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Sample records for interaction based composable

  1. Research on BOM based composable modeling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingxin; He, Qiang; Gong, Jianxing

    2013-03-01

    Composable modeling method has been a research hotpot in the area of Modeling and Simulation for a long time. In order to increase the reuse and interoperability of BOM based model, this paper put forward a composable modeling method based on BOM, studied on the basic theory of composable modeling method based on BOM, designed a general structure of the coupled model based on BOM, and traversed the structure of atomic and coupled model based on BOM. At last, the paper introduced the process of BOM based composable modeling and made a conclusion on composable modeling method based on BOM. From the prototype we developed and accumulative model stocks, we found this method could increase the reuse and interoperability of models.

  2. Efficient Non-interactive Universally Composable String-Commitment Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaki, Ryo; Fujisaki, Eiichiro; Tanaka, Keisuke

    The universal composability (UC) for commitment is a very strong security notion. It guarantees that commitment schemes remain secure even if they are composed with arbitrary protocols and polynomially many copies of the schemes are run concurrently. Several UC commitment schemes in the common reference string (CRS) model have been proposed, but, they are either interactive commitment or bit-commitment (not string-commitment) schemes. We propose new non-interactive string-commitment schemes that achieve UC security in the CRS model assuming the difficulty of the decisional Diffie-Hellman problem or the decisional composite residuosity problem, but our schemes are not reusable. The main building blocks of our constructions are all-but-one trapdoor functions (ABO-TDFs) introduced by Peikert and Waters in STOC 2008 to construct secure public-key encryption schemes. Our main idea is to use the homomorphic properties of the function indices of the all-but-one trapdoor functions and to extend the functions to probabilistic ones by using re-randomization of ciphertexts. This is a new application of ABO-TDFs.

  3. Modeling and Composing Scenario-Based Requirements with Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araujo, Joao; Whittle, Jon; Ki, Dae-Kyoo

    2004-01-01

    There has been significant recent interest, within the Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) community, in representing crosscutting concerns at various stages of the software lifecycle. However, most of these efforts have concentrated on the design and implementation phases. We focus in this paper on representing aspects during use case modeling. In particular, we focus on scenario-based requirements and show how to compose aspectual and non-aspectual scenarios so that they can be simulated as a whole. Non-aspectual scenarios are modeled as UML sequence diagram. Aspectual scenarios are modeled as Interaction Pattern Specifications (IPS). In order to simulate them, the scenarios are transformed into a set of executable state machines using an existing state machine synthesis algorithm. Previous work composed aspectual and non-aspectual scenarios at the sequence diagram level. In this paper, the composition is done at the state machine level.

  4. Composable communication constraint-based control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mong-ying A.; Srivastava, Pranav; Kumar, Vijay; Taylor, Camillo J.

    2004-12-01

    We describe a framework for multi-vehicle control which explicitly incorporates the state of the communication network and the constraints imposed by specifications on the quality of the communications links available to each robot. In a multi-robot adhoc setting, the need for guaranteed communications is essential for cooperative behavior. We propose a control methodology that ensures local connectivity in multi-robot navigation. Specifically, given an initial and final configuration of robots in which the quality of each communication link is above some specified threshold, we synthesize controllers that guarantee each robot goes to its goal destination while maintaining the quality of the communication links above the given threshold. For the sake of simplicity, we assume each robot has a pre-assigned "base unit" with which the robot tries to maintain connectivity while performing the assigned task. The proposed control methodology allows the robot's velocity to align with the tangent of a critical communication surface such that it might be possible for the robot to move on the surface. No assumptions are made regarding the critical surface, which might be arbitrarily complex for cluttered urban environments. The stability of such technique is shown and three-dimensional simulations with a small team of robots are presented. The paper demonstrates the performance of the control scheme in various three-dimensional settings with proofs of guarantees in simple scenarios.

  5. The Nature of Children's Interactions while Composing Together on Computers. CIERA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomangino, Adrienne Gelpi; Nicholson, Julie; Sulzby, Elizabeth

    Patterns of interaction, including power relations and social goals, were investigated by observing first-grade children over a 5-month period as they worked in small groups to compose stories on the computer. Three groups selected for in-depth analysis represent the wide range of observed interaction patterns. Differences in interaction patterns…

  6. Composing Cardinal Direction Relations Basing on Interval Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juan; Jia, Haiyang; Liu, Dayou; Zhang, Changhai

    Direction relations between extended spatial objects are important commonsense knowledge. Skiadopoulos proposed a formal model for representing direction relations between compound regions (the finite union of simple regions), known as SK-model. It perhaps is currently one of most cognitive plausible models for qualitative direction information, and has attracted interests from artificial intelligence and geographic information system. Originating from Allen first using composition table to process time interval constraints; composing has become the key technique in qualitative spatial reasoning to check the consistency. Due to the massive number of basic directions in SK-model, its composition becomes extraordinary complex. This paper proposed a novel algorithm for the composition. Basing the concepts of smallest rectangular directions and its original directions, it transforms the composition of basic cardinal direction relations into the composition of interval relations corresponding to Allen's interval algebra. Comparing with existing methods, this algorithm has quite good dimensional extendibility, that is, it can be easily transferred to the tridimensional space with a few modifications.

  7. Real-time rendering method and performance evaluation of composable 3D lenses for interactive VR.

    PubMed

    Borst, Christoph W; Tiesel, Jan-Phillip; Best, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new approach for real-time rendering of composable 3D lenses for polygonal scenes. Such lenses, usually called "volumetric lenses," are an extension of 2D Magic Lenses to 3D volumes in which effects are applied to scene elements. Although the composition of 2D lenses is well known, 3D composition was long considered infeasible due to both geometric and semantic complexity. Nonetheless, for a scene with multiple interactive 3D lenses, the problem of intersecting lenses must be considered. Intersecting 3D lenses in meaningful ways supports new interfaces such as hierarchical 3D windows, 3D lenses for managing and composing visualization options, or interactive shader development by direct manipulation of lenses providing component effects. Our 3D volumetric lens approach differs from other approaches and is one of the first to address efficient composition of multiple lenses. It is well-suited to head-tracked VR environments because it requires no view-dependent generation of major data structures, allowing caching and reuse of full or partial results. A Composite Shader Factory module composes shader programs for rendering composite visual styles and geometry of intersection regions. Geometry is handled by Boolean combinations of region tests in fragment shaders, which allows both convex and nonconvex CSG volumes for lens shape. Efficiency is further addressed by a Region Analyzer module and by broad-phase culling. Finally, we consider the handling of order effects for composed 3D lenses.

  8. Interaction of melittin with mixed phospholipid membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine studied by deuterium NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.; Bitbol, M.; Watts, A. )

    1989-08-08

    The interaction of bee venom melittin with mixed phospholipid bilayers composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine deuterated in the {alpha}- and {beta}-methylenes of the choline head group (DMPC-d{sub 4}) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine deuterated in the {alpha}-methylene and {beta}-CH positions of the serine head group (DMPS-d{sub 3}) was studied in ternary mixtures by using deuterium NMR spectroscopy. The changes in the deuterium quadrupole splittings of the head-group deuteriomethylenes of DMPC-d{sub 4} induced by DMPS in binary mixtures were systematically reversed by increasing concentrations of melittin, so that at a melittin concentration of 4 mol % relative to total lipid the deuterium NMR spectrum from DMPC-d{sub 4} in the ternary mixture was similar to the spectrum from pure DMPC-d{sub 4} bilayers. The absence of deuterium NMR signals arising from melittin-bound DMPS in ternary mixtures containing DMPS-d{sub 3} indicates that the reversal by melittin of the effects of DMPS on the quadrupole splittings of DMPC-d{sub 4} results from the response of the choline head group to the net surface charge rather than from phase separation of melittin-DMPS complexes. The similarity in the effects of the two cationic but otherwise dissimilar peptides indicates that the DMPS head group responds to the surface charge resulting from the presence in the bilayer of charged amphiphiles, in a manner analogous to the response of the choline head group of phosphatidylcholine to the bilayer surface charge. The presence of DMPS greatly stabilized DMPC bilayers with respect to melittin-induced micellization, indicating that the latter effect of melittin may not be important for the hemolytic activity of the peptide.

  9. Computer-Based Multimodal Composing Activities, Self-Revision, and L2 Acquisition through Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzekoe, Richmond

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how 22 advanced-low proficiency ESL students used computer-based multimodal composing activities (CBMCAs) to facilitate self-revision and learn English through academic writing in the USA. The CBMCAs involved a combination of writing, listening, visual analysis, and speaking activities. The research was framed within an…

  10. Facility Composer Design Wizards: A Method for Extensible Codified Design Logic Based on Explicit Facility Criteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    36 22 Submittal worksheet for criterion 1.C7_1-1...Criteria Wizard Criteria Wizards are wizards that assist a user primarily in Planning Composer by providing one or more worksheets consisting of...for these criteria based on user input. Other Cri - teria Wizards currently under development include the Plumbing Fixture Calcu- lation Wizard and

  11. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Niessner, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2004-02-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Köhler theory calculations (100-300nm particle size range, 298K, 960hPa). BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance for proteins and other macromolecular compounds, which constitute a large fraction of the water-soluble organic component of air particulate matter.

    Pure BSA particles exhibited deliquescence and efflorescence transitions at sim35% relative humidity (RH) and a hygroscopic diameter increase by up to sim10% at 95% RH in good agreement with model calculations based on a simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient. Pure NaCl particles were converted from near-cubic to near-spherical shape upon interaction with water vapor at relative humidities below the deliquescence threshold (partial surface dissolution and recrystallisation), and the diameters of pure NH4NO3 particles decreased by up to 10% due to chemical decomposition and evaporation.

    Mixed NaCl-BSA and NH4NO3-BSA particles interacting with water vapor exhibited mobility equivalent diameter reductions of up to 20%, depending on particle generation, conditioning, size, and chemical composition (BSA dry mass fraction 10-90%). These observations can be explained by formation of porous agglomerates (envelope void fractions up to 50%) due to ion-protein interactions and electric charge effects on the one hand, and by compaction of the agglomerate structure due to capillary condensation effects on the other. The size of NH4NO3-BSA particles was apparently also influenced by volatilisation of NH4NO3, but not as much as for pure salt particles, i.e. the protein inhibited the decomposition of NH4NO3 or the

  12. Interaction of aerosol particles composed of protein and salts with water vapor: hygroscopic growth and microstructural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Niessner, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2003-09-01

    The interaction of aerosol particles in the 100-200 nm size range composed of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the inorganic salts sodium chloride and ammonium nitrate with water vapor at ambient temperature and pressure (25°C, 1 atm) has been investigated by hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) experiments complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Köhler theory calculations. BSA was chosen as a well-defined model substance for proteins and other macromolecular compounds, which constitute a large fraction of the water-soluble organic component of air particulate matter. Pure BSA particles exhibited deliquescence and efflorescence transitions at ~35% relative humidity (RH) and a hygroscopic diameter increase by up to ~10% at 95% RH in good agreement with model calculations based on a simple parameterisation of the osmotic coefficient. Pure NaCl particles were converted from near-cubic to near-spherical or polyhedral shape upon interaction with water vapor at relative humidities below the deliquescence threshold (partial surface dissolution and recrystallisation), and the diameters of pure NH4NO3 particles decreased by up to 10% due to chemical decomposition and evaporation. Mixed NaCl-BSA and NH4NO3-BSA particles interacting with water vapor exhibited mobility equivalent diameter reductions of up to 20%, depending on particle generation, conditioning, size, and chemical composition (BSA dry mass fraction 10-90%). These observations can be explained by formation of porous agglomerates (envelope void fractions up to 50%) due to ion-protein interactions and electric charge effects on the one hand, and by compaction of the agglomerate structure due to capillary condensation effects on the other. The size of NH4NO3-BSA particles was apparently also influenced by volatilisation of NH4NO3, but not as much as for pure salt particles, i.e. the protein inhibited the decomposition of NH4NO3 or the evaporation of the

  13. Towards Composing Data Aware Systems Biology Workflows on Cloud Platforms: A MeDICi-based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian; Kulkarni, Anand V.; Wynne, Adam S.

    2011-09-08

    Cloud computing is being increasingly adopted for deploying systems biology scientific workflows. Scientists developing these workflows use a wide variety of fragmented and competing data sets and computational tools of all scales to support their research. To this end, the synergy of client side workflow tools with cloud platforms is a promising approach to share and reuse data and workflows. In such systems, the location of data and computation is essential consideration in terms of quality of service for composing a scientific workflow across remote cloud platforms. In this paper, we describe a cloud-based workflow for genome annotation processing that is underpinned by MeDICi - a middleware designed for data intensive scientific applications. The workflow implementation incorporates an execution layer for exploiting data locality that routes the workflow requests to the processing steps that are colocated with the data. We demonstrate our approach by composing two workflowswith the MeDICi pipelines.

  14. Possible Way To Describe Breit's Interaction in Solids Composed From Heavy Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kutepov, A L

    2009-02-24

    The report describes a theoretical procedure which could help evaluate the effect of quantum electrodynamic corrections on the electronic structure of crystals consisting of heavy elements. The procedure uses the effective Breit interaction as correction to traditional Coulomb interaction between electrons in non-relativistic theory. A number of other simplifying assumptions were made since even such a simplified consideration of quantum electrodynamic effects in crystals is a great challenge. These are as follows: (1) Exchange and correlation effects from the nonrelativistic interaction (the Coulomb term) between electrons are described within Density Functional Theory (DFT). (2) The Breit correction is on at the phase which involves the calculation of matrix elements between basis functions which define the single-electron spectrum of a crystal. In order to calculate the contribution from the Breit correction, the total wave function of electrons in the crystal is approximated by one Slater determinant consisting of the single-electron DFT-orbitals. (3) Only local matrix elements (i.e., the part of the two-electron integral for which both coordinate arguments belong to one and the same muffin-tin sphere) are considered.

  15. 17 CFR 41.15 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 41.15 Section 41.15 Commodity and... Indexes § 41.15 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the securities of an issuer...

  16. 17 CFR 41.15 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 41.15 Section 41.15 Commodity and... Indexes § 41.15 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the securities of an issuer...

  17. A novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Sun, Henghu

    2012-04-30

    In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to investigate a novel silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash. The coal refuse and fly ash had different properties under various thermal activation temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 350 °C, 550 °C, 750 °C and 950 °C). It is known that a thermal activation temperature ranging from 20 °C to 950 °C significantly increases the flowability and pozzolanic properties of the coal refuse; however, the flowability of fly ash decreases when the activation temperature is higher than 550 °C because of a severe agglomeration phenomenon on its surface. An optimal design for this backfill material was determined to include an activated portion composed of 5% coal refuse at 750 °C and 15% fly ash at 20 °C. This combination yields the best performance with excellent flowability, a high compressive strength and a low bleeding rate. The microanalysis results corresponded well with the performance tests at different activation conditions. In the coal refuse, kaolinite peaks began to decrease because of their transformation into metakaolin at 550 °C. Chlorite peaks disappeared at 750 °C. Muscovite peaks decreased at 750 °C and disappeared at 950 °C. During this process, muscovite 2M(1) gradually dehydroxylated to muscovite HT. Furthermore, this paper examined the environmental acceptance and economic feasibility of this technology and found that this silica alumina-based backfill material composed of coal refuse and fly ash not only meets EPA requirements but also has several advantages in industry feasibility when compared with hydraulic backfill, rock backfill and paste backfill. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Carrier behavior in special multilayer device composed of different transition metal oxide-based intermediate connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yan-Hong; Chen, Xiang-Yu E-mail: xychen@suda.edu.cn; Ou, Qing-Dong; Wang, Qian-Kun; Jiang, Xiao-Cheng; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Yan-Qing E-mail: xychen@suda.edu.cn

    2014-06-02

    The impact of illumination on the connection part of the tandem organic light-emitting diodes was studied by using a special organic multilayer sample consisted of two organic active layers coupled with different transition metal oxide (TMO)-based intermediate connectors (ICs). Through measuring the current density-voltage characteristic, interfacial electronic structures, and capacitance-voltage characteristic, we observe an unsymmetrical phenomenon in current density-voltage and capacitance-voltage curves of Mg:Alq{sub 3}/MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} composed devices, which was induced by the charge spouting zone near the ICs region and the recombination state in the MoO{sub 3} layer. Moreover, Mg:Alq{sub 3}/MoO{sub 3} composed device displays a photovoltaic effect and the V{sub oc} shifts to forward bias under illumination. Our results demonstrate that the TMO-based IC structure coupled with photovoltaic effect can be a good approach for the study of photodetector, light sensor, and so on.

  19. Filters based on spoof surface plasmon polaritons composed of planar Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Binggang; Chen, Jing; Kong, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Filter characteristics of a planar Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) structure composed of periodically thin corrugated metal films were studied here. From theoretical simulation, spoof surface plasmon polaritons can propagate along the periodically thin corrugated metal films in microwave frequency, which can be excited by a coplanar waveguide. When the two arms of the MZI have the same length with the angle between them being 60°, the MZI structure has a very wide bandwidth with 8.6 GHz. By changing the length of one of the interference arms, a novel low-pass filter based on the planar MZI structure with two notched frequencies was proposed. The proposed planar structure can find potential applications in developing surface wave devices in integrated microwave circuits and systems.

  20. Recorder Composer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    The best moments happen when students begin to realize how much power they have and use that power to create. Composing as they master different instrumental stages helps students make composition and performance a natural step in learning. A step-by-step process (rhythm notation, add pitches, copy to a five-line staff, check work, and play) keeps…

  1. Recorder Composer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    The best moments happen when students begin to realize how much power they have and use that power to create. Composing as they master different instrumental stages helps students make composition and performance a natural step in learning. A step-by-step process (rhythm notation, add pitches, copy to a five-line staff, check work, and play) keeps…

  2. A level set-based shape optimization method for periodic sound barriers composed of elastic scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kim, Min-Geun; Abe, Kazuhisa; Cho, Seonho

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a level set-based topology optimization method for noise barriers formed from an assembly of scatterers. The scattering obstacles are modeled by elastic bodies arranged periodically along the wall. Due to the periodicity, the problem can be reduced to that in a unit cell. The interaction between the elastic scatterers and the acoustic field is described in the context of the level set analysis. The semi-infinite acoustic wave regions located on the both sides of the barrier are represented by impedance matrices. The objective function is defined by the energy transmission passing the barrier. The design sensitivity is evaluated analytically by the aid of adjoint equations. The dependency of the optimal profile on the stiffness of scatterers and on the target frequency band is examined. The feasibility of the developed optimization method is proved through numerical examples.

  3. Nonenzymatic glucose sensor based on CuO microfibers composed of CuO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fei; Gong, Jian

    2012-04-20

    Fluorine tin oxide (FTO) electrode modified by copper oxide microfibers (CuO-MFs) composed of numerous interconnected CuO nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) for nonenzymatic glucose sensor was prepared by electrospinning precursor containing high percentage content of copper nitrate with subsequent calcination. The results of scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed the size of CuO particles composing CuO-MFs depended on the percentage content of copper nitrate in precursor solution. With increasing the percentage content of copper nitrate, the interconnected CuO-NPs would gradually replace the large-size CuO particles to accumulate the CuO-MFs, which have the potential to provide larger surface area and more reaction sites for electrocatalytic activity toward glucose. As a glucose sensor, the CuO-MFs modified FTO electrode prepared by 40 wt.% of copper nitrate exhibited a high sensitivity of 2321 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a low detection limit of 2.2 nM (signal/noise ratio (S/N)=3). Additionally, the application of the CuO-MFs modified FTO electrode as a glucose sensor for biological samples was demonstrated with satisfactory results.

  4. Realisation de composants tout-fibre passifs bases sur des fibres optiques a deux coeurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob Poulin, Anne C.

    2002-01-01

    Les composants passifs tout-optique sont des elements de choix dans les systemes de communications optiques. Cette these presente l'utilisation experimentale de fibres a deux coeurs dissimilaires pour la realisation de filtres passe-bande. Les fibres a deux coeurs ont la particularite de favoriser un couplage d'un coeur a l'autre a intervalles reguliers lorsque les coeurs sont exactement identiques. Dans le cas ou une legere difference apparait, ce couplage est rapidement reduit a zero. La premiere partie de la these montre comment, par l'emploi d'une geometrie de fibre appropriee, il est possible de compenser cette desyntonisation et de fabriquer des coupleurs 100%. Les filtres obtenus ayant toutefois une largeur de bande trop grande pour les besoins du marche des communications optiques, il est montre dans la deuxieme partie de la these comment, en alliant la technologie des reseaux de Bragg avec celle des coupleurs, il est possible de realiser des filtres operant en transmission et possedant d'excellentes caracteristiques spectrales, toujours avec ces memes fibres a deux coeurs.

  5. Flexible logic circuits composed of chalcogenide-nanocrystal-based thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Yun, Junggwon; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2010-06-11

    Complementary NAND and NOR gates composed of p-channel HgTe-nanocrystal (NC) films and n-channel HgSe-NC films were constructed on back-gate patterned plastic substrates. The NAND gate was made of two HgTe-p-channel thin film transistors (TFTs) in parallel and two HgSe-n-channel TFTs in series. The NOR gate was built up with both two HgSe-n-channel TFTs in parallel and two HgTe-p-channel TFTs in series. The mobility and on/off ratio for the p-channel TFTs were estimated to be 0.9 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10, respectively, and those for the n-channel TFTs were measured to be 1.8 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(2), respectively. The NAND and NOR gates were operated with gains of 1.45 and 1.63 and transition widths of 7.8 and 6.2 V, respectively, at room temperature in air. In addition, the operations of the NAND and NOR logics are reproducible for up to 1000 strain cycles.

  6. Fabrication of novel chemosensors composed of rhodamine derivative for the detection of ferric ion and mechanism studies on the interaction between sensor and ferric ion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongjian; Ni, Ming; Luo, Jing; Akashi, Mitsuru; Liu, Xiaoya; Chen, Mingqing

    2015-02-21

    Although many rhodamine based fluorescence sensors were reported to detect metal ions with high sensitivity and selectivity, there are very few reports available to study the mechanisms of detection and the interaction between probe and metal ions. This paper aims to detect ferric ions by novel fluorescence chemosensors and study the mechanisms in detail. A novel probe AD-MAH-RhB was designed and synthesized from rhodamine B (RhB), adamantyl (AD), ethylene diamine and maleic anhydride (MAH). AD-MAH-RhB could detect Fe(3+) in aqueous solutions. The mechanism was explored by the HSAB principle, FTIR and mass spectra. The results suggested that Fe(3+) bound with amine and oxygen atoms in AD-MAH-RhB to form a complex composed of a 2 : 1 stoichiometry of Fe(3+) and the probe. Moreover, computational simulations were employed to further investigate the detection mechanism. The calculated results showed that Fe(3+) could conjugate with AD-MAH-RhB probe to form a stable complex, which was induced by synergetic effects of the suitable space and distance of van der Waals forces. However, Hg(2+) was found to disturb this detection and form a complex with 1 : 2 stoichiometry of Hg(2+) and AD-MAH-RhB. Then, another probe, β-cyclodextrin modified polymaleic anhydride (PMAH-CD) including AD-MAH-RhB (PMAH-CD/AD-MAH-RhB) was fabricated by inclusion interaction between CD and AD. PMAH-CD@AD-MAH-RhB showed high selectivity and sensitivity to Fe(3+) in the aqueous solution by eliminating the interruption of Hg(2+) possibly due to the high hydrogen interaction among the probes to inhibit the stable form complex with Hg(2+).

  7. Score Reliability of a Test Composed of Passage-Based Testlets: A Generalizability Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yong-Won

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of local item dependence (LID) in passage-based testlets on the test score reliability of an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading comprehension test from the perspective of generalizability (G) theory. Definitions and causes of LID in passage-based testlets are reviewed within the…

  8. Score Reliability of a Test Composed of Passage-Based Testlets: A Generalizability Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yong-Won

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of local item dependence (LID) in passage-based testlets on the test score reliability of an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading comprehension test from the perspective of generalizability (G) theory. Definitions and causes of LID in passage-based testlets are reviewed within the…

  9. Three-dimensional computer reconstruction of large tissue volumes based on composing series of high-resolution confocal images by GlueMRC and LinkMRC software.

    PubMed

    Karen, Petr; Jirkovská, Marie; Tomori, Zoltán; Demjénová, Erna; Janácek, Jirí; Kubínová, Lucie

    2003-12-01

    Computer-based visualization of large tissue volumes with high resolution based on composing series of high-resolution confocal images is presented. GlueMRC and LinkMRC programs are introduced, implementing composition of overlapping series of optical sections captured by a confocal microscope, registration and subsequent composition of successive confocal stacks. Both programs are using an interactive approach in combination with automatic algorithms for image registration. Further, the method for obtaining surface renderings of microscopical structure under study is described. For this purpose, structure contours visible in the sections are interactively digitized using a Colon plug-in module running in Ellipse environment. Then the coordinates of the contours are processed by special modules in the graphic programming environment IRIS Explorer and the structure surface is rendered. The method is shown on the 3-D reconstruction of the capillary bed of human placental villi and chick embryonic gut and its vascular bed. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Ferrite-based magnetically tunable left-handed metamaterial composed of SRRs and wires.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-27

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetically tunable left-handed metamaterial by introducing yttrium iron garnet rods into SRRs/wires array. It shows that the left-handed passband of the metamaterial can be continuously and reversibly adjusted by external dc applied magnetic fields. Retrieved effective parameters based on simulated scattering parameters show that tunable effective refraction index can be conveniently realized in a broad frequency range by changing the applied magnetic field. Different from those tuned by controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit of SRR, this metamaterial is based on a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance via the active ambient effective permeability.

  11. Nodulation ability of the common bean genotypes composing the BASE 120 trial after inoculation with Rhizobium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the nodulation characteristics of the BASE 120 genotypes in a trial of 118 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and two tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) lines. Inoculation with Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 and Rhizobium etli strain CIAT 632 was carried out in a screenhouse...

  12. Molecular spintronics based on single-molecule magnets composed of multiple-decker phthalocyaninato terbium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Isshiki, Hironari; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2012-06-01

    Unlike electronics, which is based on the freedom of the charge of an electron whose memory is volatile, spintronics is based on the freedom of the charge, spin, and orbital of an electron whose memory is non-volatile. Although in most GMR, TMR, and CMR systems, bulk or classical magnets that are composed of transition metals are used, this Focus Review considers the growing use of single-molecule magnets (SMMs) that are composed of multinuclear metal complexes and nanosized magnets, which exhibit slow magnetic-relaxation processes and quantum tunneling. Molecular spintronics, which combines spintronics and molecular electronics, is an emerging field of research. Using molecules is advantageous because their electronic and magnetic properties can be manipulated under specific conditions. Herein, recent developments in [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs on surfaces for molecular spintronic devices are presented. First, we discuss the strategies for preparing single-molecular-memory devices by using SMMs. Next, we focus on the switching of the Kondo signal of [LnPc]-based multiple-decker SMMs that are adsorbed onto surfaces, their characterization by using STM and STS, and the relationship between the molecular structure, the electronic structure, and the Kondo resonance of [TbPc(2)]. Finally, the field-effect-transistor (FET) properties of surface-adsorbed [LnPc(2)] and [Ln(2)Pc(3)] cast films are reported, which is the first step towards controlling SMMs through their spins for applications in single-molecular memory and spintronics devices.

  13. Crystal surface mediated structure transformation of a kinetic framework composed of multi-interactive ligand TPHAP and Co(II).

    PubMed

    Yakiyama, Yumi; Ueda, Akira; Morita, Yasushi; Kawano, Masaki

    2012-11-07

    A tripyridyl multi-interactive ligand TPHAP is prepared by a one-pot reaction on a gram scale. Network formation of Co(ii) with TPHAP(-) gave kinetic and thermally more stable products. The kinetic network showed an unprecedented dynamic network transformation on the crystal surface by a ligand exchange reaction.

  14. Composing and Arranging Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Elliott; And Others

    1977-01-01

    With the inspiration, the originality, the skill and craftsmanship, the business acumen, the patience, and the luck, it's possible to become a classical composer, pop/rock/country composer, jingle composer, or educational composer. Describes these careers. (Editor/RK)

  15. Rheological characterization of cataplasm bases composed of cross-linked partially neutralized polyacrylate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Hongqin; An, Dianyun; Yu, Jian; Li, Wei; Shen, Teng; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-10-01

    Viscoelasticity is a useful parameter for characterizing the intrinsic properties of the cross-linked polyacrylate hydrogel used in cataplasm bases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various formulation parameters on the rheological characteristics of polyacrylate hydrogel. The hydrogel layers were formed using a partially neutralized polyacrylate (Viscomate(™)), which contained acrylic acid and sodium acrylate in different copolymerization ratios, as the cross-linked gel framework. Dihydroxyaluminum aminoacetate (DAAA), which produces aluminum ions, was used as the cross-linking agent. Rheological analyses were performed using a "stress amplitude sweep" and a "frequency sweep". The results showed that greater amounts of acrylic acid in the structure of Viscomate as well as higher concentrations of DAAA and Viscomate led to an increase in the elastic modulus (G'). However, greater amounts of acrylic acid in the structure of Viscomate and higher concentrations of DAAA had an opposite on the viscous modulus (G″); this might be owing to higher steric hindrance. The results of this study can serve as guidelines for the optimization of formulations for cataplasms.

  16. Thermophysical properties of gases, liquids, and solids composed of particles interacting with a short-range attractive potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Siegfried; Kröger, Martin

    2001-07-01

    A short-range polynomial interaction potential is introduced which has both a repulsive core and an attractive part. It is cut off smoothly such that its first and second derivatives vanish at the cutoff distance. The potential therefore enables efficient simulation studies of a model material that exhibits similarities to a full (but computationally expensive) classical Lennard-Jones system. Thermophysical properties of the model are calculated by (nonequilibrium) molecular dynamics computer simulations and compared with analytical results. Among the quantities studied is the pressure as a function of the density for various temperatures. Equations of state for the fluid and the solid are tested. The coexistence of gaseous, (metastable) liquid, and fcc solid phases is found for a range of temperatures. Bulk and shear moduli are computed. The response of the system to a shear deformation with a constant shear rate is analyzed. The liquid shows viscoelastic behavior that can be described with a Maxwell model. The solid behaves as an elastic medium up to a finite deformation and then undergoes a transition to plastic flow, which is stick-slip-like at small shear rates and continuous at higher ones.

  17. My Career: Composer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  18. 17 CFR 240.3a55-4 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 240.3a55-4 Section 240.3a55-4... Miscellaneous Exemptions § 240.3a55-4 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the...

  19. 17 CFR 240.3a55-4 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 240.3a55-4 Section 240.3a55-4... Miscellaneous Exemptions § 240.3a55-4 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the...

  20. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    SciTech Connect

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-18

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. By and large, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). Finally, as an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  1. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-09-13

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. Overall, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). As an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.

  2. GIS-Based Data Structure for Geological Mapping of Ceres — One Global Map Composed of 15 Map Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naß, A.; Dawn Mapping Team

    2017-06-01

    Deriving valid statements out of interpretative geological mapping is very time intensive. Another challenge is generating one map composed of several map sheets which presents a geologically-consistent and geometrical/visual comparable content.

  3. Powders, composed of chlorine-releasing agent acrylic resin mixtures or based on peroxygen compounds, for spills of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Coates, D; Wilson, M

    1992-08-01

    The use of powders, composed of a mixture of a chlorine-releasing agent with highly absorbent acrylic resin, for disinfecting body fluid spills was evaluated by laboratory tests. 'Encap' and 'Red Z' were found to absorb rapidly up to 200 ml of water to form a semi-solid gel. When experimental formulations containing 1%, 5% and 10% available chlorine were evaluated by a standardized surface test, those containing 10% gave the best results. The ease and rate of absorption of fluids by these formulations decreased as the fluid consistency increased and they seem more suitable for watery spills than for blood. The use of a powder based on peroxygen compounds ('Virkon') for disinfecting contaminated spills was evaluated by laboratory tests and hospital trials. Laboratory tests showed that 'Virkon' is strongly and rapidly bactericidal. In hospital ward trials by nurses using 'Virkon' on both natural and artificial spills, 60 of 62 contact plates pressed on to decontaminated surfaces proved negative, and no unpleasant fumes were generated when 'Virkon' was applied to urine. In another trial, 1% 'Virkon' solution proved very effective in decontaminating mortuary tables. Antiviral activity was not tested.

  4. How Accurate Are the Minnesota Density Functionals for Noncovalent Interactions, Isomerization Energies, Thermochemistry, and Barrier Heights Involving Molecules Composed of Main-Group Elements?

    DOE PAGES

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-08-18

    The 14 Minnesota density functionals published between the years 2005 and early 2016 are benchmarked on a comprehensive database of 4986 data points (84 data sets) involving molecules composed of main-group elements. The database includes noncovalent interactions, isomerization energies, thermochemistry, and barrier heights, as well as equilibrium bond lengths and equilibrium binding energies of noncovalent dimers. Additionally, the sensitivity of the Minnesota density functionals to the choice of basis set and integration grid is explored for both noncovalent interactions and thermochemistry. By and large, the main strength of the hybrid Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide verymore » good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., M06-2X), barrier heights (e.g., M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., M06-2X, M08-HX, M08-SO, MN15), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-2X is recommended from the 10 hybrid Minnesota functionals). Similarly, the main strength of the local Minnesota density functionals is that the best ones provide very good performance for thermochemistry (e.g., MN15-L), barrier heights (e.g., MN12-L), and systems heavily characterized by self-interaction error (e.g., MN12-L and MN15-L), while the main weakness is that none of them are state-of-the-art for the full spectrum of noncovalent interactions and isomerization energies (although M06-L is clearly the best from the four local Minnesota functionals). Finally, as an overall guide, M06-2X and MN15 are perhaps the most broadly useful hybrid Minnesota functionals, while M06-L and MN15-L are perhaps the most broadly useful local Minnesota functionals, although each has different strengths and weaknesses.« less

  5. Carbon nanotubes based transistors composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes mats as gas sensors: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondavalli, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    This contribution presents the main studies on the CNTFET based gas sensors obtained using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes mats (SWCNTs) as channel. Although these devices have allowed one to achieve sensors with an impressive sensitivity compared to existing technologies, the physical interpretation of the effect of interaction between the gas molecules and the CNTFETs has not yet been clarified. Concerning selectivity, we will deal with the main routes that have been proposed to overcome this problem: functionalization using polymers, electrodes metal diversification, metal decoration of SWCNT mats.

  6. SPR-based PCF D-type sensor based on a metamaterial composed of planar metals for refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. F.; Guerreiro, A.; Baptista, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a numerically investigation of the performance analysis of a conventional photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a planar metamaterials structure for refractive index sensing, based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR), using the finite element method (FEM). We study the concentration metamaterials conformed by the aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and silver (Ag) and compared its performance with a single metal (Ag), assessing their impacts in the effective refractive index. Furthermore, we also use different types of mechanics to describe the effects of varying the structural parameters sensor on the evanescent field and the sensor performance.

