting complex as energy donor for semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Werwie, Mara; Xu, Xiangxing; Haase, Mathias; Basché, Thomas; Paulsen, Harald

    2012-04-03

    Light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of the photosynthetic apparatus in plants is attached to type-II core-shell CdTe/CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals (quantum dots, QD) exhibiting an absorption band at 710 nm and carrying a dihydrolipoic acid coating for water solubility. LHCII stays functional upon binding to the QD surface and enhances the light utilization of the QDs significantly, similar to its light-harvesting function in photosynthesis. Electronic excitation energy transfer of about 50% efficiency is shown by donor (LHCII) fluorescence quenching as well as sensitized acceptor (QD) emission and corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The energy transfer efficiency is commensurable with the expected efficiency calculated according to Förster theory on the basis of the estimated donor-acceptor separation. Light harvesting is particularly efficient in the red spectral domain where QD absorption is relatively low. Excitation over the entire visible spectrum is further improved by complementing the biological pigments in LHCII with a dye attached to the apoprotein; the dye has been chosen to absorb in the "green gap" of the LHCII absorption spectrum and transfers its excitation energy ultimately to QD. This is the first report of a biological light-harvesting complex serving an inorganic semiconductor nanocrystal. Due to the charge separation between the core and the shell in type-II QDs the presented LHCII-QD hybrid complexes are potentially interesting for sensitized charge-transfer and photovoltaic applications.

  2. Monolithically integrated quantum dot optical modulator with Semiconductor optical amplifier for short-range optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Akahane, Kouichi; Umezawa, Toshimasa; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2015-04-01

    A monolithically integrated quantum dot (QD) optical gain modulator (OGM) with a QD semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was successfully developed. Broadband QD optical gain material was used to achieve Gbps-order high-speed optical data transmission, and an optical gain change as high as approximately 6-7 dB was obtained with a low OGM voltage of 2.0 V. Loss of optical power due to insertion of the device was also effectively compensated for by the SOA section. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the QD-OGM/SOA device helped achieve 6.0-Gbps error-free optical data transmission over a 2.0-km-long photonic crystal fiber. We also successfully demonstrated generation of Gbps-order, high-speed, and error-free optical signals in the >5.5-THz broadband optical frequency bandwidth larger than the C-band. These results suggest that the developed monolithically integrated QD-OGM/SOA device will be an advantageous and compact means of increasing the usable optical frequency channels for short-reach communications.

  3. Spin splitting generated in a Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, P. Adamowski, J. Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.

    2015-07-07

    We have studied the spin splitting of the current in the Y-shaped semiconductor nanostructure with a quantum point contact (QPC) in a perpendicular magnetic field. Our calculations show that the appropriate tuning of the QPC potential and the external magnetic field leads to an almost perfect separation of the spin-polarized currents: electrons with opposite spins flow out through different output branches. The spin splitting results from the joint effect of the QPC, the spin Zeeman splitting, and the electron transport through the edge states formed in the nanowire at the sufficiently high magnetic field. The Y-shaped nanostructure can be used to split the unpolarized current into two spin currents with opposite spins as well as to detect the flow of the spin current. We have found that the separation of the spin currents is only slightly affected by the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The spin-splitter device is an analogue of the optical device—the birefractive crystal that splits the unpolarized light into two beams with perpendicular polarizations. In the magnetic-field range, in which the current is carried through the edges states, the spin splitting is robust against the spin-independent scattering. This feature opens up a possibility of the application of the Y-shaped nanostructure as a non-ballistic spin-splitter device in spintronics.

  4. Büttiker probes for dissipative phonon quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, K.; Sadasivam, S.; Charles, J.; Klimeck, G.; Fisher, T. S.; Kubis, T.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical prediction of phonon transport in modern semiconductor nanodevices requires atomic resolution of device features and quantum transport models covering coherent and incoherent effects. The nonequilibrium Green's function method is known to serve this purpose well but is numerically expensive in simulating incoherent scattering processes. This work extends the efficient Büttiker probe approach widely used in electron transport to phonons and considers salient implications of the method. Different scattering mechanisms such as impurity, boundary, and Umklapp scattering are included, and the method is shown to reproduce the experimental thermal conductivity of bulk Si and Ge over a wide temperature range. Temperature jumps at the lead/device interface are captured in the quasi-ballistic transport regime consistent with results from the Boltzmann transport equation. Results of this method in Si/Ge heterojunctions illustrate the impact of atomic relaxation on the thermal interface conductance and the importance of inelastic scattering to activate high-energy channels for phonon transport. The resultant phonon transport model is capable of predicting the thermal performance in the heterostructure efficiently.

  5. Strain-induced vertical self-organization of semiconductor quantum dots: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Shtinkov, N.

    2013-12-28

    Atomistic strain simulations based on the valence force field method are employed to study the vertical arrangements of semiconductor quantum dot (QD) multilayers. The effects of the QD shape, dimensions, and materials parameters are systematically investigated, varying independently the following parameters: spacer width H, QD lateral spacing D, base b, and height h, slope of the side facets, elastic properties of the dot and the substrate materials, and lattice mismatch between the dot and the substrate. The transition between vertically aligned and anti-aligned structures is found to be determined mainly by the ratios H/D and b/D, as well as by the strain anisotropy of the substrate and to a lesser extent of the QD. The dependence on the QD height h is significant only for steep side facets and large aspect ratios h/b, and the effects of the lattice mismatch strain and the bulk elastic moduli are found to be negligible. The comparison with experimental data shows an excellent agreement with the results from the simulations, demonstrating that the presented analysis results in precise theoretical predictions for the vertical self-organization regime in a wide range of QD materials systems.

  6. Spectroscopy of equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge transfer in semiconductor quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, C.; Burkhard, S.; Krähenmann, T.; Röösli, M.; Märki, P.; Basset, J.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge-transfer processes by performing high-resolution transport spectroscopy. Using electrostatically defined quantum dots for energy-selective emission and detection, we achieved very high spectral resolution and a high degree of tunability of relevant experimental parameters. Most importantly, we observe that the spectral width of elastically transferred electrons can be substantially smaller than the linewidth of a thermally broadened Coulomb peak. This finding indicates that the charge-transfer process is fast compared to the electron-phonon interaction time. By drawing an analogy to double quantum dots, we argue that the spectral width of the elastic resonance is determined by the lifetime broadening hΓ of the emitter and detector states. Good agreement with the model is found also in an experiment in which the charge transfer is in the regime hΓ≫kBT. By performing spectroscopy below the Fermi energy, we furthermore observe elastic and inelastic transfer of holes.

  7. Interactions between graphene oxide and wide band gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, M.; Podborska, A.; Szaciłowski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The graphene oxide (GO) and GO@TiO2 nanocomposite have been synthesised by using modified Hummers method and ultrasonics respectively. The materials were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the interaction between GO and TiO2 affects the average interlayer spacing in carbonaceous material. The formation of bonds between various oxygen-containing functional groups and surface of titanium dioxide was investigated. One of them formed between the quinone structures (occur in graphene oxide) and titanium atoms exhibited 1.5 bond order. Furthermore the charge-transfer processes in GO@TiO2 composite were observed.

  8. Interaction of solitons with a string of coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijendra; Swami, O. P.; Taneja, S.; Nagar, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we develop a theory for discrete solitons interaction with a string of coupled quantum dots in view of the local field effects. Discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equations are used to describe the dynamics of the string. Numerical calculations are carried out and results are analyzed with the help of matlab software. With the help of numerical solutions we demonstrate that in the quantum dots string, Rabi oscillations (RO) are self trapped into stable bright Rabi solitons. The Rabi oscillations in different types of nanostructures have potential applications to the elements of quantum logic and quantum memory.

  9. Silver and potassium ion-exchanged waveguides in glasses doped with PbS semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auxier, Jason M.; Honkanen, Seppo; Schülzgen, Axel; Morrell, Michael M.; Leigh, Matthew A.; Sen, Sabyasachi; Borrelli, Nicholas F.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2006-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of potassium-sodium and silver-sodium ion-exchange processes for fabricating waveguides in glass doped with PbS semiconductor quantum dots. We compare the propagation losses of these waveguides, and we discuss the sources of these losses. In addition, we demonstrate a fourfold reduction in the propagation loss previously reported for potassium-sodium ion-exchanged waveguides and show that waveguides can be produced at additional quantum-dot resonances using both methods. We show that the near-infrared optical properties of these quantum dots remain intact by comparing the waveguide and bulk (unguided) luminescence spectra. Measurements of the near-field mode profiles show a high level of field confinement, which make these waveguides ideal for nonlinear optical (high-intensity) applications.

  10. Distance-dependent energy transfer between CdSe/CdS quantum dots and a two-dimensional semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Vamivakas, A. Nick; Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Sowers, Kelly; Waduge, Pradeep; Wanunu, Meni; Krauss, Todd; Driscoll, Kristina

    2016-01-11

    Atomically thin semiconductors, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides, show great potential for nanoscale photodetection, energy harvesting, and nanophotonics. Here, we investigate the efficiency of energy transfer between colloidal quantum dots with a cadmium selenide core and cadmium sulfide shell and monolayer molybdenum diselenide (MoSe{sub 2}). We show that MoSe{sub 2} effectively quenches the fluorescence of quantum dots when the two materials are in contact. We then separate the MoSe{sub 2} and quantum dots by inserting variable thickness hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) spacers and show that the efficiency at which the MoSe{sub 2} quenches fluorescence decreases as the h-BN thickness is increased. For distances d, this trend can be modeled by a 1/d{sup 4} decay, in agreement with theory and recent studies involving graphene.

  11. Distance-dependent energy transfer between CdSe/CdS quantum dots and a two-dimensional semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Sowers, Kelly; Waduge, Pradeep; Wanunu, Meni; Krauss, Todd; Driscoll, Kristina; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin semiconductors, such as the transition metal dichalcogenides, show great potential for nanoscale photodetection, energy harvesting, and nanophotonics. Here, we investigate the efficiency of energy transfer between colloidal quantum dots with a cadmium selenide core and cadmium sulfide shell and monolayer molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2). We show that MoSe2 effectively quenches the fluorescence of quantum dots when the two materials are in contact. We then separate the MoSe2 and quantum dots by inserting variable thickness hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) spacers and show that the efficiency at which the MoSe2 quenches fluorescence decreases as the h-BN thickness is increased. For distances d, this trend can be modeled by a 1/d4 decay, in agreement with theory and recent studies involving graphene.

  12. Quantum memory with strong and controllable Rydberg-level interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Kuzmich, A.

    2016-11-01

    Realization of distributed quantum systems requires fast generation and long-term storage of quantum states. Ground atomic states enable memories with storage times in the range of a minute, however their relatively weak interactions do not allow fast creation of non-classical collective states. Rydberg atomic systems feature fast preparation of singly excited collective states and their efficient mapping into light, but storage times in these approaches have not yet exceeded a few microseconds. Here we demonstrate a system that combines fast quantum state generation and long-term storage. An initially prepared coherent state of an atomic memory is transformed into a non-classical collective atomic state by Rydberg-level interactions in less than a microsecond. By sheltering the quantum state in the ground atomic levels, the storage time is increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This advance opens a door to a number of quantum protocols for scalable generation and distribution of entanglement.

  13. Quantum memory with strong and controllable Rydberg-level interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Kuzmich, A

    2016-01-01

    Realization of distributed quantum systems requires fast generation and long-term storage of quantum states. Ground atomic states enable memories with storage times in the range of a minute, however their relatively weak interactions do not allow fast creation of non-classical collective states. Rydberg atomic systems feature fast preparation of singly excited collective states and their efficient mapping into light, but storage times in these approaches have not yet exceeded a few microseconds. Here we demonstrate a system that combines fast quantum state generation and long-term storage. An initially prepared coherent state of an atomic memory is transformed into a non-classical collective atomic state by Rydberg-level interactions in less than a microsecond. By sheltering the quantum state in the ground atomic levels, the storage time is increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This advance opens a door to a number of quantum protocols for scalable generation and distribution of entanglement. PMID:27869195

  14. Interaction of porphyrins with CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Liu, Zhongxin; Ma, Lun; Hossu, Marius; Chen, Wei

    2011-05-13

    Porphyrins may be used as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, photocatalysts for organic pollutant dissociation, agents for medical imaging and diagnostics, applications in luminescence and electronics. The detection of porphyrins is significantly important and here the interaction of protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) with CdTe quantum dots was studied. It was observed that the luminescence of CdTe quantum dots was quenched dramatically in the presence of PPIX. When CdTe quantum dots were embedded into silica layers, almost no quenching by PPIX was observed. This indicates that PPIX may interact and alter CdTe quantum dots and thus quench their luminescence. The oxidation of the stabilizers such as thioglycolic acid (TGA) as well as the nanoparticles by the singlet oxygen generated from PPIX is most likely responsible for the luminescence quenching. The quenching of quantum dot luminescence by porphyrins may provide a new method for photosensitizer detection.

  15. Positive spaces, generalized semi-densities, and quantum interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canarutto, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The basics of quantum particle physics on a curved Lorentzian background are expressed in a formulation which has original aspects and exploits some non-standard mathematical notions. In particular, positive spaces and generalized semi-densities (in a distributional sense) are shown to link, in a natural way, discrete multi-particle spaces to distributional bundles of quantum states. The treatment of spinor and boson fields is partly original also from an algebraic point of view and suggests a non-standard approach to quantum interactions. The case of electroweak interactions provides examples.

  16. Experimental realization of a strongly interacting quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Kuzmich, Alex

    2016-05-01

    A quantum memory is a device which enables the storage and retrieval of quantum states of light. Ground atomic states interact only weakly with the environment and with each other, enabling memories with long storage times. However, for scalable generation and distillation of entanglement within distributed quantum information systems, it is desirable to controllably switch on and off interactions between the individual atoms. We realize a strongly interacting quantum memory by coupling the ground state of an ultra-cold atomic gas to a highly excited Rydberg state. The memory is subsequently retrieved into a propagating light field which is measured using the Hanbury Brown-Twiss photo-electric detection. The results reveal memory transformation from an initially prepared coherent state into the state of single excitation.