  7. Composing in Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heintz, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The central premise of this project is that researching student communication and composing actions in light of audience will illuminate particular features of student composing processes in 21st century interdisciplinary contexts. Students in this study took part in a six week inquiry unit about their local area. Data generated included student…

  8. Composability in quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Quade, Jörn; Renner, Renato

    2009-08-01

    If we combine two secure cryptographic systems, is the resulting system still secure? Answering this question is highly nontrivial and has recently sparked a considerable research effort, in particular, in the area of classical cryptography. A central insight was that the answer to the question is yes, but only within a well-specified composability framework and for carefully chosen security definitions. In this article, we review several aspects of composability in the context of quantum cryptography. The first part is devoted to key distribution. We discuss the security criteria that a quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol must fulfill to allow its safe use within a larger security application (e.g. for secure message transmission); and we demonstrate—by an explicit example—what can go wrong if conventional (non-composable) security definitions are used. Finally, to illustrate the practical use of composability, we show how to generate a continuous key stream by sequentially composing rounds of a QKD protocol. In the second part, we take a more general point of view, which is necessary for the study of cryptographic situations involving, for example, mutually distrustful parties. We explain the universal composability (UC) framework and state the composition theorem that guarantees that secure protocols can securely be composed to larger applications. We focus on the secure composition of quantum protocols into unconditionally secure classical protocols. However, the resulting security definition is so strict that some tasks become impossible without additional security assumptions. Quantum bit commitment is impossible in the UC framework even with mere computational security. Similar problems arise in the quantum bounded storage model and we observe a trade-off between the UC and the use of the weakest possible security assumptions.

  9. Composing decoherence functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boës, Paul; Navascués, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Quantum measure theory (QMT) is a generalization of quantum theory where physical predictions are computed from a matrix known as the decoherence functional (DF). Previous works have noted that, in its original formulation, QMT exhibits a problem with composability, since the composition of two decoherence functionals is, in general, not a valid decoherence functional. This does not occur when the DFs in question happen to be positive semidefinite (a condition known as strong positivity). In this paper, we study the concept of composability of DFs and its consequences for QMT. Firstly, we show that the problem of composability is much deeper than originally envisaged, since, for any n , there exists a DF that can coexist with n -1 copies of itself, but not with n . Secondly, we prove that the set of strongly positive DFs cannot be enlarged while remaining closed under composition. Furthermore, any closed set of DFs containing all quantum DFs can only contain strongly positive DFs.

  10. Composing and Comprehending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Julie M., Ed.

    Intended for elementary school teachers of reading and composition, this book assembles several articles on the reading/writing relationship that have appeared in 1982 and 1983 issues of the journal "Language Arts." The three sections of the book define the relationship between composing and comprehending, explore relevant research, and…

  11. Aqueous biphasic systems composed of ionic liquids and acetate-based salts: phase diagrams, densities and viscosities.

    PubMed

    Quental, Maria V; Passos, Helena; Kurnia, Kiki A; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2015-06-11

    Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have been largely investigated as promising extraction and purification routes. In this context, the determination of their phase diagrams and the physical properties of the coexisting phases are of high relevance when envisaging their large-scale applications. Low viscosities improve the mass transfer and reduce energy consumptions, while the knowledge on their densities is important for the equipment design. In this work, novel phase diagrams for aqueous solutions of imidazolium-based ILs combined with acetate-based salts, namely KCH3CO2 or NaCH3CO2, are reported and discussed. The ability of the acetate-based salts to induce the phase separation not only depends on the ions hydration energy, but also on the concentration of "free" ions in solution. The tie-lines, tie-line lengths and critical points are also addressed. Experimental measurements of density and viscosity of the coexisting phases, for the different systems and at several compositions and temperatures, are additionally presented. The Othmer-Tobias and Bancroft equations are also applied to ascertain on the tie-lines coherence. It is here shown that low-viscous IL-based ABS, with a high difference in the densities of the coexisting phases, can be formed with organic and biodegradable salts thus offering enhanced features over conventional polymer-based systems.

  12. Aqueous biphasic systems composed of ionic liquids and acetate-based salts: phase diagrams, densities and viscosities

    PubMed Central

    Quental, Maria V.; Passos, Helena; Kurnia, Kiki A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2017-01-01

    Ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems (IL-based ABS) have been largely investigated as promising extraction and purification routes. In this context, the determination of their phase diagrams and the physical properties of the coexisting phases are of high relevance when envisaging their large-scale applications. Low viscosities improve the mass transfer and reduce energy consumptions, while the knowledge on their densities is important for the equipment design. In this work, novel phase diagrams for aqueous solutions of imidazolium-based ILs combined with acetate-based salts, namely KCH3CO2 or NaCH3CO2, are reported and discussed. The ability of the acetate-based salts to induce the phase separation not only depends on the ions hydration energy, but also on the concentration of “free” ions in solution. The tie-lines, tie-line lengths and critical points are also addressed. Experimental measurements of density and viscosity of the coexisting phases, for the different systems and at several compositions and temperatures, are additionally presented. The Othmer–Tobias and Bancroft equations are also applied to ascertain on the tie-lines coherence. It is here shown that low-viscous IL-based ABS, with a high difference in the densities of the coexisting phases, can be formed with organic and biodegradable salts thus offering enhanced features over conventional polymer-based systems. PMID:28260810

  13. Composing Interfering Abstract Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    when composing abstract protocols. To evaluate the expres- siveness of our protocol framework for ensuring safe shared memory interference, we show how...progress and preservation theorems that show the ab- sence of unsafe interference in correctly typed programs. Our design ensures memory safety and data...system by discussing how our core shared memory protocol framework is capable of expressing safe, typeful message-passing idioms. Next, we briefly

  14. An aqueous media based approach for the preparation of a biosensor platform composed of graphene oxide and Pt-black.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin; Zhang, Hangyu; Snyder, Alexandra; Wang, Mei-xian; Xie, Jian; Marshall Porterfield, D; Stanciu, Lia A

    2012-01-01

    The combination of Pt nanoparticles and graphene was more effective in enhancing biosensing than either nanomaterial alone according to previous reports. Based on the structural similarities between water soluble graphene oxide (GrO(x)) and graphene, we report the fabrication of an aqueous media based GrO(x)/Pt-black nanocomposite for biosensing enhancement. In this approach GrO(x) acted as a nanoscale molecular template for the electrodeposition of Pt-black, an amorphously nanopatterned isoform of platinum metal. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed that Pt-black was growing along GrO(x). The effective surface area and electrocatalytic activity towards H(2)O(2) oxidation of GrO(x)/Pt-black microelectrodes were significantly higher than for Pt-black microelectrodes. When used to prepare a bio-nanocomposite based on protein functionalization with the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx), the GrO(x)/Pt-black microbiosensors exhibited improved sensitivity over the Pt-black microbiosensors. This suggested that the GrO(x)/Pt-black nanocomposite facilitated an increase in electron transfer, and/or minimized mass transport limitations as compared to Pt-black used alone. Glucose microbiosensors based on GrO(x)/Pt-black exhibited high sensitivity (465.9 ± 48.0 nA/mM), a low detection limit of 1 μM, a linear response range of 1 μM-2mM, and response time of ≈ 4s. Additionally the sensor was stable and highly selective over potential interferents.

  15. Novel Piezoelectric Paper‐Based Flexible Nanogenerators Composed of BaTiO3 Nanoparticles and Bacterial Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangjie; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Zheng; Liang, Qijie; Zhao, Yingli; Zheng, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A piezoelectric paper based on BaTiO3 (BTO) nanoparticles and bacterial cellulose (BC) with excellent output properties for application of nanogenerators (NGs) is reported. A facile and scalable vacuum filtration method is used to fabricate the piezoelectric paper. The BTO/BC piezoelectric paper based NG shows outstanding output performance with open‐circuit voltage of 14 V and short‐circuit current density of 190 nA cm−2. The maximum power density generated by this unique BTO/BC structure is more than ten times higher than BTO/polydimethylsiloxane structure. In bending conditions, the NG device can generate output voltage of 1.5 V, which is capable of driving a liquid crystal display screen. The improved performance can be ascribed to homogeneous distribution of piezoelectric BTO nanoparticles in the BC matrix as well as the enhanced stress on piezoelectric nanoparticles implemented by the unique percolated networks of BC nanofibers. The flexible BTO/BC piezoelectric paper based NG is lightweight, eco‐friendly, and cost‐effective, which holds great promises for achieving wearable or implantable energy harvesters and self‐powered electronics. PMID:27774389

  16. Novel Piezoelectric Paper-Based Flexible Nanogenerators Composed of BaTiO3 Nanoparticles and Bacterial Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guangjie; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Zheng; Liang, Qijie; Zhao, Yingli; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2016-02-01

    A piezoelectric paper based on BaTiO3 (BTO) nanoparticles and bacterial cellulose (BC) with excellent output properties for application of nanogenerators (NGs) is reported. A facile and scalable vacuum filtration method is used to fabricate the piezoelectric paper. The BTO/BC piezoelectric paper based NG shows outstanding output performance with open-circuit voltage of 14 V and short-circuit current density of 190 nA cm(-2). The maximum power density generated by this unique BTO/BC structure is more than ten times higher than BTO/polydimethylsiloxane structure. In bending conditions, the NG device can generate output voltage of 1.5 V, which is capable of driving a liquid crystal display screen. The improved performance can be ascribed to homogeneous distribution of piezoelectric BTO nanoparticles in the BC matrix as well as the enhanced stress on piezoelectric nanoparticles implemented by the unique percolated networks of BC nanofibers. The flexible BTO/BC piezoelectric paper based NG is lightweight, eco-friendly, and cost-effective, which holds great promises for achieving wearable or implantable energy harvesters and self-powered electronics.

  17. Correlated-imaging-based chosen plaintext attack on general cryptosystems composed of linear canonical transforms and phase encodings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingjing; Liu, Wei; Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a chosen-plaintext attack scheme on general optical cryptosystems that use linear canonical transform and phase encoding based on correlated imaging. The plaintexts are chosen as Gaussian random real number matrixes, and the corresponding ciphertexts are regarded as prior knowledge of the proposed attack method. To establish the reconstruct of the secret plaintext, correlated imaging is employed using the known resources. Differing from the reported attack methods, there is no need to decipher the distribution of the decryption key. The original secret image can be directly recovered by the attack in the absence of decryption key. In addition, the improved cryptosystems combined with pixel scrambling operations are also vulnerable to the proposed attack method. Necessary mathematical derivations and numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the validity of the proposed attack scheme.

  18. Manipulation of novel nano-prodrug composed of organic pigment-based hybrid network and its optical uses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zheng, Yuhui; Cheng, Cheng Zhang; Wen, Jiajia; Wang, Qianming

    2017-01-01

    Here we developed the first case of pyropheophorbide-a-loaded PEGylated-hybrid carbon nanohorns (CNH-Pyro) to study tumor targeting therapy. During incubation with living cells, CNH-Pyro exhibited very intense red emissions. The intracellular imaging results were carried out by flow cytometry based on four different kinds of cell lines (including three adherent cell lines and one suspension cell line). Compared with free pyropheophorbide-a, CNH-Pyro demonstrated enhanced photodynamic tumor ablation efficiency during in vitro experiments due to improved biocompatibility of the hybrid nanomaterial and the photothermal therapy effect derived from carbon-network structure. Trypan blue staining experiments supported that the cell fate was dependent on the synergistic effects of both CNH-Pyro and laser irradiations. These results indicated that the chlorin-entrapped carbon nanohorns could provide powerful delivery vehicles for increasing photodynamic efficacy and possess early identification of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance and mechanism on a high durable silica alumina based cementitious material composed of coal refuse and coal combustion byproducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan

    Coal refuse and combustion byproducts as industrial solid waste stockpiles have become great threats to the environment. Recycling is one practical solution to utilize this huge amount of solid waste through activation as substitute for ordinary Portland cement. The central goal of this dissertation is to investigate and develop a new silica-alumina based cementitious material largely using coal refuse as a constituent that will be ideal for durable construction, mine backfill, mine sealing and waste disposal stabilization applications. This new material is an environment-friendly alternative to ordinary Portland cement. The main constituents of the new material are coal refuse and other coal wastes including coal sludge and coal combustion products (CCPs). Compared with conventional cement production, successful development of this new technology could potentially save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, recycle vast amount of coal wastes, and significantly reduce production cost. A systematic research has been conducted to seek for an optimal solution for enhancing pozzolanic reactivity of the relatively inert solid waste-coal refuse in order to improve the utilization efficiency and economy benefit for construction and building materials. The results show that thermal activation temperature ranging from 20°C to 950°C significantly increases the workability and pozzolanic property of the coal refuse. The optimal activation condition is between 700°C to 800°C within a period of 30 to 60 minutes. Microanalysis illustrates that the improved pozzolanic reactivity contributes to the generated amorphous materials from parts of inert aluminosilicate minerals by destroying the crystallize structure during the thermal activation. In the coal refuse, kaolinite begins to transfer into metakaol in at 550°C, the chlorite minerals disappear at 750°C, and muscovite 2M1 gradually dehydroxylates to muscovite HT. Furthermore, this research examines the environmental

  20. Process of timbral composing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withrow, Sam

    In this paper, I discuss the techniques and processes of timbral organization I developed while writing my chamber work, Afterimage. I compare my techniques with illustrative examples by other composers to place my work in historical context. I examine three elements of my composition process. The first is the process of indexing and cataloging basic sonic materials. The second consists of the techniques and mechanics of manipulating and assembling these collections into larger scale phrases, textures, and overall form in a musical work. The third element is the more elusive, and often extra-musical, source of inspiration and motivation. The evocative power of tone color is both immediately evident yet difficult to explain. What is timbre? This question cannot be answered solely in scientific terms; subjective factors affect our perception of it.

  1. The composing process in technical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and application of the composing process in technical communications is addressed. The composing process of engineers, some implications for composing research for the teaching and research of technical communication, and an interpretation of the processes as creative experience are also discussed. Two areas of technical communications summarized concern: the rhetorical features of technical communications, and the theoretical background for a process-based view, a problem-solving approach to technical writing.

  2. Interplay between Intrinsic Conformational Propensities and Intermolecular Interactions in the Self-Assembly of Short Surfactant-like Peptides Composed of Leucine/Isoleucine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Deng, Li; Wang, Yanting; Lu, Jian R; Xu, Hai

    2016-05-10

    To study how the conformational propensities of individual amino acid residues, primary structures (i.e., adjacent residues and molecular lengths), and intermolecular interactions of peptides affect their self-assembly properties, we report the use of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to investigate the monomers, dimers, and trimers of a series of short surfactant-like peptides (I3K, L3K, L4K, and L5K). For four-residue peptides X3K (I3K and L3K), the results show that their different aggregation behaviors arise from the different intrinsic conformational propensities of isoleucine and leucine. For LmK peptides (L3K, L4K, and L5K), the molecular length is found to dictate their aggregation via primarily modulating intermolecular interactions. Increasing the number of hydrophobic amino acid residues of LmK peptides enhances their intermolecular H-bonding and promotes the formation of β-strands in dimer and trimer aggregates, overwhelming the intrinsic preference of Leu for helical structures. Thus, the interplay between the conformational propensities of individual amino acid residues for secondary structures and molecular interactions determines the self-assembly properties of the peptides, and the competition between intramolecular and intermolecular H-bonding interactions determines the probability of β-sheet alignment of peptide molecules. These results are validated by comparing simulated and experimental CD spectra of the peptides. This study will aid the design of short peptide amphiphiles and improve the mechanistic understanding of their self-assembly behavior.

  3. Composing Disability: Diagnosis, Interrupted.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Abby; Fisher, Joseph; Fletcher, Wade

    2016-12-01

    Writing is central both to the medical diagnostic codification of disability and to disabled people's efforts to interrupt, complicate, or disrupt dominant medical narratives. This Symposium, like the George Washington University conference from which it takes its name, creates space for diverse modes and genres of claiming authority regarding diagnosis and its cultural and material effects. "Queer" and "crip" interrogations of diagnosis illuminate its status as a cultural phenomenon, embracing culturally disavowed embodiments and embodied experiences as tools for diagnosing inegalitarian social relations and opportunities for cultural interventions. This Symposium traces the workings of diagnostic normativity manifested in experiences such as "disruptive deafness," unstable bodily materialities, pathologized grief and other forms of affective distress, and "surgical assemblages." It presents a diverse array of compositions, articulated on each writer's own terms, addressing a range of embodied experiences through multiple genres and voices, ranging from conversation transcript to scholarly essay, poetry, graphic memoir, and personal essay. Here, laypersons interrupt monologic medical diagnosis, claiming space to compose themselves. Together, the authors trace instances of corporeal "correction" back to the noxious agents, both environmental and political, that consistently breach the boundaries of corporeality.

  4. Adolescents' Dialogic Composing with Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This 14-month study examined the phone-based composing practice of three adolescents. Given the centrality of mobile phones to youth culture, the researcher sought to create a description of the participants' composing practices with these devices. Focal participants were users of Twitter and Instagram, two social media platforms that are usually…

  5. Adolescents' Dialogic Composing with Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This 14-month study examined the phone-based composing practice of three adolescents. Given the centrality of mobile phones to youth culture, the researcher sought to create a description of the participants' composing practices with these devices. Focal participants were users of Twitter and Instagram, two social media platforms that are usually…

  6. A GDP fluctuation model based on interacting firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Gao, Yan

    2008-09-01

    A distinctive feature of the market economies is the short-run fluctuations in output around the trend of long-run growth over time, and we regard this feature is internal to complex economic systems composed of interacting heterogeneous units. To explore such internal mechanisms of macroeconomic fluctuations, we present a multi-agent Keynesian theory-based model, which can provide a good approximation to the key empirical features of the western business cycles in the 20th Century, such as the structure of the autocorrelation function of overall output growth, correlations between the output growth of individual agents over time, the distribution of recessions, etc.

  7. Results-Based Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Interaction design is a user-centered approach to development in which users and their goals are the driving force behind a project's design. Interaction design principles are fundamental to the design and implementation of effective websites, but they are not sufficient. This article argues that, to reach its full potential, a website should also…

  8. Results-Based Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Interaction design is a user-centered approach to development in which users and their goals are the driving force behind a project's design. Interaction design principles are fundamental to the design and implementation of effective websites, but they are not sufficient. This article argues that, to reach its full potential, a website should also…

  9. Teaching Composing with an Identity as a Teacher-Composer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    I enjoy composing and feel able to write songs that I like and which feel significant to me. This has not always been the case and the change had nothing to do with my school education or my degree. Composing at secondary school did not move beyond Bach and Handel pastiche. I did not take any composing courses during my degree. What did influence…

  10. Teaching Composing with an Identity as a Teacher-Composer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    I enjoy composing and feel able to write songs that I like and which feel significant to me. This has not always been the case and the change had nothing to do with my school education or my degree. Composing at secondary school did not move beyond Bach and Handel pastiche. I did not take any composing courses during my degree. What did influence…

  11. Influence of trehalose on the interaction of curcumin with surface active ionic liquid micelle and its vesicular aggregate composed of a non-ionic surfactant sorbitan stearate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-11-01

    The present investigation unravels the effect of trehalose on 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C16mim]Cl), a cationic surface active ionic liquid (SAIL) micelle and SAIL ([C16mim]Cl)-nonionic surfactant (Sorbitan Stearate, Span 60) based vesicles. The influence of trehalose on size and morphology of the aggregates has been investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. Besides, we have studied the dynamic properties of curcumin inside these aggregates using fluorescence spectroscopic based techniques. The results revealed that trehalose molecules play crucial role in modulation of the photophysical properties of curcumin in these organized assemblies.

  12. Probing charge transfer in a novel class of luminescent perovskite-based heterostructures composed of quantum dots bound to RE-activated CaTiO3 phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Crystal S.; Liu, Haiqing; Han, Jinkyu; Wang, Lei; Yue, Shiyu; Brennan, Nicholas A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite building blocks were created by a multi-pronged synthetic strategy involving molten salt and hydrothermal protocols. Subsequently, optical characterization of these heterostructures indicated a clear behavioral dependence of charge transfer in these systems upon a number of parameters such as the nature of the dopant, the reaction temperature, and particle size. Specifically, 2.7 nm diameter ligand-functionalized CdSe QDs were anchored onto sub-micron sized CaTiO3-based spherical assemblies, prepared by molten salt protocols. We found that both the Pr- and Eu-doped CaTiO3 displayed pronounced PL emissions, with maximum intensities observed using optimized lanthanide concentrations of 0.2 mol% and 6 mol%, respectively. Analogous experiments were performed on Eu-doped BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 motifs, but CaTiO3 still performed as the most effective host material amongst the three perovskite systems tested. Moreover, the ligand-capped CdSe QD-doped CaTiO3 heterostructures exhibited effective charge transfer between the two individual constituent nanoscale components, an assertion corroborated by the corresponding quenching of their measured PL signals.We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite

  13. Probing charge transfer in a novel class of luminescent perovskite-based heterostructures composed of quantum dots bound to RE-activated CaTiO3 phosphors

    DOE PAGES

    Crystal S. Lewis; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Liu, Haiqing; ...

    2016-01-04

    We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite building blocks were created by a multi-pronged synthetic strategy involving molten salt and hydrothermal protocols. Subsequently, optical characterization of these heterostructures indicated a clear behavioral dependence of charge transfer in these systems upon a number of parameters such as the nature of the dopant, the reaction temperature,more » and particle size. Specifically, 2.7 nm diameter ligand-functionalized CdSe QDs were anchored onto sub-micron sized CaTiO3-based spherical assemblies, prepared by molten salt protocols. We found that both the Pr- and Eu-doped CaTiO3 displayed pronounced PL emissions, with maximum intensities observed using optimized lanthanide concentrations of 0.2 mol% and 6 mol%, respectively. Analogous experiments were performed on Eu-doped BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 motifs, but CaTiO3 still performed as the most effective host material amongst the three perovskite systems tested. Furthermore, the ligand-capped CdSe QD-doped CaTiO3 heterostructures exhibited effective charge transfer between the two individual constituent nanoscale components, an assertion corroborated by the corresponding quenching of their measured PL signals.« less

  14. Probing charge transfer in a novel class of luminescent perovskite-based heterostructures composed of quantum dots bound to RE-activated CaTiO3 phosphors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Crystal S; Liu, Haiqing; Han, Jinkyu; Wang, Lei; Yue, Shiyu; Brennan, Nicholas A; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2016-01-28

    We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite building blocks were created by a multi-pronged synthetic strategy involving molten salt and hydrothermal protocols. Subsequently, optical characterization of these heterostructures indicated a clear behavioral dependence of charge transfer in these systems upon a number of parameters such as the nature of the dopant, the reaction temperature, and particle size. Specifically, 2.7 nm diameter ligand-functionalized CdSe QDs were anchored onto sub-micron sized CaTiO3-based spherical assemblies, prepared by molten salt protocols. We found that both the Pr- and Eu-doped CaTiO3 displayed pronounced PL emissions, with maximum intensities observed using optimized lanthanide concentrations of 0.2 mol% and 6 mol%, respectively. Analogous experiments were performed on Eu-doped BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 motifs, but CaTiO3 still performed as the most effective host material amongst the three perovskite systems tested. Moreover, the ligand-capped CdSe QD-doped CaTiO3 heterostructures exhibited effective charge transfer between the two individual constituent nanoscale components, an assertion corroborated by the corresponding quenching of their measured PL signals.

  15. An Integrated Approach for Creating Service-Based Interactive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Marius; Janeiro, Jordan; Nestler, Tobias; Hübsch, Gerald; Jugel, Uwe; Preussner, André; Schill, Alexander

    While the implementation of business logic and business processes based on service-oriented architectures is well-understood and covered by existing development approaches, integrated concepts that empower users to exploit the Internet of Services to create complex interactive applications are missing. In this paper, we present an integrated approach that fills this gap. Our approach builds upon service annotations that add meta-information related to user interface generation, service dependencies, and service composition to existing service descriptions. Services can be composed visually to complex interactive applications based on these annotations without the need to write any code. The application code is generated completely from the service composition description. Our approach is able to support heterogeneous target environments ranging from client/server architectures to mobile platforms.

  16. Layout modification for library cell Alt-PSM composability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ke; Hu, Jiang; Cheng, Mosong

    2004-05-01

    In sub-wavelength lithography, light field Alt-PSM (Alternating Phase Shifting Mask) is an essential technology for poly layer printability. In a standard cell based design, the problem of obtaining Alt-PSM compliance for an individual cell layout has been solved well [3]. However, placing Alt-PSM compliant cells together can not guarantee Alt-PSM compliance of the entire chip/block layout due to phase interactions among adjacent cells. A simple solution to this Alt-PSM composability problem is to wrap blank area around each cell, which is very inefficient on chip area usage. In this paper, we formulate the composability problem as a graph model and propose a polynomial time optimal algorithm to achieve Alt-PSM composability with the least impact on cell layout.

  17. Composing the Curriculum: Teacher Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    What is composing and how is it valued? What does a good education in composing look like; what constraints hinder it and is it possible to overcome such constraints? Can composing be a personal, creative and valuable activity for the school student? What role does the teacher play in all of this? These are questions that I discuss in this…

  18. Build Less Code, Deliver More Science: An Experience Report on Composing Scientific Environments using Component-based and Commodity Software Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Lansing, Carina S.; Elsethagen, Todd O.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2013-07-17

    Modern scientific software is daunting in its diversity and complexity. From massively parallel simulations running on the world’s largest supercomputers, to visualizations and user support environments that manage ever growing complex data collections, the challenges for software engineers are plentiful. While high performance simulators are necessarily specialized codes to maximize performance on specific supercomputer architectures, we argue the vast majority of supporting infrastructure, data management and analysis tools can leverage commodity open source and component-based technologies. This approach can significantly drive down the effort and costs of building complex, collaborative scientific user environments, as well as increase their reliability and extensibility. In this paper we describe our experiences in creating an initial user environment for scientists involved in modeling the detailed effects of climate change on the environment of selected geographical regions. Our approach composes the user environment using the Velo scientific knowledge management platform and the MeDICi Integration Framework for scientific workflows. These established platforms leverage component-based technologies and extend commodity open source platforms with abstractions and capabilities that make them amenable for broad use in science. Using this approach we were able to deliver an operational user environment capable of running thousands of simulations in a 7 month period, and achieve significant software reuse.

  19. Composable Operations Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    synchronize around relevant data sets and persist critical information, even in denied environments leveraging a properly distributed infrastructure ...instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send...illustrated through standards-based simple message and data formats. The ubiquitous nature of the simple formats results in many data sources and tools that

  20. Design and Realization of a Three Degrees of Freedom Displacement Measurement System Composed of Hall Sensors Based on Magnetic Field Fitting by an Elliptic Function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-09-08

    This paper presents the design and realization of a three degrees of freedom (DOFs) displacement measurement system composed of Hall sensors, which is built for the XYθz displacement measurement of the short stroke stage of the reticle stage of lithography. The measurement system consists of three pairs of permanent magnets mounted on the same plane on the short stroke stage along the Y, Y, X directions, and three single axis Hall sensors correspondingly mounted on the frame of the reticle stage. The emphasis is placed on the decoupling and magnetic field fitting of the three DOFs measurement system. The model of the measurement system is illustrated, and the XY positions and θZ rotation of the short stroke stage can be obtained by decoupling the sensor outputs. A magnetic field fitting by an elliptic function-based compensation method is proposed. The practical field intensity of a permanent magnet at a certain plane height can be substituted for the output voltage of a Hall sensors, which can be expressed by the elliptic function through experimental data as the crucial issue to calculate the three DOFs displacement. Experimental results of the Hall sensor displacement measurement system are presented to validate the proposed three DOFs measurement system.

  1. Design and Realization of a Three Degrees of Freedom Displacement Measurement System Composed of Hall Sensors Based on Magnetic Field Fitting by an Elliptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Wang, Lei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design and realization of a three degrees of freedom (DOFs) displacement measurement system composed of Hall sensors, which is built for the XYθz displacement measurement of the short stroke stage of the reticle stage of lithography. The measurement system consists of three pairs of permanent magnets mounted on the same plane on the short stroke stage along the Y, Y, X directions, and three single axis Hall sensors correspondingly mounted on the frame of the reticle stage. The emphasis is placed on the decoupling and magnetic field fitting of the three DOFs measurement system. The model of the measurement system is illustrated, and the XY positions and θZ rotation of the short stroke stage can be obtained by decoupling the sensor outputs. A magnetic field fitting by an elliptic function-based compensation method is proposed. The practical field intensity of a permanent magnet at a certain plane height can be substituted for the output voltage of a Hall sensors, which can be expressed by the elliptic function through experimental data as the crucial issue to calculate the three DOFs displacement. Experimental results of the Hall sensor displacement measurement system are presented to validate the proposed three DOFs measurement system. PMID:26370993

  2. Prediction of the properties and thermodynamics of formation for energetic nitrogen-rich salts composed of triaminoguanidinium cation and 5-nitroiminotetrazolate-based anions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weihua; Yan, Qingli; Li, Jinshan; Cheng, Bibo; Shao, Yuling; Xia, Xuelan; Xiao, Heming

    2012-08-15

    Density functional theory and volume-based thermodynamics calculations were performed to study the effects of different substituents and linkages on the densities, heats of formation (HOFs), energetic properties, and thermodynamics of formation for a series of energetic nitrogen-rich salts composed of triaminoguanidinium cation and 5-nitroiminotetrazolate anions. The results show that the -NO(2), -NF(2), or -N(3) group is an effective substituent for increasing the densities of the 5-nitroiminotetrazolate salts, whereas the effects of the bridge groups on the density are coupled with those of the substituents. The substitution of the group -NH(2), -NO(2), -NF(2), -N(3), or the nitrogen bridge is helpful for increasing the HOFs of the salts. The calculated energetic properties indicate that the -NO(2), -NF(2), -N(3), or -N=N- group is an effective structural unit for improving the detonation performance for salts. The thermodynamics of formation of the salts show that all the salts may be synthesized easily by the proposed reactions. The structure-property relationships provide basic information for the molecular design of novel high-energy salts.

  3. Influence of magnetic interactions between clusters on particle orientational characteristics and viscosity of a colloidal dispersion composed of ferromagnetic spherocylinder particles: analysis by means of mean field approximation for a simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira

    2005-09-01

    We have theoretically investigated the particle orientational distribution and viscosity of a dense colloidal dispersion composed of ferromagnetic spherocylinder particles under an applied magnetic field. The mean field approximation has been applied to take into account the magnetic interactions of the particle of interest with the other ones that belong to the neighboring clusters, besides those that belong to its own cluster. The basic equation of the orientational distribution function, which is an integrodifferential equation, has approximately been solved by Galerkin's method and the method of successive approximation. Some of the main results obtained here are summarized as follows. Even when the magnetic interaction between particles is of the order of the thermal energy, the effect of particle-particle interactions on the orientational distribution comes to appear more significant with increasing volumetric fraction of particles; the orientational distribution function exhibits a sharper peak in the direction nearer to the magnetic field one as the volumetric fraction increases. Such a significant inclination of the particle in the field direction induces the large increase in viscosity in the range of larger values of the volumetric fraction. The above-mentioned characteristics of the orientational distribution and viscosity come to appear more significantly when the influence of the applied magnetic field is not so strong compared with that of magnetic particle-particle interactions.

  4. How Composers Compose: In Search of the Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Bernard W.

    2004-01-01

    The Genesis Project is a multi-phase research project designed for the purpose of developing an in-depth understanding of the nature of musical creativity by investigating how composers compose. In this first phase of the project, an understanding of the four dimensions of musical creativity: (1) the "person", (2) the compositional…

  5. Effect of alkyl chain length on the interfacial strength of surgical sealants composed of hydrophobically-modified Alaska-pollock-derived gelatins and poly(ethylene)glycol-based four-armed crosslinker.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Ryo; Ito, Temmei; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2016-10-01

    Surgical sealants are widely used clinically. Fibrin sealant is a commonly used sealant, but is ineffective under wet conditions during surgery. In this study, we developed surgical sealants composed of hydrophobically modified Alaska-pollock-derived gelatins (hm-ApGltns) with different alkyl chain lengths from C3 to C18 and a poly(ethylene)glycol-based 4-armed crosslinker (4S-PEG). The burst strength of the hm-ApGltns-based sealant was evaluated using a fresh porcine blood vessel and was found to increase with increasing alkyl chain length from 167±22 to 299±43mmHg when the substitution ratio of amino groups of ApGltn was around 10mol%. The maximum burst strength was observed when stearoyl-group modified ApGltn (Ste-ApGltn)/4S-PEG-based sealant was used, displaying 3-fold higher burst strength than the original ApGltn (Org-ApGltn)/4S-PEG sealant, and 10-fold higher than the commercial fibrin sealant. Ste-ApGltn/4S-PEG-based sealant was biodegraded in rat subcutaneous tissue within 8 weeks without severe inflammation. By molecular interaction analysis using surface plasmon resonance, the binding constant of Ste-ApGltn to fibronectin was found to be 9-fold higher than that of Org-ApGltn. Therefore, the developed sealant, in particular the Ste-ApGltn/4S-PEG-based sealant, has potential applications in the field of cardiovascular surgery as well as thoracic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Adding Interactivity to Web Based Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafolla, Ralph; Knee, Richard

    Web Based Distance Learning (WBDL) is a form of distance learning based on providing instruction mainly on the World Wide Web. This paradigm has limitations, especially the lack of interactivity inherent in the Web. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the technologies the authors have used in their courses at Florida Atlantic…

  7. High Temperature Oxidation of Nickel-based Cermet Coatings Composed of Al2O3 and TiO2 Nanosized Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhzad, M. A.; Khan, T. I.

    2014-09-01

    New technological challenges in oil production require materials that can resist high temperature oxidation. In-Situ Combustion (ISC) oil production technique is a new method that uses injection of air and ignition techniques to reduce the viscosity of bitumen in a reservoir and as a result crude bitumen can be produced and extracted from the reservoir. During the in-situ combustion process, production pipes and other mechanical components can be exposed to air-like gaseous environments at extreme temperatures as high as 700 °C. To protect or reduce the surface degradation of pipes and mechanical components used in in-situ combustion, the use of nickel-based ceramic-metallic (cermet) coating produced by co-electrodeposition of nanosized Al2O3 and TiO2 have been suggested and earlier research on these coatings have shown promising oxidation resistance against atmospheric oxygen and combustion gases at elevated temperatures. Co-electrodeposition of nickel-based cermet coatings is a low-cost method that has the benefit of allowing both internal and external surfaces of pipes and components to be coated during a single electroplating process. Research has shown that the volume fraction of dispersed nanosized Al2O3 and TiO2 particles in the nickel matrix which affects the oxidation resistance of the coating can be controlled by the concentration of these particles in the electrolyte solution, as well as the applied current density during electrodeposition. This paper investigates the high temperature oxidation behaviour of novel nanostructured cermet coatings composed of two types of dispersed nanosized ceramic particles (Al2O3 and TiO2) in a nickel matrix and produced by coelectrodeposition technique as a function of the concentration of these particles in the electrolyte solution and applied current density. For this purpose, high temperature oxidation tests were conducted in dry air for 96 hours at 700 °C to obtain mass changes (per unit of area) at specific time

  8. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    DOE PAGES

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  9. Is the Higgs boson composed of neutrinos?

    SciTech Connect

    Krog, Jens; Hill, Christopher T.

    2015-11-09

    We show that conventional Higgs compositeness conditions can be achieved by the running of large Higgs-Yukawa couplings involving right-handed neutrinos that become active at ~1013–1014 GeV. Together with a somewhat enhanced quartic coupling arising by a Higgs portal interaction to a dark matter sector, we can obtain a Higgs boson composed of neutrinos. Furthermore, this is a “next-to-minimal” dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking scheme.

  10. Interactive Pedagogy in a Literature Based Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Preserving a literary-based curriculum, creating a sensitivity to the literature, and encouraging communicative skills relative to the literature are significant goals in foreign language study. Therefore, a program involving strategic interaction and cooperative learning techniques applied to the study of literature fosters communication and…

  11. Guidelines for Coaching Student Composers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dana

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on teaching students how to compose music. Addresses issues, such as how to get the students started and types of questions to ask students about their compositions. Discusses the musical elements involved in composition, such as melody, harmony, rhythm and meter, timbre, texture, and formal design. (CMK)

  12. Characterization of the proteasome interaction network using a QTAX-based tag-team strategy and protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cortnie; Milenkovic, Tijana; Przulj, Natasa; Kaiser, Peter; Huang, Lan

    2008-09-09

    Quantitative analysis of tandem-affinity purified cross-linked (x) protein complexes (QTAX) is a powerful technique for the identification of protein interactions, including weak and/or transient components. Here, we apply a QTAX-based tag-team mass spectrometry strategy coupled with protein network analysis to acquire a comprehensive and detailed assessment of the protein interaction network of the yeast 26S proteasome. We have determined that the proteasome network is composed of at least 471 proteins, significantly more than the total number of proteins identified by previous reports using proteasome subunits as baits. Validation of the selected proteasome-interacting proteins by reverse copurification and immunoblotting experiments with and without cross-linking, further demonstrates the power of the QTAX strategy for capturing protein interactions of all natures. In addition, >80% of the identified interactions have been confirmed by existing data using protein network analysis. Moreover, evidence obtained through network analysis links the proteasome to protein complexes associated with diverse cellular functions. This work presents the most complete analysis of the proteasome interaction network to date, providing an inclusive set of physical interaction data consistent with physiological roles for the proteasome that have been suggested primarily through genetic analyses. Moreover, the methodology described here is a general proteomic tool for the comprehensive study of protein interaction networks.

  13. Interactive analysis of geodata based intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Boris; Eck, Ralf; Unmüessig, Gabriel; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    When a spatiotemporal events happens, multi-source intelligence data is gathered to understand the problem, and strategies for solving the problem are investigated. The difficulties arising from handling spatial and temporal intelligence data represent the main problem. The map might be the bridge to visualize the data and to get the most understand model for all stakeholders. For the analysis of geodata based intelligence data, a software was developed as a working environment that combines geodata with optimized ergonomics. The interaction with the common operational picture (COP) is so essentially facilitated. The composition of the COP is based on geodata services, which are normalized by international standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The basic geodata are combined with intelligence data from images (IMINT) and humans (HUMINT), stored in a NATO Coalition Shared Data Server (CSD). These intelligence data can be combined with further information sources, i.e., live sensors. As a result a COP is generated and an interaction suitable for the specific workspace is added. This allows the users to work interactively with the COP, i.e., searching with an on board CSD client for suitable intelligence data and integrate them into the COP. Furthermore, users can enrich the scenario with findings out of the data of interactive live sensors and add data from other sources. This allows intelligence services to contribute effectively to the process by what military and disaster management are organized.

  14. Theoretical calculations of base-base interactions in nucleic acids: II. Stacking interactions in polynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Sasisekharan, V

    1978-01-01

    Base-base interactions were computed for single- and double stranded poly,ucleotides, for all possible base sequences. In each case, both right and left stacking arrangements are energetically possible. The preference of one over the other depends upon the base-sequence and the orientation of the bases with respect to helix-axis. Inverted stacking arrangement is also energetically possible for both single- and double-stranded polynucleotides. Finally, interacting energies of a regular duplex and the alternative structures were compared. It was found that the type II model is energetically more favourable than the rest. PMID:662698

  15. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical potency, and increased disease incidence. This review outlines the interactions possible between chemicals and background disease and identifies the type of information needed to evaluate such interactions. Key among these is the existence of a clinically relevant and easy to measure biomarker of disease risk which allows the identification of vulnerable individuals based upon the level of risk biomarker. The impact of toxic chemicals on this biomarker can then be used to predict how the chemical modifies disease risk as long as related mechanistic and toxicological data are consistent with toxicant effect on the disease process. Several case studies are briefly presented which describe the toxic chemical, the clinical biomarker and the impacted disease including: fine particulate matter/decreased heart rate variability/increased cardiopulmonary events; cadmium/decreased glomerular filtration rate/increased chronic kidney disease; methyl mercury/decreased paraoxonase-1/increased cardiovascular risk; trichloroethylene/increased anti-nuclear antibody/autoimmunity; dioxin/increased CYP1A1/hypertension. These case studies point o

  16. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical potency, and increased disease incidence. This review outlines the interactions possible between chemicals and background disease and identifies the type of information needed to evaluate such interactions. Key among these is the existence of a clinically relevant and easy to measure biomarker of disease risk which allows the identification of vulnerable individuals based upon the level of risk biomarker. The impact of toxic chemicals on this biomarker can then be used to predict how the chemical modifies disease risk as long as related mechanistic and toxicological data are consistent with toxicant effect on the disease process. Several case studies are briefly presented which describe the toxic chemical, the clinical biomarker and the impacted disease including: fine particulate matter/decreased heart rate variability/increased cardiopulmonary events; cadmium/decreased glomerular filtration rate/increased chronic kidney disease; methyl mercury/decreased paraoxonase-1/increased cardiovascular risk; trichloroethylene/increased anti-nuclear antibody/autoimmunity; dioxin/increased CYP1A1/hypertension. These case studies point o

  17. Risk analysis based on hazards interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Lauro; Rudari, Roberto; Trasforini, Eva; De Angeli, Silvia; Becker, Joost

    2017-04-01

    Despite an increasing need for open, transparent, and credible multi-hazard risk assessment methods, models, and tools, the availability of comprehensive risk information needed to inform disaster risk reduction is limited, and the level of interaction across hazards is not systematically analysed. Risk assessment methodologies for different hazards often produce risk metrics that are not comparable. Hazard interactions (consecutive occurrence two or more different events) are generally neglected, resulting in strongly underestimated risk assessment in the most exposed areas. This study presents cases of interaction between different hazards, showing how subsidence can affect coastal and river flood risk (Jakarta and Bandung, Indonesia) or how flood risk is modified after a seismic event (Italy). The analysis of well documented real study cases, based on a combination between Earth Observation and in-situ data, would serve as basis the formalisation of a multi-hazard methodology, identifying gaps and research frontiers. Multi-hazard risk analysis is performed through the RASOR platform (Rapid Analysis and Spatialisation Of Risk). A scenario-driven query system allow users to simulate future scenarios based on existing and assumed conditions, to compare with historical scenarios, and to model multi-hazard risk both before and during an event (www.rasor.eu).

  18. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  19. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  20. Avoiding Common Security Flaws in Composed Service-Oriented Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    remain exposed to security attacks. Service Oriented Architecture ( SOA ) based systems are inherently composition-based. New functionality is ex...survivability of the composed system. Keywords: Service Oriented Architecture , Trustworthy system design, Information Assurance, Survivability I...Avoiding Common Security Flaws in Composed Service - Oriented Systems Michael Atighetchi, Partha Pal, Joseph Loyall Raytheon BBN Technologies

  1. Extended weak bonding interactions in DNA: pi-stacking (base-base), base-backbone, and backbone-backbone interactions.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Castillo, Norberto; Boyd, Russell J

    2006-01-12

    We report on several weak interactions in nucleic acids, which, collectively, can make a nonnegligible contribution to the structure and stability of these molecules. Fragments of DNA were obtained from previously determined accurate experimental geometries and their electron density distributions calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The electron densities were analyzed topologically according to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). A web of closed-shell bonding interactions is shown to connect neighboring base pairs in base-pair duplexes and in dinuleotide steps. This bonding underlies the well-known pi-stacking interaction between adjacent nucleic acid bases and is characterized topologically for the first time. Two less widely appreciated modes of weak closed-shell interactions in nucleic acids are also described: (i) interactions between atoms in the bases and atoms belonging to the backbone (base-backbone) and (ii) interactions among atoms within the backbone itself (backbone-backbone). These interactions include hydrogen bonding, dihydrogen bonding, hydrogen-hydrogen bonding, and several other weak closed-shell X-Y interactions (X, Y = O, N, C). While each individual interaction is very weak and typically accompanied by perhaps 0.5-3 kcal/mol, the sum total of these interactions is postulated to play a role in stabilizing the structure of nucleic acids. The Watson-and-Crick hydrogen bonding is also characterized in detail at the experimental geometries as a prelude to the discussion of the modes of interactions listed in the title.

  2. Composing Music with Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofan; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    In this paper we study the network structure in music and attempt to compose music artificially. Networks are constructed with nodes and edges corresponding to musical notes and their co-occurrences. We analyze sample compositions from Bach, Mozart, Chopin, as well as other types of music including Chinese pop music. We observe remarkably similar properties in all networks constructed from the selected compositions. Power-law exponents of degree distributions, mean degrees, clustering coefficients, mean geodesic distances, etc. are reported. With the network constructed, music can be created by using a biased random walk algorithm, which begins with a randomly chosen note and selects the subsequent notes according to a simple set of rules that compares the weights of the edges, weights of the nodes, and/or the degrees of nodes. The newly created music from complex networks will be played in the presentation.

  3. Organists and organ music composers.

    PubMed

    Foerch, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical case reports of patients with exceptional musical talent and education provide clues as to how the brain processes musical ability and aptitude. In this chapter, selected examples from famous and unknown organ players/composers are presented to demonstrate the complexity of modified musical performances as well as the capacities of the brain to preserve artistic abilities: both authors are active organists and academic neurologists with strong clinical experience, practice, and knowledge about the challenges to play such an outstanding instrument and share their interest to explore potentially instrument-related phenomena of brain modulation in specific transient or permanent impairments. We concentrate on the sites of lesions, suggested pathophysiology, separate positive (e.g., seizures, visual or auditory hallucinations, or synesthesia [an involuntary perception produced by stimulation of another sense]) and negative phenomena (e.g., amusia, aphasia, neglect, or sensory-motor deficits) and particularly address aspects of recent concepts of temporary and permanent network disorders.

  4. Defining interaction and strategies to enhance interactions in Web-based courses.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Veronica A

    2003-01-01

    Designing interaction components in Web-based courses is important to ensure an effective learning environment. The author provides a definition of interaction and describes four types of interactions: learner-content, learner-learner, learner-instructor, and learner-interface. Finally, strategies to enhance the four types of interaction when developing and delivering Web-based course are discussed.

  5. A probability-based sampling approach for the analysis of drug seizures composed of multiple containers of either cocaine, heroin, or Cannabis.

    PubMed

    Mario, John R

    2010-04-15

    A probability-based analytical sampling approach for seized containers of cocaine, Cannabis, or heroin, to answer questions of both content weight and identity, is described. It utilizes the Student's t distribution, and, because of the lack of normality in studied populations, the power of the Central Limit Theorem with samples of size 20 to calculate the mean net weights of multiple item drug seizures. Populations studied ranged between 50 and 1200 units. Identity determination is based on chemical testing and sampling using the hypergeometric distribution fit to a program macro - created by the European Network of Forensic Science Institutes (ENFSI) Drugs Working Group. Formal random item selection is effected through use of an Excel-generated list of random numbers. Included, because of their impact on actual practice, are discussions of admissibility, sufficiency of proof, method validation, and harmony with the guidelines of international standardizing bodies.

  6. Light absorption and plasmon – exciton interaction in three-layer nanorods with a gold core and outer shell composed of molecular J- and H-aggregates of dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, B I; Tyshkunova, E S; Kondorskiy, A D; Lebedev, V S

    2015-12-31

    Optical properties of hybrid rod-like nanoparticles, consisting of a gold core, an intermediate passive organic layer (spacer) and outer layer of ordered molecular cyanine dye aggregates, are experimentally and theoretically investigated. It is shown that these dyes can form not only ordered J-aggregates but also H-aggregates (differing by the packing angle of dye molecules in an aggregate and having other spectral characteristics) in the outer shell of the hybrid nanostructure. Absorption spectra of synthesised three-layer nanorods are recorded, and their sizes are determined. The optical properties of the composite nanostructures under study are found to differ significantly, depending on the type of the molecular aggregate formed in the outer shell. The experimental data are quantitatively explained based on computer simulation using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and characteristic features of the plasmon – exciton interaction in the systems under study are revealed. (nanophotonics)

  7. Simple and rapid CD4 testing based on large-field imaging system composed of microcavity array and two-dimensional photosensor.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Tatsuya; Sugamura, Yuriko; Hosokawa, Masahito; Yoshino, Tomoko; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    This study presents a novel method for CD4 testing based on one-shot large-field imaging. The large-field imaging system was fabricated by a microcavity array and a two-dimensional (2D) photosensor within the desk-top-sized instrument. The microcavity array was employed to separate leukocytes from whole blood based on differences in the size of leukocytes and other blood cells. The large-field imaging system with lower side irradiation enabled acquisition of cell signatures with high signal-to-noise ratio, because the metallic substrate of the microcavity array obstructed excessive excitation light. In this setting, dual-color imaging of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was achieved within the entire image area (64 mm(2)) in 2s. The practical performance of the large-field imaging system was demonstrated by determining the CD4/CD8 ratio in a few microliter of control whole blood as small as those obtained by a finger prick. The CD4/CD8 ratios measured using the large-field imaging system correlated well with those measured by microscopic analysis. These results indicate that our proposed system provides a simple and rapid CD4 testing for the application of HIV/AIDS treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bridging peripheral nerve defects with a tissue engineered nerve graft composed of an in vitro cultured nerve equivalent and a silk fibroin-based scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Xue, Chengbin; Wang, Yaxian; Ding, Fei; Yang, Yumin; Gu, Xiaosong

    2012-05-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts are considered as a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafts used for peripheral nerve repair. The differences between these two types of nerve grafts are mainly in the regenerative microenvironment established by them. To construct ideal tissue engineered nerve grafts, it is therefore required to develop a better way to introduce biochemical cues into a neural scaffold, as compared to single or combined use of support cells and growth factors. Here, we used a co-culture system of dorsal root ganglia and Schwann cells to create an in vitro formed nerve equivalent, which was introduced into a silk fibroin-based scaffold to furnish a tissue engineered nerve graft (TENG). At 4- and 12- weeks after the TENG was implanted to bridge a 10-mm-long sciatic nerve defect in rats, histological and functional assessments as well as Western blot analysis were performed to evaluate the influences of the TENG on peripheral nerve regeneration. We found that at an early stage of nerve regeneration, the TENG significantly accelerated axonal growth, and up-regulated expressions of N-cadherin and PMP22. Twelve weeks after nerve grafting, the TENG produced a further improved outcome of nerve regeneration and functional recovery, which was more close to that of the autologous nerve graft than that of the silk fibroin-based scaffold. The introduction of an in vitro cultured nerve equivalent into a scaffold might contribute to establishing a native-like microenvironment for nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  10. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  11. A Taxonomy for Composing Effective Naval Teams. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driskell, James E.; And Others

    Since teams perform a majority of mission-critical Navy tasks, a significant applied research problem is how to compose maximally effective task teams. Two problems have traditionally hindered the attainment of this goal: how to compose teams on bases other than ability or technical skill and how to classify team tasks, so that predictions can be…

  12. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  13. Learning through Interaction: Improving Practice with Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Christian; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the first stage of a design-based research project to introduce case-based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between case-based learning, student interaction and the study of interactions--and includes a review of research into…

  14. Learning through Interaction: Improving Practice with Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Christian; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the first stage of a design-based research project to introduce case-based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between case-based learning, student interaction and the study of interactions--and includes a review of research into…

  15. GAIA: a gram-based interaction analysis tool – an approach for identifying interacting domains in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kelvin X; Ouellette, BF Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play important roles in many biological functions. Protein domains, which are defined as independently folding structural blocks of proteins, physically interact with each other to perform these biological functions. Therefore, the identification of Domain-Domain Interactions (DDIs) is of great biological interests because it is generally accepted that PPIs are mediated by DDIs. As a result, much effort has been put on the prediction of domain pair interactions based on computational methods. Many DDI prediction tools using PPIs network and domain evolution information have been reported. However, tools that combine the primary sequences, domain annotations, and structural annotations of proteins have not been evaluated before. Results In this study, we report a novel approach called Gram-bAsed Interaction Analysis (GAIA). GAIA extracts peptide segments that are composed of fixed length of continuous amino acids, called n-grams (where n is the number of amino acids), from the annotated domain and DDI data set in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and identifies a list of n-grams that may contribute to DDIs and PPIs based on the frequencies of their appearance. GAIA also reports the coordinate position of gram pairs on each interacting domain pair. We demonstrate that our approach improves on other DDI prediction approaches when tested against a gold-standard data set and achieves a true positive rate of 82% and a false positive rate of 21%. We also identify a list of 4-gram pairs that are significantly over-represented in the DDI data set and may mediate PPIs. Conclusion GAIA represents a novel and reliable way to predict DDIs that mediate PPIs. Our results, which show the localizations of interacting grams/hotspots, provide testable hypotheses for experimental validation. Complemented with other prediction methods, this study will allow us to elucidate the interactome of cells. PMID:19208164

  16. Q&A: The AI composer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinney, Laura

    2017-09-01

    Computer scientist Luc Steels uses artificial intelligence to explore the origins and evolution of language. He is best known for his 1999-2001 Talking Heads Experiment, in which robots had to construct a language from scratch to communicate with each other. Now Steels, who works at the Free University of Brussels (VUB), has composed an opera based on the legend of Faust, with a twenty-first-century twist. He talks about Mozart as a nascent computer programmer, how music maps onto language, and the blurred boundaries of a digitized world.

  17. Electroluminescence of organic light emitting diodes with a thick hole transport layer composed of a triphenylamine based polymer doped with an antimonium compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamori, Asuka; Adachi, Chihaya; Koyama, Toshiki; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    1999-10-01

    We investigated the electroluminescence (EL) performance of organic light emitting diodes having a thick doped hole transport layer [(DHTL):650 nm-1.5 μm]. The basic cell structure is an anode/DHTL/hole transport layer [(HTL):50-60 nm]/emitter layer [(EML):50-60 nm]/cathode. We examined various combinations of host polymers and guest molecules as a component of DHTL in this device structure. During the course of the materials' search, we found that the best combination of a hole transport polycarbonate polymer (PC-TPD-DEG) and a tris (4-bromophenyl) aminium hexachroloantimonate (TBAHA) as a dopant enabled us to form a uniform thick DHTL (typically 650 nm-1.5 μm thick), which resulted in excellent EL performance. The thick DHTL not only showed considerable reduction in cell resistance compared with a conventional anode/DHTL (without doping)/HTL/EML/cathode device with the same thicknesses of the organic layers, but also greatly contributed to the enhancement of the device stability, particularly to pinhole problems that can occur with conventional 100-nm-thick thin devices. Furthermore, the interposed HTL between DHTL and EML was confirmed to function not only as a HTL but also as electron and exciton blocking layers. Without the HTL, the EL quantum efficiency (ΦEL) was low, because of the serious exciton energy transfer and/or electron migration from EML to DHTL where the PC-TPD-DEG:TBAHA complex layer had absorption at around 485 nm based on a charge transfer complex between them. We could increase it by interposing a thin transparent N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'bis(3-methyl phenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine or 4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl-amino] biphenyl (α-NPD) layer between DHTL and EML, while keeping the driving voltage low. With the DHTL (650 nm, 10 wt % of TBAHA) showed a luminance of 4004 cd/m2 at 10.0 V and 220 mA/cm2, of which the performance was comparable with that of typical thin film devices. Furthermore, we could expand the DHTL thickness up to 1.5

  18. CABINS: Case-based interactive scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyashita, Kazuo; Sycara, Katia

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the need for interactive factory schedule repair and improvement, and we identify case-based reasoning (CBR) as an appropriate methodology. Case-based reasoning is the problem solving paradigm that relies on a memory for past problem solving experiences (cases) to guide current problem solving. Cases similar to the current case are retrieved from the case memory, and similarities and differences of the current case to past cases are identified. Then a best case is selected, and its repair plan is adapted to fit the current problem description. If a repair solution fails, an explanation for the failure is stored along with the case in memory, so that the user can avoid repeating similar failures in the future. So far we have identified a number of repair strategies and tactics for factory scheduling and have implemented a part of our approach in a prototype system, called CABINS. As a future work, we are going to scale up CABINS to evaluate its usefulness in a real manufacturing environment.

  19. Nurturing the Careers of Australia's Future Composers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Amanda; Forrest, David

    2008-01-01

    In 1994, the Australian Society for Music Education (ASME) initiated two related projects supporting and acknowledging composition in schools and offering the opportunity for secondary school-aged students to work with prominent Australian composers. These were the Young Composers' Project and the Composer-in-Residence Project. Both projects were…

  20. Preparing Students to Compose on a Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadomski, Kenneth E.

    In the proliferation of articles about using computers in the composition classroom published in the last five or ten years, few mention anything about preparing students to compose on a computer while all assert that computers do indeed help the composing process. Preparing students to compose on a computer involves three major processes:…

  1. Sing the Songs of Women Composers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Sue Fay; Keenan-Takagi, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Presents an annotated listing of choral works by women composers. Suggests sources of information about women composers and their music. Discusses some contemporary women whose compositions are particularly appropriate for student voices. Concludes that the listed works will help place women composers in perspective for student choral groups. (SG)

  2. Interactions between space-based and feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Carly J.; Balestreri, Angela; Luck, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Although early research suggested that attention to nonspatial features (i.e., red) was confined to stimuli appearing at an attended spatial location, more recent research has emphasized the global nature of feature-based attention. For example, a distractor sharing a target feature may capture attention even if it occurs at a task-irrelevant location. Such findings have been used to argue that feature-based attention operates independently of spatial attention. However, feature-based attention may nonetheless interact with spatial attention, yielding larger feature-based effects at attended locations than at unattended locations. The present study tested this possibility. In two experiments, participants viewed a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream and identified a target letter defined by its color. Target-colored distractors were presented at various task-irrelevant locations during the RSVP stream. We found that feature-driven attentional capture effects were largest when the target-colored distractor was closer to the attended location. These results demonstrate that spatial attention modulates the strength of feature-based attention capture, calling into question the prior evidence that feature-based attention operates in a global manner that is independent of spatial attention. PMID:25285472

  3. Dual-responsive colloidal microcapsules based on host-guest interaction on solid templates.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangyu; Dong, Zhirui; Zhu, Yuting; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal microcapsules (MCs) have received considerable attention in the fields of microencapsulation, drug delivery as well as microreactors due to their unique nanoparticles-composed structure. In this study, dual-responsive colloidal MCs based on host-guest interaction were successfully fabricated via a layer-by-layer assembly method on sacrificial solid templates. Ferrocene-modified polyethylenimine (PEI-Fc) and cyclodextrin-modified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-CD NPs) were used as building blocks for assembly. The colloidal MCs could be disassembled into nano-components upon addition of competitive adamantane (Ad) molecules or in the solution with a pH lower than 4.

  4. Evaluation Novelty in Modeling-Based and Interactive Engagement Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Örnek, Funda

    2007-01-01

    A calculus-based introductory physics course, which is based on the Matter and Interactions curriculum of Chabay and Sherwood (2002), has been taught at Purdue University. Characteristic of this course is its emphasis on modeling. Therefore, I would like to investigate the effects of modeling-based instruction and interactive engagement on…

  5. Problem Solving: Physics Modeling-Based Interactive Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornek, Funda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how modeling-based instruction combined with an interactive-engagement teaching approach promotes students' problem solving abilities. I focused on students in a calculus-based introductory physics course, based on the matter and interactions curriculum of Chabay & Sherwood (2002) at a large state…

  6. Probing charge transfer in a novel class of luminescent perovskite-based heterostructures composed of quantum dots bound to RE-activated CaTiO3 phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal S. Lewis; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Liu, Haiqing; Han, Jinkyu; Wang, Lei; Yue, Shiyu; Brennan, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-04

    We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of novel semiconducting heterostructures composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) attached onto the surfaces of novel high-surface area, porous rare-earth-ion doped alkaline earth titanate micron-scale spherical motifs, i.e. both Eu-doped and Pr-doped CaTiO3, composed of constituent, component nanoparticles. These unique metal oxide perovskite building blocks were created by a multi-pronged synthetic strategy involving molten salt and hydrothermal protocols. Subsequently, optical characterization of these heterostructures indicated a clear behavioral dependence of charge transfer in these systems upon a number of parameters such as the nature of the dopant, the reaction temperature, and particle size. Specifically, 2.7 nm diameter ligand-functionalized CdSe QDs were anchored onto sub-micron sized CaTiO3-based spherical assemblies, prepared by molten salt protocols. We found that both the Pr- and Eu-doped CaTiO3 displayed pronounced PL emissions, with maximum intensities observed using optimized lanthanide concentrations of 0.2 mol% and 6 mol%, respectively. Analogous experiments were performed on Eu-doped BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 motifs, but CaTiO3 still performed as the most effective host material amongst the three perovskite systems tested. Furthermore, the ligand-capped CdSe QD-doped CaTiO3 heterostructures exhibited effective charge transfer between the two individual constituent nanoscale components, an assertion corroborated by the corresponding quenching of their measured PL signals.

  7. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  8. A Virtual Composer in Every Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adria R.; Carter, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous generations applauded grant-funded programs that brought living composers into the lives of K-12 music students. The current economic climate, however, limits opportunities similar to those enjoyed in the past. We designed a virtual composer-in-residence experience that uses technology to overcome the barriers of funding limitations and…

  9. Children Composing and the Tonal Idiom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roels, Johanna Maria; Van Petegem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Existing studies have demonstrated how children compose, experiment and use their imagination within the conventions of the tonal idiom with functional harmony. However, one area of research that has hardly been explored is how tonality emerges in the compositions of children who compose by transforming their own non-musical ideas, such as their…

  10. A Virtual Composer in Every Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adria R.; Carter, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous generations applauded grant-funded programs that brought living composers into the lives of K-12 music students. The current economic climate, however, limits opportunities similar to those enjoyed in the past. We designed a virtual composer-in-residence experience that uses technology to overcome the barriers of funding limitations and…

  11. Dave Brubeck on Music Education and Composing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponick, F. S.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dave Brubeck, a composer and performer in contemporary jazz. Covers topics such as how Brubeck introduced his sons to music, whether he differentiates between "popular" and "serious" music, suggestions for helping music teachers develop relationships with composers, and the role music education should have in schools.…

  12. Children Composing and the Tonal Idiom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roels, Johanna Maria; Van Petegem, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Existing studies have demonstrated how children compose, experiment and use their imagination within the conventions of the tonal idiom with functional harmony. However, one area of research that has hardly been explored is how tonality emerges in the compositions of children who compose by transforming their own non-musical ideas, such as their…

  13. A Composer Succeeds with Beginning Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, Katherine

    1984-01-01

    Described is a "Composer in Residence" project in which a local choral songwriter participated in a semester-long music course for fourth and fifth graders. He visited the schools and composed an instrumental work which the students performed at a spring concert. (RM)

  14. America's Women Composers: Up from the Footnotes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pool, Jeannie G.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents an overview on women composers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. It also lists women's musical organizations, selected references on women in music, and available recordings of works by American women composers. (SJL)

  15. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  16. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haliburton, John R; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms.

  17. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  18. An Interactive Computer-Based Revision Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, J. M.; Harris, F. T. C.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based review system has been developed, based on the multiple-choice technique, at the University of London for medical students. The user can enter an answer or can have a list of questions to take away and enter later. Student response has been favorable. (LBH)

  19. Physically-based interactive Schlieren flow visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Mccormick, Patrick S; Brownlee, Carson S; Pegoraro, Vincent; Shankar, Siddharth; Hansen, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph and schlieren imaging for centuries which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraphs and schlieren images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are presented.

  20. 3-D interactive physically based micro world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Keith; Wang, SerKuang

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes an approach to synthetic three-dimensional object manipulation using three different haptic I/O devices in a virtual workspace on a graphics superworkstation. The devices involve the operator in unique mode8 of interaction that require positioning a six degree-of-freedom sensor, applying torques to a static ball, or creating interpreted hand ge8tures. With these devices, the user can select, rotate and deposit synthetic virtual objects in the micro world. The micro world is an "artificial reality" in which elementary physical forces of gravity, volume preservation, collision, and external user input may be applied. The techniques developed overcome some of the difficulties experienced with two-dimensional input devices in a three-dimensional space. Furthermore, the ability of the user to continuous modify physical constraints while observing the results in real-time facilitates data interpretation tasks.

  1. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  3. On Interactive Teaching Model of Translation Course Based on Wechat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Constructivism is a theory related to knowledge and learning, focusing on learners' subjective initiative, based on which the interactive approach has been proved to play a crucial role in language learning. Accordingly, the interactive approach can also be applied to translation teaching since translation itself is a bilingual transformational…

  4. Current Issues in Interactive Videodisc and Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebner, Donald G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents findings from a literature review on interactive videodisc technology, interactive videodisc-based training, computer-assisted instruction, and their translations into effective instructional applications. Issues in educational development and application, guidelines for using graphics and other video effects, instructor and student…

  5. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  6. Internet-based Interactive Construction Management Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawhney, Anil; Mund, Andre; Koczenasz, Jeremy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a way to incorporate practical content into the construction engineering and management curricula: the Internet-based Interactive Construction Management Learning System, which uses interactive and adaptive learning environments to train students in the areas of construction methods, equipment and processes using multimedia, databases,…

  7. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  8. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the…

  9. A web-based protein interaction network visualizer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction between proteins is one of the most important mechanisms in the execution of cellular functions. The study of these interactions has provided insight into the functioning of an organism’s processes. As of October 2013, Homo sapiens had over 170000 Protein-Protein interactions (PPI) registered in the Interologous Interaction Database, which is only one of the many public resources where protein interactions can be accessed. These numbers exemplify the volume of data that research on the topic has generated. Visualization of large data sets is a well known strategy to make sense of information, and protein interaction data is no exception. There are several tools that allow the exploration of this data, providing different methods to visualize protein network interactions. However, there is still no native web tool that allows this data to be explored interactively online. Results Given the advances that web technologies have made recently it is time to bring these interactive views to the web to provide an easily accessible forum to visualize PPI. We have created a Web-based Protein Interaction Network Visualizer: PINV, an open source, native web application that facilitates the visualization of protein interactions (http://biosual.cbio.uct.ac.za/pinv.html). We developed PINV as a set of components that follow the protocol defined in BioJS and use the D3 library to create the graphic layouts. We demonstrate the use of PINV with multi-organism interaction networks for a predicted target from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its interacting partners and its orthologs. Conclusions The resultant tool provides an attractive view of complex, fully interactive networks with components that allow the querying, filtering and manipulation of the visible subset. Moreover, as a web resource, PINV simplifies sharing and publishing, activities which are vital in today’s research collaborative environments. The source code is freely available for download at

  10. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V. B.; Kassim, Yasmin M.; Maude, Richard J.; Glinskii, Olga V.; Glinsky, Vladislav V.; Huxley, Virginia H.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches. PMID:28261011

  11. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V B; Kassim, Yasmin M; Maude, Richard J; Glinskii, Olga V; Glinsky, Vladislav V; Huxley, Virginia H; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-08-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches.

  12. Disinfectant test against monoculture and mixed-culture biofilms composed of technological, spoilage and pathogenic bacteria: bactericidal effect of essential oil and hydrosol of Satureja thymbra and comparison with standard acid-base sanitizers.

    PubMed

    Chorianopoulos, N G; Giaouris, E D; Skandamis, P N; Haroutounian, S A; Nychas, G-J E

    2008-06-01

    To assess the antimicrobial action of three natural-derived products (essential oil, decoction and hydrosol of Satureja thymbra) against biofilms, composed of useful, spoilage and pathogenic bacteria (formed as monoculture or/and mixed-culture), and to compare their efficiency with three standard acid and alkaline chemical disinfectants. Two acids (hydrochloric and lactic, pH 3), one alkali (sodium hydroxide, pH 11), the essential oil of S. thymbra (1% v/v) and the two by-products of the essential oil purification procedure (the decoction and the hydrosol fraction of essential oil, 100%), were tested against biofilms formed by five bacterial species, either as monospecies, or as mixed-culture of all species. The tested bacterial species were Staphylococcus simulans and Lactobacillus fermentum (useful technological bacteria), Pseudomonas putida (spoilage bacterium), Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes (pathogenic bacteria). Biofilms were left to be formed on stainless steel coupons for 5 days at 16 degrees C, before the application of disinfection treatments, for 60 and 180 min. The disinfection efficiency was evaluated by detaching the remaining viable biofilm cells and enumerating them by agar plating, as well as by automated conductance measurements (using Rapid Automated Bacterial Impedance Technique). Both these methods revealed that the essential oil and the hydrosol of S. thymbra exhibited a strong antimicrobial action against both monospecies and mixed-culture biofilms. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the other three acid-base disinfectants was not adequate, although a long antimicrobial treatment was applied (180 min). The essential oil of S. thymbra (1%), as well as its hydrosol fraction (100%), presents sufficient bactericidal effect on bacterial biofilms formed on stainless steel. Use of natural antimicrobial agents could provide alternative or supplemented ways for the disinfection of microbial-contaminated industrial surfaces.

  13. Composable Analytic Systems for next-generation intelligence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBona, Phil; Llinas, James; Barry, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (LM ATL) is collaborating with Professor James Llinas, Ph.D., of the Center for Multisource Information Fusion at the University at Buffalo (State of NY), researching concepts for a mixed-initiative associate system for intelligence analysts to facilitate reduced analysis and decision times while proactively discovering and presenting relevant information based on the analyst's needs, current tasks and cognitive state. Today's exploitation and analysis systems have largely been designed for a specific sensor, data type, and operational context, leading to difficulty in directly supporting the analyst's evolving tasking and work product development preferences across complex Operational Environments. Our interactions with analysts illuminate the need to impact the information fusion, exploitation, and analysis capabilities in a variety of ways, including understanding data options, algorithm composition, hypothesis validation, and work product development. Composable Analytic Systems, an analyst-driven system that increases flexibility and capability to effectively utilize Multi-INT fusion and analytics tailored to the analyst's mission needs, holds promise to addresses the current and future intelligence analysis needs, as US forces engage threats in contested and denied environments.