  17. Evaluation of diverse peptidyl motifs for cellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Gemmill, Kelly Boeneman; Muttenthaler, Markus; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dawson, Philip E; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have rapidly become a mainstay technology for facilitating the delivery of a wide variety of nanomaterials to cells and tissues. Currently, the library of CPPs to choose from is still limited, with the HIV TAT-derived motif still being the most used. Among the many materials routinely delivered by CPPs, nanoparticles are of particular interest for a plethora of labeling, imaging, sensing, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. The development of nanoparticle-based technologies for many of these uses will require access to a much larger number of functional peptide motifs that can both facilitate cellular delivery of different types of nanoparticles to cells and be used interchangeably in the presence of other peptides and proteins on the same surface. Here, we evaluate the utility of four peptidyl motifs for their ability to facilitate delivery of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) in a model cell culture system. We find that an LAH4 motif, derived from a membrane-inserting antimicrobial peptide, and a chimeric sequence that combines a sweet arrow peptide with a portion originating from the superoxide dismutase enzyme provide effective cellular delivery of QDs. Interestingly, a derivative of the latter sequence lacking just a methyl group was found to be quite inefficient, suggesting that even small changes can have significant functional outcomes. Delivery was effected using 1 h incubation with cells, and fluorescent counterstaining strongly suggests an endosomal uptake process that requires a critical minimum number or ratio of peptides to be displayed on the QD surface. Concomitant cytoviability testing showed that the QD-peptide conjugates are minimally cytotoxic in the model COS-1 cell line tested. Potential applications of these peptides in the context of cellular delivery of nanoparticles and a variety of other (bio)molecules are discussed.

  18. Quantum transport with two interacting conduction channels.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander J; Migliore, Agostino; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2013-05-07

    The transport properties of a conduction junction model characterized by two mutually coupled channels that strongly differ in their couplings to the leads are investigated. Models of this type describe molecular redox junctions (where a level that is weakly coupled to the leads controls the molecular charge, while a strongly coupled one dominates the molecular conduction), and electron counting devices in which the current in a point contact is sensitive to the charging state of a nearby quantum dot. Here we consider the case where transport in the strongly coupled channel has to be described quantum mechanically (covering the full range between sequential tunneling and co-tunneling), while conduction through the weakly coupled channel is a sequential process that could by itself be described by a simple master equation. We compare the result of a full quantum calculation based on the pseudoparticle non-equilibrium Green function method to that obtained from an approximate mixed quantum-classical calculation, where correlations between the channels are taken into account through either the averaged rates or the averaged energy. We find, for the steady state current, that the approximation based on the averaged rates works well in most of the voltage regime, with marked deviations from the full quantum results only at the threshold for charging the weekly coupled level. These deviations are important for accurate description of the negative differential conduction behavior that often characterizes redox molecular junctions in the neighborhood of this threshold.

  19. Tunable Surface Plasmon and Phonon Polariton Interactions for Moderately Doped Semiconductor Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janipour, Mohsen; Misirlioglu, Ibrahim Burc; Sendur, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Spatial charge distribution for biased semiconductors fundamentally differs from metals since they can allow inhomogeneous charge distributions due to penetration of the electric field, as observed in the classical Schottky junctions. Similarly, the electrostatics of the dielectric/semiconductor interface can lead to a carrier depletion or accumulation in the semiconductor side when under applied bias. In this study, we demonstrate that the inhomogeneous carrier accumulation in a moderately p-doped GaAs–dielectric interface can be tailored for tunable plasmonics by an external voltage. Solving Maxwell’s equations in the doped GaAs-dielectric stack, we investigate the tunability of the surface plasmon and phonon polaritons’ interaction via an external bias. The plasmonic mode analysis of such an interface reveals interesting dispersion curves for surface plasmon and phonon polariton interactions that are not possible in metals. We show that the plasmon dispersion curve can be engineered through an external bias using the inherent properties of the p-doped GaAs– dielectric interface. PMID:27698393

  20. Tunable Surface Plasmon and Phonon Polariton Interactions for Moderately Doped Semiconductor Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janipour, Mohsen; Misirlioglu, Ibrahim Burc; Sendur, Kursat

    2016-10-01

    Spatial charge distribution for biased semiconductors fundamentally differs from metals since they can allow inhomogeneous charge distributions due to penetration of the electric field, as observed in the classical Schottky junctions. Similarly, the electrostatics of the dielectric/semiconductor interface can lead to a carrier depletion or accumulation in the semiconductor side when under applied bias. In this study, we demonstrate that the inhomogeneous carrier accumulation in a moderately p-doped GaAs–dielectric interface can be tailored for tunable plasmonics by an external voltage. Solving Maxwell’s equations in the doped GaAs-dielectric stack, we investigate the tunability of the surface plasmon and phonon polaritons’ interaction via an external bias. The plasmonic mode analysis of such an interface reveals interesting dispersion curves for surface plasmon and phonon polariton interactions that are not possible in metals. We show that the plasmon dispersion curve can be engineered through an external bias using the inherent properties of the p-doped GaAs– dielectric interface.

  1. Generating and moving Dirac points in a two-dimensional deformed honeycomb lattice arrayed by coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Juan Duan, Yifeng; Chen, PeiJian; Peng, Yan

    2015-03-15

    Analysis of the electronic properties of a two-dimensional (2D) deformed honeycomb structure arrayed by semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is conducted theoretically by using tight-binding method in the present paper. Through the compressive or tensile deformation of the honeycomb lattice, the variation of energy spectrum has been explored. We show that, the massless Dirac fermions are generated in this adjustable system and the positions of the Dirac cones as well as slope of the linear dispersions could be manipulated. Furthermore, a clear linear correspondence between the distance of movement d (the distance from the Dirac points to the Brillouin zone corners) and the tunable bond angle α of the lattice are found in this artificial planar QD structure. These results provide the theoretical basis for manipulating Dirac fermions and should be very helpful for the fabrication and application of high-mobility semiconductor QD devices.

  2. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  3. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-21

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  4. Transport properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures in the presence of spin-orbit interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, P. M.; Pagano, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.

    2011-02-01

    Transport properties of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and of quantum wires are theoretically studied in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus terms of the spin-orbit interaction (SOI). Fully quantum mechanical expressions for the conductivity are evaluated for very low temperatures and the differences between them and previous semiclassical results are highlighted. Two kinds of confining potentials in quantum wires are considered, square-type and parabolic. Various cases depending on the relative strengths of two different SOI terms are discussed and the relaxation times for various impurity potentials are evaluated. In addition, the spin accumulation in a 2DEG and in a quantum wire (QW) is evaluated semiclassically and its dependence on the Fermi energy and the SOI strengths is discussed. A nearly saw-tooth dependence on the electron concentration is obtained for a QW with parabolic confinement.

  5. Quantum particle interacting with a metallic particle: Spectra from quantum Langevin theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, W. M. Edmund; Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a nearby metallic particle on the quantum optical properties of a quantum particle in the four-level double Raman configuration is studied using the quantum Langevin approach. We obtain analytical expressions for the correlated quantum fields of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons emitted from the system and perform analysis on how the interparticle distance, the direction of observation or detection, the strengths of controllable laser fields, the presence of surface plasmon resonance, and the number density of the quantum particle affect the quantum spectra of the Stokes and anti-Stokes fields. We explore the physics behind the quantum-particle-metallic-nanoparticle interaction within the dipole approximation, that is, when the interparticle distance is much larger than the sizes of the particles. Our results show the dependence of the spectra on the interparticle distance in the form of oscillatory behavior with damping as the interparticle distance increases. At weaker laser fields the enhancement of quantum fields which manifests itself in the form of a Fano dip in the central peak of the spectra becomes significant. Also, the quantum-particle-metallic-nanoparticle coupling, which is affected by the size of the metallic nanoparticle and the number density of the quantum particle, changes the angular dependence of the spectra by breaking the angular rotational symmetry. In the presence of surface plasmon resonance the oscillatory dependence of the spectra on the interparticle distance and angles of observation becomes even stronger due to the plasmonic enhancement effect.

  6. Modeling of growth and prediction of properties of electronic nanomaterials: Silicon thin films and compound semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Sumeet C.

    The enhanced functionality and tunability of electronic nanomaterials enables the development of next-generation photovoltaic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices, as well as biomolecular tags. Design and efficient synthesis of such semiconductor nanomaterials require a fundamental understanding of the underlying process-structure/composition-property-function relationships. To this end, this thesis focuses on a systematic, comprehensive analysis of the physical and chemical phenomena that determine the composition and properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. Through synergistic combination of computational modeling and experimental studies, the thesis addresses the thermodynamics and kinetics that are relevant during synthesis and processing and their resulting impact on the properties of silicon thin films and ternary quantum dots (TQDs) of compound semiconductors. The thesis presents a computational study of the growth mechanisms of plasma deposited a-Si:H thin films based on kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations according to a transition probability database constructed by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on the results, a comprehensive model is proposed for a-Si:H thin-film growth by plasma deposition under conditions that make the silyl (SiH3) radical the dominant deposition precursor. It is found that the relative roles of surface coordination defects are crucial in determining the surface composition of plasma deposited a-Si:H films and should be properly accounted for. The KMC predictions for the temperature dependence (over the range from 300 K to 700 K) of the surface concentration of SiHx(s) (x = 1,2,3) surface hydride species, the surface hydrogen content, and the surface dangling-bond coverage are in agreement with experimental measurements. In addition, the thesis details a systematic analysis of equilibrium compositional distribution in TQDs and their effects on the electronic and optoelectronic properties

  7. Hyperfine Interactions for Hole Spins in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippoppoulos, Pericles; Chesi, Sefano; Coish, William

    2014-03-01

    Due to the anisotropic nature of the hyperfine coupling for hole spins in semiconductor quantum dots, these systems may show significantly longer coherence times than electron spins given the correct quantum-dot geometry and magnetic field orientation. This advantage of hole spins relies on the hyperfine tensor taking-on an Ising-like form. This form of the hyperfine coupling has been recently called into question with experiments that have been interpreted to indicate a strong hybridization of p-like and d-like components in the valence band of III-V semiconductors. However, this interpretation relies on two assumptions: (1) That spin-orbit coupling is weak in these systems compared to the anisotropic crystal field, and (2) that higher-angular-momentum contributions are negligible. Assumption (1) may break down in light of the fact that the spin-orbit energy is even larger than the principle gap in InAs, and assumption (2) is difficult to justify in any crystal that breaks pure rotational symmetry. Using a generalization of the group-theoretic analysis in, we show here that relaxing either of these assumptions can restore the Ising-like nature of the hyperfine tensor, albeit for a particular choice of coupling constants.

  8. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  9. Quantum Networks with Chiral-Light-Matter Interaction in Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Lodahl, Peter; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a scalable architecture for a quantum network based on a simple on-chip photonic circuit that performs loss-tolerant two-qubit measurements. The circuit consists of two quantum emitters positioned in the arms of an on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of waveguides with chiral-light-matter interfaces. The efficient chiral-light-matter interaction allows the emitters to perform high-fidelity intranode two-qubit parity measurements within a single chip and to emit photons to generate internode entanglement, without any need for reconfiguration. We show that, by connecting multiple circuits of this kind into a quantum network, it is possible to perform universal quantum computation with heralded two-qubit gate fidelities F ˜0.998 achievable in state-of-the-art quantum dot systems.

  10. Quantum Networks with Chiral-Light-Matter Interaction in Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Lodahl, Peter; Sørensen, Anders S

    2016-12-09

    We propose a scalable architecture for a quantum network based on a simple on-chip photonic circuit that performs loss-tolerant two-qubit measurements. The circuit consists of two quantum emitters positioned in the arms of an on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of waveguides with chiral-light-matter interfaces. The efficient chiral-light-matter interaction allows the emitters to perform high-fidelity intranode two-qubit parity measurements within a single chip and to emit photons to generate internode entanglement, without any need for reconfiguration. We show that, by connecting multiple circuits of this kind into a quantum network, it is possible to perform universal quantum computation with heralded two-qubit gate fidelities F∼0.998 achievable in state-of-the-art quantum dot systems.

  11. Two Dimensional Effective Electron Mass at the Fermi Level in Quantum Wells of III-V, Ternary and Quaternary Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, S; Chatterjee, B; Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the influence of strong electric field on the two dimensional (2D)effective electron mass (EEM) at the Fermi level in quantum wells of III-V, ternary and quaternary semiconductors within the framework of k x p formalism by formulating a new 2D electron energy spectrum. It appears taking quantum wells of InSb, InAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(y) lattice matched to InP as examples that the EEM increases with decreasing film thickness, increasing electric field and increases with increasing surface electron concentration exhibiting spikey oscillations because of the crossing over of the Fermi level by the quantized level in quantum wells and the quantized oscillation occurs when the Fermi energy touches the sub-band energy. The electric field makes the mass quantum number dependent and the oscillatory mass introduces quantum number dependent mass anisotropy in addition to energy. The EEM increases with decreasing alloy composition where the variations are totally band structure dependent. Under certain limiting conditions all the results for all the cases get simplified into the well-known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The content of this paper finds three applications in the fields of nano-science and technology.

  12. Generation of a multi-qubit W entangled state through spatially separated semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules in cavity-quantum electrodynamics arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Siping; Yu, Rong; Li, Jiahua; Wu, Ying

    2014-04-07

    Generating entangled states attract tremendous interest as the most vivid manifestation of nonlocality of quantum mechanics and also for emerging applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Here, we propose theoretically a scheme for the deterministic generation of a three-qubit W sate with three semiconductor quantum-dot-molecules (QDMs) trapped in spatially separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The proposed scheme takes full advantage of the voltage-controlled tunnelling effects in QDMs, which induces the quantum coherence and further controls the generation of the W entangled state. The influences of the system parameters and various decoherence processes including spontaneous decay and photon leakage on the fidelity of the W state are discussed in details. Numerical results indicate that our scheme is not only robust against these decoherence factors but also insensitive to the deviation of the system parameters from the ideal conditions. Furthermore, the present scheme can be directly extended to realize an N-qubit W state. Also, this scheme can be generically transferred to other physical systems, including circuit quantum electrodynamics and photonic crystal cavities. The results obtained here may be useful in real experiments for realizing QIP in a solid-state platform.