  14. Interactive Internet Based Pendulum for Learning Mechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethson, Magnus R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet based remote experimental setup of a double lined pendulum mechanism for students experiments at the M. Sc. Level. Some of the first year experience using this web-based setup in classes is referred. In most of the courses given at the division of mechanical engineering systems at Linkoeping Institute of Technology we provide experimental setups to enhance the teaching Of M.Sc. students. Many of these experimental setups involve mechatronical systems. Disciplines like fluid power, electronics, and mechanics and also software technologies are used in each experiment. As our campus has recently been split into two different cities some new concepts for distance learning have been studied. The one described here tries to implement remotely controlled mechatronic setups for teaching basic programming of real-time operating systems and analysis of the dynamics of mechanical systems. The students control the regulators for the pendulum through a web interface and get measurement results and a movie back through their email. The present setup uses a double linked pendulum that is controlled by a DC-motor and monitored through both camera and angular position sensors. All software needed is hosted on a double-processor PC running the RedHat 7.1. distribution complemented with real-time scheduling using DIAPM-RTAI 1.7. The Internet site is presented to the students using PHP, Apache and MySQL. All of the used software originates from the open source domain. The experience from integrating these technologies and security issues is discussed together with the web-camera interface. One of the important experiences from this project so far is the need for a good visual feedback. This is both in terms of video speed but also in resolution. It has been noticed that when the students makes misstates and wants to search the failure they want clear, large images with high resolution to support their personal believes in the cause of the failure. Even

  15. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  16. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  17. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  18. Music and emotion—a composer's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Douek, Joel

    2013-01-01

    This article takes an experiential and anecdotal look at the daily lives and work of film composers as creators of music. It endeavors to work backwards from what practitioners of the art and craft of music do instinctively or unconsciously, and try to shine a light on it as a conscious process. It examines the role of the film composer in his task to convey an often complex set of emotions, and communicate with an immediacy and universality that often sit outside of common language. Through the experiences of the author, as well as interviews with composer colleagues, this explores both concrete and abstract ways in which music can bring meaning and magic to words and images, and as an underscore to our daily lives. PMID:24348344

  19. Drug-target interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The labor-intensive and expensive experimental process of drug-target interaction prediction has motivated many researchers to focus on in silico prediction, which leads to the helpful information in supporting the experimental interaction data. Therefore, they have proposed several computational approaches for discovering new drug-target interactions. Several learning-based methods have been increasingly developed which can be categorized into two main groups: similarity-based and feature-based. In this paper, we firstly use the bi-gram features extracted from the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of proteins in predicting drug-target interactions. Our results demonstrate the high-confidence prediction ability of the Bigram-PSSM model in terms of several performance indicators specifically for enzymes and ion channels. Moreover, we investigate the impact of negative selection strategy on the performance of the prediction, which is not widely taken into account in the other relevant studies. This is important, as the number of non-interacting drug-target pairs are usually extremely large in comparison with the number of interacting ones in existing drug-target interaction data. An interesting observation is that different levels of performance reduction have been attained for four datasets when we change the sampling method from the random sampling to the balanced sampling.

  20. Quantum Corrections to Solitons Composed of Interacting Fermions and Bosons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming

    To understand quark-confinment and hadron physics, many models have been proposed in attempts to describe hadrons as bound states of quarks through using solitons in an effective theory. Here we utilize a method of Green's function to study the quantum corrections to solitons at the one-loop level. We apply it first to investigate several two dimensional non-linear theories. We then generalize it to study in detail the one loop quantum corrections to nontopological solitons in the four dimensional Friedberg -Lee soliton model, which reduces to either the MIT or the SLAC bag model for appropriate limits of parameters in the theory. The derivative and inverse mass expansions to the non-local one loop energy are studied in detail. The behaviors of the model at finite temperature and baryon density are also studied.

  1. Composing Songs for Teaching Science to College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee Pinn Tsin, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that songs may enhance learning as they function as mnemonic devices to increase memorability. In this research, songs based on the more difficult subtopics in Chemistry were composed, encompassing many formulas, equations and facts to be remembered. This technique of song composition can be used in any subject, any point…

  2. "Composing Visual History: Using Powerpoint Slideshows to Explore Historical Narrative"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This article explores PowerPoint slideshow's capacities for introducing history teachers and students to the pictorial and digital turns for representing and narrating the past. Based upon this research, the author argues that image-dominated PowerPoint slideshow provides teachers and students with a unique and powerful tool for composing and…

  3. Interaction Mechanism Insights on the Solvation of Fullerene B(80)with Choline-based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-09-24

    Beyond carbon allotropes, other nanostructures such as fullerene B80 are attracting a growing interest due to their potential applications. The use of new materials based on fullerene B80 is still in a premature stage; however many of these applications would require the use of B80 in solution. This paper reports an unprecedented density functional theory (DFT) analysis on the interaction mechanism between B80 and two choline-based ionic liquids as a first insight for the fullerene B80 solvation by ionic liquids. The analysis of properties such as binding energies, charge distributions or intermolecular interactions shed light on the main features, which should govern interaction between ionic liquids and fullerene B80. In addition, the optimization of systems composed by six ionic pairs around a fullerene B80 has supplied some information about the first solvation shell at the molecular level. As a summary, this paper provides the first insights in the rational design of ionic liquids with suitable properties for the solvation of B80.

  4. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-01

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  5. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-24

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  6. Learner Attention to Form in ACCESS Task-Based Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dao, Phung; Iwashita, Noriko; Gatbonton, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the potential effects of communicative tasks developed using a reformulation of a task-based language teaching called Automatization in Communicative Contexts of Essential Speech Sequences (ACCESS) that includes automatization of language elements as one of its goals on learner attention to form in task-based interaction. The…

  7. Interacting with Visual Poems through AR-Based Digital Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Hsieh, Min-Chai; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an AR-based digital artwork called "Mind Log" was designed and evaluated. The augmented reality technique was employed to create digital artwork that would present interactive poems. A digital poem was generated via the interplay between a video film and a text-based poem. This artwork was created following a rigorous design flow,…

  8. User Interaction Design for a Home-Based Telecare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Spyros; Tsiakoulis, Pirros; Chalamandaris, Aimilios; Karabetsos, Sotiris

    This paper presents the design of the user-interaction component of a home-based telecare system for congestive heart failure patients. It provides a short overview of the overall system and offers details on the different interaction types supported by the system. Interacting with the user occurs either as part of a scheduled procedure or as a consequence of identifying or predicting a potentially hazardous deterioration of the patients' health state. The overall logic of the interaction is structured around event-scenario associations, where a scenario consists of concrete actions to be performed, some of which may involve the patient. A key objective in this type of interaction that it is very simple, intuitive and short, involving common everyday objects and familiar media such as speech.

  9. Helping Students Understand the Composer's Job.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the string orchestra students of Natchitoches Central High School in Natchitoches (Louisiana) and their director commissioned the composer Jody Nagel to write a composition dedicated to their ensemble in order to increase the students' understanding of composition. Discusses student reaction to the project and use of discipline-based…

  10. The Composer in the Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the role of music composition within the curriculum of a typical small liberal arts college and the faculty composer's role(s) in facilitating the study of composition. The relationship between composition and campus performance is discussed, particularly in light of the increased emphasis on performance in formerly all-male…

  11. Discourse Theory: Implications for Research in Composing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odell, Lee; And Others

    Although current theories concerning the composing process overlap in useful and interesting ways, a paradigm is emerging. This article discusses two of the major assumptions of this emerging paradigm: that there are distinct purposes for each kind of discourse (for example, expressive, literary, persuasive, and referential) and that the relation…

  12. Take a Change with Aleatory Composing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambaugh, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how teachers can incorporate musical composition into their classrooms by teaching students about aleatory, or chance, music. Provides a definition of aleatory music and provides various composing techniques, focusing on aleatory music. Includes lesson plans using aleatory music, such as the "Mozart Model" for grades 4-12. (CMK)

  13. Enhancing Memory in Your Students: COMPOSE Yourself!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotter, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    The essence of teaching is, in fact, creating new memories for your students. The teacher's role is to help students store the correct information (memories) in ways that make recall and future access and use likely. Therefore, choosing techniques to enhance memory is possibly the most critical aspect of instructional design. COMPOSE is an acronym…

  14. Composing Networks: Writing Practices on Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swarts, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article is an investigation of composing practices through which people create networks with mobile phones. By looking through the lens of actor-network theory, the author portrays the networking activity of mobile phone users as translation, what Latour describes as an infralanguage to which different disciplinary perspectives can be…

  15. Composing Networks: Writing Practices on Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swarts, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article is an investigation of composing practices through which people create networks with mobile phones. By looking through the lens of actor-network theory, the author portrays the networking activity of mobile phone users as translation, what Latour describes as an infralanguage to which different disciplinary perspectives can be…

  16. Factors Important in Composing Legal Written Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Judy Ferguson

    To determine which factors were considered important in composing legal written documents, personal interviews were conducted with 111 Middle Tennessee Bar Association members, and questionnaires were mailed to 211 legal secretaries/paralegals. The self-administered questionnaires were completed and returned by 133 persons. Of those, 108 indicated…

  17. Composing Zen Haiku: Training to Make Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Stewart W.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that composing "haiku" requires a discipline in a person's thinking and emoting patterns similar to that of a general semantics system for training people to make sense. Describes how such haiku are written and gives some guidelines to help individuals create their own. (PA)

  18. The Composer's Blueprint: A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trzcinski, Louis C.; Nelhybel, Vaclav

    This teacher's guide is designed to accompany two 15-minute color television programs dealing with the creative process involved in conceiving a composition. The programs are appropriate for junior high school string students and instrumental students in string methods courses at teacher training institutions. In the program, the composer explains…

  19. The Composer in the Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores the role of music composition within the curriculum of a typical small liberal arts college and the faculty composer's role(s) in facilitating the study of composition. The relationship between composition and campus performance is discussed, particularly in light of the increased emphasis on performance in formerly all-male…

  20. The Composing Processes of Mature Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabbe, Katharyn

    The study examined 41 students (24 male, 17 female) in a beginning writing course for adults. Data were collected by (1) taping four workshop sessions in which all students participated in small groups, (2) interviewing all the students, and (3) observing four students writing in the classroom. The adult writers composed in two models: the…

  1. Research on Composing: Points of Departure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Charles R., Ed.; Odell, Lee, Ed.

    While the chapters of this book present a variety of perspectives, they share the common goal of redirecting and revitalizing research on written composition. The authors review research on written discourse and the composing process and raise questions regarding information and skills that teachers and researchers need to consider. The chapters…

  2. Pathway-based discovery of genetic interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xu, Zack Z; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Lange, Carol A; Myers, Chad L

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the second largest cause of cancer death among U.S. women and the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic variants associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, but these still explain less than half of the estimated genetic contribution to the disease. Combinations of variants (i.e. genetic interactions) may play an important role in breast cancer susceptibility. However, due to a lack of statistical power, the current tests for genetic interactions from GWAS data mainly leverage prior knowledge to focus on small sets of genes or SNPs that are known to have an association with breast cancer. Thus, many genetic interactions, particularly among novel variants, remain understudied. Reverse-genetic interaction screens in model organisms have shown that genetic interactions frequently cluster into highly structured motifs, where members of the same pathway share similar patterns of genetic interactions. Based on this key observation, we recently developed a method called BridGE to search for such structured motifs in genetic networks derived from GWAS studies and identify pathway-level genetic interactions in human populations. We applied BridGE to six independent breast cancer cohorts and identified significant pathway-level interactions in five cohorts. Joint analysis across all five cohorts revealed a high confidence consensus set of genetic interactions with support in multiple cohorts. The discovered interactions implicated the glutathione conjugation, vitamin D receptor, purine metabolism, mitotic prometaphase, and steroid hormone biosynthesis pathways as major modifiers of breast cancer risk. Notably, while many of the pathways identified by BridGE show clear relevance to breast cancer, variants in these pathways had not been previously discovered by traditional single variant association tests, or single pathway enrichment analysis that does not consider SNP

  3. A symmetry model for genetic coding via a wallpaper group composed of the traditional four bases and an imaginary base E: towards category theory-like systematization of molecular/genetic biology.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Jitsuki; Morishita, Shigeru; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-05-07

    Previously, we suggested prototypal models that describe some clinical states based on group postulates. Here, we demonstrate a group/category theory-like model for molecular/genetic biology as an alternative application of our previous model. Specifically, we focus on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base sequences. We construct a wallpaper pattern based on a five-letter cruciform motif with letters C, A, T, G, and E. Whereas the first four letters represent the standard DNA bases, the fifth is introduced for ease in formulating group operations that reproduce insertions and deletions of DNA base sequences. A basic group Z5 = {r, u, d, l, n} of operations is defined for the wallpaper pattern, with which a sequence of points can be generated corresponding to changes of a base in a DNA sequence by following the orbit of a point of the pattern under operations in group Z5. Other manipulations of DNA sequence can be treated using a vector-like notation 'Dj' corresponding to a DNA sequence but based on the five-letter base set; also, 'Dj's are expressed graphically. Insertions and deletions of a series of letters 'E' are admitted to assist in describing DNA recombination. Likewise, a vector-like notation Rj can be constructed for sequences of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The wallpaper group B = {Z5×∞, ●} (an ∞-fold Cartesian product of Z5) acts on Dj (or Rj) yielding changes to Dj (or Rj) denoted by 'Dj◦B(j→k) = Dk' (or 'Rj◦B(j→k) = Rk'). Based on the operations of this group, two types of groups-a modulo 5 linear group and a rotational group over the Gaussian plane, acting on the five bases-are linked as parts of the wallpaper group for broader applications. As a result, changes, insertions/deletions and DNA (RNA) recombination (partial/total conversion) are described. As an exploratory study, a notation for the canonical "central dogma" via a category theory-like way is presented for future developments. Despite the large incompleteness of our

  4. Evaluation of an Interactive Case-Based Online Network (ICON) in a Problem Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathoo, Arif N.; Goldhoff, Patricia; Quattrochi, James J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to assess the introduction of a web-based innovation in medical education that complements traditional problem-based learning curricula. Utilizing the case method as its fundamental educational approach, the Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) allows students to interact with each other, faculty and a virtual…

  5. A feature-based approach to modeling protein–protein interaction hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-01-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to π–related interactions, especially π · · · π interactions. PMID:19273533

  6. A symmetry model for genetic coding via a wallpaper group composed of the traditional four bases and an imaginary base E: Towards category theory-like systematization of molecular/genetic biology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previously, we suggested prototypal models that describe some clinical states based on group postulates. Here, we demonstrate a group/category theory-like model for molecular/genetic biology as an alternative application of our previous model. Specifically, we focus on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base sequences. Results We construct a wallpaper pattern based on a five-letter cruciform motif with letters C, A, T, G, and E. Whereas the first four letters represent the standard DNA bases, the fifth is introduced for ease in formulating group operations that reproduce insertions and deletions of DNA base sequences. A basic group Z5 = {r, u, d, l, n} of operations is defined for the wallpaper pattern, with which a sequence of points can be generated corresponding to changes of a base in a DNA sequence by following the orbit of a point of the pattern under operations in group Z5. Other manipulations of DNA sequence can be treated using a vector-like notation ‘Dj’ corresponding to a DNA sequence but based on the five-letter base set; also, ‘Dj’s are expressed graphically. Insertions and deletions of a series of letters ‘E’ are admitted to assist in describing DNA recombination. Likewise, a vector-like notation Rj can be constructed for sequences of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The wallpaper group B = {Z5×∞, ●} (an ∞-fold Cartesian product of Z5) acts on Dj (or Rj) yielding changes to Dj (or Rj) denoted by ‘Dj◦B(j→k) = Dk’ (or ‘Rj◦B(j→k) = Rk’). Based on the operations of this group, two types of groups—a modulo 5 linear group and a rotational group over the Gaussian plane, acting on the five bases—are linked as parts of the wallpaper group for broader applications. As a result, changes, insertions/deletions and DNA (RNA) recombination (partial/total conversion) are described. As an exploratory study, a notation for the canonical “central dogma” via a category theory-like way is presented for future

  7. Influence of organic acid and organic base interactions on interfacial properties in NAPL--water systems.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Lan; Demond, Avery H

    2007-02-01

    Interfacial properties play an important role in determining the transport and distribution of waste nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in groundwater. To develop a better understanding of the solute interactions governing the interfacial properties of waste NAPLs, this study examined the interfacial tension and contact angle of a tetrachloroethylene/water/quartz system containing octanoic acid and dodecylamine as a function of pH. The results showed that interactions between these solutes affected the system's interfacial properties significantly, producing a positive synergism. For example, octanoic acid, which by itself does not affect wettability, could reverse the wettability of quartz in the presence of dodecylamine. The significant reduction in interfacial tension and increase in contact angle around neutral pH was, based on the results of speciation modeling, attributed to the formation of a complex composed of the protonated organic base and deprotonated organic acid, whose formation also peaks around neutral pH. Thus, measures of the content of only one class of compounds, such as the base number, are inadequate descriptors of a NAPL's ability to alter wettability.

  8. A Context-Aware Interactive Health Care System Based on Ontology and Fuzzy Inference.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tzu-Chiang; Liang, Wen-Hua

    2015-09-01

    In the present society, most families are double-income families, and as the long-term care is seriously short of manpower, it contributes to the rapid development of tele-homecare equipment, and the smart home care system gradually emerges, which assists the elderly or patients with chronic diseases in daily life. This study aims at interaction between persons under care and the system in various living spaces, as based on motion-sensing interaction, and the context-aware smart home care system is proposed. The system stores the required contexts in knowledge ontology, including the physiological information and environmental information of the person under care, as the database of decision. The motion-sensing device enables the person under care to interact with the system through gestures. By the inference mechanism of fuzzy theory, the system can offer advice and rapidly execute service, thus, implementing the EHA. In addition, the system is integrated with the functions of smart phone, tablet PC, and PC, in order that users can implement remote operation and share information regarding the person under care. The health care system constructed in this study enables the decision making system to probe into the health risk of each person under care; then, from the view of preventive medicine, and through a composing system and simulation experimentation, tracks the physiological trend of the person under care, and provides early warning service, thus, promoting smart home care.

  9. Cyberpsychology: a human-interaction perspective based on cognitive modeling.

    PubMed

    Emond, Bruno; West, Robert L

    2003-10-01

    This paper argues for the relevance of cognitive modeling and cognitive architectures to cyberpsychology. From a human-computer interaction point of view, cognitive modeling can have benefits both for theory and model building, and for the design and evaluation of sociotechnical systems usability. Cognitive modeling research applied to human-computer interaction has two complimentary objectives: (1) to develop theories and computational models of human interactive behavior with information and collaborative technologies, and (2) to use the computational models as building blocks for the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive technologies. From the perspective of building theories and models, cognitive modeling offers the possibility to anchor cyberpsychology theories and models into cognitive architectures. From the perspective of the design and evaluation of socio-technical systems, cognitive models can provide the basis for simulated users, which can play an important role in usability testing. As an example of application of cognitive modeling to technology design, the paper presents a simulation of interactive behavior with five different adaptive menu algorithms: random, fixed, stacked, frequency based, and activation based. Results of the simulation indicate that fixed menu positions seem to offer the best support for classification like tasks such as filing e-mails. This research is part of the Human-Computer Interaction, and the Broadband Visual Communication research programs at the National Research Council of Canada, in collaboration with the Carleton Cognitive Modeling Lab at Carleton University.

  10. A behavioral biometric system based on human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new behavioural biometric technique based on human computer interaction. We developed a system that captures the user interaction via a pointing device, and uses this behavioural information to verify the identity of an individual. Using statistical pattern recognition techniques, we developed a sequential classifier that processes user interaction, according to which the user identity is considered genuine if a predefined accuracy level is achieved, and the user is classified as an impostor otherwise. Two statistical models for the features were tested, namely Parzen density estimation and a unimodal distribution. The system was tested with different numbers of users in order to evaluate the scalability of the proposal. Experimental results show that the normal user interaction with the computer via a pointing device entails behavioural information with discriminating power, that can be explored for identity authentication.

  11. NERIES: Seismic Data Gateways and User Composed Datasets Metadata Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Trani, Luca; Kamb, Linus; Frobert, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    One of the NERIES EC project main objectives is to establish and improve the networking of seismic waveform data exchange and access among four main data centers in Europe: INGV, GFZ, ORFEUS and IPGP. Besides the implementation of the data backbone, several investigations and developments have been conducted in order to offer to the users the data available from this network, either programmatically or interactively. One of the challenges is to understand how to enable users` activities such as discovering, aggregating, describing and sharing datasets to obtain a decrease in the replication of similar data queries towards the network, exempting the data centers to guess and create useful pre-packed products. We`ve started to transfer this task more and more towards the users community, where the users` composed data products could be extensively re-used. The main link to the data is represented by a centralized webservice (SeismoLink) acting like a single access point to the whole data network. Users can download either waveform data or seismic station inventories directly from their own software routines by connecting to this webservice, which routes the request to the data centers. The provenance of the data is maintained and transferred to the users in the form of URIs, that identify the dataset and implicitly refer to the data provider. SeismoLink, combined with other webservices (eg EMSC-QuakeML earthquakes catalog service), is used from a community gateway such as the NERIES web portal (http://www.seismicportal.eu). Here the user interacts with a map based portlet which allows the dynamic composition of a data product, binding seismic event`s parameters with a set of seismic stations. The requested data is collected by the back-end processes of the portal, preserved and offered to the user in a personal data cart, where metadata can be generated interactively on-demand. The metadata, expressed in RDF, can also be remotely ingested. They offer rating

  12. Active magnetic compensation composed of shielding panels.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Yamazaki, K; Sato, T; Haga, A; Okitsu, T; Muramatsu, K; Ueda, T; Kobayashi, K; Yoshizawa, M

    2004-11-30

    Magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) with materials of high permeability and active shield systems have been used to shield magnetic noise for biomagnetic measurements up to now. However, these techniques have various disadvantages. Therefore, we have developed a new shielding system composed of shielding panels using an active compensation technique. In this study, we evaluated the shielding performance of several unit panels attached together. Numerical and experimental approaches indicated that the shielding factor of a cubic model composed of 24 panels was 17 for uniform fields, and 7 for disturbances due to car movement. Furthermore, the compensation space is larger than that of an ordinary active system using large coils rather than panels. Moreover, the new active compensation system has the important advantage that panels of any shape can be assembled for occasional use because the unit panels are small and light.

  13. Interactive smart battery storage for a PV and wind hybrid energy management control based on conservative power theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Simões, Marcelo; Davi Curi Busarello, Tiago; Saad Bubshait, Abdullah; Harirchi, Farnaz; Antenor Pomilio, José; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents interactive smart battery-based storage (BBS) for wind generator (WG) and photovoltaic (PV) systems. The BBS is composed of an asymmetric cascaded H-bridge multilevel inverter (ACMI) with staircase modulation. The structure is parallel to the WG and PV systems, allowing the ACMI to have a reduction in power losses compared to the usual solution for storage connected at the DC-link of the converter for WG or PV systems. Moreover, the BBS is embedded with a decision algorithm running real-time energy costs, plus a battery state-of-charge manager and power quality capabilities, making the described system in this paper very interactive, smart and multifunctional. The paper describes how BBS interacts with the WG and PV and how its performance is improved. Experimental results are presented showing the efficacy of this BBS for renewable energy applications.

  14. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  15. Comparison of ICME Parameters Using Drag Based Model for Interacting and Non-interacting CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Subramanian, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Vrřnak, B.

    It is well known that solar wind drag is an important parameter for propagation of CMEs in the interplanetary space. In the present work, we utilize the Drag Based Model (DBM) developed recently by Vrš}nak et al., (2013) to obtain the travel time of CMEs from the Sun to the Earth and speed of interplanetary CME (ICME) near the Earth using the initial parameters of CMEs near the Sun. For this study, we consider the list of 91 CME-ICME pairs given by Manoharan et al., (2004). These events were observed during the period 1997-2002 and the list includes 66 non-interacting and 25 interacting events. The aim of this study is to compare the observed parameters of CMEs/ICMEs (transit time of CMEs and speed of ICMEs) in interacting and non-interacting events with the parameters derived from the DBM. The results obtained from this analysis are: (i) The CME transit times and ICME speeds derived from the model are nearly consistent with the observations for non-interacting CMEs (correlation coefficient = 0.70). But, they deviate from the model results for interacting CMEs (correlation coefficient = 0.45). (ii) While the deviation in transit times is symmetrical (± 20 hours) for non-interacting events and it is positive asymmetric for interacting CMEs according to its mean transit time values. (iii) The ICME speeds derived from the model for most of the interacting CMEs are slightly higher than the observed values, whereas, they seem to be similar for non-interacting events. (iv) When the transit times and ICME speeds near the Earth are determined for various solar wind speeds, it is seen that the derived and observed values are in agreement for a solar wind speed of 500 km s^{-1}. (v) Also, the percentage of error between the DBM value and observed value (at solar wind speed 400 km s^{-1}) shows that the derived parameters of more than 80% of events have less than 30% error. This analysis is useful to evaluate the forecasting model in general and to compare the interacting

  16. Gene-based interaction analysis shows GABAergic genes interacting with parenting in adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Evelien; Moons, Tim; Cinar, Ozan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Verschueren, Karine; Colpin, Hilde; Lambrechts, Diether; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc; Claes, Stephan; van Winkel, Ruud

    2017-06-28

    Most gene-environment interaction studies (G × E) have focused on single candidate genes. This approach is criticized for its expectations of large effect sizes and occurrence of spurious results. We describe an approach that accounts for the polygenic nature of most psychiatric phenotypes and reduces the risk of false-positive findings. We apply this method focusing on the role of perceived parental support, psychological control, and harsh punishment in depressive symptoms in adolescence. Analyses were conducted on 982 adolescents of Caucasian origin (Mage (SD) = 13.78 (.94) years) genotyped for 4,947 SNPs in 263 genes, selected based on a literature survey. The Leuven Adolescent Perceived Parenting Scale (LAPPS) and the Parental Behavior Scale (PBS) were used to assess perceived parental psychological control, harsh punishment, and support. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was the outcome. We used gene-based testing taking into account linkage disequilibrium to identify genes containing SNPs exhibiting an interaction with environmental factors yielding a p-value per single gene. Significant results at the corrected p-value of p < 1.90 × 10(-4) were examined in an independent replication sample of Dutch adolescents (N = 1354). Two genes showed evidence for interaction with perceived support: GABRR1 (p = 4.62 × 10(-5) ) and GABRR2 (p = 9.05 × 10(-6) ). No genes interacted significantly with psychological control or harsh punishment. Gene-based analysis was unable to confirm the interaction of GABRR1 or GABRR2 with support in the replication sample. However, for GABRR2, but not GABRR1, the correlation of the estimates between the two datasets was significant (r (46) = .32; p = .027) and a gene-based analysis of the combined datasets supported GABRR2 × support interaction (p = 1.63 × 10(-4) ). We present a gene-based method for gene-environment interactions in a polygenic context and show that genes

  17. Concepts and Applications of Composable FORCEnet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    2080 WSEAS TRANS. on INFORMATION SCIENCE & APPLICATIONS Issue 12. Volume 2. December 2005 ISSN: 1790-0832 Concepts and Applications of Composable...STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release Distribution Unlimited 20060926075 WSEAS TRANS. on INFORMATION SCIENCE & APPLICATIONS Issue 12. Volume 2, December...information from one system or network to an- automatic insertion of content. The project team connects these data sources, views, and agents 2082 WSEAS

  18. Projector-based surgeon-computer interaction on deformable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kocev, Bojan; Ritter, Felix; Linsen, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Providing intuitive and easy to operate interaction for medical augmented reality is essential for use in the operating room. Commonly, intra-operative navigation information is displayed on an installed monitor, requiring the operating surgeon to change focus from the monitor to the surgical site and vice versa during navigation. Projector-based augmented reality has the potential to alleviate this problem. The aim of our work is to use a projector for visualization and to provide intuitive means for direct interaction with the projected information. A consumer-grade projector is used to visualize preoperatively defined surgical planning data. The projection of the virtual information is possible on any deformable surface, and the surgeon can interact with the presented virtual information. A Microsoft Kinect camera is used to capture both the surgeon interactions and the deformations of the surface over time. After calibration of projector and Kinect camera, the fingertips are localized automatically. A point cloud surface representation is used to determine the surgeon interaction with the projected virtual information. Interaction is detected by estimating the proximity of the surgeon's fingertips to the interaction zone and applying projector-Kinect calibration information. Interaction is performed using multi-touch gestures. In our experimental surgical scenario, the surgeon stands in front of the Microsoft Kinect camera, while relevant medical information is projected on the interaction zone. A hand wave gesture initiates the tracking of the hand. The user can then interact with the projected virtual information according to the defined multi-touch-based gestures. Thus, all information such as preoperative planning data is provided to the surgeon and his/her team intra-operatively in a familiar context. We enabled the projection of the virtual information on an arbitrarily shaped surface and used a Microsoft Kinect camera to capture the interaction zone and

  19. Student Satisfaction in Interactive Engagement-Based Physics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and…

  20. Interactive Video-Based Industrial Training in Basic Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirkin, Barry

    The Wisconsin Foundation for Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education is currently involved in the development, implementation, and distribution of a sophisticated interactive computer and video learning system. Designed to offer trainees an open entry and open exit opportunity to pace themselves through a comprehensive competency-based,…

  1. Web-Based Interactive Writing Environment: Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jie Chi; Ko, Hwa Wei; Chung, I. Ling

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a web-based interactive writing environment designed for elementary school students. The environment includes three writing themes, "story pass on", "story chameleon" and "thousand ideas", to encourage reading comprehension, creativity and problem-solving skills of…

  2. Interaction in Graduate Nursing Web-based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Diane K.; Wambach, Karen A.

    2001-01-01

    Web-based instruction in graduate nursing courses was built on learner-centered and adult learning philosophies and interaction at several points: precourse, course start-up, course maintenance, and course closure. Students were relatively satisfied, found the courses convenient, were moderately engaged in active learning, and felt prepared for…

  3. Student Satisfaction in Interactive Engagement-Based Physics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and…

  4. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  5. A dynamics based view of atmosphere-fire interactions

    Treesearch

    Brian E. Potter

    2002-01-01

    Current research on severe fire interactions with the atmosphere focuses largely on examination of correlations between fire growth and various atmospheric properties, and on the development of indices based on these correlations. The author proposes that progress requires understanding the physics and atmospheric dynamics behind the correlations. A conceptual 3-stage...

  6. A Microcomputer-Based Interactive Presentation Development System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Dennis R.; Dominick, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews research and development projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that address microcomputer-based support for instructional activities at the University of Southwestern Louisiana. Highlights include a graphics project, local area networks, and the Interactive Presentation Development System, which is…

  7. Interactive Computer-Based Education for Satellite Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Keith A.; Mitzel, Harold E.

    This paper describes a narrow-band satellite application for facilitating a Computer-Based Education Utility (CBEU). A review of computer uses in education is presented with an emphasis on interactive computer applied to instructional processes. An example of major use of the CBEU focuses on meeting the educational needs of handicapped children,…

  8. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  9. Interactive Video-Based Industrial Training in Basic Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirkin, Barry

    The Wisconsin Foundation for Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education is currently involved in the development, implementation, and distribution of a sophisticated interactive computer and video learning system. Designed to offer trainees an open entry and open exit opportunity to pace themselves through a comprehensive competency-based,…

  10. Composing simulations using persistent software components

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.V.; Michelsen, R.E.; Powell, D.R.; Upton, S.C.; Thompson, D.R.

    1999-03-01

    The traditional process for developing large-scale simulations is cumbersome, time consuming, costly, and in some cases, inadequate. The topics of software components and component-based software engineering are being explored by software professionals in academic and industrial settings. A component is a well-delineated, relatively independent, and replaceable part of a software system that performs a specific function. Many researchers have addressed the potential to derive a component-based approach to simulations in general, and a few have focused on military simulations in particular. In a component-based approach, functional or logical blocks of the simulation entities are represented as coherent collections of components satisfying explicitly defined interface requirements. A simulation is a top-level aggregate comprised of a collection of components that interact with each other in the context of a simulated environment. A component may represent a simulation artifact, an agent, or any entity that can generated events affecting itself, other simulated entities, or the state of the system. The component-based approach promotes code reuse, contributes to reducing time spent validating or verifying models, and promises to reduce the cost of development while still delivering tailored simulations specific to analysis questions. The Integrated Virtual Environment for Simulation (IVES) is a composition-centered framework to achieve this potential. IVES is a Java implementation of simulation composition concepts developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for use in several application domains. In this paper, its use in the military domain is demonstrated via the simulation of dismounted infantry in an urban environment.

  11. Wandering: A Web-Based Platform for the Creation of Location-Based Interactive Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Ziv, Shani

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is an innovative web-based platform that was designed to facilitate outdoor, authentic, and interactive learning via the creation of location-based interactive learning objects (LILOs). Wandering was integrated as part of a novel environmental education program among middle school students. This paper describes the Wandering platform's…

  12. Potential drug interactions with statins: Estonian register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Daisy; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In Estonia, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are widely used to modify lipid levels but there are no current data on additional medicines prescribed alongside the statins. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential clinically relevant interactions at a national level among an outpatient population treated with statins between January and June 2008, based on the prescription database of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. This retrospective prevalence study included 203,646 outpatients aged 50 years or older, of whom 29,367 received statin therapy. The study analysed individuals who had used at least one prescription medicine for a minimum of 7 days concomitantly with statins. Potential drug interactions were analysed using Epocrates online, Stockley’s Drug Interactions, and the drug interaction database developed in Estonia. Statins metabolised by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme were prescribed to 64% of all statin users. Medicines known to have potentially clinically significant interactions with statins were prescribed to 4.6% of patients. The drugs prescribed concomitantly most often with simvastatin were warfarin (5.7%) and amiodarone (3.9%), whereas digoxin (1.2%) and ethinylestradiol (2%) were prescribed with atorvastatin. Potential interactions were not detected in the treatment regimens of rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin users. PMID:28352703

  13. Sheet music by mind: Towards a brain-computer interface for composing.

    PubMed

    Pinegger, Andreas; Wriessnegger, Selina C; Muller-Putz, Gernot R

    2015-08-01

    Providing brain-computer interface (BCI) users engaging applications should be one of the main targets in BCI research. A painting application, a web browser and other applications can already be controlled via BCI. Another engaging application would be a music composer for self-expression. In this work, we describe Brain Composing: A BCI controlled music composing software. We tested and evaluated the implemented brain composing system with five volunteers. Using a tap water-based electrode biosignal amplifier further improved the usability of the system. Three participants reached accuracies above 77% and were able to copy-compose a given melody. Results of questionnaires support that our brain composing system is an attractive and easy way to compose music via a BCI.

  14. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination. PMID:26491711

  15. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion.

    PubMed

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination.

  16. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  17. Innovation in preregistration midwifery education: Web based interactive storytelling learning.

    PubMed

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    through a critical description of the implementation of a web based interactive storytelling learning activity introduced into an undergraduate, preregistration midwifery education programme, this paper will explore how low-cost, low-fidelity online storytelling, designed using Moodle, can be used to enhance students' understanding of compassion and empathy in practice. cross sectional sample of first year undergraduate Midwifery students (n111) METHOD: drawing from both research and audit data collected in an Higher Education Institution in London England, the paper presents the case for using web based technology to create a sustainable model for midwifery education. initial results indicate that it is both the low cost and positive student evaluations of web based interactive storytelling, which make this approach to preregistration midwifery education which suggests that this approach has significant potential for learning and teaching in midwifery education in diverse settings around the world. Or how about: global relevance? . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of Geophysical Data Bases and Models for Spacecraft Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    electrons, protons, ions (major species), and measured dose. - Evaluation of magnetic field models (Delta B Model). - Quasi- static Data Bases, Analysis ...AIB4 889 ANALYSIS OF GEOPHYSICRL DATA BASES AND MODELS FOR 1/3 SPACECRAFT INTERACTIONS(U) RADEX INC CARLISLE MA J N BAS ET AL 31 OCT 86 AFGL-TR-86...1114 11116 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATI()NAL BUREAU flE SIANDARD % 43 A oJ P=I -- % AFGL-TR-86-0221 0 00 ANALYSIS OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA BASES

  19. Object information based interactive segmentation for fatty tissue extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Fang; Jiao, Li-Cheng; Li, Ling-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gou, Shui-Ping; Wang, Shuang

    2013-10-01

    Lymph nodes are very important factors for diagnosing gastric cancer in clinical use, and are usually distributed within the fatty tissue around the stomach. When extracting fatty tissues whose structures and textures are complicated, automatic extraction is still a challenging task, while manual extraction is time-consuming. Consequently, semi-automatic extraction, which allows introducing interactive operations, appears to be more realistic. Currently, most interactive methods need to indicate the position and main features in both the object and background. However, it is easier for radiologists to only mark object information. Due to this issue, a new Object Information based Interactive Segmentation (OIIS) method is proposed in this paper. Different from the most existing methods, OIIS just needs to input the object information, while the background information is not required. Experimental results and comparative studies show that OIIS is effective for fatty tissue extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  1. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-01-01

    Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis

  2. Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Pelletier, J. D.; Duffin, K.; Ormand, C. J.; Hung, W.; Iverson, E. A.; Shernoff, D.; Zhai, X.; Chowdary, A.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science educators need interactive tools to engage and enable students to better understand how Earth systems work over geologic time scales. The evolution of landforms is ripe for interactive, inquiry-based learning exercises because landforms exist all around us. The Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon (WILSIM-GC, http://serc.carleton.edu/landform/) is a continuation and upgrade of the simple cellular automata (CA) rule-based model (WILSIM-CA, http://www.niu.edu/landform/) that can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. Major improvements in WILSIM-GC include adopting a physically based model and the latest Java technology. The physically based model is incorporated to illustrate the fluvial processes involved in land-sculpting pertaining to the development and evolution of one of the most famous landforms on Earth: the Grand Canyon. It is hoped that this focus on a famous and specific landscape will attract greater student interest and provide opportunities for students to learn not only how different processes interact to form the landform we observe today, but also how models and data are used together to enhance our understanding of the processes involved. The latest development in Java technology (such as Java OpenGL for access to ubiquitous fast graphics hardware, Trusted Applet for file input and output, and multithreaded ability to take advantage of modern multi-core CPUs) are incorporated into building WILSIM-GC and active, standards-aligned curricula materials guided by educational psychology theory on science learning will be developed to accompany the model. This project is funded NSF-TUES program.

  3. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-04-07

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  4. Violent Interaction Detection in Video Based on Deep Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peipei; Ding, Qinghai; Luo, Haibo; Hou, Xinglin

    2017-06-01

    Violent interaction detection is of vital importance in some video surveillance scenarios like railway stations, prisons or psychiatric centres. Existing vision-based methods are mainly based on hand-crafted features such as statistic features between motion regions, leading to a poor adaptability to another dataset. En lightened by the development of convolutional networks on common activity recognition, we construct a FightNet to represent the complicated visual violence interaction. In this paper, a new input modality, image acceleration field is proposed to better extract the motion attributes. Firstly, each video is framed as RGB images. Secondly, optical flow field is computed using the consecutive frames and acceleration field is obtained according to the optical flow field. Thirdly, the FightNet is trained with three kinds of input modalities, i.e., RGB images for spatial networks, optical flow images and acceleration images for temporal networks. By fusing results from different inputs, we conclude whether a video tells a violent event or not. To provide researchers a common ground for comparison, we have collected a violent interaction dataset (VID), containing 2314 videos with 1077 fight ones and 1237 no-fight ones. By comparison with other algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model for violent interaction detection shows higher accuracy and better robustness.

  5. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society. PMID:26508911

  6. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Bin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society.

  7. A Multi-Phase Based Fluid-Structure-Microfluidic interaction sensor for Aerodynamic Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Christopher; Dutta, Diganta; Bashirzadeh, Yashar; Ahmed, Kareem; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-11-01

    A novel innovative microfluidic shear stress sensor is developed for measuring shear stress through multi-phase fluid-structure-microfluidic interaction. The device is composed of a microfluidic cavity filled with an electrolyte liquid. Inside the cavity, two electrodes make electrochemical velocimetry measurements of the induced convection. The cavity is sealed with a flexible superhydrophobic membrane. The membrane will dynamically stretch and flex as a result of direct shear cross-flow interaction with the seal structure, forming instability wave modes and inducing fluid motion within the microfluidic cavity. The shear stress on the membrane is measured by sensing the induced convection generated by membrane deflections. The advantages of the sensor over current MEMS based shear stress sensor technology are: a simplified design with no moving parts, optimum relationship between size and sensitivity, no gaps such as those created by micromachining sensors in MEMS processes. We present the findings of a feasibility study of the proposed sensor including wind-tunnel tests, microPIV measurements, electrochemical velocimetry, and simulation data results. The study investigates the sensor in the supersonic and subsonic flow regimes. Supported by a NASA SBIR phase 1 contract.

  8. Using Agent Based Modeling (ABM) to Develop Cultural Interaction Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Nick; Jones, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    Today, most cultural training is based on or built around "cultural engagements" or discrete interactions between the individual learner and one or more cultural "others". Often, success in the engagement is the end or the objective. In reality, these interactions usually involve secondary and tertiary effects with potentially wide ranging consequences. The concern is that learning culture within a strict engagement context might lead to "checklist" cultural thinking that will not empower learners to understand the full consequence of their actions. We propose the use of agent based modeling (ABM) to collect, store, and, simulating the effects of social networks, promulgate engagement effects over time, distance, and consequence. The ABM development allows for rapid modification to re-create any number of population types, extending the applicability of the model to any requirement for social modeling.

  9. Student satisfaction in interactive engagement-based physics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-12-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and traditional physics classes lies in the interpersonal relationships between the instructor and students. Therefore, we introduce the interpersonal communication constructs of instructor credibility and facework as possible frameworks for understanding how instructors and students navigate the new space of interactions. By interpreting survey data (N =161 respondents in eight sections of an IE introductory algebra-based physics course), we found both frameworks to be useful in explaining variance in student ratings of their satisfaction in the course, although we are unable to distinguish at this point whether instructor credibility acts as a mediating variable between facework and course satisfaction.

  10. Structure-based prediction of host-pathogen protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan

    2017-03-16

    The discovery, validation, and characterization of protein-based interactions from different species are crucial for translational research regarding a variety of pathogens, ranging from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to HIV-1. Here, we review recent advances in the prediction of host-pathogen protein interfaces using structural information. In particular, we observe that current methods chiefly perform machine learning on sequence and domain information to produce large sets of candidate interactions that are further assessed and pruned to generate final, highly probable sets. Structure-based studies have also emphasized the electrostatic properties and evolutionary transformations of pathogenic interfaces, supplying crucial insight into antigenic determinants and the ways pathogens compete for host protein binding. Advancements in spectroscopic and crystallographic methods complement the aforementioned techniques, permitting the rigorous study of true positives at a molecular level. Together, these approaches illustrate how protein structure on a variety of levels functions coordinately and dynamically to achieve host takeover.

  11. Uncertainty-Based Design Methods for Flow-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    07 Final _ 2/01/05 - 01/31/07 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Uncertainty-based Design Methods for Flow- N00014-04-1-0007 Structure ...project is to develop advanced tools for efficient simulations of flow- structure interactions that account for random excitation and uncertain input...with emphasis on realistic three-dimensional nonlinear representatiol of the structures of interest. This capability will set the foundation for the

  12. Lyapunov instability of fluids composed of rigid diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Posch, H. A.; Baranyai, András

    1996-04-01

    We study the Lyapunov instability of a two-dimensional fluid composed of rigid diatomic molecules, with two interaction sites each, and interacting with a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson site-site potential. We compute full spectra of Lyapunov exponents for such a molecular system. These exponents characterize the rate at which neighboring trajectories diverge or converge exponentially in phase space. Qualitative different degrees of freedom, such as rotation and translation, affect the Lyapunov spectrum differently. We study this phenomenon by systematically varying the molecular shape and the density. We define and evaluate ``rotation numbers'' measuring the time averaged modulus of the angular velocities for vectors connecting perturbed satellite trajectories with an unperturbed reference trajectory in phase space. For reasons of comparison, various time correlation functions for translation and rotation are computed. The relative dynamics of perturbed trajectories is also studied in certain subspaces of the phase space associated with center-of-mass and orientational molecular motion.

  13. [Mental disease in two classical music composers].

    PubMed

    Rempelakos, L; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Ploumpidis, D

    2012-01-01

    A study οn two neglected classical music composers suffering a not syphilitic mental disease, is attempted here, syphilis of the central nervous system being frequent in that time. A brief overview on the psychiatric ailments of many great composers reveals suicide attempts and more or less severe depression following external events. The issue of a possible relationship between mental disease and (musical) creativity can be discussed, as mood swings and a certain tendency to melancholia are frequent features of a talented brain (a fact that can also be detected in their works). The first case presented here is Hans Rott from Austria, the beloved student of Anton Bruckner, who was considered to be at least equal to his famous classmate Gustav Mahler. The great expectations of his teacher and his friends suddenly came to an end, when he suffered a crisis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized in an insane asylum in Lower Austria. The tragic psychiatric adventure of the young musician lasted almost four years. He was diagnosed as a case of "hallucinatory insanity" and "persecution mania" by the medical staff, before dying of tuberculosis, aged only 26, and having completed only one symphony and several smaller works. His name came again on surface only a century after his death, when in 1989 his Symphony in E Major was discovered and premiered with great success, permitting to its creator a posthumous recognition, among Bruckner and Mahler. The second case of mental illness is that of the Armenian Komitas Vardapet. He was an orphan who grew up in theological schools and became a monk and later a priest, though he spent some years in Berlin in order to develop his musical skills. He is considered to be an authority of Armenian ecclesiastic music, introducing polyphony in the Armenian Church's music and collecting numerous traditional songs from all parts of Armenia. In 1915, during the Armenian genocide he was deported, tortured but finally saved, due to interventions

  14. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  15. Composing Models of Geographic Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Barbara; Frank, Andrew U.

    Processes are central for geographic information science; yet geographic information systems (GIS) lack capabilities to represent process related information. A prerequisite to including processes in GIS software is a general method to describe geographic processes independently of application disciplines. This paper presents such a method, namely a process description language. The vocabulary of the process description language is derived formally from mathematical models. Physical processes in geography can be described in two equivalent languages: partial differential equations or partial difference equations, where the latter can be shown graphically and used as a method for application specialists to enter their process models. The vocabulary of the process description language comprises components for describing the general behavior of prototypical geographic physical processes. These process components can be composed by basic models of geographic physical processes, which is shown by means of an example.

  16. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  17. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  18. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems. PMID:27195976

  19. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    PubMed

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  20. The rainbow effect on composing chaotic algorithmic music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Vaggelis D.

    The effect of rainbow color sequence on composing chaotic algorithmic music is examined. The mathematical range of the chaotic algorithm is mapped onto musical notes whose sequence follows the sequence of the seven main rainbow colors and their in-between five auxiliary colors. Each musical note is identified with the frequency of a color by a frequency shift. As a result, for a single rainbow, the scale of the chaotic music comprises an ascending chromatic F major scale without the thirteenth note, followed by its corresponding descending chromatic scale, for a total of twenty four notes. For aesthetic purposes, a note can be placed in any octave at the composer's will. The effect of a double rainbow on composing chaotic music is also studied. It is known from nature that the outer bow has its color sequence reversed. Thus, in this case, the double rainbow musical scale comprises forty eight notes on a repeated reversed full chromatic F major scale without the thirteenth note in the ascent or the first note in the descent, resembling in shape the letter w. Colorless regions in the rainbow or dark (Alexander's bands) regions in a supernumerary rainbow are included in the musical range as rests. With the musical scale based on the described rainbow mapping, chaotic music is composed from an algorithm defined by a semi-elliptical first order iterative map. The minor axis of the ellipse is defined by the range of the mathematical pitch from 0 to 1 while the semi-major axis by that of the succeeding pitch from 0 to r/2; r is a free parameter that varies from 1 to 2 to be chosen by the composer. The lower limiting value of the free parameter r corresponds to a circle of radius 1/2 yielding steady state music whereas all the other values of r correspond to ellipses. Chaotic compositions result from r values between 1.95 and 2, the latter value yielding full chaos from an ellipse with its major axis double its minor axis. Fixed notes are obtained for all r's, i.e., notes

  1. ANNIE - INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF DATA BASES FOR HYDROLOGIC MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumb, Alan M.; Kittle, John L.

    1985-01-01

    ANNIE is a data storage and retrieval system that was developed to reduce the time and effort required to calibrate, verify, and apply watershed models that continuously simulate water quantity and quality. Watershed models have three categories of input: parameters to describe segments of a drainage area, linkage of the segments, and time-series data. Additional goals for ANNIE include the development of software that is easily implemented on minicomputers and some microcomputers and software that has no special requirements for interactive display terminals. Another goal is for the user interaction to be based on the experience of the user so that ANNIE is helpful to the inexperienced user and yet efficient and brief for the experienced user. Finally, the code should be designed so that additional hydrologic models can easily be added to ANNIE.

  2. Point based interactive image segmentation using multiquadrics splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Sachin; Duraisamy, Prakash; Palniappan, Kannappan; Seetharaman, Guna

    2017-05-01

    Multiquadrics (MQ) are radial basis spline function that can provide an efficient interpolation of data points located in a high dimensional space. MQ were developed by Hardy to approximate geographical surfaces and terrain modelling. In this paper we frame the task of interactive image segmentation as a semi-supervised interpolation where an interpolating function learned from the user provided seed points is used to predict the labels of unlabeled pixel and the spline function used in the semi-supervised interpolation is MQ. This semi-supervised interpolation framework has a nice closed form solution which along with the fact that MQ is a radial basis spline function lead to a very fast interactive image segmentation process. Quantitative and qualitative results on the standard datasets show that MQ outperforms other regression based methods, GEBS, Ridge Regression and Logistic Regression, and popular methods like Graph Cut,4 Random Walk and Random Forest.6

  3. Optimization-based interactive segmentation interface for multiregion problems.

    PubMed

    Baxter, John S H; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-04-01

    Interactive segmentation is becoming of increasing interest to the medical imaging community in that it combines the positive aspects of both manual and automated segmentation. However, general-purpose tools have been lacking in terms of segmenting multiple regions simultaneously with a high degree of coupling between groups of labels. Hierarchical max-flow segmentation has taken advantage of this coupling for individual applications, but until recently, these algorithms were constrained to a particular hierarchy and could not be considered general-purpose. In a generalized form, the hierarchy for any given segmentation problem is specified in run-time, allowing different hierarchies to be quickly explored. We present an interactive segmentation interface, which uses generalized hierarchical max-flow for optimization-based multiregion segmentation guided by user-defined seeds. Applications in cardiac and neonatal brain segmentation are given as example applications of its generality.

  4. Interactive Reference Point Procedure Based on the Conic Scalarizing Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In multiobjective optimization methods, multiple conflicting objectives are typically converted into a single objective optimization problem with the help of scalarizing functions. The conic scalarizing function is a general characterization of Benson proper efficient solutions of non-convex multiobjective problems in terms of saddle points of scalar Lagrangian functions. This approach preserves convexity. The conic scalarizing function, as a part of a posteriori or a priori methods, has successfully been applied to several real-life problems. In this paper, we propose a conic scalarizing function based interactive reference point procedure where the decision maker actively takes part in the solution process and directs the search according to her or his preferences. An algorithmic framework for the interactive solution of multiple objective optimization problems is presented and is utilized for solving some illustrative examples. PMID:24723795

  5. Interactive reference point procedure based on the conic scalarizing function.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Ozden

    2014-01-01

    In multiobjective optimization methods, multiple conflicting objectives are typically converted into a single objective optimization problem with the help of scalarizing functions. The conic scalarizing function is a general characterization of Benson proper efficient solutions of non-convex multiobjective problems in terms of saddle points of scalar Lagrangian functions. This approach preserves convexity. The conic scalarizing function, as a part of a posteriori or a priori methods, has successfully been applied to several real-life problems. In this paper, we propose a conic scalarizing function based interactive reference point procedure where the decision maker actively takes part in the solution process and directs the search according to her or his preferences. An algorithmic framework for the interactive solution of multiple objective optimization problems is presented and is utilized for solving some illustrative examples.

  6. Composing only by thought: Novel application of the P300 brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Hiebel, Hannah; Wriessnegger, Selina C.; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2017-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential is a well-known pattern in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This kind of brain signal is used for many different brain-computer interface (BCI) applications, e.g., spellers, environmental controllers, web browsers, or for painting. In recent times, BCI systems are mature enough to leave the laboratories to be used by the end-users, namely severely disabled people. Therefore, new challenges arise and the systems should be implemented and evaluated according to user-centered design (USD) guidelines. We developed and implemented a new system that utilizes the P300 pattern to compose music. Our Brain Composing system consists of three parts: the EEG acquisition device, the P300-based BCI, and the music composing software. Seventeen musical participants and one professional composer performed a copy-spelling, a copy-composing, and a free-composing task with the system. According to the USD guidelines, we investigated the efficiency, the effectiveness and subjective criteria in terms of satisfaction, enjoyment, frustration, and attractiveness. The musical participants group achieved high average accuracies: 88.24% (copy-spelling), 88.58% (copy-composing), and 76.51% (free-composing). The professional composer achieved also high accuracies: 100% (copy-spelling), 93.62% (copy-composing), and 98.20% (free-composing). General results regarding the subjective criteria evaluation were that the participants enjoyed the usage of the Brain Composing system and were highly satisfied with the system. Showing very positive results with healthy people in this study, this was the first step towards a music composing system for severely disabled people. PMID:28877175

  7. Interactions of selected policy-stakeholder groups implementing middle school science standards-based systemic reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston, Theodore Lewis, III

    1999-12-01

    This research is an interpretive inquiry into the views and interactions of stakeholders in a district office of a large school system responsible for implementing science systemic reform. Three major sources of data were used in this research: surveys, stakeholder interviews, and autobiographical reflection on experiences as part of the reform initiative. This is an emergent research that is evident in the shift in the focus of research questions and their supporting assumptions during the research. The literature review describes standards-based reform, arguments about reform, and the major dimensions of reform research. The results of the survey of stakeholders revealed that the views among the stakeholder groups followed the system hierarchy and could be separated into two large groups; staff responsible for implementing the reform initiative and the other stakeholder groups. Each of these groups was composed of identifiable subgroups. The interviews with stakeholders revealed how their different attitudes, values, and beliefs frame the context of stakeholder interactions. An over reliance on an authoritarian view of decision-making leaves many stakeholders feeling disempowered and critical of others. This atmosphere promotes blaming, which inhibits collegial interaction. Work experiences in the district office revealed how stakeholders' unaddressed assumptions, attitudes, and beliefs promote fragmentation and competition rather than cooperation. Hidden assumptions about management by control and mandate, competition, and teaching and learning appear to restrain the interactions of stakeholders. Support of the National Science Education Standards was identified as a unifying view among the stakeholders, yet the professional development program focused on content and pedagogical knowledge without addressing stakeholder concerns and beliefs about the intended constructivist framework of the program. Stakeholders' attitudes about the issue of equity demonstrated

  8. Composing across Modes: A Comparative Analysis of Adolescents' Multimodal Composing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Blaine E.

    2017-01-01

    Although the shift from page to screen has dramatically redefined conceptions of writing, very little is known about how youth compose with multiple modes in digital environments. Integrating multimodality and multiliteracies theoretical frameworks, this comparative case study examined how urban twelfth-grade students collaboratively composed…

  9. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-09-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes.

  10. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes. PMID:27662342

  11. Ontology-based interactive information extraction from scientific abstracts.

    PubMed

    Milward, David; Bjäreland, Marcus; Hayes, William; Maxwell, Michelle; Oberg, Lisa; Tilford, Nick; Thomas, James; Hale, Roger; Knight, Sylvia; Barnes, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a growing interest in extracting information automatically or semi-automatically from the scientific literature. This paper describes a novel ontology-based interactive information extraction (OBIIE) framework and a specific OBIIE system. We describe how this system enables life scientists to make ad hoc queries similar to using a standard search engine, but where the results are obtained in a database format similar to a pre-programmed information extraction engine. We present a case study in which the system was evaluated for extracting co-factors from EMBASE and MEDLINE.

  12. Human-computer Interaction System Based on GRBF & HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Wang

    People have made many researches on computer vision, but the accuracy and speed were not satisfactory. This paper introduced a Human-computer interaction system based on GRBF and HMM. The paper used GRBF Artificial Neural Networks define the position of head, and HMM define the position of fingers. We combined the line of sight and the direction of fingers to ensure the uses' input focus. And the results showed that the recognition accuracy and speed of the system had been increased greatly in this way.

  13. Investigation into interactive graphics data base exchange via Gerber data

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, R.E.

    1980-03-01

    Data representing the same interactive grahic design vary greatly from one graphics system manufacturer to another. Therefore, translating the data into a common form to effect data base exchange is a difficult problem. This study examines the use of the Gerber language as a common data form through which design data could be exchanged between unlike systems. For this study Applicon Graphic System was used cyclically to check retention or degeneration of the data integrity when the original design was extracted/defined in the Gerber language and reentered into the AGS utilizing various Gerber Interface Programs. The various parts of this study include the transferring of data not only in the 2D environment, but 2D to 3D and 3D to 2D. Even though plots of the files appear very similar, the individual data bases are very dissimilar. Programs, both present and future, that might supply needed information or design aids and characteristics would find it virtually impossible to do so from a data base lacking the sophistication and completeness of the original AGS data base. Man-machine hours required to bring the data base back to original quality would be extensive. The loss of data base integrity shown by this study was restricted to an AGS to AGS transfer. The loss could very easily be magnified if the transfer were between unlike systems. 8 figures. (RWR)

  14. SOLO: An Interactive Microcomputer-Based Bedside Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Comerchero, Harry; Vernia, Michael; Tivig, Gerhard; Kalinsky, David; Miller, Avram; Rackow, Eric C.; Welch, Jim

    1979-01-01

    An interactive, microcomputer-based bedside monitor is described which facilitates continuous on-line monitoring of a given patient's hemodynamic parameters. Used primarily in shock/trauma and intensive care units, the user has easy access to the patient data via a special interactive keypad and video display integrally a part of the bedside monitor. Phasic waveforms are analyzed in order to derive heart rate, arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, temperature and respiration rate. Special procedure functions are available to facilitate on-line, interactive measurement of Cardiac Output, Pulmonary Wedge Pressure, and Fluid Input/Output. All continuously monitored parameters, as well as specially acquired parameters, can be graphically trended over the last 72 hours. Medication administration and special event markers can be displayed together with trends to correlate such actions with changes in the patient status. The SOLO MONITOR is currently implemented on a Digital Equipment Corporation LSI-11 with 28K words of memory and is commercially available through Mennen Medical Inc. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 11

  15. Accelerated Learning-Based Interactive Image Segmentation using Pairwise Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Sourati, Jamshid; Erdogmus, Deniz; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Algorithms for fully automatic segmentation of images are often not sufficiently generic with suitable accuracy, and fully manual segmentation is not practical in many settings. There is a need for semi-automatic algorithms which are capable of interacting with the user and taking into account the collected feedback. Typically such methods have simply incorporated user feedback directly. Here we employ active learning of optimal queries to guide user interaction. Our work in this paper is based on constrained spectral clustering that iteratively incorporates user feedback by propagating it through the calculated affinities [17]. The original framework does not scale well to large data sets, and hence is not straightforward to apply to interactive image segmentation. In order to address this issue, we adopt advanced numerical methods for eigen-decomposition implemented over a subsampling scheme. Our key innovation, however, is an active learning strategy that chooses pairwise queries to present to the user in order to increase the rate of learning from the feedback. Performance evaluation is carried out on the Berkeley segmentation and Graz-02 image data sets, confirming that convergence to high accuracy levels is realizable in relatively few iterations. PMID:24860031

  16. A prototype system based on visual interactive SDM called VGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zelu; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Yanfang

    2009-10-01

    In many application domains, data is collected and referenced by its geo-spatial location. Spatial data mining, or the discovery of interesting patterns in such databases, is an important capability in the development of database systems. Spatial data mining recently emerges from a number of real applications, such as real-estate marketing, urban planning, weather forecasting, medical image analysis, road traffic accident analysis, etc. It demands for efficient solutions for many new, expensive, and complicated problems. For spatial data mining of large data sets to be effective, it is also important to include humans in the data exploration process and combine their flexibility, creativity, and general knowledge with the enormous storage capacity and computational power of today's computers. Visual spatial data mining applies human visual perception to the exploration of large data sets. Presenting data in an interactive, graphical form often fosters new insights, encouraging the information and validation of new hypotheses to the end of better problem-solving and gaining deeper domain knowledge. In this paper a visual interactive spatial data mining prototype system (visual geo-classify) based on VC++6.0 and MapObject2.0 are designed and developed, the basic algorithms of the spatial data mining is used decision tree and Bayesian networks, and data classify are used training and learning and the integration of the two to realize. The result indicates it's a practical and extensible visual interactive spatial data mining tool.

  17. Collision Tumor Composed of Meningioma and Cavernoma

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Jens; Neher, Markus; Schrey, Michael; Wünsch, Peter H.; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    A true collision tumor is a rare entity composed of two histologically distinct neoplasms coinciding in the same organ. This paper reports a unique case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. On the first hand, meningioma which is usually a benign lesion arising from the meningothelial cell in the arachnoidal membrane. On the other, cerebral cavernoma which is a well-circumscribed, benign vascular hamartoma within the brain. To our knowledge, there is no previously documented case of cerebral collision tumor consisting of two benign components. A 56-year-old Caucasian male suffered in 2002 from an atypical meningioma WHO II° located in the left lateral ventricle. Three years after the tumor extirpation, the patient suffered from a hematoma in the fourth ventricle due to a recurrently haemorrhaged cavernoma. In 2008, a recurrence of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle was discovered. Additionally, another tumor located in the quadrigeminal lamina was detected. After surgical resection of the tumor in the left lateral ventricle, the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a collision tumor consisting of components of a meningioma WHO II° and a cavernoma. Postoperatively, no adjuvant treatment was needed and no tumor recurrence is discovered up to the present. A possible explanation for the collision of those two different tumors may be migration of tumor cells mediated by the cerebrospinal fluid. After 5-years of follow-up, there is no sign of any tumor recurrence; therefore, surgical tumor removal without adjuvant therapy seems to be the treatment of choice. PMID:28061500

  18. Joint Composable Object Model and LVC Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinsmith, Richard; Wallace, Jeffrey; Bizub, Warren; Ceranowicz, Andy; Cutts, Dannie; Powell, Edward T.; Gustavson, Paul; Lutz, Robert; McCloud, Terrell

    2010-01-01

    Within the Department of Defense, multiple architectures are created to serve and fulfill one or several specific service or mission related LVC training goals. Multiple Object Models exist across and within those architectures and it is there that those disparate object models are a major source of interoperability problems when developing and constructing the training scenarios. The two most commonly used architectures are; HLA and TENA, with DIS and CTIA following close behind in terms of the number of users. Although these multiple architectures can share and exchange data the underlying meta-models for runtime data exchange are quite different, requiring gateways/translators to bridge between the different object model representations; while the Department of Defense's use of gateways are generally effective in performing these functions, as the LVC environment increases so too does the cost and complexity of these gateways. Coupled with the wide range of different object models across the various user communities we increase the propensity for run time errors, increased programmer stop gap measures during coordinated exercises, or failure of the system as a whole due to unknown or unforeseen incompatibilities. The Joint Composable Object Model (JCOM) project was established under an M&S Steering Committee (MSSC)-sponsored effort with oversight and control placed under the Joint Forces Command J7 Advanced Concepts Program Directorate. The purpose of this paper is to address the initial and the current progress that has been made in the following areas; the Conceptual Model Development Format, the Common Object Model, the Architecture Neutral Data Exchange Model (ANDEM), and the association methodology to allow the re-use of multiple architecture object models and the development of the prototype persistent reusable library.

  19. Teaching Vectors Through an Interactive Game Based Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Sirokman, Gergely

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, science and particularly physics education has been furthered by the use of project based interactive learning [1]. There is a tremendous amount of evidence [2] that use of these techniques in a college learning environment leads to a deeper appreciation and understanding of fundamental concepts. Since vectors are the basis for any advancement in physics and engineering courses the cornerstone of any physics regimen is a concrete and comprehensive introduction to vectors. Here, we introduce a new turn based vector game that we have developed to help supplement traditional vector learning practices, which allows students to be creative, work together as a team, and accomplish a goal through the understanding of basic vector concepts.

  20. Agent Based Modeling of Human Gut Microbiome Interactions and Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Shashkova, Tatiana; Popenko, Anna; Tyakht, Alexander; Peskov, Kirill; Kosinsky, Yuri; Bogolubsky, Lev; Raigorodskii, Andrei; Ischenko, Dmitry; Alexeev, Dmitry; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the human health. It is involved in the digestion and protects the host against external pathogens. Examination of the intestinal microbiome interactions is required for understanding of the community influence on host health. Studies of the microbiome can provide insight on methods of improving health, including specific clinical procedures for individual microbial community composition modification and microbiota correction by colonizing with new bacterial species or dietary changes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report an agent-based model of interactions between two bacterial species and between species and the gut. The model is based on reactions describing bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides to acetate and propionate and fermentation of acetate to butyrate. Antibiotic treatment was chosen as disturbance factor and used to investigate stability of the system. System recovery after antibiotic treatment was analyzed as dependence on quantity of feedback interactions inside the community, therapy duration and amount of antibiotics. Bacterial species are known to mutate and acquire resistance to the antibiotics. The ability to mutate was considered to be a stochastic process, under this suggestion ratio of sensitive to resistant bacteria was calculated during antibiotic therapy and recovery. Conclusion/Significance The model confirms a hypothesis of feedbacks mechanisms necessity for providing functionality and stability of the system after disturbance. High fraction of bacterial community was shown to mutate during antibiotic treatment, though sensitive strains could become dominating after recovery. The recovery of sensitive strains is explained by fitness cost of the resistance. The model demonstrates not only quantitative dynamics of bacterial species, but also gives an ability to observe the emergent spatial structure and its alteration, depending on various feedback mechanisms

  1. Interactive Webmap-Based Science Planning for BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, J.; Martinez, S.; Ortiz de Landaluce, I.; de la Fuente, S.

    2015-10-01

    For BepiColombo, ESA's Mission to Mercury, we will build a web-based, map-based interface to the Science Planning System. This interface will allow the mission's science teams to visually define targets for observations and interactively specify what operations will make up the given observation. This will be a radical departure from previous ESA mission planning methods. Such an interface will rely heavily on GIS technologies. This interface will provide footprint coverage of all existing archived data for Mercury, including a set of built-in basemaps. This will allow the science teams to analyse their planned observations and operational constraints with relevant contextual information from their own instrument, other BepiColombo instruments or from previous missions. The interface will allow users to import and export data in commonly used GIS formats, such that it can be visualised together with the latest planning information (e.g. import custom basemaps) or analysed in other GIS software. The interface will work with an object-oriented concept of an observation that will be a key characteristic of the overall BepiColombo scienceplanning concept. Observation templates or classes will be tracked right through the planning-executionprocessing- archiving cycle to the final archived science products. By using an interface that synthesises all relevant available information, the science teams will have a better understanding of the operational environment; it will enhance their ability to plan efficiently minimising or removing manual planning. Interactive 3D visualisation of the planned, scheduled and executed observations, simulation of the viewing conditions and interactive modification of the observation parameters are also being considered.

  2. SMT: a reliability based interactive DTI tractography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yoldemir, Burak; Acar, Burak; Firat, Zeynep; Kiliçkesmez, Özgür

    2012-10-01

    Tractography refers to the in vivo reconstruction of fiber bundles, e.g., in brain, via the analysis of anisotropic diffusion patterns measured by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). The data provides a probabilistic model of local diffusion which was shown to correlate with the underlying fibrous structure under certain assumptions. Deterministic tractography suffers from uncertainties at kissing and crossing fibers, at different levels depending on the diffusion model employed (e.g., DTI, HARDI), yet it is easy to interpret and use in clinic. In this study, a novel generic algorithm, split and merge tractography (SMT), is proposed that provides a real-time, interactive and reliability ranked assessment of potential pathways, communicating the true information content of the data without sacrificing the usability of tractography. Specifically, SMT takes in a precomputed set of tracts and the diffusion data (e.g., DTI, HARDI) as its input, generates a set of short (reliable) tracts via splitting at unreliable points and forms quasi-random clusters of short tracts by means of which the space of short tract clusters, representing complete tracts, is sampled. A histogram of thus formed clusters is built in an efficient way and used for real-time, interactive assessment of pathways. The current implementation uses DTI and fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration based streamline tractography as its input. The method is qualitatively assessed on phantom DTI data and real DTI data. Phantom experiments demonstrated that SMT is capable of highlighting the problematic regions and suggesting pathways that are completely overseen by input streamline tractography. Real data experiment results correlate well with known anatomy and also demonstrate that the reliability ranking can efficiently suppress the erroneous tracts interactively. The method is compared to a recent method that also pursues a similar approach, yet in a global optimization based framework. The

  3. A ribozyme composed of only two different nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Reader, John S; Joyce, Gerald F

    RNA molecules are thought to have been prominent in the early history of life on Earth because of their ability both to encode genetic information and to exhibit catalytic function. The modern genetic alphabet relies on two sets of complementary base pairs to store genetic information. However, owing to the chemical instability of cytosine, which readily deaminates to uracil, a primitive genetic system composed of the bases A, U, G and C may have been difficult to establish. It has been suggested that the first genetic material instead contained only a single base-pairing unit. Here we show that binary informational macromolecules, containing only two different nucleotide subunits, can act as catalysts. In vitro evolution was used to obtain ligase ribozymes composed of only 2,6-diaminopurine and uracil nucleotides, which catalyse the template-directed joining of two RNA molecules, one bearing a 5'-triphosphate and the other a 3'-hydroxyl. The active conformation of the fastest isolated ribozyme had a catalytic rate that was about 36,000-fold faster than the uncatalysed rate of reaction. This ribozyme is specific for the formation of biologically relevant 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages.