  13. Super-resolution imaging of light-matter interactions near single semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johlin, Eric; Solari, Jacopo; Mann, Sander A.; Wang, Jia; Shimizu, Thomas S.; Garnett, Erik C.

    2016-12-01

    Nanophotonics is becoming invaluable for an expanding range of applications, from controlling the spontaneous emission rate and the directionality of quantum emitters, to reducing material requirements of solar cells by an order of magnitude. These effects are highly dependent on the near field of the nanostructure, which constitutes the evanescent fields from propagating and resonant localized modes. Although the interactions between quantum emitters and nanophotonic structures are increasingly well understood theoretically, directly imaging these interactions experimentally remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a photoactivated localization microscopy-based technique to image emitter-nanostructure interactions. For a 75 nm diameter silicon nanowire, we directly observe a confluence of emission rate enhancement, directivity modification and guided mode excitation, with strong interaction at scales up to 13 times the nanowire diameter. Furthermore, through analytical modelling we distinguish the relative contribution of these effects, as well as their dependence on emitter orientation.

  14. Super-resolution imaging of light–matter interactions near single semiconductor nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Johlin, Eric; Solari, Jacopo; Mann, Sander A.; Wang, Jia; Shimizu, Thomas S.; Garnett, Erik C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanophotonics is becoming invaluable for an expanding range of applications, from controlling the spontaneous emission rate and the directionality of quantum emitters, to reducing material requirements of solar cells by an order of magnitude. These effects are highly dependent on the near field of the nanostructure, which constitutes the evanescent fields from propagating and resonant localized modes. Although the interactions between quantum emitters and nanophotonic structures are increasingly well understood theoretically, directly imaging these interactions experimentally remains challenging. Here we demonstrate a photoactivated localization microscopy-based technique to image emitter-nanostructure interactions. For a 75 nm diameter silicon nanowire, we directly observe a confluence of emission rate enhancement, directivity modification and guided mode excitation, with strong interaction at scales up to 13 times the nanowire diameter. Furthermore, through analytical modelling we distinguish the relative contribution of these effects, as well as their dependence on emitter orientation. PMID:27996010

  15. Quantum cascade semiconductor infrared and far-infrared lasers: from trace gas sensing to non-linear optics.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Langford, Nigel; McCulloch, Michael T; Wright, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    The Quantum cascade (QC) laser is an entirely new type of semiconductor device in which the laser wavelength depends on the band-gap engineering. It can be made to operate over a much larger range than lead salt lasers, covering significant parts of both the infrared and submillimetre regions, and with higher output power. In this tutorial review we survey some of the applications of these new lasers, which range from trace gas detection for atmospheric or medical purposes to sub-Doppler and time dependent non-linear spectroscopy.

  16. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of complexes of semiconductor quantum dots with chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundelev, Evgeny V.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Baranov, Alexsander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental investigation of circular dichroism (CD) spectra of complexes based on ZnS:Mn/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS QDs and chlorin e6 (Ce6) molecules in aqua solutions at different pH level, in methanol and in DMSO were carried out. The changes in CD spectra of Ce6 upon its bonding in complex with semiconductor QDs were analyzed. Application of CD spectroscopy allowed to obtain the CD spectrum of luminescent Ce6 dimer for the first time, and to discover a nonluminescent Ce6 aggregate, preliminary identified as a "tetramer", dissymmetry factor of which is 40 times larger than that for its monomer. The analysis of obtained data showed that in complexes with QDs Ce6 can be either in the monomeric form or in the form of non-luminescent tetramer. The interaction of relatively unstable luminescent Ce6 dimerwith QDs leads to its partial monomerization and formation complexes with chlorin e6 in monomeric form.

  17. Effective quantum dynamics of interacting systems with inhomogeneous coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Christ, H.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a single mode (particle) interacting inhomogeneously with a large number of particles and introduce an effective approach to find the accessible Hilbert space, where the dynamics takes place. Two relevant examples are given: the inhomogeneous Tavis-Cummings model (e.g., N atomic qubits coupled to a single cavity mode, or to a motional mode in trapped ions) and the inhomogeneous coupling of an electron spin to N nuclear spins in a quantum dot.

  18. Unconventional quantum critical points in systems of strongly interacting bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, T. A.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2014-09-01

    Using the combined Bogoliubov method and the quantum rotor approach, we map the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian of strongly interacting bosons onto U(1) phase action. By unraveling consequences of the nontrivial topology of the U(1) gauge group and the associated ground state degeneracy we found a close kinship of the zero-temperature divergence of the compressibility and the topological susceptibility at degeneracy points, which marks a novel quantum criticality governed by topological features rather than the Landau principle of the symmetry breaking. We argue that the existence of this new type of the criticality may be instrumental in explaining unconventional quantum critical points observed in superconducting cuprates.

  19. Calendar effects in quantum mechanics in view of interactive holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Quantum mechanics in terms of interactive holography appears as `normal' science [1]. With the holography quantum behavior is determined by the interplay of material formations and their conjugate images. To begin with, this effortlessly elucidates the nonlocality in quantum entanglements. Then, it has been shown that Schr"odinger's dynamics for a single particle arises from Bi-Fragmental random walks of the particle itself and its holographic image. For many particles this picture blurs with fragments merging as bosons or fermions. In biomolecules, swapping of particles and their holographic placeholders leads to self-replication of the living matter. Because of broad interpretations of quantum formalism direct experiments attributing it to holography may not be very compelling. The holographic mechanism better reveals as an absolute frame of reference. A number of physical and biological events exhibit annual variations when Earth orbital position changes with respect to the universal holographic mechanism. The well established calendar variations of heart attacks can be regarded as a positive outcome of a generalization of the Michelson experiment, where holography is interferometry and ailing hearts are detectors of pathologically replicated proteins. Also, there have been already observed calendar changes in radioactive decay rates. The same could be expected for various fine quantum experiences, like, e.g., Josephson tunneling. In other words, Quantum Mechanics (February) Quantum Mechanics (August). [1] S. Berkovich, ``A comprehensive explanation of quantum mechanics,'' www.cs.gwu.edu/research/technical-report/170 .

  20. A brief overview of some physical studies on the relaxation dynamics and Förster resonance energy transfer of semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Suparna; Patra, Amitava

    2013-08-26

    This article highlights some physical studies on the relaxation dynamics and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and the way these phenomena change with size, shape, and composition of the QDs. The understanding of the excited-state dynamics of photoexcited QDs is essential for technological applications such as efficient solar energy conversion, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells. Here, our emphasis is directed at describing the influence of size, shape, and composition of the QDs on their different relaxation processes, that is, radiative relaxation rate, nonradiative relaxation rate, and number of trap states. A stochastic model of carrier relaxation dynamics in semiconductor QDs was proposed to correlate with the experimental results. Many recent studies reveal that the energy transfer between the QDs and a dye is a FRET process, as established from 1/d(6) distance dependence. QD-based energy-transfer processes have been used in applications such as luminescence tagging, imaging, sensors, and light harvesting. Thus, the understanding of the interaction between the excited state of the QD and the dye molecule and quantitative estimation of the number of dye molecules attached to the surface of the QD by using a kinetic model is important. Here, we highlight the influence of size, shape, and composition of QDs on the kinetics of energy transfer. Interesting findings reveal that QD-based energy-transfer processes offer exciting opportunities for future applications. Finally, a tentative outlook on future developments in this research field is given.

  1. Functional Si and CdSe quantum dots: synthesis, conjugate formation, and photoluminescence quenching by surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Sudeep, P K; Emrick, Todd

    2009-12-22

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) were prepared with a corona of di-n-octyl phosphine oxides, by performing hydrosilylation chemistry on the surface of hydrogen-terminated Si QDs. These novel Si QDs proved well-suited to serve as "ligands" for other semiconductor QDs, such as CdSe, by interaction of the phosphine oxide corona with the CdSe surface. A pronounced photoluminescence quenching of CdSe quantum dots was observed upon introduction of the phosphine oxide functionalized Si QDs to a CdSe QD solution. Surface functionalization of the Si QDs proved critically important to observing these effects, as conventional (alkane-covered) Si QD samples gave no evidence of electronic interactions with TOPO-covered CdSe. In a comparative system, phosphine oxide terminated oligo(phenylene vinylene) molecules acting as CdSe QD ligands provide a similar fluorescence quenching, with exciton decay kinetics supporting the formation of an electronically interacting hybrid materials system.

  2. Electric-field induced quantum broadening of the characteristic energy level of traps in semiconductors and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Mazharuddin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Verreck, Devin; Van de Put, Maarten; Simoen, Eddy; Sorée, Bart; Kaczer, Ben; Degraeve, Robin; Mocuta, Anda; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Groeseneken, Guido

    2016-12-01

    The trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) current in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) is one of the crucial factors degrading the sub-60 mV/dec sub-threshold swing. To correctly predict the TAT currents, an accurate description of the trap is required. Since electric fields in TFETs typically reach beyond 106 V/cm, there is a need to quantify the impact of such high field on the traps. We use a quantum mechanical implementation based on the modified transfer matrix method to obtain the trap energy level. We present the qualitative impact of electric field on different trap configurations, locations, and host materials, including both semiconductors and oxides. We determine that there is an electric-field related trap level shift and level broadening. We find that these electric-field induced quantum effects can enhance the trap emission rates.

  3. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-04-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10∶1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  4. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core (shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model. PMID:20482016

  5. Challenge to the charging model of semiconductor-nanocrystal fluorescence intermittency from off-state quantum yields and multiexciton blinking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2010-04-16

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they "blink," under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  6. Effect of carrier dynamics and temperature on two-state lasing in semiconductor quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Korenev, V. V. Savelyev, A. V.; Zhukov, A. E.; Omelchenko, A. V.; Maximov, M. V.

    2013-10-15

    It is analytically shown that the both the charge carrier dynamics in quantum dots and their capture into the quantum dots from the matrix material have a significant effect on two-state lasing phenomenon in quantum dot lasers. In particular, the consideration of desynchronization in electron and hole capture into quantum dots allows one to describe the quenching of ground-state lasing observed at high injection currents both qualitatevely and quantitatively. At the same time, an analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in a single quantum dot allowed us to describe the temperature dependences of the emission power via the ground- and excited-state optical transitions of quantum dots.

  7. Designing learning environments to teach interactive Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Puente, Sonia M.; Swagten, Henk J. M.

    2012-10-01

    This study aims at describing and analysing systematically an interactive learning environment designed to teach Quantum Physics, a second-year physics course. The instructional design of Quantum Physics is a combination of interactive lectures (using audience response systems), tutorials and self-study in unit blocks, carried out with small groups. Individual formative feedback was introduced as a rapid assessment tool to provide an overview on progress and identify gaps by means of questioning students at three levels: conceptual; prior knowledge; homework exercises. The setup of Quantum Physics has been developed as a result of several loops of adjustments and improvements from a traditional-like type of teaching to an interactive classroom. Results of this particular instructional arrangement indicate significant gains in students' achievements in comparison with the traditional structure of this course, after recent optimisation steps such as the implementation of an individual feedback system.

  8. A Transactional Analysis of Quantum Interaction-Free Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, John G.

    2000-04-01

    In 1993 Elitzur and Vaidmann(A. C. Elitzur and L. Vaidman, Found. Physics 23), 987-997 (1993). (EV) demonstrated that quantum mechanics permits the use of light quanta to examine an object without a single photon having actually interacted with the object, requiring only the possibility of such an interaction. The EV scenario has recently been carried out in the laboratory and its predictions verified. EV discussed their scenario in terms of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, in which the interaction-free result is rather mysterious, using a ``knowledge'' not available classically. They also used the Everett-Wheeler interpretation and suggested that the information indicating the presence of the opaque object comes from an interaction in a separate Everett-Wheeler universe, with the information communicated to our universe through the absence of interference. In the present work, we will examine the EV interaction-free scenario in terms of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics(J. G. Cramer, Reviews of Modern Physics 58), 647-687 (1986); see http://www.npl.washington.edu/ti and will provide a more plausible account of the physical processes that make possible quantum interaction-free measurements.

  9. Asymmetric current-phase relation due to spin-orbit interaction in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2013-12-04

    We theoretically study the current-phase relation in semiconductor nanowire Josephson junction in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. In the nanowire, the impurity scattering with strong SO interaction is taken into account using the random matrix theory. In the absence of magnetic field, the Josephson current I and phase difference φ between the superconductors satisfy the relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In the presence of magnetic field along the nanowire, the interplay between the SO interaction and Zeeman effect breaks the current-phase relation of I(φ) = –I(–φ). In this case, we show that the critical current depends on the current direction, which qualitatively agrees with recent experimental findings.

  10. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Romero, G.; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Retamal, J. C.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-06-15

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  11. Exchange interactions in coupled quantum dots observed through polarized photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Kushal C.; Garrido, Mauricio; Ramanathan, Swati; Stinaff, Eric; Bracker, Allan; Gammon, Dan

    2009-03-01

    Identification and manipulation of the exchange interaction between different spin configurations may be useful for implementing quantum logic operations. Coupled quantum dots offer the possibility of controlling the exchange interaction by continuously tuning between direct and indirect excitonic configurations. The effect of the anisotropic part of the exchange energy was clearly identified from polarization dependent photoluminescence (PL) results arising from the direct and indirect configurations of the neutral exciton. We also observe direct experimental evidence of the isotropic exchange interaction via PL measurements from positive trion configurations. The isotropic exchange interactions observed to be an order of magnitude larger than the anisotropic splitting as expected. High resolution measurements of this charged exciton configurations are expected to reveal additional insight into the details of the exchange interaction.

  12. Photoexcited electron and hole dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots: phonon-induced relaxation, dephasing, multiple exciton generation and recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeon-Deuk, Kim; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-09-01

    Photoexcited dynamics of electrons and holes in semiconductor quantum dots (QD), including phonon-induced relaxation, multiple exciton generation, fission and recombination (MEG, MEF and MER), were simulated by combining ab initio time-dependent density functional theory and non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. These nonequilibrium phenomena govern the optical properties and photoexcited dynamics of QDs, determining the branching between electronic processes and thermal energy losses. Our approach accounts for QD size and shape as well as defects, core-shell distribution, surface ligands and charge trapping, which significantly influence the properties of photoexcited QDs. The method creates an explicit time-domain representation of photoinduced processes and describes various kinetic regimes owing to the non-perturbative treatment of quantum dynamics. QDs of different sizes and materials, with and without ligands, are considered. The simulations provide direct evidence that the high-frequency ligand modes on the QD surface play a pivotal role in the electron-phonon relaxation, MEG, MEF and MER. The insights reported here suggest novel routes for controlling the photoinduced processes in semiconductor QDs and lead to new design principles for increasing the efficiencies of photovoltaic devices.

  13. Proposal of Trench-Oxide Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Structure and Computer Simulation of Silicon Quantum-Wire Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukui, Tetsuya; Oda, Shunri

    1993-12-01

    We propose “trench-oxide metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS)” structures as a novel formation method of silicon-based low-dimensional quantum structures, which are considered to be basic elements of future ultrahigh-speed and ultralarge-scale integrated devices. In this method, the applied gate voltage forms the potential well confined in an additional direction defined by ultrafine “trenches” on the oxide layer of the MOS structure. We characterize “trench-oxide MOS” quantum wire structures by two-dimensional numerical calculation of the shape of the potential well, the subband energy levels and the electron density, and investigate the possibility of the experimental observation of quantized density of states peculiar to quantum wires, by measuring capacitance-gate voltage (C-V) characteristics of “trench-oxide MOS capacitors.” We also have successfully fabricated “trench-oxide MOS” quantum wires with the width of 16 nm using electron beam (EB) lithography and electron cyclotron resonance reactive ion etching (ECR-RIE).

  14. Interaction of a quantum well with squeezed light: Quantum-statistical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sete, Eyob A.; Eleuch, H.

    2010-10-15

    We investigate the quantum statistical properties of the light emitted by a quantum well interacting with squeezed light from a degenerate subthreshold optical parametric oscillator. We obtain analytical solutions for the pertinent quantum Langevin equations in the strong-coupling and low-excitation regimes. Using these solutions we calculate the intensity spectrum, autocorrelation function, and quadrature squeezing for the fluorescent light. We show that the fluorescent light exhibits bunching and quadrature squeezing. We also show that the squeezed light leads to narrowing of the width of the spectrum of the fluorescent light.

  15. Probing the Interaction of Quantum Dots with Chiral Capping Molecules Using Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) induced at exciton transitions by chiral ligands attached to single component and core/shell colloidal quantum dots (QDs) was used to study the interactions between QDs and their capping ligands. Analysis of the CD line shapes of CdSe and CdS QDs capped with l-cysteine reveals that all of the features in the complex spectra can be assigned to the different excitonic transitions. It is shown that each transition is accompanied by a derivative line shape in the CD response, indicating that the chiral ligand can split the exciton level into two new sublevels, with opposite angular momentum, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. The role of electrons and holes in this effect could be separated by experiments on various types of core/shell QDs, and it was concluded that the induced CD is likely related to interactions of the highest occupied molecular orbitals of the ligands with the holes. Hence, CD was useful for the analysis of hole level–ligand interactions in quantum semiconductor heterostructures, with promising outlook toward better general understanding the properties of the surface of such systems. PMID:27960517

  16. Nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices via autonomous feedforward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelmann, A.; Clerk, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a recent work [A. Metelmann and A. A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. X 5, 021025 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.021025], a general reservoir engineering approach for generating nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices was described. We show here how in many cases this general recipe can be viewed as an example of autonomous feedforward: the full dissipative evolution is identical to the unconditional evolution in a setup where an observer performs an ideal quantum measurement of one system, and then uses the results to drive a second system. We also extend the application of this approach to nonreciprocal quantum amplifiers, showing the added functionality possible when using two engineered reservoirs. In particular, we demonstrate how to construct an ideal phase-preserving cavity-based amplifier which is fully nonreciprocal, quantum limited, and free of any fundamental gain-bandwidth constraint.

  17. Spin thermopower in interacting quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejec, Tomaž; Žitko, Rok; Mravlje, Jernej; Ramšak, Anton

    2012-02-01

    Using analytical arguments and the numerical renormalization group method, we investigate the spin thermopower of a quantum dot in a magnetic field. In the particle-hole-symmetric situation, the temperature difference applied across the dot drives a pure spin current without accompanying charge current. For temperatures and fields at or above the Kondo temperature, but of the same order of magnitude, the spin-Seebeck coefficient is large, of the order of kB/|e|. Via a mapping, we relate the spin-Seebeck coefficient to the charge-Seebeck coefficient of a negative-U quantum dot where the corresponding result was recently reported by Andergassen [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.84.241107 84, 241107 (2011)]. For several regimes, we provide simplified analytical expressions. In the Kondo regime, the dependence of the spin-Seebeck coefficient on the temperature and the magnetic field is explained in terms of the shift of the Kondo resonance due to the field and its broadening with the temperature and the field. We also consider the influence of breaking the particle-hole symmetry and show that a pure spin current can still be realized, provided a suitable electric voltage is applied across the dot. Then, except for large asymmetries, the behavior of the spin-Seebeck coefficient remains similar to that found in the particle-hole-symmetric point.

  18. Quantum Interactive Dualism: An Alternative to Materialism

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P

    2005-06-01

    Materialism rest implicitly upon the general conception of nature promoted by Galileo and Newton during the seventeenth century. It features the causal closure of the physical: The course of physically described events for all time is fixed by laws that refer exclusively to the physically describeable features of nature, and initial conditions on these feature. No reference to subjective thoughts or feeling of human beings enter. That simple conception of nature was found during the first quarter of the twentieth century to be apparently incompatible with the empirical facts. The founders of quantum theory created a new fundamental physical theory, quantum theory, which introduced crucially into the causal structure certain conscious choices made by human agents about how they will act. These conscious human choices are ''free'' in the sense that they are not fixed by the known laws. But they can influence the course of physically described events. Thus the principle of the causal closure of the physical fails. Applications in psycho-neuro-dynamics are described.

  19. Block-adaptive quantum mechanics: an adaptive divide-and-conquer approach to interactive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Maël; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2013-03-05

    We present a novel Block-Adaptive Quantum Mechanics (BAQM) approach to interactive quantum chemistry. Although quantum chemistry models are known to be computationally demanding, we achieve interactive rates by focusing computational resources on the most active parts of the system. BAQM is based on a divide-and-conquer technique and constrains some nucleus positions and some electronic degrees of freedom on the fly to simplify the simulation. As a result, each time step may be performed significantly faster, which in turn may accelerate attraction to the neighboring local minima. By applying our approach to the nonself-consistent Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization Molecular Orbital theory, we demonstrate interactive rates and efficient virtual prototyping for systems containing more than a thousand of atoms on a standard desktop computer.

  20. Quantum teleportation of dynamics and effective interactions between remote systems.

    PubMed

    Muschik, Christine A; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S; Cirac, Ignacio J

    2013-07-12

    Most protocols for quantum information processing consist of a series of quantum gates, which are applied sequentially. In contrast, interactions between matter and fields, for example, as well as measurements such as homodyne detection of light are typically continuous in time. We show how the ability to perform quantum operations continuously and deterministically can be leveraged for inducing nonlocal dynamics between two separate parties. We introduce a scheme for the engineering of an interaction between two remote systems and present a protocol that induces a dynamics in one of the parties that is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time, and are based on real-time feedback.

  1. Ultrafast optical coherent control of individual electron and hole spins in a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Greve, Kristiaan

    2012-02-01

    We report on the complete optical coherent control of individual electron and hole spin qubits in InAs quantum dots. With a magnetic field in Voigt geometry, broadband, detuned optical pulses couple the spin-split ground states, resulting in Rabi flopping. In combination with the Larmor precession around the external magnetic field, this allows an arbitrary single-qubit operation to be realized in less than 20 picoseconds [1,2]. Slow fluctuations in the spin's environment lead to shot-to-shot variations in the Larmor precession frequency. In a time-ensemble measurement, these would prevent a measurement of the true decoherence of the qubit, and instead give rise to ensemble dephasing. This effect was overcome by implementing a spin echo measurement scheme for both electron and hole spins, where an optical π-pulse refocuses the spin coherence and filters out the slow variations in Larmor precession frequency. We measured coherence times up to 3 microseconds [2,3]. Finally, our optical pulse manipulation scheme allows us to probe the hyperfine interaction between the single spin and the nuclei in the quantum dot. Interesting non-Markovian dynamics could be observed in the free-induction decay of a single electron spin, whereas the complete absence of such effects illustrates the reduction of the hyperfine interaction for hole spin qubits. We measured and modeled these effects, and explain the non-Markovian electron spin dynamics as involving a feedback effect resulting from both the strong Overhauser shift of the electron spin and spin dependent nuclear relaxation [2,4]. [4pt] [1] D. Press, T. D. Ladd, B. Zhang and Y. Yamamoto, Nature 456, 218 (2008)[0pt] [2] K. De Greve, P. McMahon, D. Press et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 872 (2011)[0pt] [3] D. Press, K. De Greve, P. McMahon et al., Nat. Phot. 4, 367 (2010)[0pt] [4] T. D. Ladd, D. Press, K. De Greve et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107401 (2010)

  2. Quantum dot photosensitizers. Interactions with transition metal centers.

    PubMed

    Burks, Peter T; Ford, Peter C

    2012-11-14

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive for potential use as photosensitizers for a variety of applications. These nanomaterials have very high absorption cross-sections and often display strong photoluminescence (PL). Furthermore, QD absorption and emission spectra can be tuned simply by varying their size, and QD surfaces can be modified to access multiple sites for attaching potential acceptors as well as other functionalities. Here we provide an overview of recent studies concerned with the photosensitization of transition metal centers and other acceptors. Particular focus is directed towards potential therapeutic applications and to our own interest in the delivery of small molecule bioregulators to physiological targets. Studies that have addressed factors that control likely energy and charge transfer processes between QD donors and acceptor molecules are also discussed. Understanding the mechanisms of these photosensitization processes can provide design guidelines for successful applications.

  3. Automated generation of quantum-accurate classical interatomic potentials for metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan; Foiles, Stephen; Schultz, Peter; Swiler, Laura; Trott, Christian; Tucker, Garritt

    2013-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a powerful condensed matter simulation tool for bridging between macroscopic continuum models and quantum models (QM) treating a few hundred atoms, but is limited by the accuracy of available interatomic potentials. Sound physical and chemical understanding of these interactions have resulted in a variety of concise potentials for certain systems, but it is difficult to extend them to new materials and properties. The growing availability of large QM data sets has made it possible to use more automated machine-learning approaches. Bartók et al. demonstrated that the bispectrum of the local neighbor density provides good regression surrogates for QM models. We adopt a similar bispectrum representation within a linear regression scheme. We have produced potentials for silicon and tantalum, and we are currently extending the method to III-V compounds. Results will be presented demonstrating the accuracy of these potentials relative to the training data, as well as their ability to accurately predict material properties not explicitly included in the training data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy Nat. Nuclear Security Admin. under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots: Linear and nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. O.; My, R.; Tung, Y.; Ueda, A.; Zhu, J.; Collins, W. E.; Hall, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantion for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. In general the host material is typically a glass such as optical grade silica. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga and As. An emphasis is placed on host guest interactions between the matrix and the implanted ion and how the matrix effects and implantation parameters can be used to obtain designer level optical devices tailored for specific applications. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. In this part of the program, we are particularly interested in characterizing the thermodynamic and optical properties of these non-composite materials. We also address how phase diagram of the confined material is altered by the interfacial properties between the confined material and the pore wall.

  5. Classical and quantum interaction of the dipole

    PubMed

    Anandan

    2000-08-14

    A unified and fully relativistic treatment of the interaction of the electric and magnetic dipole moments of a particle with the electromagnetic field is given. New forces on the particle due to the combined effect of electric and magnetic dipoles are obtained. Several new experiments are proposed, which include observation of topological phase shifts.

  6. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Roushan, P; Neill, C; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M; Quintana, C; Leung, N; Fang, M; Barends, R; Campbell, B; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Mutus, J; O'Malley, P J J; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T; Polkovnikov, A; Cleland, A N; Martinis, J M

    2014-11-13

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems.

  7. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, P.; Neill, C.; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M.; Quintana, C.; Leung, N.; Fang, M.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Polkovnikov, A.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems.

  8. Single-electron regime and Pauli spin blockade in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochette, Sophie; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Silicon quantum dots are promising candidates for quantum information processing as spin qubits with long coherence time. We present electrical transport measurements on a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) double quantum dot (DQD). First, Coulomb diamonds measurements demonstrate the one-electron regime at a relatively high temperature of 1.5 K. Then, the 8 mK stability diagram shows Pauli spin blockade with a large singlet-triplet separation of approximatively 0.40 meV, pointing towards a strong lifting of the valley degeneracy. Finally, numerical simulations indicate that by integrating a micro-magnet to those devices, we could achieve fast spin rotations of the order of 30 ns. Those results are part of the recent body of work demonstrating the potential of Si MOS DQD as reliable and long-lived spin qubits that could be ultimately integrated into modern electronic facilities. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. A quantum efficiency analytical model for complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor image pixels with a pinned photodiode structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chen; Zhang, Bing; Wu, Long-Sheng; Li, Na; Wang, Jun-Feng

    2014-12-01

    A quantum efficiency analytical model for complementary metal—oxide—semiconductor (CMOS) image pixels with a pinned photodiode structure is developed. The proposed model takes account of the non-uniform doping distribution in the N-type region due to the impurity compensation formed by the actual fabricating process. The characteristics of two boundary PN junctions located in the N-type region for the particular spectral response of a pinned photodiode, are quantitatively analyzed. By solving the minority carrier steady-state diffusion equations and the barrier region photocurrent density equations successively, the analytical relationship between the quantum efficiency and the corresponding parameters such as incident wavelength, N-type width, peak doping concentration, and impurity density gradient of the N-type region is established. The validity of the model is verified by the measurement results with a test chip of 160 × 160 pixels array, which provides the accurate process with a theoretical guidance for quantum efficiency design in pinned photodiode pixels.