  4. Investigating antimalarial drug interactions of emetine dihydrochloride hydrate using CalcuSyn-based interactivity calculations

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Holly; Deakin, Jon; Rajab, May; Idris-Usman, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    The widespread introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy has contributed to recent reductions in malaria mortality. Combination therapies have a range of advantages, including synergism, toxicity reduction, and delaying the onset of resistance acquisition. Unfortunately, antimalarial combination therapy is limited by the depleting repertoire of effective drugs with distinct target pathways. To fast-track antimalarial drug discovery, we have previously employed drug-repositioning to identify the anti-amoebic drug, emetine dihydrochloride hydrate, as a potential candidate for repositioned use against malaria. Despite its 1000-fold increase in in vitro antimalarial potency (ED50 47 nM) compared with its anti-amoebic potency (ED50 26–32 uM), practical use of the compound has been limited by dose-dependent toxicity (emesis and cardiotoxicity). Identification of a synergistic partner drug would present an opportunity for dose-reduction, thus increasing the therapeutic window. The lack of reliable and standardised methodology to enable the in vitro definition of synergistic potential for antimalarials is a major drawback. Here we use isobologram and combination-index data generated by CalcuSyn software analyses (Biosoft v2.1) to define drug interactivity in an objective, automated manner. The method, based on the median effect principle proposed by Chou and Talalay, was initially validated for antimalarial application using the known synergistic combination (atovaquone-proguanil). The combination was used to further understand the relationship between SYBR Green viability and cytocidal versus cytostatic effects of drugs at higher levels of inhibition. We report here the use of the optimised Chou Talalay method to define synergistic antimalarial drug interactivity between emetine dihydrochloride hydrate and atovaquone. The novel findings present a potential route to harness the nanomolar antimalarial efficacy of this affordable natural product. PMID:28257497

  5. The Use of a Web-Based Classroom Interaction System in Introductory Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Corpuz, Ma. Aileen A.; Rosalez, Rolando

    2010-10-01

    A web-based interaction system was used in algebra-based and calculus-based physics classes to enhance students' classroom interaction. The interactive teaching approach primarily incorporated elements of Mazur's Peer Instruction and Interactive Lecture Demonstration. In our implementation, students used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to interact with their instructor during lecture and classroom demonstration. In this paper, we document the perceptions and attitudes of algebra-based and calculus-based physics students towards the interactive teaching approach and likewise present data on how this approach affected students' performance on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

  6. Thermoelectric properties of an interacting quantum dot based heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Paolo Andrea; Mazza, Francesco; Bosisio, Riccardo; Benenti, Giuliano; Fazio, Rosario; Taddei, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties and heat-to-work conversion performance of an interacting, multilevel quantum dot (QD) weakly coupled to electronic reservoirs. We focus on the sequential tunneling regime. The dynamics of the charge in the QD is studied by means of master equations for the probabilities of occupation. From here we compute the charge and heat currents in the linear response regime. Assuming a generic multiterminal setup, and for low temperatures (quantum limit), we obtain analytical expressions for the transport coefficients which account for the interplay between interactions (charging energy) and level quantization. In the case of systems with two and three terminals we derive formulas for the power factor Q and the figure of merit Z T for a QD-based heat engine, identifying optimal working conditions which maximize output power and efficiency of heat-to-work conversion. Beyond the linear response we concentrate on the two-terminal setup. We first study the thermoelectric nonlinear coefficients assessing the consequences of large temperature and voltage biases, focusing on the breakdown of the Onsager reciprocal relation between thermopower and Peltier coefficient. We then investigate the conditions which optimize the performance of a heat engine, finding that in the quantum limit output power and efficiency at maximum power can almost be simultaneously maximized by choosing appropriate values of electrochemical potential and bias voltage. At last we study how energy level degeneracy can increase the output power.

  7. Graphics processing unit-based alignment of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiang; Zhou, Zhonghua; Ma, Jin; Xiang, Chaojuan; Nie, Qing; Zhang, Wu

    2015-08-01

    Network alignment is an important bridge to understanding human protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and functions through model organisms. However, the underlying subgraph isomorphism problem complicates and increases the time required to align protein interaction networks (PINs). Parallel computing technology is an effective solution to the challenge of aligning large-scale networks via sequential computing. In this study, the typical Hungarian-Greedy Algorithm (HGA) is used as an example for PIN alignment. The authors propose a HGA with 2-nearest neighbours (HGA-2N) and implement its graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. Numerical experiments demonstrate that HGA-2N can find alignments that are close to those found by HGA while dramatically reducing computing time. The GPU implementation of HGA-2N optimises the parallel pattern, computing mode and storage mode and it improves the computing time ratio between the CPU and GPU compared with HGA when large-scale networks are considered. By using HGA-2N in GPUs, conserved PPIs can be observed, and potential PPIs can be predicted. Among the predictions based on 25 common Gene Ontology terms, 42.8% can be found in the Human Protein Reference Database. Furthermore, a new method of reconstructing phylogenetic trees is introduced, which shows the same relationships among five herpes viruses that are obtained using other methods.

  8. Ultrasonic power measurement system based on acousto-optic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Zhu, Fulong; Chen, Yanming; Duan, Ke; Lin, Xinxin; Pan, Yongjun; Tao, Jiaquan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic waves are widely used, with applications including the medical, military, and chemical fields. However, there are currently no effective methods for ultrasonic power measurement. Previously, ultrasonic power measurement has been reliant on mechanical methods such as hydrophones and radiation force balances. This paper deals with ultrasonic power measurement based on an unconventional method: acousto-optic interaction. Compared with mechanical methods, the optical method has a greater ability to resist interference and also has reduced environmental requirements. Therefore, this paper begins with an experimental determination of the acoustic power in water contained in a glass tank using a set of optical devices. Because the light intensity of the diffraction image generated by acousto-optic interaction contains the required ultrasonic power information, specific software was written to extract the light intensity information from the image through a combination of filtering, binarization, contour extraction, and other image processing operations. The power value can then be obtained rapidly by processing the diffraction image using a computer. The results of this work show that the optical method offers advantages that include accuracy, speed, and a noncontact measurement method.

  9. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on the Gogny interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrödinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.

  10. RNA-RNA interaction prediction based on multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew X; Marz, Manja; Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2011-02-15

    Many computerized methods for RNA-RNA interaction structure prediction have been developed. Recently, O(N(6)) time and O(N(4)) space dynamic programming algorithms have become available that compute the partition function of RNA-RNA interaction complexes. However, few of these methods incorporate the knowledge concerning related sequences, thus relevant evolutionary information is often neglected from the structure determination. Therefore, it is of considerable practical interest to introduce a method taking into consideration both: thermodynamic stability as well as sequence/structure covariation. We present the a priori folding algorithm ripalign, whose input consists of two (given) multiple sequence alignments (MSA). ripalign outputs (i) the partition function, (ii) base pairing probabilities, (iii) hybrid probabilities and (iv) a set of Boltzmann-sampled suboptimal structures consisting of canonical joint structures that are compatible to the alignments. Compared to the single sequence-pair folding algorithm rip, ripalign requires negligible additional memory resource but offers much better sensitivity and specificity, once alignments of suitable quality are given. ripalign additionally allows to incorporate structure constraints as input parameters. The algorithm described here is implemented in C as part of the rip package.

  11. Interaction of vitamin D with membrane-based signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, María Jesús; González-Sancho, José Manuel; Bonilla, Félix; Muñoz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Many studies in different biological systems have revealed that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) modulates signaling pathways triggered at the plasma membrane by agents such as Wnt, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and others. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 may affect gene expression by paracrine mechanisms that involve the regulation of cytokine or growth factor secretion by neighboring cells. Moreover, post-transcriptional and post-translational effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 add to or overlap with its classical modulation of gene transcription rate. Together, these findings show that vitamin D receptor (VDR) cannot be considered only as a nuclear-acting, ligand-modulated transcription factor that binds to and controls the transcription of target genes. Instead, available data support the view that much of the complex biological activity of 1α,25(OH)2D3 resides in its capacity to interact with membrane-based signaling pathways and to modulate the expression and secretion of paracrine factors. Therefore, we propose that future research in the vitamin D field should focus on the interplay between 1α,25(OH)2D3 and agents that act at the plasma membrane, and on the analysis of intercellular communication. Global analyses such as RNA-Seq, transcriptomic arrays, and genome-wide ChIP are expected to dissect the interactions at the gene and molecular levels. PMID:24600406

  12. Interactive Web-based tutorials for teaching digital electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Donald G.

    2000-10-01

    With a wide range of student abilities in a class, it is difficult to effectively teach and stimulate all students. A series of web based tutorials was designed to help weaker students and stretch the stronger students. The tutorials consist of a series of HTML web pages with embedded Java applets. This combination is particularly powerful for providing interactive demonstrations because any textual content may be easily provided within the web page. The applet is able to be a compete working program that dynamically illustrates the concept, or provides a working environment for the student to experiment and work through their solution. The applet is dynamic, and responds to the student through both mouse clicks and keyboard entry. These allow the student to adjust parameters, make selections, and affect the way the program is run or information is displayed. Such interaction allows each applet to provide a mini demonstration or experiment to help the student understand a particular concept or technique. The approach taken is illustrated with a tutorial that dynamically shows the relationships between a truth table, Karnaugh amp, logic circuit and Boolean algebra representations of a logic function, and dramatically illustrates the effect of minimization on the resultant circuit. Use of the tutorial has resulted in significant benefits, particularly with weaker students.

  13. CIVILITY: cloud based interactive visualization of tractography brain connectome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puechmaille, Danaële; Styner, Martin; Prieto, Juan C.

    2017-03-01

    Cloud based Interactive Visualization of Tractography Brain Connectome (CIVILITY) is an interactive visualization tool of brain connectome in the cloud. This application submits tasks to remote computing grids were the CIVILITY-tractography pipeline is deployed. The application will list the running tasks for the user and once a task is completed the brain connectome is visualized using Hierarchical Edge Bundling. The analysis pipeline uses FSL tools (bedpostx and probtrackx2) to generate a triangular matrix indicating the connectivity strength between different regions in the brain. This work is motivated by medical applications in which expensive computational tasks such as brain connectivity is needed and to provide a state of the art visualization tool of Brain Connectome. This work does not contribute any novelty with respect to the visualization methodology, is rather a new resource for the neuroimaging community. This work is submitted to the SPIE Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging conference. The source code of this application is available in NITRC∗

  14. Ultrasonic power measurement system based on acousto-optic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Liping; Zhu, Fulong Duan, Ke; Lin, Xinxin; Pan, Yongjun; Tao, Jiaquan; Chen, Yanming

    2016-05-15

    Ultrasonic waves are widely used, with applications including the medical, military, and chemical fields. However, there are currently no effective methods for ultrasonic power measurement. Previously, ultrasonic power measurement has been reliant on mechanical methods such as hydrophones and radiation force balances. This paper deals with ultrasonic power measurement based on an unconventional method: acousto-optic interaction. Compared with mechanical methods, the optical method has a greater ability to resist interference and also has reduced environmental requirements. Therefore, this paper begins with an experimental determination of the acoustic power in water contained in a glass tank using a set of optical devices. Because the light intensity of the diffraction image generated by acousto-optic interaction contains the required ultrasonic power information, specific software was written to extract the light intensity information from the image through a combination of filtering, binarization, contour extraction, and other image processing operations. The power value can then be obtained rapidly by processing the diffraction image using a computer. The results of this work show that the optical method offers advantages that include accuracy, speed, and a noncontact measurement method.

  15. Sequoias, Mavericks, Open Doors...Composing Joan Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2011-01-01

    This essay interview with Joan Tower is a meditation on the importance of composing, understood as a process larger than the making of new sound combinations or musical scores, suggesting that the compositional act is self-educative and self-forming. Tower's musical life, one of teaching and learning, one of composing and self-composing, is an…

  16. Sequoias, Mavericks, Open Doors...Composing Joan Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2011-01-01

    This essay interview with Joan Tower is a meditation on the importance of composing, understood as a process larger than the making of new sound combinations or musical scores, suggesting that the compositional act is self-educative and self-forming. Tower's musical life, one of teaching and learning, one of composing and self-composing, is an…

  17. 16 CFR 301.20 - Fur products composed of pieces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fur products composed of pieces. 301.20... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.20 Fur products composed of pieces. (a) Where fur products, or fur mats and plates, are composed in whole or in substantial part...

  18. 16 CFR 301.20 - Fur products composed of pieces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fur products composed of pieces. 301.20... RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.20 Fur products composed of pieces. (a) Where fur products, or fur mats and plates, are composed in whole or in substantial part...

  19. Shape-based interactive three-dimensional medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1997-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation continues to be one of the biggest challenges in medical image analysis. Simple, low- level vision techniques have had limited success in this domain because of the visual complexity of medical images. This paper presents a 3-D shape model that uses prior knowledge of an object's structure to guide the search for its boundaries. The shape model has been incorporated into scanner, an interactive software package for image segmentation. We describe a graphical user interface that was developed for finding the surface of the brain and explain how the 3-D model assists with the segmentation process. Preliminary experiments show that with this shape- based approach, a low-resolution boundary for a surface can be found with two-thirds less work for the user than with a comparable manual method.

  20. Interactive brain shift compensation using GPU based programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Steen, Sander; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    Processing large images files or real-time video streams requires intense computational power. Driven by the gaming industry, the processing power of graphic process units (GPUs) has increased significantly. With the pixel shader model 4.0 the GPU can be used for image processing 10x faster than the CPU. Dedicated software was developed to deform 3D MR and CT image sets for real-time brain shift correction during navigated neurosurgery using landmarks or cortical surface traces defined by the navigation pointer. Feedback was given using orthogonal slices and an interactively raytraced 3D brain image. GPU based programming enables real-time processing of high definition image datasets and various applications can be developed in medicine, optics and image sciences.

  1. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfan; Niu, Linwei; Xian, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Genshe

    2017-01-01

    The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI) technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based Brain Computer Interface (BCI), to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques. PMID:28484488

  2. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  3. High-Affinity DNA Aptamer Generation Targeting von Willebrand Factor A1-Domain by Genetic Alphabet Expansion for Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment Using Two Types of Libraries Composed of Five Different Bases.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Ken-Ichiro; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-01-11

    The novel evolutionary engineering method ExSELEX (genetic alphabet expansion for systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) provides high-affinity DNA aptamers that specifically bind to target molecules, by introducing an artificial hydrophobic base analogue as a fifth component into DNA aptamers. Here, we present a newer version of ExSELEX, using a library with completely randomized sequences consisting of five components: four natural bases and one unnatural hydrophobic base, 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds). In contrast to the limited number of Ds-containing sequence combinations in our previous library, the increased complexity of the new randomized library could improve the success rates of high-affinity aptamer generation. To this end, we developed a sequencing method for each clone in the enriched library after several rounds of selection. Using the improved library, we generated a Ds-containing DNA aptamer targeting von Willebrand factor A1-domain (vWF) with significantly higher affinity (KD = 75 pM), relative to those generated by the initial version of ExSELEX, as well as that of the known DNA aptamer consisting of only the natural bases. In addition, the Ds-containing DNA aptamer was stabilized by introducing a mini-hairpin DNA resistant to nucleases, without any loss of affinity (KD = 61 pM). This new version is expected to consistently produce high-affinity DNA aptamers.

  4. Interaction Pattern Analysis in cMOOCs Based on the Connectivist Interaction and Engagement Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhijun; Anderson, Terry; Chen, Li; Barbera, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Connectivist learning is interaction-centered learning. A framework describing interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning was constructed using logical reasoning techniques. The framework and analysis was designed to help researchers and learning designers understand and adapt the characteristics and principles of interaction in…

  5. Interaction Pattern Analysis in cMOOCs Based on the Connectivist Interaction and Engagement Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhijun; Anderson, Terry; Chen, Li; Barbera, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Connectivist learning is interaction-centered learning. A framework describing interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning was constructed using logical reasoning techniques. The framework and analysis was designed to help researchers and learning designers understand and adapt the characteristics and principles of interaction in…

  6. [Music, composers and psychopathology: the psychiatrist's view].

    PubMed

    Constant, E

    2011-01-01

    A first reason for the psychiatrist to be interested in music, musicians and their artistic work, comes from the strong biographical and scientific evidence linking mood disorders and in particular, bipolar disorder, to artistic creativity. Moreover, a family association between psychopathology and creativity has been found in several studies. Important changes in mood, but also cognition, personality and behaviour can occur during all phases of manic-depressive illness and these changes have potentially important effects on creativity and productivity. Those changes are usually opposite in mania and depression. Many bipolar artists see emotional turmoil as essential to their creativity, which has therapeutical but also ethical consequences. A second area of interest is the impaired emotional recognition in schizophrenic patients, not only for visual material (faces or contextual scenes) but also for auditive material (voice or music) leading to impaired social interactions in this condition.

  7. Using Interactive Simulations in Assessment: The Use of Computer-Based Interactive Simulations in the Assessment of Statistical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Interactive computer-based simulations have been applied in several contexts to teach statistical concepts in university level courses. In this report, the use of interactive simulations as part of summative assessment in a statistics course is described. Students accessed the simulations via the web and completed questions relating to the…

  8. Interactive model evaluation tool based on IPython notebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemans, Sophie; Van Hoey, Stijn; Nopens, Ingmar; Seuntjes, Piet

    2015-04-01

    In hydrological modelling, some kind of parameter optimization is mostly performed. This can be the selection of a single best parameter set, a split in behavioural and non-behavioural parameter sets based on a selected threshold or a posterior parameter distribution derived with a formal Bayesian approach. The selection of the criterion to measure the goodness of fit (likelihood or any objective function) is an essential step in all of these methodologies and will affect the final selected parameter subset. Moreover, the discriminative power of the objective function is also dependent from the time period used. In practice, the optimization process is an iterative procedure. As such, in the course of the modelling process, an increasing amount of simulations is performed. However, the information carried by these simulation outputs is not always fully exploited. In this respect, we developed and present an interactive environment that enables the user to intuitively evaluate the model performance. The aim is to explore the parameter space graphically and to visualize the impact of the selected objective function on model behaviour. First, a set of model simulation results is loaded along with the corresponding parameter sets and a data set of the same variable as the model outcome (mostly discharge). The ranges of the loaded parameter sets define the parameter space. A selection of the two parameters visualised can be made by the user. Furthermore, an objective function and a time period of interest need to be selected. Based on this information, a two-dimensional parameter response surface is created, which actually just shows a scatter plot of the parameter combinations and assigns a color scale corresponding with the goodness of fit of each parameter combination. Finally, a slider is available to change the color mapping of the points. Actually, the slider provides a threshold to exclude non behaviour parameter sets and the color scale is only attributed to the

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO₂ Separation from CH₄ and N₂.

    PubMed

    Otvagina, Ksenia V; Mochalova, Alla E; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Moskvichev, Alexandr A; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V; Afonso, Carlos A M; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2016-06-09

    CO₂ separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)-poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)-poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF₄], [bmim][PF₆], and [bmim][Tf₂N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75-104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69-75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO₂ permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF₄]. The highest selectivity α (CO₂/N₂) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF₄]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Facilitated Transport Membranes Composed of Chitosan-Styrene and Chitosan-Acrylonitrile Copolymers Modified by Methylimidazolium Based Ionic Liquids for CO2 Separation from CH4 and N2

    PubMed Central

    Otvagina, Ksenia V.; Mochalova, Alla E.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Moskvichev, Alexandr A.; Vorotyntsev, Andrey V.; Afonso, Carlos A. M.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2016-01-01

    CO2 separation was found to be facilitated by transport membranes based on novel chitosan (CS)–poly(styrene) (PS) and chitosan (CS)–poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) copolymer matrices doped with methylimidazolium based ionic liquids: [bmim][BF4], [bmim][PF6], and [bmim][Tf2N] (IL). CS plays the role of biodegradable film former and selectivity promoter. Copolymers were prepared implementing the latest achievements in radical copolymerization with chosen monomers, which enabled the achievement of outstanding mechanical strength values for the CS-based membranes (75–104 MPa for CS-PAN and 69–75 MPa for CS-PS). Ionic liquid (IL) doping affected the surface and mechanical properties of the membranes as well as the gas separation properties. The highest CO2 permeability 400 Barrers belongs to CS-b-PS/[bmim][BF4]. The highest selectivity α (CO2/N2) = 15.5 was achieved for CS-b-PAN/[bmim][BF4]. The operational temperature of the membranes is under 220 °C. PMID:27294964

  11. Interactive Multimedia and Model-based Learning in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Barbara C.

    2000-01-01

    Documents a case of model-building in biology through microanalysis of one student's interaction with "Science for Living: The Circulatory System (SFL)", an interactive multimedia resource prototype for research. Describes the student's learning goals, gains, and activities with particular attention to interactions with representations,…

  12. Interactive Multimedia and Model-based Learning in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Barbara C.

    2000-01-01

    Documents a case of model-building in biology through microanalysis of one student's interaction with "Science for Living: The Circulatory System (SFL)", an interactive multimedia resource prototype for research. Describes the student's learning goals, gains, and activities with particular attention to interactions with representations,…

  13. Structural relaxation in dense liquids composed of anisotropic particles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tianqi; Schreck, Carl; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Freed, Denise E; O'Hern, Corey S

    2012-10-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of dense liquids composed of bidisperse dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles in two dimensions that interact via purely repulsive contact forces. We measure the structural relaxation times obtained from the long-time α decay of the self part of the intermediate scattering function for the translational and rotational degrees of freedom (DOF) as a function of packing fraction φ, temperature T, and aspect ratio α. We are able to collapse the packing-fraction and temperature-dependent structural relaxation times for disks, and dimers and ellipses over a wide range of α, onto a universal scaling function F(±)(|φ-φ(0)|,T,α), which is similar to that employed in previous studies of dense liquids composed of purely repulsive spherical particles in three dimensions. F(±) for both the translational and rotational DOF are characterized by the α-dependent scaling exponents μ and δ and packing fraction φ(0)(α) that signals the crossover in the scaling form F(±) from hard-particle dynamics to super-Arrhenius behavior for each aspect ratio. We find that the fragility of structural relaxation at φ(0), m(φ(0)), decreases monotonically with increasing aspect ratio for both ellipses and dimers. For α>α(p), where α(p) is the location of the peak in the packing fraction φ(J) at jamming onset, the rotational DOF are strongly coupled to the translational DOF, and the dynamic scaling exponents and φ(0) are similar for the rotational and translational DOF. For 1<α<α(p), the translational DOF become frozen at higher temperatures than the rotational DOF, and φ(0) for the rotational degrees of freedom increases above φ(J). Moreover, the results for the slow dynamics of dense liquids composed of dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles are qualitatively the same, despite the fact that zero-temperature static packings of dimers are isostatic, while static packings of ellipses are hypostatic. Thus, zero-temperature contact

  14. Catalysis based on reversible covalent interactions of organoboron compounds.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark S

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: An Account of the development of organoboron-catalyzed methods for chemo- or regioselective activation of pyruvic acids, diols, and carbohydrate derivatives is presented. These methods are based on reversible, covalent interactions that have been exploited extensively in host-guest chemistry, but were comparatively underutilized in catalysis. Important differences between the established properties of organboron compounds in molecular recognition and their behavior as catalysts emerged over the course of this work: for instance, borinic acids, which have largely been ignored in molecular recognition, proved to be a particularly useful class of catalysts. Nonetheless, the high selectivity that has enabled applications of organoboron compounds in molecular recognition (e.g., the selective binding of cis-1,2-diol groups in carbohydrates) also appears to play a key role in the outcomes of catalytic reactions. This research program began as a modest, narrowly defined project aimed at developing direct aldol reactions based on established interactions between pyruvic acids and boronic acids. While this goal was achieved, it was unexpected observations related to the nature of the nucleophile in this transformation (a putative tetracoordinate boron enolate) that attracted our attention and pointed toward broader applications in the catalyst-controlled, regioselective functionalization of polyols. This line of research proved to be fruitful: diarylborinic-acid-based precatalysts were found to promote efficient monoalkylations, sulfonylations, and alkylations of a range of diol substrates, as well as cis-1,2-diol motifs in pyranoside-derived triols. Extension of this chemistry to glycosyl donors as electrophiles enabled the regioselective, catalyst-controlled synthesis of disaccharides from readily accessible feedstocks, and was also employed to modify the oligosaccharide component of a complex, glycosylated natural product. Mechanistic studies have played an

  15. Composite optical waveguide composed of a tapered film of bromothymol blue evaporated onto a potassium ion-exchanged waveguide and its application as a guided wave absorption-based ammonia-gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Qi, Z M; Yimit, A; Itoh, K; Murabayashi, M; Matsuda, N; Takatsu, A; Kato, K

    2001-05-01

    For what is the first time to our knowledge, we have successfully evaporated a tapered film of bromothymol blue (BTB) onto a potassium ion-exchanged (PIE) waveguide to form a composite optical waveguide (COWG) for trace-ammonia detection. The BTB film has a high refractive index (1.69) and a smooth surface and is transparent to a 633-nm laser beam in air. In the COWG structure, the BTB film serves as a single-mode waveguide, and adiabatic transition of the TE(0) mode was realized between the BTB waveguide and the PIE waveguide with both BTB tapers. In the presence of ammonia, the BTB film changes color from yellow to blue, which causes absorption of the 633-nm guided wave. Our experimental results demonstrate that such a guided wave absorption-based ammonia-gas sensor is much more sensitive than one based on evanescent-wave absorption. A detection limit of part in 10(9) of ammonia has been realized for a BTB film-PIE glass COWG.

  16. Maxwell's equations-based dynamic laser-tissue interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elharith M; Barrera, Frederick J; Early, Edward A; Denton, Michael L; Clark, C D; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2013-12-01

    Since its invention in the early 1960s, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the dynamic changes in the spatial and temporal temperature rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Unlike conventional models, the new approach is grounded on the rigorous electromagnetic theory that accounts for wave interference, polarization, and nonlinearity in propagation using a Maxwell's equations-based technique.

  17. Long range interactions on wires: A reciprocal space based formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mináry, Peter; Morrone, Joseph A.; Yarne, Dawn A.; Tuckerman, Mark E.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2004-12-01

    There are many atomic scale systems in materials, chemistry, and biology that can be effectively modeled as finite in two of the physical spatial dimensions and periodically replicated in the third including nanoscale metallic and semiconducting wires, carbon nanotubes, and DNA. However, it is difficult to design techniques to treat long range forces in these systems without truncation or recourse to slowly convergent supercells or computationally inefficient Poisson solvers. In this paper, a rigorous reciprocal space based formalism which permits long range forces on wires to be evaluated simply and easily via a small modification of existing methods for three dimensional periodicity is derived. The formalism is applied to determine long range interactions both between point particles using an Ewald-like approach and the continuous charge distributions that appear in electronic structure calculations. In this way, both empirical force field calculations and, for example, plane-wave based density functional theory computations on wires can be performed easily. The methodology is tested on model and realistic systems including a lithium doped carbon nanotube.

  18. Photon-Electron Interactions in Graphene-Based Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangze

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice, has been one of the most attractive materials for fundamental and applied research in the past decade. Its unique electronic, optical, thermal, chemical and mechanical properties have lead to the discovery of new physics and many promising applications. In particular, research on photon-electron interaction in graphene-based heterojunctions has revealed a new route to design photoactive devices. In this thesis, I present our work on the synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and the study of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In addition to the conventional synthesis of graphene on copper (Cu) foils, we also present the CVD synthesis of graphene on a new substrate: palladium (Pd). Especially, we performed detailed study of the nucleation, evolution and morphology of graphene growth on Pd substrate. It helps us to understand the growth reaction mechanism and achieve controllable synthesis of graphene from single layer to multiple layers with different morphologies. We then studied the broadband and ultrasensitive photocurrent and photovoltage response of graphene/silicon (Si) Schottky diodes. For the same architecture, we identified a new photoconductive mode with ultra high photoconductive gain, namely "quantum carrier reinvestment (QCR)". A gain exceeding 107 A/W was demonstrated. The underlying physics of photon-electron interactions in these junctions were studied by a combination of optical characterization tools including Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning optical microscopy. The results obtained have been discussed in the framework of the unique electronic band structure, density states, and mobility of graphene, along with the manner in witch photoexcited carrier behave under various externally tuned parameters. We also systematically studied the optimization of performance of graphene/Si and thin transparent graphite/Si junction solar cells and

  19. Interactive vessel-tracking with a hybrid model-based and graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Dominik; Beck, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael

    2009-02-01

    For assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) the automatic extraction of vessel centerlines is a crucial technology. In the most common approach two seed points have to be manually placed in the vessel and the centerline is automatically computed between these points. This methodology is appropriate for the quantitative analysis of single vessel segments. However, for an interactive and fast reading of complete datasets a more interactive approach would be beneficial. In this work we introduce an interactive vessel-tracking approach which eases the reading of cardiac and vascular CTA datasets. Starting with a single seed point a local vessel-tracking is initialized and extended in both directions while the user "walks" along the vessel centerline. For a robust tracking of a wide variety of vessel diameters, from coronaries to the aorta, we combine a local A*-graph-search for tiny vessels and a model-based tracking for larger vessels to an hybrid model-based and graph-based approach. In order to further ease the reading of cardiac and vascular CTA datasets, we introduce a subdivision of the interactively acquired centerline into segments that can be approximated by a single plane. This subdivision allows the visualization of the vessel in optimally oriented multi-planar reformations (MPR). The proposed visualization combines the advantage of a curved planar reformation (CPR), showing a large part of the vessel in one view, with the benefits of a MPR, having a non distorted more trustable image.

  20. Encapsulation and 3D culture of human adipose-derived stem cells in an in-situ crosslinked hybrid hydrogel composed of PEG-based hyperbranched copolymer and hyaluronic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cell therapy using adipose-derived stem cells has been reported to improve chronic wounds via differentiation and paracrine effects. One such strategy is to deliver stem cells in hydrogels, which are studied increasingly as cell delivery vehicles for therapeutic healing and inducing tissue regeneration. This study aimed to determine the behaviour of encapsulated adipose-derived stem cells and identify the secretion profile of suitable growth factors for wound healing in a newly developed thermoresponsive PEG–hyaluronic acid (HA) hybrid hydrogel to provide a novel living dressing system. Methods In this study, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) were encapsulated in situ in a water-soluble, thermoresponsive hyperbranched PEG-based copolymer (PEGMEMA–MEO2MA–PEGDA) with multiple acrylate functional groups in combination with thiolated HA, which was developed via deactivated enhanced atom transfer radical polymerisation of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMEMA, Mn = 475), 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethyl methacrylate (MEO2MA) and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate PEGDA (Mn = 258). hADSCs embedded in the PEGMEMA–MEO2MA–PEGDA and HA hybrid hydrogel system (P-SH-HA) were monitored and analysed for their cell viability, cell proliferation and secretion of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta and placental-derived growth factor) and cytokines (IFNγ, IL-2 and IL-10) under three-dimensional culture conditions via the ATP activity assay, alamarBlue® assay, LIVE/DEAD® assay and multiplex ELISA, respectively. Results hADSCs were successfully encapsulated in situ with high cell viability for up to 7 days in hydrogels. Although cellular proliferation was inhibited, cellular secretion of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and placental-derived growth factor production increased over 7 days, whereas IL-2 and IFNγ release were unaffected. Conclusion This study indicates

  1. Ocean interactions with the base of Amery Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellmer, Hartmut H.; Jacobs, Stanley S.

    1992-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional ocean themohaline circulation model, we varied the cavity shape beneath Amery Ice Shelf in an attempt to reproduce the 150-m-thick marine ice layer observed at the 'G1' ice core site. Most simulations caused melting rates which decrease the ice thickness by as much as 400 m between grounding line and G1, but produce only minor accumulation at the ice core site and closer to the ice front. Changes in the sea floor and ice topographies revealed a high sensitivity of the basal mass balance to water column thickness near the grounding line, to submarine sills, and to discontinuities in ice thickness. Model results showed temperature/salinity gradients similar to observations from beneath other ice shelves where ice is melting into seawater. Modeled outflow characteristics at the ice front are in general agreement with oceanographic data from Prydz Bay. We concur with Morgan's inference that the G1 core may have been taken in a basal crevasse filled with marine ice. This ice is formed from water cooled by ocean/ice shelf interactions along the interior ice shelf base.

  2. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations.

    PubMed

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update. In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  3. Optical immunoassay systems based upon evanescent wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas A.; Herron, James N.

    1996-04-01

    Immunoassays based upon evanescent wave interactions are finding increased biosensing application. In these devices, the evanescent tail associated with total internal reflection of an incident beam at the substrate/solution interface provides sensitivity for surface-bound protein over bulk molecules, allowing homogeneous assays and real-time measurement of binding dynamics. Among such systems are surface plasmon resonance sensors and a resonant mirror device. Several research groups are also developing fluorescent fiberoptic or planar waveguide sensors for biomedical applications. We describe a second-generation planar waveguide fluoroimmunoassay system being developed in our laboratory which uses a molded polystyrene sensor. The 633-nm beam from a laser diode is focused into the 500 micrometer- thick planar waveguide by an integral lens. Antibodies to the desired analyte (hCG) are immobilized on the waveguide surface and fluorescence from bound analyte/tracer antibodies in a sandwich format is imaged onto the detector. The geometry of the waveguide allows several zones to be detected, providing the capability for on-sensor calibration. This sensor has shown picomolar sensitivity for the detection of hCG.

  4. Quadrupole beam-based alignment in the RHIC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, J.; Satogata, T.

    2011-03-28

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements. BBA data has been collected over the past two runs for all three of the active experimental IRs at RHIC, updating results from the 2005 run which were taken with incorrectly installed offsets. The technique was successfully applied to expose a systematic misuse of the BPM survey offsets in the control system. This is likely to benefit polarized proton operations as polarization transmission through acceleration ramps depends on RMS orbit control in the arcs, but a quantitative understanding of its impact is still under active investigation. Data taking is ongoing as are refinements to the BBA technique aimed at reducing systematic errors and properly accounting for dispersive effects. Further development may focus on non-triplet BPMs such as those located near snakes, or arc quadrupoles that do not have individually shunted power supplies (a prerequisite for the current method) and as such, will require a modified procedure.