  10. Single step deposition of an interacting layer of a perovskite matrix with embedded quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Thi Tuyen; Suarez, Isaac; Sanchez, Rafael S.; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P.; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Hybrid lead halide perovskite (PS) derivatives have emerged as very promising materials for the development of optoelectronic devices in the last few years. At the same time, inorganic nanocrystals with quantum confinement (QDs) possess unique properties that make them suitable materials for the development of photovoltaics, imaging and lighting applications, among others. In this work, we report on a new methodology for the deposition of high quality, large grain size and pinhole free PS films (CH3NH3PbI3) with embedded PbS and PbS/CdS core/shell Quantum Dots (QDs). The strong interaction between both semiconductors is revealed by the formation of an exciplex state, which is monitored by photoluminescence and electroluminescence experiments. The radiative exciplex relaxation is centered in the near infrared region (NIR), ~1200 nm, which corresponds to lower energies than the corresponding band gap of both perovskite (PS) and QDs. Our approach allows the fabrication of multi-wavelength light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on a PS matrix with embedded QDs, which show considerably low turn-on potentials. The presence of the exciplex state of PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications in both LEDs and solar cells.Hybrid lead halide perovskite (PS) derivatives have emerged as very promising materials for the development of optoelectronic devices in the last few years. At the same time, inorganic nanocrystals with quantum confinement (QDs) possess unique properties that make them suitable materials for the development of photovoltaics, imaging and lighting applications, among others. In this work, we report on a new methodology for the deposition of high quality, large grain size and pinhole free PS films (CH3NH3PbI3) with embedded PbS and PbS/CdS core/shell Quantum Dots (QDs). The strong interaction between both semiconductors is revealed by the formation of an exciplex state, which is monitored by photoluminescence and

  11. Thermodynamics of a statistically interacting quantum gas in D dimensions.

    PubMed

    Potter, Geoffrey G; Müller, Gerhard; Karbach, Michael

    2007-12-01

    We present the exact thermodynamics (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions) of a statistically interacting quantum gas in D dimensions. The results in D=1 are those of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for the nonlinear Schrödinger model, a gas with repulsive two-body contact potential. In all dimensions the ideal boson and fermion gases are recovered in the weak-coupling and strong-coupling limits, respectively. For all nonzero couplings ideal fermion gas behavior emerges for D>1 and, in the limit D-->infinity , a phase transition occurs at T>0 . Significant deviations from ideal quantum gas behavior are found for intermediate coupling and finite D .

  12. Hole-Nuclear Spin Interaction in Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eble, B.; Testelin, C.; Desfonds, P.; Bernardot, F.; Balocchi, A.; Amand, T.; Miard, A.; Lemaître, A.; Marie, X.; Chamarro, M.

    2009-04-01

    We have measured the carrier spin dynamics in p-doped InAs/GaAs quantum dots by pump-probe and time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. We obtained experimental evidence of the hyperfine interaction between hole and nuclear spins. In the absence of an external magnetic field, our calculations based on dipole-dipole coupling between the hole and the quantum dot nuclei lead to a hole-spin dephasing time for an ensemble of dots of 14 ns, in close agreement with experiments.

  13. Equilibration properties of a disordered interacting open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert; Huber, Sebastian

    The central question in the field of many body localization is if a closed interacting quantum system effectively thermalizes in the presence of disorder. However, any experimental test necessarily involves the opening of the ideally closed quantum system. Both from a fundamental point of view as well as for concrete experimental investigations of many body localization phenomena, a solid understanding of the effect of an attached bath is of significant importance. We study the equilibration properties of disordered interacting open quantum systems. On the one hand we consider the equilibration of such a many body localized system by coupling baths to the ends of a 1D spin chain. We find non-monotonous behaviour of the slowest relaxation time towards equilibrium. On the other hand, we take the bath itself to be a disordered interacting open quantum system and investigate the dephasing of a single qubit coupled to it. The model for the bath has a many body localization transition, affecting the dephasing of the single qubit.

  14. Exchange interaction effects on waves in magnetized quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv. Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-02-15

    We have applied the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics that includes the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We considered a number of wave phenomena that are affected by the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects the longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves, we focused our attention on the Langmuir waves, the Trivelpiece-Gould waves, the ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves, and low-frequency electromagnetic waves at T{sub e} ≫ T{sub i}. We have studied the dispersion of these waves and present the numeric simulation of their dispersion properties.

  15. Solid-State Dynamics and Quantum Transport in Novel Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    heterostructures and (2) quantum transport in solids with special emphasis on non-perturbative role of high-electric fields, many-body effects, and band-mixing in...electron quantum transport theory under hot-electron conditions, dielectric response function theory, and the effects of band-mixing in tunneling. The

  16. Solid-State Dynamics and Quantum Transport in Novel Semiconductor Nanostructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    band structure on electronic and optical properties of heterostructures, and (3) quantum transport in solids with special emphasis on the non...optical and acoustic phonon modes, band mixing in phonon-assisted transitions, and Bloch electron quantum transport theory under hot-electron

  17. The diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in a semiconductor core shell quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Sudharshan, M. S.; Subhash, P.; Shaik, Nagoor Babu; Kalpana, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.

    2015-06-24

    The effect of Aluminium concentration, shell thickness and size of the core shell Quantum Dot on the Diamagnetic Susceptibility of a donor in the Core Shell Quantum Dot is calculated in the effective mass approximation using the variational method. The results are presented and discussed.

  18. The diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in a semiconductor core shell quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudharshan, M. S.; Subhash, P.; Shaik, Nagoor Babu; Kalpana, P.; Jayakumar, K.; Reuben, A. Merwyn Jasper D.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Aluminium concentration, shell thickness and size of the core shell Quantum Dot on the Diamagnetic Susceptibility of a donor in the Core Shell Quantum Dot is calculated in the effective mass approximation using the variational method. The results are presented and discussed.

  19. Cold atom simulation of interacting relativistic quantum field theories.

    PubMed

    Cirac, J Ignacio; Maraner, Paolo; Pachos, Jiannis K

    2010-11-05

    We demonstrate that Dirac fermions self-interacting or coupled to dynamic scalar fields can emerge in the low energy sector of designed bosonic and fermionic cold atom systems. We illustrate this with two examples defined in two spacetime dimensions. The first one is the self-interacting Thirring model. The second one is a model of Dirac fermions coupled to a dynamic scalar field that gives rise to the Gross-Neveu model. The proposed cold atom experiments can be used to probe spectral or correlation properties of interacting quantum field theories thereby presenting an alternative to lattice gauge theory simulations.

  20. TRIQS: A toolbox for research on interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcollet, Olivier; Ferrero, Michel; Ayral, Thomas; Hafermann, Hartmut; Krivenko, Igor; Messio, Laura; Seth, Priyanka

    2015-11-01

    We present the TRIQS library, a Toolbox for Research on Interacting Quantum Systems. It is an open-source, computational physics library providing a framework for the quick development of applications in the field of many-body quantum physics, and in particular, strongly-correlated electronic systems. It supplies components to develop codes in a modern, concise and efficient way: e.g. Green's function containers, a generic Monte Carlo class, and simple interfaces to HDF5. TRIQS is a C++/Python library that can be used from either language. It is distributed under the GNU General Public License (GPLv3). State-of-the-art applications based on the library, such as modern quantum many-body solvers and interfaces between density-functional-theory codes and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) codes are distributed along with it.

  1. Controlled interaction of surface quantum-well electronic states.

    PubMed

    Seufert, Knud; Auwärter, Willi; García de Abajo, F J; Ecija, David; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Joshi, Sushobhan; Barth, Johannes V

    2013-01-01

    We report on the construction of well-defined surface quantum well arrangements by combining self-assembly protocols and molecular manipulation procedures. After the controlled removal of individual porphyrin molecules from dense-packed arrays on Ag(111), the surface state electrons are confined at the bare silver patches. These act as quantum wells that show well-defined unoccupied bound surface states. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy and complementary boundary element method calculations are performed to characterize the interaction between the bound states of adjacent quantum wells and reveal a hybridization of wave functions resulting in bonding and antibonding states. The interwell coupling can be tuned by the deliberate choice of the molecules acting as potential barriers. The fabrication method is shown to be ideally suited to engineer specific configurations as one-dimensional chains or two-dimensional artificial molecules.

  2. Variation of the feedback sensitivity in a 1.55 μm InAs/InP quantum-dash Fabry-Perot semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillot, F.; Naderi, N. A.; Pochet, M.; Lin, C.-Y.; Lester, L. F.

    2008-11-01

    Dynamic feedback properties of a 1.55 μm InAs/InP quantum dash laser are reported. The ground state linewidth enhancement factor (αH-factor) is found to be enhanced from ˜1 to ˜14 as the bias current is increased beyond the threshold value. As a consequence of the variation in the αH-factor, the feedback sensitivity of the quantum dash semiconductor laser is dramatically affected over the entire range of operational currents. The onset of its critical feedback regime, which is incompatible with data transmission, is shown to exhibit a variation of approximately 20 dB for the quantum dash device.

  3. Present Status and Future Prospects of Quantum Information Processing: With Special Focus on Optically Controlled Semiconductor Spins and Single-Photon Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2011-10-01

    The scheme of directly controlling electron spins trapped in semiconductor quantum dots or donor impurities as qubits using optical pulses has various advantages, such as the achievements of local excitation and fast operation, low power consumption, easy implementation of an interface with optical fiber communication networks, and the capability of transferring information to nuclear spins, which are expected to serve as quantum memories with a long coherence time. In this report, I introduce the present status of the research and development of this scheme and discuss its potential application to quantum information processing.

  4. Spin Relaxation in III-V Semiconductors in various systems: Contribution of Electron-Electron Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Fatih; Kesserwan, Hasan; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    In spintronics, most of the phenomena that we are interested happen at very fast time scales and are rich in structure in time domain. Our understanding, on the other hand, is mostly based on energy domain calculations. Many of the theoretical tools use approximations and simplifications that can be perceived as oversimplifications. We compare the structure, material, carrier density and temperature dependence of spin relaxation time in n-doped III-V semiconductors using Elliot-Yafet (EY) and D'yakanov-Perel'(DP) with real time analysis using kinetic spin Bloch equations (KSBE). The EY and DP theories fail to capture details as the system investigated is varied. KSBE, on the other hand, incorporates all relaxation sources as well as electron-electron interaction which modifies the spin relaxation time in a non-linear way. Since el-el interaction is very fast (~ fs) and spin-conserving, it is usually ignored in the analysis of spin relaxation. Our results indicate that electron-electron interaction cannot be neglected and its interplay with the other (spin and momentum) relaxation mechanisms (electron-impurity and electron-phonon scattering) dramatically alters the resulting spin dynamics. We use each interaction explicitly to investigate how, in the presence of others, each relaxation source behaves. We use GaAs and GaN for zinc-blend structure, and GaN and AlN for the wurtzite structure.

  5. Madelung and Hubbard interactions in polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Png, Rui-Qi; Ang, Mervin C.Y.; Teo, Meng-How; Choo, Kim-Kian; Tang, Cindy Guanyu; Belaineh, Dagmawi; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The standard polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors predicts that density-of-states shift into the π–π* gap to give a partially filled polaron band that pins the Fermi level. This picture neglects both Madelung and Hubbard interactions. Here we show using ultrahigh workfunction hole-doped model triarylamine–fluorene copolymers that Hubbard interaction strongly splits the singly-occupied molecular orbital from its empty counterpart, while Madelung (Coulomb) interactions with counter-anions and other carriers markedly shift energies of the frontier orbitals. These interactions lower the singly-occupied molecular orbital band below the valence band edge and give rise to an empty low-lying counterpart band. The Fermi level, and hence workfunction, is determined by conjunction of the bottom edge of this empty band and the top edge of the valence band. Calculations are consistent with the observed Fermi-level downshift with counter-anion size and the observed dependence of workfunction on doping level in the strongly doped regime. PMID:27582355

  6. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeghuzi, A. Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D.; Meuer, C.; Schubert, C.; Bunge, C.-A.

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  7. Influence of optical pumping wavelength on the ultrafast gain and phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2013-10-01

    We numerically investigate the influence of the optical pumping wavelength on the ultrafast gain and phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) by solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The temporal variations of the gain and phase recovery response at the ground state (GS) of QDs are calculated at various signal wavelengths when the optical pumping wavelengths at the excited state (ES) of QDs are varied. The phase recovery response is fastest when the wavelength of the signal and pumping beams corresponds to the respective emission wavelength of the GS and the ES in the same size of QDs. The absorption efficiency of the optical pumping beam at the ES is determined by the Lorentzian line shape function of the homogeneous broadening.

  8. Intense laser field effects on the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a semiconductor quantum wire with triangle cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.; Duque, C. A.; Niculescu, E. C.; Radu, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the laser field effects on the intersubband optical absorption and the refractive index changes in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wire with equilateral triangle cross section. The wire is under the action of a laser beam which is assumed to be non-resonant with the semiconductor structure and linearly polarized perpendicularly to the triangle side. In the effective mass approximation and for a finite potential barrier we calculate the subband states by using a finite element method. Linear, non linear and total absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are calculated as functions of the laser field for the allowed intersubband transitions. Two polarizations of the pump radiation, parallel and perpendicular to the laser field direction, are discussed.