  5. Sensing Landscape History with an Interactive Location Based Service

    PubMed Central

    van Lammeren, Ron; Goossen, Martin; Roncken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the STEAD approach for interpreting data acquired by a “human sensor”, who uses an informal interactive location-based service (iLBS) to sense cultural-historic facts and anecdotes of, and in the landscape. This user-generated data is collected outdoors and in situ. The approach consists of four related facets (who, what, where, when). Three of the four facets are discussed and illustrated by user generated data collected during a Dutch survey in 2008. These data represent the personal cultural-historic knowledge and anecdotes of 150 people using a customized iLBS for experiencing the cultural history of a landscape. The “who” facet shows three dominant mentality groups (cosmopolitans, modern materialists and post modern hedonists) that generated user content. The “what” facet focuses on three subject types of pictures and four picture framing classes. Pictures of the place type showed to be dominant and foreground framing class was slightly favourite. The “where” facet is explored via density, distribution, and distance of the pictures made. The illustrations of the facets indirectly show the role of the “human sensor” with respect to the domain of interest. The STEAD approach needs further development of the when-facet and of the relations between the four facets. Finally the results of the approach may support data archives of iLBS applications. PMID:22399994

  6. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update. In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:26085713

  7. Sensing landscape history with an interactive location based service.

    PubMed

    van Lammeren, Ron; Goossen, Martin; Roncken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the STEAD approach for interpreting data acquired by a "human sensor", who uses an informal interactive location-based service (iLBS) to sense cultural-historic facts and anecdotes of, and in the landscape. This user-generated data is collected outdoors and in situ. The approach consists of four related facets (who, what, where, when). Three of the four facets are discussed and illustrated by user generated data collected during a Dutch survey in 2008. These data represent the personal cultural-historic knowledge and anecdotes of 150 people using a customized iLBS for experiencing the cultural history of a landscape. The "who" facet shows three dominant mentality groups (cosmopolitans, modern materialists and post modern hedonists) that generated user content. The "what" facet focuses on three subject types of pictures and four picture framing classes. Pictures of the place type showed to be dominant and foreground framing class was slightly favourite. The "where" facet is explored via density, distribution, and distance of the pictures made. The illustrations of the facets indirectly show the role of the "human sensor" with respect to the domain of interest. The STEAD approach needs further development of the when-facet and of the relations between the four facets. Finally the results of the approach may support data archives of iLBS applications.

  8. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  9. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  10. Design and realization of a contact-less interaction system based on infrared reflection photoelectric detection array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Lei, Bing; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Due to the good performance of high sensitivity, quick response and low cost, infrared reflection detection technology is widely used in various fields. In this work, we present a novel contact-less interaction system which is based on infrared reflection detection technology. The system is mainly composed of a Micro Controller Unit (MCU), upper computer and photoelectric detection module. The MCU is utilized to control the photoelectric detection module and to make sure that the sensing unit is lighted one by one in a given order. When the interactive object appears upon the infrared reflection photoelectric detection array, its position information will be ensured and sent to the upper computer through MCU. In this system, every sensing unit is lighted for 1ms, and the detection array includes 8×8 units. It means that the photoelectric detection array will scan 15.6 times per-second. The experimental research results indicate that the factors affecting the detection range including the working current of transmitting diode, modulation frequency, and the reflectivity of the interactive object. When the working current is 10mA, and the modulation frequency is 80 KHz, the system has a detection range of 20 cm. Moreover, efficient modulation and demodulation of optical signal is quite necessary to remove the influence of surrounding light.

  11. Movement-Based Interaction Applied to Physical Rehabilitation Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. Objective The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. Methods A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient’s actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient’s progress. Results The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their

  12. Movement-based interaction applied to physical rehabilitation therapies.

    PubMed

    Garrido Navarro, Juan Enrique; Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-12-09

    Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient's actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient's progress. The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their interaction with the system allowed us to obtain

  13. Intermolecular magnetic interactions in stacked DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando A; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2017-10-09

    The influence of pi-stacking on the magnetic properties of atoms that belong to adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine pairs in sequences of three and five layers of DNA base pairs was analysed. As probes we used NMR spectroscopic parameters, which are among the most useful tools to learn about the transmission of magnetic interactions in molecules. Four DFT functionals were employed: B3LYP, BHANDLYP, KT2 and KT3, together with the SOPPA method. Besides, given that the number of non-hydrogen atoms of the supramolecular systems studied here is larger than 50 we applied a locally dense basis set scheme. Our results show that the piling up of a few Watson-Crick base pairs above and below a given pair modifies its NMR spectroscopic parameters by an amount that may be measurable and the percentage of variation does not depend on dispersion. We found that magnetic shieldings are more sensitive than J-couplings, and also that some atoms are more sensitive than others. Stacking affects the shielding of non-hydrogen atoms like nitrogens, that are donors in hydrogen bonds, HBs, and the carbons bonded to them. The amount of variation of these shieldings was found to be from 2% to 5% when the pairs are considered first as isolated, and then, placed in the middle of a sequence of three layers of base pairs. Such a variation becomes vanishingly small when the sequence contains more than three layers, showing that the stacking effect on NMR spectroscopic parameters has a local nature. We have also found a pattern for shieldings. First, equivalent atoms of similar monomers (thymine and adenine, or guanine and cytosine) have similar values of absolute shieldings in isolated pairs, and the amount of variation from isolated pairs to aggregates of a few pairs is also similar, meaning that equivalent atoms are affected in a similar manner by pi-stacking. Second, the hydrogen atoms which belong to hydrogen bonds are more sensitive to the piling up than the non-hydrogen atoms.

  14. Dendrimer-protein interactions versus dendrimer-based nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Shcharbina, Natallia; Dzmitruk, Volha; Pedziwiatr-Werbicka, Elzbieta; Ionov, Maksim; Mignani, Serge; de la Mata, F Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Dendrimers are hyperbranched polymers belonging to the huge class of nanomedical devices. Their wide application in biology and medicine requires understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of their interactions with biological systems. Summarizing, electrostatic force plays the predominant role in dendrimer-protein interactions, especially with charged dendrimers. Other kinds of interactions have been proven, such as H-bonding, van der Waals forces, and even hydrophobic interactions. These interactions depend on the characteristics of both participants: flexibility and surface charge of a dendrimer, rigidity of protein structure and the localization of charged amino acids at its surface. pH and ionic strength of solutions can significantly modulate interactions. Ligands and cofactors attached to a protein can also change dendrimer-protein interactions. Binding of dendrimers to a protein can change its secondary structure, conformation, intramolecular mobility and functional activity. However, this strongly depends on rigidity versus flexibility of a protein's structure. In addition, the potential applications of dendrimers to nanomedicine are reviwed related to dendrimer-protein interactions.

  15. Interactive Language Simulation Systems: Technology for a National Language Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, A. Allen

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the efforts of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center to make interactive video an integral part of foreign language instruction. Interactive video is seen as a method which could profoundly alter the old classroom model of language instruction. (Author/SED)

  16. Natural Interaction Based Online Military Boxing Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chenglei; Wang, Lu; Sun, Bing; Yin, Xu; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Li; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Military boxing, a kind of Chinese martial arts, is widespread and health beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a military boxing learning system realized by 3D motion capture, Web3D and 3D interactive technologies. The interactions with the system are natural and intuitive. Users can observe and learn the details of each action of the…

  17. Natural Interaction Based Online Military Boxing Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chenglei; Wang, Lu; Sun, Bing; Yin, Xu; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Li; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Military boxing, a kind of Chinese martial arts, is widespread and health beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a military boxing learning system realized by 3D motion capture, Web3D and 3D interactive technologies. The interactions with the system are natural and intuitive. Users can observe and learn the details of each action of the…

  18. Internet-based interactive teaching file for neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J; DeMarco, J K; Parikh, T

    2000-11-01

    Our goal was to implement an interactive neuroradiologic teaching file that can be accessed on the Internet and easily expanded to include radiologic, clinical, and pathologic correlation. Our growing interactive neuroradiologic teaching file is available on the Internet. It provides an easily accessed database of interesting cases to aid in the study or analysis of difficult cases.

  19. Interactive Video and Group Learning: Two Action Enquiry Based Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloke, Chris; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Two evaluations of video programs that involved groups of learners interacting with LaserVision software are presented. One concerns counselling skills for student teachers. The other is a geography simulation program. Program structure, group interaction, and the role of the instructor are discussed. Learners in both studies found the visual…

  20. Anion Recognition Strategies Based on Combined Noncovalent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Molina, Pedro; Zapata, Fabiola; Caballero, Antonio

    2017-08-09

    This review highlights the most significant examples of an emerging field in the design of highly selective anion receptors. To date, there has been remarkable progress in the binding and sensing of anions. This has been driven in part by the discovery of ways to construct effective anion binding receptors using the dominant N-H functional groups and neutral and cationic C-H hydrogen bond donors, as well as underexplored strong directional noncovalent interactions such as halogen-bonding and anion-π interactions. In this review, we will describe a new and promising strategy for constructing anion binding receptors with distinct advantages arising from their elaborate design, incorporating multiple binding sites able to interact cooperatively with anions through these different kinds of noncovalent interactions. Comparisons with control species or solely hydrogen-bonding analogues reveal unique characteristics in terms of strength, selectivity, and interaction geometry, representing important advances in the rising field of supramolecular chemistry.

  1. Utility Generalization and Composability Problems in Explanation-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratch, Jonathan M.; DeJong, Gerald F.

    The PRODIGY/EBL system [Minton88] was one of the first works to directly attack the problem of strategy utility. The problem of finding effective strategies was reduced to the problem of finding effective rules. However, this paper illustrates limitations of the approach. There are two basic difficulties. The first arises from the fact that the…

  2. Interaction Junk: User Interaction-Based Evaluation of Visual Analytic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2012-10-14

    With the growing need for visualization to aid users in understanding large, complex datasets, the ability for users to interact and explore these datasets is critical. As visual analytic systems have advanced to leverage powerful computational models and data analytics capabilities, the modes by which users engage and interact with the information are limited. Often, users are taxed with directly manipulating parameters of these models through traditional GUIs (e.g., using sliders to directly manipulate the value of a parameter). However, the purpose of user interaction in visual analytic systems is to enable visual data exploration – where users can focus on their task, as opposed to the tool or system. As a result, users can engage freely in data exploration and decision-making, for the purpose of gaining insight. In this position paper, we discuss how evaluating visual analytic systems can be approached through user interaction analysis, where the goal is to minimize the cognitive translation between the visual metaphor and the mode of interaction (i.e., reducing the “Interactionjunk”). We motivate this concept through a discussion of traditional GUIs used in visual analytics for direct manipulation of model parameters, and the importance of designing interactions the support visual data exploration.

  3. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  4. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  5. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  6. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  7. Characterization of planar biomimetic lipid films composed of phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylglycerols from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Konarzewska, Dorota; Juhaniewicz, Joanna; Güzeloğlu, Alişan; Sęk, Sławomir

    2017-03-01

    We have characterized planar lipid films composed of phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG) from E. coli bacteria. The nature of the interactions and miscibility of PE and PG components within mixed lipid films was evaluated based on surface pressure measurements and Brewster angle microscopy imaging at the air-water interface. We have found that PE and PG components show tendency to form separated domains at surface pressures relevant for biological membranes. Further, we have directly compared mechanisms of formation of supported lipid bilayers either on mica or Au(111) by spreading of small unilamellar vesicles. The bilayer formation was monitored by in situ atomic force microscopy imaging. The pathways of the vesicles spreading on each substrate are substantially different and the buildup of the bilayer on Au(111) occurs through complex multistep mechanism. The morphology and nanomechanical properties of the resulting PE/PG bilayers were thoroughly compared. We have found that the interactions between lipids and supporting substrate significantly affect molecular organization within the films since the bilayer on Au(111) is uniform in terms of the topography, while the same lipid composition on mica results in formation of distinct gel and liquid disordered domains. Different molecular organization affects also nanomechanical properties of lipid films. The latter were expressed in terms of Young's moduli and bending stiffness.

  8. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  9. An Agent-Based Architecture for Generating Interactive Stories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    other characters, but also directly by the user. The interaction of the user impacts the development of the story, but not at discrete points in...without detailed planning. The underlying agent architecture centers around a mind-body design. The mind is the implementation of a social- psychological ...the plot level. By defining a set of plot events and computer events that will tell the story, interactive input by the user impacts the sequencing

  10. How Composers Approach Teaching Composition: Strategies for Music Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randles, Clint; Sullivan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Composition pedagogy is explored from the perspective of a composer and a music teacher educator in this article. The primary goal is to help practicing music teachers develop strategies that will encourage students to create original music. The authors provide reflection about the process of helping students compose on the basis of personal…

  11. The Links between Handwriting and Composing for Y6 Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medwell, Jane; Strand, Steve; Wray, David

    2009-01-01

    Although handwriting is often considered a matter of presentation, a substantial body of international research suggests that the role of handwriting in children's composing has been neglected. Automaticity in handwriting is now seen as of key importance in composing but this proposition is relatively untested in the UK and the assumption has been…

  12. Talking about Composing in Secondary School Music Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Angela E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports an action research study of teacher and pupil talk about composing. Data were collected through video and audio recordings of composition lessons in a secondary school. Qualitative analysis of the data led to the development of a "typology of pupil talk about composing" which distinguishes between six main types:…

  13. Grammar for College Writing: A Sentence-Composing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killgallon, Don; Killgallon, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Across America, in thousands of classrooms, from elementary school to high school, the time-tested sentence-composing approach has given students tools to become better writers. Now the authors present a much anticipated sentence-composing grammar worktext for college writing. This book presents a new and easier way to understand grammar: (1) Noun…

  14. Composing in Public: The Ambient Audiences of a Writing Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Although scholars have investigated the ways youths individually enact composing practices and the impact of audience on these practices, this study examines the impact of an audience physically present while composing in a shared, public space--an ambient audience. Blurring the line between traditional notions of audience and collaborator through…

  15. Grammar for College Writing: A Sentence-Composing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killgallon, Don; Killgallon, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Across America, in thousands of classrooms, from elementary school to high school, the time-tested sentence-composing approach has given students tools to become better writers. Now the authors present a much anticipated sentence-composing grammar worktext for college writing. This book presents a new and easier way to understand grammar: (1) Noun…

  16. Syllabus for a Women Studies Course on Women Composers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Deborah

    An upper division college-level course dealing with women composers for both music majors and nonmusic majors is outlined. The course provides an historical and analytical survey of western music through works composed by women, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Students listen to music, participate in class discussions, and listen to…

  17. Collaborative Composing in High School String Chamber Music Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine collaborative composing in high school string chamber music ensembles. Research questions included the following: (a) How do high school string instrumentalists in chamber music ensembles use verbal and musical forms of communication to collaboratively compose a piece of music? (b) How do selected variables…

  18. Collaborative Composing in High School String Chamber Music Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine collaborative composing in high school string chamber music ensembles. Research questions included the following: (a) How do high school string instrumentalists in chamber music ensembles use verbal and musical forms of communication to collaboratively compose a piece of music? (b) How do selected variables…

  19. Alexia Without Agraphia in a Composer. Technical Report No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Tedd; And Others

    The case study of a 78-year-old music composer who had had a stroke revealed that he had a severe reading disturbance, a well-preserved writing ability, and no appreciable aphasia. He continued to read music and to compose. His text and music reading performance under different conditions suggested that this unusual dissociation (alexia without…

  20. Compressive holography algorithm for the objects composed of point sources.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Guoxian; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-20

    A compressive holography algorithm is proposed for the objects composed of point sources in this work. The proposed algorithm is based on Gabor holography, an amazingly simple and effective encoder for compressed sensing. In the proposed algorithm, the three-dimensional sampling space is uniformly divided into a number of grids since the virtual object may appear anywhere in the sampling space. All the grids are mapped into an indication vector, which is sparse in nature considering that the number of grids occupied by the virtual object is far less than that of the whole sampling space. Consequently, the point source model can be represented in a compressed sensing framework. With the increase of the number of grids in the sampling space, the coherence of the sensing matrix gets higher, which does not guarantee a perfect reconstruction of the sparse vector with large probability. In this paper, a new algorithm named fast compact sensing matrix pursuit algorithm is proposed to cope with the high coherence problem, as well as the unknown sparsity. A similar compact sensing matrix with low coherence is constructed based on the original sensing matrix using similarity analysis. In order to tackle unknown sparsity, an orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is utilized to calculate a rough estimate of the true support set, based on the similar compact sensing matrix and the measurement vector. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently reconstruct a sequence of 3D objects including a Stanford Bunny with complex shape.

  1. The Development of a Research Agenda and Generic Disc for Computer-Based Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara; Pearson, Robert

    This paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for conducting research using computer based interactive video and a generic disc as research tools. It is argued that computer based interactive video represents the beginnings of a truly computer based learning system. An altered version of the 1984 Grabowski and Whitney conceptual…

  2. The composing process of technical writers: A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, D.; Roundy, N.

    1981-01-01

    The assumption that technical writers compose as do other writers is tested. The literature on the composing process, not limited to the pure or applied sciences, was reviewed, yielding three areas of general agreement. The composing process (1) consists of several stages, (2) is reflexive, and (3) may be mastered by means of strategies. Data on the ways technical writers compose were collected, and findings were related to the three areas of agreement. Questionnaires and interviews surveying 70 writers were used. The disciplines represented by these writers included civil, chemical, agricultural, geological, mechanical, electrical, and petroleum engineering, chemistry, hydrology, geology, and biology. Those providing consulting services, or performing research. No technical editors or professional writers were surveyed, only technicians, engineers, and researchers whose jobs involved composing reports. Three pedagogical implications are included.

  3. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery

  4. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  5. A Qualitative Examination of Two Year-Olds Interaction with Tablet Based Interactive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe children naturally interacting with these touch screen devices. Little direct instruction was given to the children on the use of the devices however an adult did assist when needed. The device was introduced to the children as would be any other educational material such as play-dough, new items in the…

  6. A Qualitative Examination of Two Year-Olds Interaction with Tablet Based Interactive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe children naturally interacting with these touch screen devices. Little direct instruction was given to the children on the use of the devices however an adult did assist when needed. The device was introduced to the children as would be any other educational material such as play-dough, new items in the…

  7. A Critical Look at Entropy-Based Gene-Gene Interaction Measures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojoo; Sjölander, Arvid; Pawitan, Yudi

    2016-07-01

    Several entropy-based measures for detecting gene-gene interaction have been proposed recently. It has been argued that the entropy-based measures are preferred because entropy can better capture the nonlinear relationships between genotypes and traits, so they can be useful to detect gene-gene interactions for complex diseases. These suggested measures look reasonable at intuitive level, but so far there has been no detailed characterization of the interactions captured by them. Here we study analytically the properties of some entropy-based measures for detecting gene-gene interactions in detail. The relationship between interactions captured by the entropy-based measures and those of logistic regression models is clarified. In general we find that the entropy-based measures can suffer from a lack of specificity in terms of target parameters, i.e., they can detect uninteresting signals as interactions. Numerical studies are carried out to confirm theoretical findings. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. ESL Students' Interaction in Second Life: Task-Based Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee, Min Jung

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore ESL students' interactions in task-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) in Second Life, a virtual environment by which users can interact through representational figures. I investigated Low-Intermediate and High-Intermediate ESL students' interaction patterns before, during, and…

  9. Faculty Choice and Student Perception of Web-Based Technologies for Interaction in Online Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated faculty choice of web-based technologies for interaction in online economics courses and students' perception of those technologies. The literature review of online interaction has established the importance of learner-learner, learner-instructor and learner-content interaction in distance learning. However, some…

  10. Faculty Choice and Student Perception of Web-Based Technologies for Interaction in Online Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated faculty choice of web-based technologies for interaction in online economics courses and students' perception of those technologies. The literature review of online interaction has established the importance of learner-learner, learner-instructor and learner-content interaction in distance learning. However, some…

  11. Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.

    PubMed

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  12. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  13. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  14. Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

  15. Interactive Image Segmentation Framework Based On Control Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-02-21

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design and analyze an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  16. Interactive image segmentation framework based on control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Ratner, Vadim; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  17. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  18. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  19. Teaching Life Enhancement Skills with Interactive Video-Based Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip; White, W. A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The article describes courseware developed by Project LIVE (Learning Through Interactive Video Education), designed to teach generic, cognitive independent living skills to mentally handicapped adolescents. The curriculum focuses on Life Enhancement Skills as content domain, uses multiple teaching strategies (e.g., verbal rehearsal), and…

  20. NMR-based analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Cala, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Physiological processes are mainly controlled by intermolecular recognition mechanisms involving protein-protein and protein-ligand (low molecular weight molecules) interactions. One of the most important tools for probing these interactions is high-field solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through protein-observed and ligand-observed experiments, where the protein receptor or the organic compounds are selectively detected. NMR binding experiments rely on comparison of NMR parameters of the free and bound states of the molecules. Ligand-observed methods are not limited by the protein molecular size and therefore have great applicability for analysing protein-ligand interactions. The use of these NMR techniques has considerably expanded in recent years, both in chemical biology and in drug discovery. We review here three major ligand-observed NMR methods that depend on the nuclear Overhauser effect-transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference spectroscopy and water-ligand interactions observed via gradient spectroscopy experiments-with the aim of reporting recent developments and applications for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes, including affinity measurements and structural determination.

  1. Theory-Based Interactive Videodisc for EFL Learning: Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Hsien-Chin

    A discussion of the design of effective instructional materials for English as a Second Language (ESL) focuses on the application of second language learning theories and concepts of instructional design from educational technology to development of interactive video. A number of second language learning models and related research are examined,…

  2. Modeling Collaborative Interaction Patterns in a Simulation-Based Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jessica J.; Kerr, Deirdre; Mislevy, Robert J.; von Davier, Alina; Hao, Jiangang; Liu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Simulations and games offer interactive tasks that can elicit rich data, providing evidence of complex skills that are difficult to measure with more conventional items and tests. However, one notable challenge in using such technologies is making sense of the data generated in order to make claims about individuals or groups. This article…

  3. Vizic: Jupyter-based interactive visualization tool for astronomical catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Vizic is a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. The software visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog and displays interactive and customizable objects in the map. Property values such as redshift and magnitude can be used to filter or apply colormaps, and objects can be selected for further analysis through standard Python functions from inside a Jupyter notebook. Vizic allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the sky map; included are Voronoi, Delaunay, Minimum Spanning Tree and HEALPix layers, which are helpful for visualizing large-scale structure. Overlays can be generated, added or removed dynamically with one line of code. Catalog data is kept in a non-relational database. The Jupyter Notebook allows the user to create scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map, making Vizic a powerful and flexible interactive analysis tool. Vizic be used for data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies, outlier identification or simply large-scale visualizations.

  4. Explaining Dynamic Interactions in Wiki-Based Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mimi; Zhu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined dynamic patterns of interaction that two small groups (Group A and Group B) of ESL students exemplified when they performed two writing tasks: a research proposal (Task 1) and an annotated bibliography (Task 2) in a wiki site. Group A demonstrated a collective pattern in Task 1, but switched to an…

  5. Physics-Based Visual Characterization of Molecular Interaction Forces.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Pedro; Estrada, Jorge; Guallar, Victor; Ropinski, Timo; Vinacua, Alvar; Vazquez, Pere-Pau

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations are used in many areas of biotechnology, such as drug design and enzyme engineering. Despite the development of automatic computational protocols, analysis of molecular interactions is still a major aspect where human comprehension and intuition are key to accelerate, analyze, and propose modifications to the molecule of interest. Most visualization algorithms help the users by providing an accurate depiction of the spatial arrangement: the atoms involved in inter-molecular contacts. There are few tools that provide visual information on the forces governing molecular docking. However, these tools, commonly restricted to close interaction between atoms, do not consider whole simulation paths, long-range distances and, importantly, do not provide visual cues for a quick and intuitive comprehension of the energy functions (modeling intermolecular interactions) involved. In this paper, we propose visualizations designed to enable the characterization of interaction forces by taking into account several relevant variables such as molecule-ligand distance and the energy function, which is essential to understand binding affinities. We put emphasis on mapping molecular docking paths obtained from Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, and provide time-dependent visualizations for different energy components and particle resolutions: atoms, groups or residues. The presented visualizations have the potential to support domain experts in a more efficient drug or enzyme design process.

  6. Attractor Dynamics of Dyadic Interaction: A Recurrence Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Marlenny; Cox, Ralf F A; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interpersonal coordination in young children during dyadic problem solving, by using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQA). We examined the interactions of seven dyads of children (Mage= 5.1 years) in a longitudinal design (6 sessions) with a sequence of problem-solving tasks increasing in difficulty. An innovative implementation of CRQA is presented in order to study the attractor dynamics of dyadic coordination. The analysis consisted of distinguishing two recurrent states in the relationship between children and the task. In other words, the analysis is focused on how the dyadic interaction oscillates between two stable states that for their recurrent presence are considered to be attractors. The distributed dyadic interaction (DDI) state indicates that both children contribute equally to the solution of the task. The unequal dyadic interaction (UDI) state indicating that only one of the children contributes actively to the solution of the task. Results showed that the DDI was more frequent than the UDI but that the dynamics of these two attractor states were quite similar. The behaviors within these states increased in complexity over time, although they did so in DDI more strongly than UDI. The overall recurrence, which indicates the global level of coordination between the individuals in the dyad across all time points, was moderately correlated with the performance of the children.

  7. 3did: a catalog of domain-based interactions of known three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Roberto; Céol, Arnaud; Stein, Amelie; Olivella, Roger; Aloy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The database of 3D interacting domains (3did, available online for browsing and bulk download at http://3did.irbbarcelona.org) is a catalog of protein-protein interactions for which a high-resolution 3D structure is known. 3did collects and classifies all structural templates of domain-domain interactions in the Protein Data Bank, providing molecular details for such interactions. The current version also includes a pipeline for the discovery and annotation of novel domain-motif interactions. For every interaction, 3did identifies and groups different binding modes by clustering similar interfaces into 'interaction topologies'. By maintaining a constantly updated collection of domain-based structural interaction templates, 3did is a reference source of information for the structural characterization of protein interaction networks. 3did is updated every 6 months.

  8. Electronic structure theory based study of proline interacting with gold nano clusters.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sandhya; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-10-01

    Interaction between metal nanoparticles and biomolecules is important from the view point of developing and designing biosensors. Studies on proline tagged with gold nanoclusters are reported here using density functional theory (DFT) calculations for its structural, electronic and bonding properties. Geometries of the complexes are optimized using the PBE1PBE functional and mixed basis set, i. e., 6-311++G for the amino acid and SDD for the gold clusters. Equilibrium configurations are analyzed in terms of interaction energies, molecular orbitals and charge density. The complexes associated with cluster composed of an odd number of Au atoms show higher stability. Marked decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gaps is observed on complexation. Major components of interaction between the two moieties are: the anchoring N-Au and O-Au bond; and the non covalent interactions between Au and N-H or O-H bonds. The electron affinities and vertical ionization potentials for all complexes are calculated. They show an increased value of electron affinity and ionization potential on complexation. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis reveals a charge transfer between the donor (proline) and acceptor (gold cluster). The results indicate that the nature of interaction between the two moieties is partially covalent. Our results will be useful for further experimental studies and may be important for future applications.

  9. Composable languages for bioinformatics: the NYoSh experiment

    PubMed Central

    Simi, Manuele

    2014-01-01

    Language WorkBenches (LWBs) are software engineering tools that help domain experts develop solutions to various classes of problems. Some of these tools focus on non-technical users and provide languages to help organize knowledge while other workbenches provide means to create new programming languages. A key advantage of language workbenches is that they support the seamless composition of independently developed languages. This capability is useful when developing programs that can benefit from different levels of abstraction. We reasoned that language workbenches could be useful to develop bioinformatics software solutions. In order to evaluate the potential of language workbenches in bioinformatics, we tested a prominent workbench by developing an alternative to shell scripting. To illustrate what LWBs and Language Composition can bring to bioinformatics, we report on our design and development of NYoSh (Not Your ordinary Shell). NYoSh was implemented as a collection of languages that can be composed to write programs as expressive and concise as shell scripts. This manuscript offers a concrete illustration of the advantages and current minor drawbacks of using the MPS LWB. For instance, we found that we could implement an environment-aware editor for NYoSh that can assist the programmers when developing scripts for specific execution environments. This editor further provides semantic error detection and can be compiled interactively with an automatic build and deployment system. In contrast to shell scripts, NYoSh scripts can be written in a modern development environment, supporting context dependent intentions and can be extended seamlessly by end-users with new abstractions and language constructs. We further illustrate language extension and composition with LWBs by presenting a tight integration of NYoSh scripts with the GobyWeb system. The NYoSh Workbench prototype, which implements a fully featured integrated development environment for NYoSh is

  10. Composable languages for bioinformatics: the NYoSh experiment.

    PubMed

    Simi, Manuele; Campagne, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Language WorkBenches (LWBs) are software engineering tools that help domain experts develop solutions to various classes of problems. Some of these tools focus on non-technical users and provide languages to help organize knowledge while other workbenches provide means to create new programming languages. A key advantage of language workbenches is that they support the seamless composition of independently developed languages. This capability is useful when developing programs that can benefit from different levels of abstraction. We reasoned that language workbenches could be useful to develop bioinformatics software solutions. In order to evaluate the potential of language workbenches in bioinformatics, we tested a prominent workbench by developing an alternative to shell scripting. To illustrate what LWBs and Language Composition can bring to bioinformatics, we report on our design and development of NYoSh (Not Your ordinary Shell). NYoSh was implemented as a collection of languages that can be composed to write programs as expressive and concise as shell scripts. This manuscript offers a concrete illustration of the advantages and current minor drawbacks of using the MPS LWB. For instance, we found that we could implement an environment-aware editor for NYoSh that can assist the programmers when developing scripts for specific execution environments. This editor further provides semantic error detection and can be compiled interactively with an automatic build and deployment system. In contrast to shell scripts, NYoSh scripts can be written in a modern development environment, supporting context dependent intentions and can be extended seamlessly by end-users with new abstractions and language constructs. We further illustrate language extension and composition with LWBs by presenting a tight integration of NYoSh scripts with the GobyWeb system. The NYoSh Workbench prototype, which implements a fully featured integrated development environment for NYoSh is

  11. Langmuir monolayers composed of single and double tail sulfobetaine lipids.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Gavin; Gee, Anthony P; Arnold, Thomas; Edler, Karen J; Lewis, Simon E

    2016-07-15

    Owing to structural similarities between sulfobetaine lipids and phospholipids it should be possible to form stable Langmuir monolayers from long tail sulfobetaines. By modification of the density of lipid tail group (number of carbon chains) it should also be possible to modulate the two-dimensional phase behaviour of these lipids and thereby compare with that of equivalent phospholipids. Potentially this could enable the use of such lipids for the wide array of applications that currently use phospholipids. The benefit of using sulfobetaine lipids is that they can be synthesised by a one-step reaction from cheap and readily available starting materials and will degrade via different pathways than natural lipids. The molecular architecture of the lipid can be easily modified allowing the design of lipids for specific purposes. In addition the reversal of the charge within the sulfobetaine head group relative to the charge orientation in phospholipids may modify behaviour and thereby allow for novel uses of these surfactants. Stable Langmuir monolayers were formed composed of single and double tailed sulfobetaine lipids. Surface pressure-area isotherm, Brewster Angle Microscopy and X-ray and neutron reflectometry measurements were conducted to measure the two-dimensional phase behaviour and out-of-plane structure of the monolayers as a function of molecular area. Sulfobetaine lipids are able to form stable Langmuir monolayers with two dimensional phase behaviour analogous to that seen for the well-studied phospholipids. Changing the number of carbon tail groups on the lipid from one to two promotes the existence of a liquid condensed phase due to increased Van der Waals interactions between the tail groups. Thus the structure of the monolayers appears to be defined by the relative sizes of the head and tail groups in a predictable way. However, the presence of sub-phase ions has little effect on the monolayer structure, behaviour that is surprisingly different to

  12. Evaluation of an Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) in a problem based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Arif N; Goldhoff, Patricia; Quattrochi, James J

    2005-08-01

    This study sought to assess the introduction of a web-based innovation in medical education that complements traditional problem-based learning curricula. Utilizing the case method as its fundamental educational approach, the Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) allows students to interact with each other, faculty and a virtual patient in difficult neurological cases. Given the paucity of available metrics to benchmark online systems, we complement user perceptions with data on system utilization. We describe a case study of distinct, small group tutorials over 2 years as part of the Human Nervous System and Behavior (HNSB) course at the Harvard Medical School. Participating students and faculty were interviewed following completion of the course and their utilization of the system was recorded and examined. Students each spent 3.2+/-1.3 h (mean+/-SD) through 8.6+/-2.8 accessions per week using ICON outside of required tutorial time. Faculty each spent 4.8+/-3.4 h through 16.6+/-8.9 accessions per week on ICON. Students identified real-time engagement, stronger relationships with faculty, increased accountability to the tutorial group and self-selected pace as the most beneficial characteristics of the ICON-based tutorial in comparison to traditional problem based learning (PBL) tutorials. Faculty identified enhanced collaboration with students and more realistic student experiences as the most beneficial characteristics. Both students and faculty reported that limitations of ICON included increased time investment for faculty and increased reliance on good faculty mentorship. This is the first study of the ICON learning system in undergraduate medical education, a platform designed to facilitate collaboration outside of the classroom. Data on user perceptions and system utilization suggest that both faculty and students chose to adopt this online learning system as a means for collaboration. The study also outlines future avenues for research in assessing

  13. What You See Is (Not) What You Get: Collaborative Composing in Visual Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Margaret; Warner, Anne Bradford

    2005-01-01

    The problems of collaboration take on new shapes and meanings when writing/composing moves into the visual realm. This claim is based on our experiences working with the Bush-Hewlett Grant Project at Spelman College, which was designed to foster collaboration through the building of course-based Web sites. Our study analyzes three sites, and the…

  14. Photon-material interaction based on single silt diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goona, Nithin Kumar; Reddy, P. S.; Reddy, G. R. C.; Singh, Priya

    2016-09-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle explains single slit diffraction1 where maximum is always at the centre. The same experiment has been conducted but with transparent walls i.e. the material present on either side of the slit, instead of opaque material. The observed result is a minimum at the centre in between two maximum. It is intuitive that atleast some photons passed through the slit must end up at the centre of the diffraction pattern but the result is different. The diffraction pattern occurs as the photons interact with the material around the slit. While uncertainty principle cannot give quantitative explanation as the photons confined in gap between slits still occupy the same space whether it is passing through a slit or not. This paper discusses various experiments and results by examining the interactions between photons and the material of the wall which makes the slit for better understanding of properties of light.

  15. Stroke, music, and creative output: Alfred Schnittke and other composers.

    PubMed

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998), a celebrated Russian composer of the twentieth century, suffered from several strokes which affected his left cerebral hemisphere. The disease, however, did not diminish his musical talent. Moreover, he stated that his illness in a way facilitated his work. The composer showed amazingly high productivity after his first and second injuries of the central nervous system. The main topic of this chapter is the effect of strokes on Schnittke's output, creativity, and style of music. A brief biography of the composer with the chronology of his brain hemorrhages is included. In addition, the influence of cerebrovascular lesions on creative potential of other prominent composers such as Benjamin Britten, Jean Langlais, Vissarion Shebalin, Igor Stravinsky, and Ira Randall Thompson is discussed.