  9. Optical Control of Intersubband Absorption in a Multiple Quantum Well-Embedded Semiconductor Microcravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Optical intersubband response of a multiple quantum well (MQW)-embedded microcavity driven by a coherent pump field is studied theoretically. The n-type doped MQW structure with three subbands in the conduction band is sandwiched between a semi-infinite medium and a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). A strong pump field couples the two upper subbands and a weak field probes the two lower subbands. To describe the optical response of the MQW-embedded microcavity, we adopt a semi-classical nonlocal response theory. Taking into account the pump-probe interaction, we derive the probe-induced current density associated with intersubband transitions from the single-particle density-matrix formalism. By incorporating the current density into the Maxwell equation, we solve the probe local field exactly by means of Green's function technique and the transfer-matrix method. We obtain an exact expression for the probe absorption coefficient of the microcavity. For a GaAs/Al(sub x)Ga(sub 1-x)As MQW structure sandwiched between a GaAs/AlAs DBR and vacuum, we performed numerical calculations of the probe absorption spectra for different parameters such as pump intensity, pump detuning, and cavity length. We find that the probe spectrum is strongly dependent on these parameters. In particular, we find that the combination of the cavity effect and the Autler-Townes effect results in a triplet in the optical spectrum of the MQW system. The optical absorption peak value and its location can be feasibly controlled by varying the pump intensity and detuning.

  10. Quantum chaos and thermalization in isolated systems of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovi, F.; Izrailev, F. M.; Santos, L. F.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    This review is devoted to the problem of thermalization in a small isolated conglomerate of interacting constituents. A variety of physically important systems of intensive current interest belong to this category: complex atoms, molecules (including biological molecules), nuclei, small devices of condensed matter and quantum optics on nano- and micro-scale, cold atoms in optical lattices, ion traps. Physical implementations of quantum computers, where there are many interacting qubits, also fall into this group. Statistical regularities come into play through inter-particle interactions, which have two fundamental components: mean field, that along with external conditions, forms the regular component of the dynamics, and residual interactions responsible for the complex structure of the actual stationary states. At sufficiently high level density, the stationary states become exceedingly complicated superpositions of simple quasiparticle excitations. At this stage, regularities typical of quantum chaos emerge and bring in signatures of thermalization. We describe all the stages and the results of the processes leading to thermalization, using analytical and massive numerical examples for realistic atomic, nuclear, and spin systems, as well as for models with random parameters. The structure of stationary states, strength functions of simple configurations, and concepts of entropy and temperature in application to isolated mesoscopic systems are discussed in detail. We conclude with a schematic discussion of the time evolution of such systems to equilibrium.

  11. Quantum interactions with closed timelike curves and superluminal signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey; Stairs, Allen

    2014-02-01

    There is now a significant body of results on quantum interactions with closed timelike curves (CTCs) in the quantum information literature, for both the Deutsch model of CTC interactions (D-CTCs) and the projective model (P-CTCs). As a consequence, there is a prima facie argument exploiting entanglement that CTC interactions would enable superluminal and, indeed, effectively instantaneous signaling. In cases of spacelike separation between the sender of a signal and the receiver, whether a receiver measures the local part of an entangled state or a disentangled state to access the signal can depend on the reference frame. We propose a consistency condition that gives priority to either an entangled perspective or a disentangled perspective in spacelike-separated scenarios. For D-CTC interactions, the consistency condition gives priority to frames of reference in which the state is disentangled, while for P-CTC interactions the condition selects the entangled state. Using the consistency condition, we show that there is a procedure that allows Alice to signal to Bob in the past via relayed superluminal communications between spacelike-separated Alice and Clio, and spacelike-separated Clio and Bob. This opens the door to time travel paradoxes in the classical domain. Ralph [T. C. Ralph, arXiv:1107.4675 [quant-ph].] first pointed this out for P-CTCs, but we show that Ralph's procedure for a "radio to the past" is flawed. Since both D-CTCs and P-CTCs allow classical information to be sent around a spacetime loop, it follows from a result by Aaronson and Watrous [S. Aaronson and J. Watrous, Proc. R. Soc. A 465, 631 (2009), 10.1098/rspa.2008.0350] for CTC-enhanced classical computation that a quantum computer with access to P-CTCs would have the power of PSPACE, equivalent to a D-CTC-enhanced quantum computer.

  12. The use of bulk states to accelerate the band edge statecalculation of a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Vomel, Christof; Tomov, Stanimire Z.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Marques,Osni A.; Dongarra, Jack J.

    2006-05-10

    We present a new technique to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method in empirical pseudopotential band edge state calculations for colloidal quantum dots. We use bulk band states of the materials constituent of the quantum dot to construct initial vectors and a preconditioner. We apply these to accelerate the convergence of the folded spectrum method for the interior states at the top of the valence and the bottom of the conduction band. For large CdSe quantum dots, the number of iteration steps until convergence decreases by about a factor of 4 compared to previous calculations.

  13. Application of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers to semiconductor cyclotron resonance.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Diane C; Khodaparast, Giti A; Tittel, Frank K; Kono, Jun; Scalari, Giacomo; Ajili, Lassaad; Faist, Jerome; Beere, Harvey; Davies, Giles; Linfield, Edmund; Ritchie, David; Nakajima, Yoji; Nakai, Masato; Sasa, Shigehiko; Inoue, Masataka; Chung, Seokjae; Santos, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    Quantum-cascade lasers operating at 4.7, 3.5, and 2.3 THz have been used to achieve cyclotron resonance in InAs and InSb quantum wells from liquid-helium temperatures to room temperature. This represents one of the first spectroscopic applications of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers. Results show that these compact lasers are convenient and reliable sources with adequate power and stability for this type of far-infrared magneto-optical study of solids. Their compactness promises interesting future applications in solid-state spectroscopy.

  14. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions. PMID:26310929

  15. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions.

  16. Ion beam synthesis and optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals and quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.G.; White, C.W.; Withrow, S.P.

    1996-11-01

    Nanocrystals of semiconductor materials have been fabricated in SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing. Strong red photoluminescence (PL) peaked around 750 nm has been observed in samples containing Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2}. The Si nanocrystals in the samples with optimized PL intensities are a few nanometers in diameter. Difference in the absorption bandgap energies and the PL peak energies are discussed. Significant influence of implantation sequence on the formation of compound semiconductor nanocrystals are demonstrated with the GaAs in the SiO{sub 2} system. Optical absorption measurements show that Ga particles have already formed in the as-implanted stage if Ga is implanted first. A single surface phonon mode has been observed in the infrared reflectance measurement from samples containing GaAs nanocrystals.

  17. (DARPA) Topologically Protected Quantum Information Processing In Spin-Orbit Compled Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-17

    high effective mass, (3) low Zeeman field and (4) reasonable band filing (within the topological regime). (“Exper mental and mater als c ns derat ns...orbit coupled semiconductors (e.g., InAs, InSb) and an s-wave superconductor (Nb, Al) in the presence of a suitably directed Zeeman field in both 2...Josephson effect , have now been successfully carried out by a number of groups worldwide. We have analyzed the experimental results in detail, explaining

  18. Electron Transfer as a Probe of the Interfacial Quantum Dot-Organic Molecule Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark D.

    This dissertation describes a set of experimental and theoretical studies of the interaction between small organic molecules and the surfaces of semiconductor nanoparticles, also called quantum dots (QDs). Chapter 1 reviews the literature on the influence of ligands on exciton relaxation dynamics following photoexcitation of semiconductor QDs, and describes how ligands promote or inhibit processes such as emission, nonradiative relaxation, and charge transfer to redox active adsorbates. Chapter 2 investigates the specific interaction of alkylcarboxylated viologen derivatives with CdS QDs, and shows how a combination of steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and transient absorption (TA) experiments can be used to reveal the specific binding geometry of redox active organic molecules on QD surfaces. Chapter 3 expands on Chapter 2 by using PL and TA to provide information about the mechanisms through which methyl viologen (MV 2+) associates with CdS QDs to form a stable QD/MV2+ complex, suggesting two chemically distinct reactions. We use our understanding of the QD/molecule interaction to design a drug delivery system in Chapter 4, which employs PL and TA experiments to show that conformational changes in a redox active adsorbate may follow electron transfer, "activating" a biologically inert Schiff base to a protein inhibitor form. The protein inhibitor limits cell motility and may be used to prevent tumor metastasis in cancer patients. Chapter 5 discusses future applications of QD/molecule redox couples with an emphasis on efficient multiple charge-transfer reactions -- a process facilitated by the high degeneracy of band-edge states in QDs. These multiple charge-transfer reactions may potentially increase the thermodynamic efficiency of solar cells, and may also facilitate the splitting of water into fuel. Multiple exciton generation procedures, multi-electron transfer experiments, and future directions are discussed.

  19. Antenna-load interactions at optical frequencies: impedance matching to quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmon, R. L.; Raschke, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of antenna design at optical frequencies is to deliver optical electromagnetic energy to loads in the form of, e.g., atoms, molecules or nanostructures, or to enhance the radiative emission from such structures, or both. A true optical antenna would, on a qualitatively new level, control the light-matter interaction on the nanoscale for controlled optical signal transduction, radiative decay engineering, quantum coherent control, and super-resolution microscopy, and provide unprecedented sensitivity in spectroscopy. Resonant metallic structures have successfully been designed to approach these goals. They are called optical antennas in analogy to radiofrequency (RF) antennas due to their capability to collect and control electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies. However, in contrast to the RF, where exact design rules for antennas, waveguides, and antenna-load matching in terms of their impedances are well established, substantial physical differences limit the simple extension of the RF concepts into the optical regime. Key distinctions include, for one, intrinsic material resonances including quantum state excitations (metals, metal oxides, semiconductor homo- and heterostructures) and extrinsic resonances (surface plasmon/phonon polaritons) at optical frequencies. Second, in the absence of discrete inductors, capacitors, and resistors, new design strategies must be developed to impedance match the antenna to the load, ultimately in the form of a vibrational, electronic, or spin excitation on the quantum level. Third, there is as yet a lack of standard performance metrics for characterizing, comparing and quantifying optical antenna performance. Therefore, optical antenna development is currently challenged at all the levels of design, fabrication, and characterization. Here we generalize the ideal antenna-load interaction at optical frequencies, characterized by three main steps: (i) far-field reception of a propagating mode exciting an antenna

  20. Antenna-load interactions at optical frequencies: impedance matching to quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Olmon, R L; Raschke, M B

    2012-11-09

    The goal of antenna design at optical frequencies is to deliver optical electromagnetic energy to loads in the form of, e.g., atoms, molecules or nanostructures, or to enhance the radiative emission from such structures, or both. A true optical antenna would, on a qualitatively new level, control the light-matter interaction on the nanoscale for controlled optical signal transduction, radiative decay engineering, quantum coherent control, and super-resolution microscopy, and provide unprecedented sensitivity in spectroscopy. Resonant metallic structures have successfully been designed to approach these goals. They are called optical antennas in analogy to radiofrequency (RF) antennas due to their capability to collect and control electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies. However, in contrast to the RF, where exact design rules for antennas, waveguides, and antenna-load matching in terms of their impedances are well established, substantial physical differences limit the simple extension of the RF concepts into the optical regime. Key distinctions include, for one, intrinsic material resonances including quantum state excitations (metals, metal oxides, semiconductor homo- and heterostructures) and extrinsic resonances (surface plasmon/phonon polaritons) at optical frequencies. Second, in the absence of discrete inductors, capacitors, and resistors, new design strategies must be developed to impedance match the antenna to the load, ultimately in the form of a vibrational, electronic, or spin excitation on the quantum level. Third, there is as yet a lack of standard performance metrics for characterizing, comparing and quantifying optical antenna performance. Therefore, optical antenna development is currently challenged at all the levels of design, fabrication, and characterization. Here we generalize the ideal antenna-load interaction at optical frequencies, characterized by three main steps: (i) far-field reception of a propagating mode exciting an antenna

  1. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Synthesis Approaches Towards Large-Scale Industrial Production for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  2. Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dot synthesis approaches towards large-scale industrial production for energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Michael Z.; Zhu, Ting

    2015-12-04

    This study reviews the experimental synthesis and engineering developments that focused on various green approaches and large-scale process production routes for quantum dots. Fundamental process engineering principles were illustrated. In relation to the small-scale hot injection method, our discussions focus on the non-injection route that could be scaled up with engineering stir-tank reactors. In addition, applications that demand to utilize quantum dots as "commodity" chemicals are discussed, including solar cells and solid-state lightings.

  3. Exactly solvable interacting two-particle quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Jens; Garforth, George

    2017-03-01

    We construct models of exactly solvable two-particle quantum graphs with certain non-local two-particle interactions, establishing appropriate boundary conditions via suitable self-adjoint realisations of the two-particle Laplacian. Showing compatibility with the Bethe ansatz method, we calculate quantisation conditions in the form of secular equations from which the spectra can be deduced. We compare spectral statistics of some examples to well known results in random matrix theory, analysing the chaotic properties of their classical counterparts.

  4. Nonequilibrium functional renormalization group for interacting quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Severin G; Meden, Volker; Schoeller, Herbert

    2007-10-12

    We propose a nonequilibrium version of functional renormalization within the Keldysh formalism by introducing a complex-valued flow parameter in the Fermi or Bose functions of each reservoir. Our cutoff scheme provides a unified approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium situations. We apply it to nonequilibrium transport through an interacting quantum wire coupled to two reservoirs and show that the nonequilibrium occupation induces new power law exponents for the conductance.

  5. Simulations of two-particle interactions with 2D quantum walks in time

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.; Laiho, K.; Silberhorn, C.; Rohde, P. P.; Štefaňak, M.; Potoček, V.; Hamilton, C.; Jex, I.

    2014-12-04

    We present the experimental implementation of a quantum walk on a two-dimensional lattice and show how to employ the optical system to simulate the quantum propagation of two interacting particles. Our quantum walk in time transfers the spatial spread of a quantum walk into the time domain, which guarantees a high stability and scalability of the setup. We present with our device quantum walks over 12 steps on a 2D lattice. By changing the properties of the driving quantum coin, we investigate different kinds of two-particle interactions and reveal their impact on the occurring quantum propagation.

  6. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-31

    D. Krauss, C. B. Poitras, and M. Lipson, " Energy transfer between colloidal semiconductor quantum dots in an optical microcavity," (submitted, 2006...Phys. Lett. 82, 4032 (2003). J. J. Peterson and T. D. Krauss, "Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Single Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots ," Nano Lett. (in press...Guo, Xiaowei Teng, Hong Yang, Todd D. Krauss, Carl B. Poitras, and Michal Lipson, "Enhanced Energy Transfer between Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum

  7. High Efficiency Four-Wave Mixing with Relaxation Coupling of Longitude-Optical Phonons in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yan-Chao; Zheng, Xue-Jun; Wang, Deng-Long; Ding, Jian-Wen

    2015-05-01

    The time-dependent analysis of four-wave mixing (FWM) has been performed in four-level double semiconductor quantum wells (SQWs) considering the cross-coupling of the longitude-optical phonons (LOP) relaxation. It is shown that both the amplitude and the conversion efficiency of the FWM field enhance greatly with the increasing strength of cross-coupling of LOP relaxation. Interestingly, a double peak value of the conversion efficiency is obtained under a relatively weak single-photon detuning considering the LOP coupling. When the detuning becomes stronger, the double peaks turn into one peak appearing at the line respect to the about equality two control fields. The results can be interpreted by the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency and the indirect transition. Such controlled high efficiency FWM based on the cross-coupling LOP may have potential applications in quantum control and communications. Supported by Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University under Grant (IRT1080), National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 51272158, 11374252, and 51372214, Changjiang Scholar Incentive Program under Grant No. [2009] 17, Scientific Research Fund of Hunan Provincial Education Department of China under Grant No. 12A140, the Science and Technology Foundation of Guizhou Province of China under Grant No. J20122314

  8. Momentum Transfer Studies and Studies of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Metal Colloids and Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, W. E.; Burger, A.; Dyer, K.; George, M.; Henderson, D.; Morgan, S.; Mu, R.; Shi, D.; Conner, D; Thompson, E.; Collins, L.; Curry, L.; Mattox, S.; Williams, G.

    1996-01-01

    Phase 1 of this work involved design work on a momentum transfer device. The progress on design and testing will be presented. Phase 2 involved the systematic study of the MPD thruster for dual uses. Though it was designed as a thruster for space vehicles, the characteristics of the plasma make it an excellent candidate for industrial applications. This project sought to characterize the system for use in materials processing and characterization. The surface modification on ZnCdTe, CdTe, and ZnTe will be presented. Phase 3 involved metal colloids and semiconductor quantum dots. One aspect of this project involves a collaborative effort with the Solid State Division of ORNL. The thrust behind this research is to develop ion implantation for synthesizing novel materials (quantum dots wires and wells, and metal colloids) for applications in all optical switching devices, up conversion, and the synthesis of novel refractory materials. The ions of interest are Au, Ag, Cd, Se, In, P, Sb, Ga, and As. The specific materials of interest are: CdSe, CdTe, InAs, GaAs, InP, GaP, InSb, GaSb, and InGaAs. A second aspect of this research program involves using porous glass (25-200 A) for fabricating materials of finite size. The results of some of this work will also be reported.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Interaction-Induced Localization in Quantum Dots and Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim Güçlü, A.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate interaction-induced localization of electrons in both quantum dots and inhomogeneous quantum wires using variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo methods. Quantum dots and wires are highly tunable systems that enable the study of the physics of strongly correlated electrons. With decreasing electronic density, interactions become stronger and electrons are expected to localize at their classical positions, as in Wigner crystallization in an infinite 2D system. (1) Dots: We show that the addition energy shows a clear progression from features associated with shell structure to those caused by commensurability of a Wigner crystal. This cross-over is, then, a signature of localization; it occurs near rs˜20. For higher values of rs, the configuration symmetry of the quantum dot becomes fully consistent with the classical ground state. (2) Wires: We study an inhomogeneous quasi-one-dimensional system -- a wire with two regions, one at low density and the other high. We find that strong localization occurs in the low density quantum point contact region as the gate potential is increased. The nature of the transition from high to low density depends on the density gradient -- if it is steep, a barrier develops between the two regions, causing Coulomb blockade effects. We find no evidence for ferromagnetic spin polarization for the range of parameters studied. The picture emerging here is in good agreement with the experimental measurements of tunneling between two wires. Collaborators: C. J. Umrigar (Cornell), Hong Jiang (Fritz Haber Institut), Amit Ghosal (IISER Calcutta), and H. U. Baranger (Duke).

  10. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  11. A nonlinear Bloch model for Coulomb interaction in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bidegaray-Fesquet, Brigitte Keita, Kole

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we first derive a Coulomb Hamiltonian for electron–electron interaction in quantum dots in the Heisenberg picture. Then we use this Hamiltonian to enhance a Bloch model, which happens to be nonlinear in the density matrix. The coupling with Maxwell equations in case of interaction with an electromagnetic field is also considered from the Cauchy problem point of view. The study is completed by numerical results and a discussion about the advisability of neglecting intra-band coherences, as is done in part of the literature.

  12. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands.

  13. Topological phases and transport properties of screened interacting quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hengyi; Xiong, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We study theoretically the effects of long-range and on-site Coulomb interactions on the topological phases and transport properties of spin-orbit-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires imposed on a s-wave superconductor. The distributions of the electrostatic potential and charge density are calculated self-consistently within the Hartree approximation. Due to the finite width of the wires and charge repulsion, the potential and density distribute inhomogeneously in the transverse direction and tend to accumulate along the lateral edges where the hard-wall confinement is assumed. This result has profound effects on the topological phases and the differential conductance of the interacting quantum wires and their hybrid junctions with superconductors. Coulomb interactions renormalize the gate voltage and alter the topological phases strongly by enhancing the topological regimes and producing jagged boundaries. Moreover, the multicritical points connecting different topological phases are modified remarkably in striking contrast to the predictions of the two-band model. We further suggest the possible non-magnetic topological phase transitions manipulated externally with the aid of long-range interactions. Finally, the transport properties of normal-superconductor junctions are further examined, in particular, the impacts of Coulomb interactions on the zero-bias peaks related to the Majorana fermions and near zero-energy peaks.

  14. Emission enhancement and polarization of semiconductor quantum dots with nanoimprinted plasmonic cavities: towards scalable fabrication of plasmon-exciton displays.

    PubMed

    Cadusch, Jasper J; Panchenko, Evgeniy; Kirkwood, Nicholas; James, Timothy D; Gibson, Brant C; Webb, Kevin J; Mulvaney, Paul; Roberts, Ann

    2015-09-07

    Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs.

  15. Assembly of mesoscale helices with near-unity enantiomeric excess and light-matter interactions for chiral semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenchun; Kim, Ji-Young; Wang, Xinzhi; Calcaterra, Heather A; Qu, Zhibei; Meshi, Louisa; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductors with chiral geometries at the nanoscale and mesoscale provide a rich materials platform for polarization optics, photocatalysis, and biomimetics. Unlike metallic and organic optical materials, the relationship between the geometry of chiral semiconductors and their chiroptical properties remains, however, vague. Homochiral ensembles of semiconductor helices with defined geometries open the road to understanding complex relationships between geometrical parameters and chiroptical properties of semiconductor materials. We show that semiconductor helices can be prepared with an absolute yield of ca 0.1% and an enantiomeric excess (e.e.) of 98% or above from cysteine-stabilized cadmium telluride nanoparticles (CdTe NPs) dispersed in methanol. This high e.e. for a spontaneously occurring chemical process is attributed to chiral self-sorting based on the thermodynamic preference of NPs to assemble with those of the same handedness. The dispersions of homochiral self-assembled helices display broadband visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) polarization rotation with anisotropy (g) factors approaching 0.01. Calculated circular dichroism (CD) spectra accurately reproduced experimental CD spectra and gave experimentally validated spectral predictions for different geometrical parameters enabling de novo design of chiroptical semiconductor materials. Unlike metallic, ceramic, and polymeric helices that serve predominantly as scatterers, chiroptical properties of semiconductor helices have nearly equal contribution of light absorption and scattering, which is essential for device-oriented, field-driven light modulation. Deconstruction of a helix into a series of nanorods provides a simple model for the light-matter interaction and chiroptical activity of helices. This study creates a framework for further development of polarization-based optics toward biomedical applications, telecommunications, and hyperspectral imaging.

  16. Assembly of mesoscale helices with near-unity enantiomeric excess and light-matter interactions for chiral semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wenchun; Kim, Ji-Young; Wang, Xinzhi; Calcaterra, Heather A.; Qu, Zhibei; Meshi, Louisa; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors with chiral geometries at the nanoscale and mesoscale provide a rich materials platform for polarization optics, photocatalysis, and biomimetics. Unlike metallic and organic optical materials, the relationship between the geometry of chiral semiconductors and their chiroptical properties remains, however, vague. Homochiral ensembles of semiconductor helices with defined geometries open the road to understanding complex relationships between geometrical parameters and chiroptical properties of semiconductor materials. We show that semiconductor helices can be prepared with an absolute yield of ca 0.1% and an enantiomeric excess (e.e.) of 98% or above from cysteine-stabilized cadmium telluride nanoparticles (CdTe NPs) dispersed in methanol. This high e.e. for a spontaneously occurring chemical process is attributed to chiral self-sorting based on the thermodynamic preference of NPs to assemble with those of the same handedness. The dispersions of homochiral self-assembled helices display broadband visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) polarization rotation with anisotropy (g) factors approaching 0.01. Calculated circular dichroism (CD) spectra accurately reproduced experimental CD spectra and gave experimentally validated spectral predictions for different geometrical parameters enabling de novo design of chiroptical semiconductor materials. Unlike metallic, ceramic, and polymeric helices that serve predominantly as scatterers, chiroptical properties of semiconductor helices have nearly equal contribution of light absorption and scattering, which is essential for device-oriented, field-driven light modulation. Deconstruction of a helix into a series of nanorods provides a simple model for the light-matter interaction and chiroptical activity of helices. This study creates a framework for further development of polarization-based optics toward biomedical applications, telecommunications, and hyperspectral imaging. PMID:28275728

  17. Direct measurement of the hole-nuclear spin interaction in single InP/GaInP quantum dots using photoluminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chekhovich, E A; Krysa, A B; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2011-01-14

    We measure the hyperfine interaction of the valence band hole with nuclear spins in single InP/GaInP semiconductor quantum dots. Detection of photoluminescence (PL) of both "bright" and "dark" excitons enables direct measurement of the Overhauser shift of states with the same electron but opposite hole spin projections. We find that the hole hyperfine constant is ≈11% of that of the electron and has the opposite sign. By measuring the degree of circular polarization of the PL, an upper limit to the contribution of the heavy-light hole mixing to the measured value of the hole hyperfine constant is deduced. Our results imply that environment-independent hole spins are not realizable in III-V semiconductor, a result important for solid-state quantum information processing using hole spin qubits.

  18. Emission enhancement and polarization of semiconductor quantum dots with nanoimprinted plasmonic cavities: towards scalable fabrication of plasmon-exciton displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadusch, Jasper J.; Panchenko, Evgeniy; Kirkwood, Nicholas; James, Timothy D.; Gibson, Brant C.; Webb, Kevin J.; Mulvaney, Paul; Roberts, Ann

    2015-08-01

    Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs.Here we present an application of a high throughput nanofabrication technique to the creation of a plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate its application to the enhancement and control of radiation by quantum dots (QDs). The metasurface consists of an array of cold-forged rectangular nanocavities in a thin silver film. High quantum efficiency graded alloy CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dots were spread over the metasurface and the effects of the plasmon-exciton interactions characterised. We found a four-fold increase in the QDs radiative decay rate and emission brightness, compared to QDs on glass, along with a degree of linear polarisation of 0.73 in the emitted field. Such a surface could be easily integrated with current QD display or organic solar cell designs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR04042F

  19. Effective interaction and condensation of dipolaritons in coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Tim; Kolmakov, German V.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Dipolaritons are a three-way superposition of a photon, a direct exciton, and an indirect exciton that are formed in coupled quantum well microcavities. As is the case with exciton-polaritons, dipolaritons have a self-interaction due to direct and exchange effects of the underlying electrons and holes. Here we present a theoretical description of dipolaritons and derive simple formulas for their basic parameters. In particular, we derive the effective dipolariton-dipolariton interaction taking into account exchange effects between the excitons. We obtain a simple relation to describe the effective interaction at low densities. We find that dipolaritons should condense under suitable conditions, described by a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation. While the parameters for condensation are promising, we find that the level of tunability of the interactions is limited.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    PubMed

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  1. Semiconductor quantum wells with BenDaniel-Duke boundary conditions: approximate analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsan, Victor; Ciornei, Mihaela-Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The Schrödinger equation for a particle moving in a square well potential with BenDaniel-Duke boundary conditions is solved. Using algebraic approximations for trigonometric functions, the transcendental equations of the bound states energy are transformed into tractable, algebraic equations. For the ground state and the first excited state, they are cubic equations; we obtain simple formulas for their physically interesting roots. The case of higher excited states is also analysed. Our results have direct applications in the physics of type I and type II semiconductor heterostructures.

  2. Optical coefficients in a semiconductor quantum ring: Electric field and donor impurity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, C. M.; Acosta, Ruben E.; Morales, A. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ojeda, J. H.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    The electron states in a two-dimensional quantum dot ring are calculated in the presence of a donor impurity atom under the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. The effect of an externally applied electric field is also taken into account. The wavefunctions are obtained via the exact diagonalization of the problem Hamiltonian using a 2D expansion within the adiabatic approximation. The impurity-related optical response is analyzed via the optical absorption, relative refractive index change and the second harmonics generation. The dependencies of the electron states and these optical coefficients with the changes in the configuration of the quantum ring system are discussed in detail.

  3. Impacts of coulomb interactions on the magnetic responses of excitonic complexes in single semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Hao; Lin, Chia-Hsien; Fu, Ying-Jhe; Lin, Ta-Chun; Lin, Hsuan; Cheng, Shuen-Jen; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lee, Chien-Ping

    2010-01-21

    We report on the diamagnetic responses of different exciton complexes in single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) and quantum rings (QRs). For QDs, the imbalanced magnetic responses of inter-particle Coulomb interactions play a crucial role in the diamagnetic shifts of excitons (X), biexcitons (XX), and positive trions (X-). For negative trions (X-) in QDs, anomalous magnetic responses are observed, which cannot be described by the conventional quadratic energy shift with the magnetic field. The anomalous behavior is attributed to the apparent change in the electron wave function extent after photon emission due to the strong Coulomb attraction by the hole in its initial state. In QRs, the diamagnetic responses of X and XX also show different behaviors. Unlike QDs, the diamagnetic shift of XX in QRs is considerably larger than that of X. The inherent structural asymmetry combined with the inter-particle Coulomb interactions makes the wave function distribution of XX very different from that of X in QRs. Our results suggest that the phase coherence of XX in QRs may survive from the wave function localization due to the structural asymmetry or imperfections.

  4. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements.

  5. Quantum gas microscopy of the interacting Harper-Hofstadter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, M. Eric; Lukin, Alex; Preiss, Philipp; Rispoli, Matthew; Schittko, Robert; Kaufman, Adam; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    At the heart of many topological states is the underlying gauge field. One example of a gauge field is the magnetic field which causes the deflection of a moving charged particle. This behavior can be understood through the Aharonov-Bohm phase that a particle acquires upon traversing a closed path. Gauge fields give rise to novel states of matter that cannot be described with symmetry breaking. Instead, these states, e.g. fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states, are characterized by topological invariants, such as the Chern number. In this talk, we report on experimental results upon introducing a gauge field in a system of strongly-interacting ultracold Rb87 atoms confined to a 2D optical lattice. With single-site resolution afforded by a quantum gas microscope, we can prepare a fixed atom number and project hard walls. With an artificial gauge field, this quantum simulator realizes the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian. We can independently control the two tunneling strengths as well as dynamically change the flux. This flexibility enables studies of topological phenomena from many perspectives, e.g. site-resolved images of edge currents. With the strong on-site interactions possible in our system, these experiments will pave the way to observing FQH-like states in a lattice.

  6. Interactions in quantum Hall edge channels at filling fraction 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, Pascal; Bocquillon, Erwann; Freulon, Vincent; Grenier, Charles; Berroir, Jean-Marc; Plaçais, Bernard; Cavanna, Antonella; Jin, Yong; Fève, Gwendal

    2013-03-01

    Coulomb interactions play a major role in one dimensional electronic transport. They modify the nature of the elementary excitations from Landau quasiparticles in higher dimensions to collective excitations in 1D. We report here on the direct observation of the collective neutral and charge modes of the two chiral co-propagating edge channels of opposite spins of the quantum Hall effect at filling factor ν = 2 . Generating a charge density wave at frequency f in the outer channel, we measure the current induced by inter-channel Coulomb interaction in the inner channel after a 3 microns propagation length. Varying the driving frequency from 0.7 to 11 GHz, we observe damped oscillations in the induced current that results from the phase shift between the fast charge and slow neutral eigenmodes. Measuring the dispersion relation and dissipation of the neutral mode from provides quantitative information on the scattering of quantum edge magnetoplasmons. We will then comment on the consequences of these results on quasi-particle relaxation and decoherence in the ν = 2 quantum Hall edge channel system. ANR Grant 1shot (ANR-2010-BLANC-0412)

  7. Investigation of Transmission Resonances with Specific Properties in Rectangular Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niketic, Nemanja; Milanovic, Vitomir; Radovanovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed analysis of the energy position and type of transmission maxima in rectangular quantum wells (QWs), taking into consideration the difference of electron effective masses in the barrier and well layers. Particular attention is given to transmission maxima that are less than unity and the implications of effective…

  8. Circular photogalvanic effect at inter-band excitation in semiconductor quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'kov, V. V.; Ganichev, S. D.; Schneider, Petra; Back, C.; Oestreich, M.; Rudolph, J.; Hägele, D.; Golub, L. E.; Wegscheider, W.; Prettl, W.

    2003-11-01

    We observed a circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) in GaAs quantum wells at inter-band excitation. The spectral dependence of the CPGE is measured together with that of the polarization degree of the time-resolved photoluminescence. A theoretical model takes into account spin splitting of conduction and valence bands.

  9. Theory Of An Electro-Optic Modulator Based On Quantum Wells In A Semiconductor etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, D. R. P.; Apsley, N.; Taylor, L. L.; Bass, S. J.; Klipstein, P. C.

    1987-08-01

    We present the design of an electro-optic modulator which is based on the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) in GaAs quantum wells contained within the central layer of a Fabry-Perot etalon. The etalon mirrors are quarter wave stacks of Ga0.7A10.3As and AlAs, eliminating the need for the application of anti-reflection coatings. p-i-n-doping is employed with the undoped Or stack sandwiched between doped mirrors, enabling electric fields of the order of 105Vcm-1 to be readily developed across the quantum wells. Placing a multiple quantum well structure within an etalon resonant cavity gives flexibility of design in terms of operating wavelength and mode: Light incident perpendicular to the QW stack is modulated through the operation of the QCSE on the QW excitons, either electro-refractively by a change in the real part of the QW refractive index producing a wavelength modulation of the narrow-band Fabry-Perot transmission resonance or in electro-absorptive mode. The semi-empirical theory uses conventional multilayer optical matrix methods together with a recent theory of the QCSE which has been tested against the results of electro-reflectance experiments. In electro-absorption mode we find a ratio of 19:1 on:off at 857.5nm for 8 quantum wells. In electro-refractive mode, using 32 wells, we predict modulation from 10% to 76% reflection at 883nm. These figures exclude substrate effects. Extension of the theory to other materials systems is readily accomplished. We present the reflectivity spectrum of a high quality etalon in In0.53Ga0.47As/InP and find good agreement with the predictions of the optical matrix model.

  10. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO2, TiO2, and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO2) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO2). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency. PMID:21149685

  11. A quantum mechanical polarizable force field for biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Donchev, A. G.; Ozrin, V. D.; Subbotin, M. V.; Tarasov, O. V.; Tarasov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a quantum mechanical polarizable force field (QMPFF) fitted solely to QM data at the MP2/aTZ(-hp) level. Atomic charge density is modeled by point-charge nuclei and floating exponentially shaped electron clouds. The functional form of interaction energy parallels quantum mechanics by including electrostatic, exchange, induction, and dispersion terms. Separate fitting of each term to the counterpart calculated from high-quality QM data ensures high transferability of QMPFF parameters to different molecular environments, as well as accurate fit to a broad range of experimental data in both gas and liquid phases. QMPFF, which is much more efficient than ab initio QM, is optimized for the accurate simulation of biomolecular systems and the design of drugs. PMID:15911753

  12. Using pseudopotentials within the interacting quantum atoms approach.

    PubMed

    Tiana, Davide; Francisco, E; Blanco, M A; Pendás, A Martín

    2009-07-09

    A general strategy to extend the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach to pseudopotential or effective core potential electronic structure calculations is presented. With the protocol proposed here, the scope of IQA thinking opens to chemical bonding problems in heavy-atom systems, as well as to larger molecules than those presently allowed by computational limitations. We show that, provided that interatomic surfaces are computed from core-reconstructed densities, reasonable results are obtained by integrating reduced density matrices built from the pseudowave functions. Comparison with all-electron results in a few test systems shows that exchange-correlation energies are better reproduced than Coulombic contributions, an effect which is traced to inadequate atomic populations and leakage of the core population into the surrounding quantum atoms.

  13. Interaction effects in a chaotic graphene quantum billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagymási, Imre; Vancsó, Péter; Pálinkás, András; Osváth, Zoltán

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the local electronic structure of a Sinai-like, quadrilateral graphene quantum billiard with zigzag and armchair edges using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature. It is revealed that besides the (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure, which is caused by the intervalley scattering, its overtones also appear in the STM measurements, which are attributed to the Umklapp processes. We point out that these results can be well understood by taking into account the Coulomb interaction in the quantum billiard, accounting for both the measured density of state values and the experimentally observed topography patterns. The analysis of the level-spacing distribution substantiates the experimental findings as well. We also reveal the magnetic properties of our system which should be relevant in future graphene based electronic and spintronic applications.

  14. Quantum capacitance modifies interionic interactions in semiconducting nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Nanopores made with low-dimensional semiconducting materials, such as carbon nanotubes and graphene slit pores, are used in supercapacitors. For modelling purposes, it is often assumed that such pores screen ion-ion interactions like metallic pores, i.e. that screening leads to an exponential decay of the interaction potential with ion separation. By introducing a quantum capacitance that accounts for the density of states in the material, we show that ion-ion interactions in carbon nanotubes and graphene slit pores actually decay algebraically with ion separation. This result suggests a new avenue of capacitance optimization based on tuning the electronic structure of a pore: a marked enhancement in capacitance might be achieved by developing nanopores made with metallic materials or bulk semimetallic materials.

  15. Integer quantum Hall effect of interacting electrons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Zhong; Ting, C. S.

    2017-02-01

    By taking into account the charge and spin orderings and the exchange interactions between all the Landau levels, we investigate the integer quantum Hall effect of electrons in graphene using the mean-field theory. We find that the fourfold degeneracy of the Landau levels cannot be completely lifted by the Coulomb interactions. In particular, at fillings ν =4 n +2 with n =0 ,1 ,... , there is no splitting between the fourfold degenerated Landau levels. We show that with doping the degenerated lowest empty level can be sequentially filled one by one; the filled level is lower than the empty ones because of the Coulomb-exchange interactions. This result explains the step Δ ν =1 in the quantized Hall conductivity. We present a highly efficient method for dealing with a huge number of the Coulomb couplings between all the Landau levels of the Dirac fermions.

  16. Synthesis of Non-blinking Semiconductor Quantum Dots Emitting in the Near-Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Piryatinski, Andrei; Park, Young-Shin; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2012-06-21

    Our previous work demonstrates that Quasi-Type II CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots with thick shells (3-5 nm) exhibit unique photophysical characteristics, including improved chemical robustness over typical thin-shelled core/shell systems and the elimination of blinking through suppression of nonradiative Auger recombination. Here we describe a new thick-shelled heterostructure, InP/CdS, which exhibits a Type II bandgap alignment producing near-infrared (NIR) emission. Samples with a range of shell thicknesses were synthesized, enabling shell-thickness-dependent study of the absorbance and emission spectra, fluorescence lifetimes, and quantum yields. InP/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell structures were also synthesized to reduce cadmium exposure for applications in the biological environment. Single particle spectroscopy indicates reduced blinking and improved photostability with increasing shell thickness, resulting in thick-shelled dots that are appropriate for single-particle tracking measurements with NIR emission.

  17. Direct growth of CdSe semiconductor quantum dots in glass matrix by femtosecond laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, G.; Filin, A. I.; Romanov, D. A.; Levis, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Controllable, spatially inhomogeneous distributions of CdSe nanocrystals smaller than the exciton Bohr radius are grown in a glass matrix under combined action of sample heating (below the transformation temperature) and focused high-repetition femtosecond (fs) laser beam. Selective quantum dot precipitation is evidenced by position-dependent absorption and Raman spectra. The particle size is estimated as r = 2.1 ± 0.3 nm by comparing the measured absorption and Raman spectra with those obtained from the samples grown in glass by traditional heat-treatment procedure. Direct growth of CdSe quantum dots in glass is enabled by nonlinear excitation using a focused fs duration laser beam (as differentiated from other methods), and this opens an avenue for adjustable selective growth patterns.

  18. General and Efficient C-C Bond Forming Photoredox Catalysis with Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Jill A; Frenette, Leah C; Zhao, Norman; Sowers, Kelly L; Krauss, Todd D; Weix, Daniel J

    2017-03-29

    Photoredox catalysis has become an essential tool in organic synthesis because it enables new routes to important molecules. However, the best available molecular catalysts suffer from high catalyst loadings and rely on precious metals. Here we show that colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) can serve as efficient and robust, precious-metal free, photoassisted redox catalysts. A single-sized CdSe quantum dot (3.0 ± 0.2 nm) can replace several different dye catalysts needed for five different photoredox reactions (β-alkylation, β-aminoalkylation, dehalogenation, amine arylation, and decarboxylative radical formation). Even without optimization of the QDs or the reaction conditions, efficiencies rivaling those of the best available metal dyes were obtained.

  19. Many-Body Effects and Lineshape of Intersubband Transitions in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Intersubband Transition (ISBT) infrared (IR) absorption and PL in InAs/AlSb were studied for narrow Quantum Wells (QWs). A large redshift was observed (7-10 meV) as temperature increased. A comprehensive many-body theory was developed for ISBTs including contributions of c-c and c-phonon scatterings. Many-body effects were studied systematically for ISBTs. Redshift and linewidth dependence on temperature, as well as spectral features were well explained by theory.

  20. High fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots for red blood cells labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Patricia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas Castro, Maria L.; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo R. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present a simple and efficient method for marking living human red blood cells using CdS (Cadmium Sulfide) quantum dots (QDs). The nanocrystals were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium with final pH=7 using sodium polyphosphate as the stabilizing agent. The methodology implementation is simple, do not requires additional capping layers nor narrow size QDs distribution. The synthesized nanoparticles were conjugated to monoclonal A anti-body. The resulting conjugates QDs/anti-A were incubated with human erythrocytes of blood groups A and O for 30 min at 37°C. The living cells in contact with the quantum dots maintained their properties for several days showing the low level of citotoxicity of the quantum dots. The conjugation of CdS QDs/anti-A show simultaneous red and green fluorescence when excited with 543 and 488 nm respectively. The efficiency of the conjugation QDs/anti-body to the erythrocytes, for each system, was monitored by confocal microscopy. The comparative analysis of the micrographs was done with the luminescence intensity maps of the samples obtained under constant capture conditions, such as, pinhole, filters, beam splitters and photomultiplier gain. The conjugates QDs/anti-A intensely marked group A erythrocytes and did not show any luminescence for group O erythrocytes, showing the sensitivity of the labeling procedure. In conclusion, we show the viability of the use of high luminescent and stable quantum dots as fluorescent labels for human erythrocytes with a methodology of simple implementation and the possibility to use them to distinguish different blood groups.