  16. Composable IO: A Novel Resource Sharing Platform in Personal Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoxin; Wang, Wei; Lin, Ben; Miao, Kai

    A fundamental goal for Cloud computing is to group resources to accomplish tasks that may require strong computing or communication capability. In this paper we design specific resource sharing technology under which IO peripherals can be shared among Cloud members. In particular, in a personal Cloud that is built up by a number of personal devices, IO peripherals at any device can be applied to support application running at another device. We call this IO sharing composable IO because it is equivalent to composing IOs from different devices for an application. We design composable USB and achieve pro-migration USB access, namely a migrated application running at the targeted host can still access the USB IO peripherals at the source host. This is supplementary to traditional VM migration under which application can only use resources from the device where the application runs. Experimental results show that through composable IO applications in personal Cloud can achieve much better user experience.

  17. Non-Native Speaker Interaction Management Strategies in a Network-Based Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the dyad-based communication of two groups of non-native speakers (NNSs) of English involved in real time interaction in a type of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool known as a MOO. The object of this semester long study was to examine the ways in which the subjects managed their L2 interaction during…

  18. The Reality of Web-Based Interaction in an Egyptian Distance Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadik, Alaa

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study conducted to evaluate the reality of interaction in a web-based distance education course. The learners were Egyptian first-grade secondary school students (15-16 years old) and the learning subject is mathematics. To investigate students' interactions via the Web, a Web-based learning environment was…

  19. Market-based Predictors of Interactivity at Southeast Asian Online Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    Market-based and press-freedom variables were tested as predictors of "interactive" online journalism at the Web companions of 17 English-language Asian newspapers. A multidimensional conception of interactivity was used in the analysis. Findings suggest that market-based variables predict only certain facets of an online newspaper's…

  20. Non-Native Speaker Interaction Management Strategies in a Network-Based Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the dyad-based communication of two groups of non-native speakers (NNSs) of English involved in real time interaction in a type of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool known as a MOO. The object of this semester long study was to examine the ways in which the subjects managed their L2 interaction during…

  1. Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release...University, West Lafayette IN 47907 Grant#: HDTRA1-09-1-0047 Young Investigator Award “ Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials...impact on the development of human resources? What is the impact on physical, institutional, and information resources that form infrastructure? What

  2. Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an invited adaptation of the IEEE Education Society Distinguished Lecture Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning. Interactive video anchors have a cognitive theory base, and they help to enlarge the context of learning with information-rich real-world situations. Carefully selected movie clips and…

  3. Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an invited adaptation of the IEEE Education Society Distinguished Lecture Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning. Interactive video anchors have a cognitive theory base, and they help to enlarge the context of learning with information-rich real-world situations. Carefully selected movie clips and…

  4. Human-Swarm Interactions Based on Managing Attractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade-offs between the scalability of interactions and mitigating the vulnerability...influence can cause the swarm to switch between attractors. We further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade- offs between the...attractors of dynamic systems, bio-inspired swarms, quorum sensing 1. INTRODUCTION Swarms provide complex behaviors out of simple agents following simple

  5. A Jupyter-based Interactive Visualization Tool for Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The ever-growing datasets in observational astronomy have challenged scientists in many aspects, including an efficient and interactive data exploration and visualization. Many tools have been developed to confront this challenge. However, they usually focus on displaying the actual images or focus on visualizing patterns within catalogs. Here we present Vizic, a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. Vizic visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog. The displayed objects in the map are highly interactive and customizable comparing to those in the observation images. These objects can be filtered by or colored by their property values, such as redshift and/or magnitude or can be sub-selected using a lasso-like tool. In addition, Vizic also allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the image. We have implemented a minimum spanning tree overlay and a Voronoi diagram overlay. Both overlays can be generated, added or removed with just a click of a button. All the data is kept in a non relational database, and the interfaces were developed in JavaScript and Python to work on Jupyter notebooks which allows to create custom widgets, user generated scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map.Vizic can be adopted in variety of exercises, for example, data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies or public data release for large surveys.

  6. HIPPIE: Integrating Protein Interaction Networks with Experiment Based Quality Scores

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein function is often modulated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and therefore defining the partners of a protein helps to understand its activity. PPIs can be detected through different experimental approaches and are collected in several expert curated databases. These databases are used by researchers interested in examining detailed information on particular proteins. In many analyses the reliability of the characterization of the interactions becomes important and it might be necessary to select sets of PPIs of different confidence levels. To this goal, we generated HIPPIE (Human Integrated Protein-Protein Interaction rEference), a human PPI dataset with a normalized scoring scheme that integrates multiple experimental PPI datasets. HIPPIE's scoring scheme has been optimized by human experts and a computer algorithm to reflect the amount and quality of evidence for a given PPI and we show that these scores correlate to the quality of the experimental characterization. The HIPPIE web tool (available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/hippie) allows researchers to do network analyses focused on likely true PPI sets by generating subnetworks around proteins of interest at a specified confidence level. PMID:22348130

  7. Model-based description of environment interaction for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Carlo; Pagello, Enrico; Vianello, Marco

    1999-01-01

    We consider a mobile robot that attempts to accomplish a task by reaching a given goal, and interacts with its environment through a finite set of actions and observations. The interaction between robot and environment is modeled by Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP). The robot takes its decisions in presence of uncertainty about the current state, by maximizing its reward gained during interactions with the environment. It is able to self-locate into the environment by collecting actions and perception histories during the navigation. To make the state estimation more reliable, we introduce an additional information in the model without adding new states and without discretizing the considered measures. Thus, we associate to the state transition probabilities also a continuous metric given through the mean and the variance of some significant sensor measurements suitable to be kept under continuous form, such as odometric measurements, showing that also such unreliable data can supply a great deal of information to the robot. The overall control system of the robot is structured as a two-levels layered architecture, where the low level implements several collision avoidance algorithms, while the upper level takes care of the navigation problem. In this paper, we concentrate on how to use POMDP models at the upper level.

  8. TopoAngler: Interactive Topology-based Extraction of Fishes.

    PubMed

    Bock, Alexander; Doraiswamy, Harish; Summers, Adam; Silva, Claudio

    2017-08-29

    We present TopoAngler, a visualization framework that enables an interactive user-guided segmentation of fishes contained in a micro-CT scan. The inherent noise in the CT scan coupled with the often disconnected (and sometimes broken) skeletal structure of fishes makes an automatic segmentation of the volume impractical. To overcome this, our framework combines techniques from computational topology with an interactive visual interface, enabling the human-in-the-loop to effectively extract fishes from the volume. In the first step, the join tree of the input is used to create a hierarchical segmentation of the volume. Through the use of linked views, the visual interface then allows users to interactively explore this hierarchy, and gather parts of individual fishes into a coherent sub-volume, thus reconstructing entire fishes. Our framework was primarily developed for its application to CT scans of fishes, generated as part of the ScanAllFish project, through close collaboration with their lead scientist. However, we expect it to also be applicable in other biological applications where a single dataset contains multiple specimen; a common routine that is now widely followed in laboratories to increase throughput of expensive CT scanners.

  9. An Interactive Internet-Based Plate for Assessing Lunchtime Food Intake: A Validation Study on Male Employees

    PubMed Central

    Bellocco, Rino; Bakkman, Linda; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    Background Misreporting food intake is common because most health screenings rely on self-reports. The more accurate methods (eg, weighing food) are costly, time consuming, and impractical. Objectives We developed a new instrument for reporting food intake—an Internet-based interactive virtual food plate. The objective of this study was to validate this instrument’s ability to assess lunch intake. Methods Participants were asked to compose an ordinary lunch meal using both a virtual and a real lunch plate (with real food on a real plate). The participants ate their real lunch meals on-site. Before and after pictures of the composed lunch meals were taken. Both meals included identical food items. Participants were randomized to start with either instrument. The 2 instruments were compared using correlation and concordance measures (total energy intake, nutritional components, quantity of food, and participant characteristics). Results A total of 55 men (median age: 45 years, median body mass index [BMI]: 25.8 kg/m2) participated. We found an overall overestimation of reported median energy intake using the computer plate (3044 kJ, interquartile range [IQR] 1202 kJ) compared with the real lunch plate (2734 kJ, IQR 1051 kJ, P<.001). Spearman rank correlations and concordance correlations for energy intake and nutritional components ranged between 0.58 to 0.79 and 0.65 to 0.81, respectively. Conclusion Although it slightly overestimated, our computer plate provides promising results in assessing lunch intake. PMID:23335728

  10. Exploring the bases for a mixed reality stroke rehabilitation system, part I: a unified approach for representing action, quantitative evaluation, and interactive feedback.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Nicole; Attygalle, Suneth; Wolf, Steven L; Rikakis, Thanassis

    2011-08-30

    Although principles based in motor learning, rehabilitation, and human-computer interfaces can guide the design of effective interactive systems for rehabilitation, a unified approach that connects these key principles into an integrated design, and can form a methodology that can be generalized to interactive stroke rehabilitation, is presently unavailable. This paper integrates phenomenological approaches to interaction and embodied knowledge with rehabilitation practices and theories to achieve the basis for a methodology that can support effective adaptive, interactive rehabilitation. Our resulting methodology provides guidelines for the development of an action representation, quantification of action, and the design of interactive feedback. As Part I of a two-part series, this paper presents key principles of the unified approach. Part II then describes the application of this approach within the implementation of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) system for stroke rehabilitation. The accompanying principles for composing novel mixed reality environments for stroke rehabilitation can advance the design and implementation of effective mixed reality systems for the clinical setting, and ultimately be adapted for home-based application. They furthermore can be applied to other rehabilitation needs beyond stroke.

  11. Exploring the bases for a mixed reality stroke rehabilitation system, Part I: A unified approach for representing action, quantitative evaluation, and interactive feedback

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although principles based in motor learning, rehabilitation, and human-computer interfaces can guide the design of effective interactive systems for rehabilitation, a unified approach that connects these key principles into an integrated design, and can form a methodology that can be generalized to interactive stroke rehabilitation, is presently unavailable. Results This paper integrates phenomenological approaches to interaction and embodied knowledge with rehabilitation practices and theories to achieve the basis for a methodology that can support effective adaptive, interactive rehabilitation. Our resulting methodology provides guidelines for the development of an action representation, quantification of action, and the design of interactive feedback. As Part I of a two-part series, this paper presents key principles of the unified approach. Part II then describes the application of this approach within the implementation of the Adaptive Mixed Reality Rehabilitation (AMRR) system for stroke rehabilitation. Conclusions The accompanying principles for composing novel mixed reality environments for stroke rehabilitation can advance the design and implementation of effective mixed reality systems for the clinical setting, and ultimately be adapted for home-based application. They furthermore can be applied to other rehabilitation needs beyond stroke. PMID:21875441

  12. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  13. Determination of base binding strength and base stacking interaction of DNA duplex using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-03-16

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes.

  14. Predicting drugs side effects based on chemical-chemical interactions and protein-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  15. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine. PMID:24078917

  16. Discovering Pair-Wise Genetic Interactions: An Information Theory-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ignac, Tomasz M.; Skupin, Alexander; Sakhanenko, Nikita A.; Galas, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic variation, including that which underlies health and disease in humans, results in part from multiple interactions among both genetic variation and environmental factors. While diseases or phenotypes caused by single gene variants can be identified by established association methods and family-based approaches, complex phenotypic traits resulting from multi-gene interactions remain very difficult to characterize. Here we describe a new method based on information theory, and demonstrate how it improves on previous approaches to identifying genetic interactions, including both synthetic and modifier kinds of interactions. We apply our measure, called interaction distance, to previously analyzed data sets of yeast sporulation efficiency, lipid related mouse data and several human disease models to characterize the method. We show how the interaction distance can reveal novel gene interaction candidates in experimental and simulated data sets, and outperforms other measures in several circumstances. The method also allows us to optimize case/control sample composition for clinical studies. PMID:24670935

  17. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods.

  18. Quantum teleportation through an entangled state composed of displaced vacuum and single-photon states

    SciTech Connect

    Podoshvedov, S. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study a teleportation protocol of an unknown macroscopic qubit by means of a quantum channel composed of the displaced vacuum and single-photon states. The scheme is based on linear optical devices such as a beam splitter and photon number resolving detectors. A method based on conditional measurement is used to generate both the macroscopic qubit and entangled state composed from displaced vacuum and single-photon states. We show that such a qubit has both macroscopic and microscopic properties. In particular, we investigate a quantum teleportation protocol from a macroscopic object to a microscopic state.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Examination of the Trophic Interactions Between a Species in Decline, the Ozark Hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis bishopi), and a Prey Base Composed of Multiple Crayfish Species Using Stable Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiler, W. R.; Wheeler, B. A.; Trauth, S. E.; Christian, A. D.

    2005-05-01

    Since the early 1980's the Ozark hellbender, North America's largest salamander, has undergone a series of declines throughout its entire range. Two Arkansas rivers known to have populations of hellbenders are the Eleven Point (EP) and Spring (SR) rivers. Ozark hellbenders from the SR have undergone the most drastic population decline witnessed within their range over the past 20 years. Shifts in benthic habitat and community compositions could influence these declines, which could affect the species composition of their primary prey item, the crayfish. The objectives of our study were to use stable C and N isotope analysis to 1) determine what individual or multiple species of crayfish contribute to hellbender diets, and 2) determine if certain size classes of crayfish contribute to hellbender diets. We chose four study sites, three from the EP and one from the SR and collected tissue plugs from a total of 10 hellbenders. Tissue samples from three size classes of the crayfish known to occur in the EP and SR rivers were also collected. By linking stable C and N ratios results and relative abundances of crayfish in each of the river sites, we hope to identify species-specific trophic relationships between hellbenders and crayfish.

  1. Magnetic hysteresis based on dipolar interactions in granular magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allia, Paolo; Coisson, Marco; Knobel, Marcelo; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco

    1999-11-01

    The magnetic hysteresis of granular magnetic systems is investigated in the high-temperature limit (T>> blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles). Measurements of magnetization curves have been performed at room temperature on various samples of granular bimetallic alloys of the family Cu100-xCox (x=5-20 at. %) obtained in ribbon form by planar flow casting in a controlled atmosphere, and submitted to different thermal treatments. The loop amplitude and shape, which are functions of sample composition and thermal history, are studied taking advantage of a novel method of graphical representation, particularly apt to emphasize the features of thin, elongated loops. The hysteresis is explained in terms of the effect of magnetic interactions of the dipolar type among magnetic-metal particles, acting to hinder the response of the system of moments to isothermal changes of the applied field. Such a property is accounted for in a mean-field scheme, by introducing a memory term in the argument of the Langevin function which describes the anhysteretic behavior of an assembly of noninteracting superparamagnetic particles. The rms field arising from the cumulative effect of dipolar interactions is linked by the theory to a measurable quantity, the reduced remanence of a major symmetric hysteresis loop. The theory's self-consistence and adequacy have been properly tested at room temperature on all examined systems. The agreement with experimental results is always striking, indicating that at high temperatures the magnetic hysteresis of granular systems is dominated by interparticle, rather than single-particle, effects. Dipolar interactions seem to fully determine the magnetic hysteresis in the high-temperature limit for low Co content (x<=10). For higher concentrations of magnetic metal, the experimental results indicate that additional hysteretic mechanisms have to be introduced.

  2. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  3. Task-Based Learning: The Interaction between Tasks and Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between tasks and learners in task-based learning. Findings suggest that manipulation of task characteristics and conditions may not achieve the intended pedagogic outcomes, and that new ways are needed to focus learners' attention of form without sacrificing the meaning-driven principles of task-based learning.…

  4. Comprehensive characterization of molecular interactions based on nanomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin; Braun, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (approximately 748*10(6) Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions.

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of Molecular Interactions Based on Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (∼748*106 Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions. PMID:18978938

  6. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2017-03-29

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  7. Child second language interaction in science-based tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Cynthia Leigh

    While quasi-experimental in design, this study utilized qualitative data collection and analysis methods to examine the questions of whether students' speech act behavior and language use would vary by linguistic grouping. Second grade Puerto Rican native speakers of Spanish, and native English speakers completed sets of paired, hands-on, science activities. Children were paired in two linguistic groupings: heterogeneous (English native speaker/non-native speaker), and homogeneous (English non-native speaker/non-native speaker, or English native speaker/native speaker). Speech acts and use of target and native language in the two linguistic groupings were compared. Interviews with both the students and their teachers provided further understanding of the speech act behavior. Most prior research has dealt with university level adults learning English. Previous research that has dealt with children and second language interaction has often focused on teacher talk directed to the children, and no child/child interaction studies have attempted to control for variables such as linguistic grouping. Results indicated that linguistically heterogeneous groupings led to higher percentages of English use for non-native speakers. Homogeneous grouping led to higher percentages of native Spanish use. English native speakers' speech act behavior remained consistent in terms of dominance or passivity of behavior regardless of linguistic grouping, but there is the possibility that non-English speakers may behave in a slightly more passive manner when in heterogeneous grouping.

  8. Mean Field Analysis of Large-Scale Interacting Populations of Stochastic Conductance-Based Spiking Neurons Using the Klimontovich Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfo, Daniel; Rodriguez, Roger; Tuckwell, Henry C.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large-scale interacting neural populations, composed of conductance based, spiking model neurons with modifiable synaptic connection strengths, which are possibly also subjected to external noisy currents. The network dynamics is controlled by a set of neural population probability distributions (PPD) which are constructed along the same lines as in the Klimontovich approach to the kinetic theory of plasmas. An exact non-closed, nonlinear, system of integro-partial differential equations is derived for the PPDs. As is customary, a closing procedure leads to a mean field limit. The equations we have obtained are of the same type as those which have been recently derived using rigorous techniques of probability theory. The numerical solutions of these so called McKean-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, which are only valid in the limit of infinite size networks, actually shows that the statistical measures as obtained from PPDs are in good agreement with those obtained through direct integration of the stochastic dynamical system for large but finite size networks. Although numerical solutions have been obtained for networks of Fitzhugh-Nagumo model neurons, which are often used to approximate Hodgkin-Huxley model neurons, the theory can be readily applied to networks of general conductance-based model neurons of arbitrary dimension.

  9. Mean Field Analysis of Large-Scale Interacting Populations of Stochastic Conductance-Based Spiking Neurons Using the Klimontovich Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfo, Daniel; Rodriguez, Roger; Tuckwell, Henry C.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large-scale interacting neural populations, composed of conductance based, spiking model neurons with modifiable synaptic connection strengths, which are possibly also subjected to external noisy currents. The network dynamics is controlled by a set of neural population probability distributions (PPD) which are constructed along the same lines as in the Klimontovich approach to the kinetic theory of plasmas. An exact non-closed, nonlinear, system of integro-partial differential equations is derived for the PPDs. As is customary, a closing procedure leads to a mean field limit. The equations we have obtained are of the same type as those which have been recently derived using rigorous techniques of probability theory. The numerical solutions of these so called McKean-Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equations, which are only valid in the limit of infinite size networks, actually shows that the statistical measures as obtained from PPDs are in good agreement with those obtained through direct integration of the stochastic dynamical system for large but finite size networks. Although numerical solutions have been obtained for networks of Fitzhugh-Nagumo model neurons, which are often used to approximate Hodgkin-Huxley model neurons, the theory can be readily applied to networks of general conductance-based model neurons of arbitrary dimension.

  10. Direct measurement of acid-base interaction energy at solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anish; Prasad, Shishir; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2010-12-07

    We have studied acid-base interactions at solid-liquid and solid-solid interfaces using interface-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The shift of the sapphire hydroxyl peak in contact with several polar and nonpolar liquids and polymers was used to determine the interaction energy. The trend in the interaction energies cannot be explained by measuring only water contact angles. Molecular rearrangements at the sapphire interface, to maximize the interaction of the acid-base groups, play a dominant role, and these effects are not accounted for in the current theoretical models. These results provide important insights into understanding adhesion, friction, and wetting on solid interfaces.

  11. Etude theorique des fluctuations structurales dans les composes organiques a dimensionnalite reduite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Benoit

    'instabilite spin-Peierls apparait ensuite vers 60K. Notre etude theorique montre qu'un modele d'electrons en interaction de type "g-ologie" avec possibilite de processus umklapp permet de bien rendre compte des proprietes physiques de ce systeme. Finalement, la troisieme partie de cette these porte sur l'etude des premiers composes organiques quasi-unidimensionnels a avoir ete synthetises: les composes de la famille du TTF-TCNQ. Notre etude theorique des instabilites structurales que presentent ces composes n'est evidemment pas la premiere. L'originalite de cette derniere est qu'elle tient compte des fortes interactions entre les electrons, presentent dans ces composes. Pour tenir compte de telles interactions, nous avons choisi la formulation "liquide de Luttinger" qui nous permet de mieux traiter ce regimne dit de couplage fort.

  12. Interactive applications for sketch-based editable polycube map.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ismael; Xia, Jiazhi; He, Ying; Xin, Shi-Qing; Patow, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a sketch-based editable polycube mapping method that, given a general mesh and a simple polycube that coarsely resembles the shape of the object, plus sketched features indicating relevant correspondences between the two, provides a uniform, regular, and user-controllable quads-only mesh that can be used as a basis structure for subdivision. Large scale models with complex geometry and topology can be processed efficiently with simple, intuitive operations. We show that the simple, intuitive nature of the polycube map is a substantial advantage from the point of view of the interface by demonstrating a series of applications, including kit-basing, shape morphing, painting over the parameterization domain, and GPU-friendly tessellated subdivision displacement, where the user is also able to control the number of patches in the base mesh by the construction of the base polycube.

  13. Protein interaction network constructing based on text mining and reinforcement learning with application to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Shen, Bairong

    2015-08-01

    Constructing interaction network from biomedical texts is a very important and interesting work. The authors take advantage of text mining and reinforcement learning approaches to establish protein interaction network. Considering the high computational efficiency of co-occurrence-based interaction extraction approaches and high precision of linguistic patterns approaches, the authors propose an interaction extracting algorithm where they utilise frequently used linguistic patterns to extract the interactions from texts and then find out interactions from extended unprocessed texts under the basic idea of co-occurrence approach, meanwhile they discount the interaction extracted from extended texts. They put forward a reinforcement learning-based algorithm to establish a protein interaction network, where nodes represent proteins and edges denote interactions. During the evolutionary process, a node selects another node and the attained reward determines which predicted interaction should be reinforced. The topology of the network is updated by the agent until an optimal network is formed. They used texts downloaded from PubMed to construct a prostate cancer protein interaction network by the proposed methods. The results show that their method brought out pretty good matching rate. Network topology analysis results also demonstrate that the curves of node degree distribution, node degree probability and probability distribution of constructed network accord with those of the scale-free network well.

  14. A global test for gene‐gene interactions based on random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Moore, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Statistical interactions between markers of genetic variation, or gene‐gene interactions, are believed to play an important role in the etiology of many multifactorial diseases and other complex phenotypes. Unfortunately, detecting gene‐gene interactions is extremely challenging due to the large number of potential interactions and ambiguity regarding marker coding and interaction scale. For many data sets, there is insufficient statistical power to evaluate all candidate gene‐gene interactions. In these cases, a global test for gene‐gene interactions may be the best option. Global tests have much greater power relative to multiple individual interaction tests and can be used on subsets of the markers as an initial filter prior to testing for specific interactions. In this paper, we describe a novel global test for gene‐gene interactions, the global epistasis test (GET), that is based on results from random matrix theory. As we show via simulation studies based on previously proposed models for common diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer, our proposed GET method has superior performance characteristics relative to existing global gene‐gene interaction tests. A glaucoma GWAS data set is used to demonstrate the practical utility of the GET method. PMID:27386793

  15. A global test for gene-gene interactions based on random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Frost, H Robert; Amos, Christopher I; Moore, Jason H

    2016-12-01

    Statistical interactions between markers of genetic variation, or gene-gene interactions, are believed to play an important role in the etiology of many multifactorial diseases and other complex phenotypes. Unfortunately, detecting gene-gene interactions is extremely challenging due to the large number of potential interactions and ambiguity regarding marker coding and interaction scale. For many data sets, there is insufficient statistical power to evaluate all candidate gene-gene interactions. In these cases, a global test for gene-gene interactions may be the best option. Global tests have much greater power relative to multiple individual interaction tests and can be used on subsets of the markers as an initial filter prior to testing for specific interactions. In this paper, we describe a novel global test for gene-gene interactions, the global epistasis test (GET), that is based on results from random matrix theory. As we show via simulation studies based on previously proposed models for common diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer, our proposed GET method has superior performance characteristics relative to existing global gene-gene interaction tests. A glaucoma GWAS data set is used to demonstrate the practical utility of the GET method.

  16. MINDS: A microcomputer interactive data system for 8086-based controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A microcomputer interactive data system (MINDS) software package for the 8086 family of microcomputers is described. To enhance program understandability and ease of code maintenance, the software is written in PL/M-86, Intel Corporation's high-level system implementation language. The MINDS software is intended to run in residence with real-time digital control software to provide displays of steady-state and transient data. In addition, the MINDS package provides classic monitor capabilities along with extended provisions for debugging an executing control system. The software uses the CP/M-86 operating system developed by Digital Research, Inc., to provide program load capabilities along with a uniform file structure for data and table storage. Finally, a library of input and output subroutines to be used with consoles equipped with PL/M-86 and assembly language is described.

  17. Human-Interaction Challenges in UAV-Based Autonomous Surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Michael; Harris, Robert; Shafto, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous UAVs provide a platform for intelligent surveillance in application domains ranging from security and military operations to scientific information gathering and land management. Surveillance tasks are often long duration, requiring that any approach be adaptive to changes in the environment or user needs. We describe a decision- theoretic model of surveillance, appropriate for use on our autonomous helicopter, that provides a basis for optimizing the value of information returned by the UAV. From this approach arise a range of challenges in making this framework practical for use by human operators lacking specialized knowledge of autonomy and mathematics. This paper describes our platform and approach, then describes human-interaction challenges arising from this approach that we have identified and begun to address.

  18. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-11-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties.

  19. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-01-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties. PMID:27897165

  20. Emerging Supramolecular Therapeutic Carriers Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anis Abdul; Dou, Qingqing; Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-05-06

    Recent advances in host-guest chemistry have significantly influenced the construction of supramolecular soft biomaterials. The highly selective and non-covalent interactions provide vast possibilities of manipulating supramolecular self-assemblies at the molecular level, allowing a rational design to control the sizes and morphologies of the resultant objects as carrier vehicles in a delivery system. In this Focus Review, the most recent developments of supramolecular self-assemblies through host-guest inclusion, including nanoparticles, micelles, vesicles, hydrogels, and various stimuli-responsive morphology transition materials are presented. These sophisticated materials with diverse functions, oriented towards therapeutic agent delivery, are further summarized into several active domains in the areas of drug delivery, gene delivery, co-delivery and site-specific targeting deliveries. Finally, the possible strategies for future design of multifunctional delivery carriers by combining host-guest chemistry with biological interface science are proposed.

  1. Inquiry and groups: student interactions in cooperative inquiry-based science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-03-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic inquiry based primary science class setting. Thirty-one upper primary students were videotaped working in cooperative inquiry based science activities. Cooperative talk and negotiation of the science content was analysed to identify any high-level group interactions. The data show that while all groups have incidences of high-level content-related group interactions, the frequency and duration of these interactions were limited. No specific pattern of preceding events was identified and no episodes of high-level content-related group interactions were immediately preceded by the teacher's interactions with the groups. This in situ study demonstrated that even without any kind of scaffolding, specific skills in knowing how to implement cooperative inquiry based science, high-level content-related group interactions did occur very briefly. Support for teachers to develop their knowledge and skills in facilitating cooperative inquiry based science learning is warranted to ensure that high-level content-related group interactions and the associated conceptual learning are not left to chance in science classrooms.

  2. Combining region-based and imprecise boundary-based cues for interactive medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan-Lee; Xie, Xianghua; Essa, Ehab

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present an approach combining both region selection and user point selection for user-assisted segmentation as either an enclosed object or an open curve, investigate the method of image segmentation in specific medical applications (user-assisted segmentation of the media-adventitia border in intravascular ultrasound images, and lumen border in optical coherence tomography images), and then demonstrate the method with generic images to show how it could be utilized in other types of medical image and is not limited to the applications described. The proposed method combines point-based soft constraint on object boundary and stroke-based regional constraint. The user points act as attraction points and are treated as soft constraints rather than hard constraints that the segmented boundary has to pass through. The user can also use strokes to specify region of interest. The probabilities of region of interest for each pixel are then calculated, and their discontinuity is used to indicate object boundary. The combinations of different types of user constraints and image features allow flexible and robust segmentation, which is formulated as an energy minimization problem on a multilayered graph and is solved using a shortest path search algorithm. We show that this combinatorial approach allows efficient and effective interactive segmentation, which can be used with both open and closed curves to segment a variety of images in different ways. The proposed method is demonstrated in the two medical applications, that is, intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography images, where image artefacts such as acoustic shadow and calcification are commonplace and thus user guidance is desirable. We carried out both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the results for the medical data; comparing the proposed method against a number of interactive segmentation techniques.

  3. Dynamic Communication of Humanoid Robot with Multiple People Based on Interaction Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Shohei; Ohba, Hayato; Yamamoto, Shunichi; Toda, Mitsuhiko; Komatani, Kazunori; Ogata, Tetsuya; Okuno, Hiroshi G.

    Research on human-robot interaction is getting an increasing amount of attention. Since most research has dealt with communication between one robot and one person, quite few researchers have studied communication between a robot and multiple people. This paper presents a method that enables robots to communicate with multiple people using the ``selection priority of the interactive partner'' based on the concept of Proxemics. In this method, a robot changes active sensory-motor modalities based on the interaction distance between itself and a person. Our method was implemented into a humanoid robot, SIG2. SIG2 has various sensory-motor modalities to interact with humans. A demonstration of SIG2 showed that our method selected an appropriate interaction partner during interaction with multiple people.

  4. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. K.; Fu, H. M.; Sha, P. F.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  5. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Z K; Fu, H M; Sha, P F; Zhu, Z W; Wang, A M; Li, H; Zhang, H W; Zhang, H F; Hu, Z Q

    2015-03-11

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  6. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  7. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene–Gene Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host–pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene–gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene–gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene–gene interactions demonstrates that host–pathogen gene–gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically

  8. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene-Gene Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host-pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene-gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene-gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene-gene interactions demonstrates that host-pathogen gene-gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically represented. Our

  9. ANAP: An Integrated Knowledge Base for Arabidopsis Protein Interaction Network Analysis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congmao; Marshall, Alex; Zhang, Dabing; Wilson, Zoe A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein interactions are fundamental to the molecular processes occurring within an organism and can be utilized in network biology to help organize, simplify, and understand biological complexity. Currently, there are more than 10 publicly available Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein interaction databases. However, there are limitations with these databases, including different types of interaction evidence, a lack of defined standards for protein identifiers, differing levels of information, and, critically, a lack of integration between them. In this paper, we present an interactive bioinformatics Web tool, ANAP (Arabidopsis Network Analysis Pipeline), which serves to effectively integrate the different data sets and maximize access to available data. ANAP has been developed for Arabidopsis protein interaction integration and network-based study to facilitate functional protein network analysis. ANAP integrates 11 Arabidopsis protein interaction databases, comprising 201,699 unique protein interaction pairs, 15,208 identifiers (including 11,931 The Arabidopsis Information Resource Arabidopsis Genome Initiative codes), 89 interaction detection methods, 73 species that interact with Arabidopsis, and 6,161 references. ANAP can be used as a knowledge base for constructing protein interaction networks based on user input and supports both direct and indirect interaction analysis. It has an intuitive graphical interface allowing easy network visualization and provides extensive detailed evidence for each interaction. In addition, ANAP displays the gene and protein annotation in the generated interactive network with links to The Arabidopsis Information Resource, the AtGenExpress Visualization Tool, the Arabidopsis 1,001 Genomes GBrowse, the Protein Knowledgebase, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and the Ensembl Genome Browser to significantly aid functional network analysis. The tool is available open access at http

  10. Composed planar Hall effect sensors with dual-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Vladislav; Roy, Debangsu; Schultz, Moty; Klein, Lior

    2016-02-01

    We present a composed planar Hall effect sensor with two modes of operation: (a) an ON mode where the composed sensor responds to magnetic field excitations similarly to the response of a regular planar Hall effect sensor, and (b) an OFF mode where the response is negligible. The composed planar Hall effect sensor switches from the OFF mode to the ON mode when it is exposed to a magnetic field which exceeds a certain threshold determined by the sensor design. The features of this sensor make it useful as a switch triggered by magnetic field and as a sensing device with memory, as its mode of operation indicates exposure to a magnetic field larger than a certain threshold without the need to be activated during the exposure itself.

  11. Classified Bibliography on Bibliographic Data Base Interaction, Compatibility and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, H.B.

    This is the third in a series of eight reports of a research study for the National Agricultural Library (NAL) on the effective utilization of bibliographic data bases in machine-readable form. It consists of about 750 references collected to provide background data for the seven technical tasks of the study. The bibliography is set up to…

  12. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  13. Classified Bibliography on Bibliographic Data Base Interaction, Compatibility and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, H.B.

    This is the third in a series of eight reports of a research study for the National Agricultural Library (NAL) on the effective utilization of bibliographic data bases in machine-readable form. It consists of about 750 references collected to provide background data for the seven technical tasks of the study. The bibliography is set up to…

  14. Supporting Language Students' Interactions in Web-Based Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Marie-Noelle; Goodfellow, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Looks at on-line tutor strategies for the support of students learning a second language with the help of a Web-based asynchronous textual conference. Looks specifically at strategies used by three tutors who participated in a project with students of French. (Author/VWL)

  15. Inquiry-Based Learning with or without Facilitator Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerasinghe, Thushani Alwis; Ramberg, Robert; Hewagamage, Kamalanath Priyantha

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings of a study investigating how students, in four online courses, engaged in inquiry-based learning with and without support from a facilitator. The investigation was conducted by analyzing discussions of the online courses using the community of inquiry model. The results of the study imply that students in online…

  16. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  17. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  18. Interactions of NO2 with sewage sludge based composite adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-06-15

    Interactions of NO2 present in most air were analyzed at room temperature on composite sewage sludge-derived adsorbents. They consist of carbonaceous and inorganic phases with the majority of the latter. The adsorption capacity was evaluated using the dynamic breakthrough experiments. The materials before and after NO2 exposure were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis and FTIR. The results showed differences in the surface activities of sludge-derived materials towards immobilization and reduction of nitric dioxide. Nitrates and nitrite are the main products of surface reactions. This is linked to the presence of active oxides and hydroxides, which are formed when the surface is exposed to water. The highest activity of the sample pyrolyzed at 650 degrees C is owing to the high content of those species formed as a result of decomposition of inorganic salts (likely chlorides, sulfates and phosphates) during thermal treatment. When sludge is pyrolyzed at 950 degrees C those oxides are engaged in stable mineral phases formed in solid-state reactions, which limits the surface activity towards NO2 retention. The reactivity of the high temperature pyrolyzed samples can be linked to the physical adsorption of water. In a water film nitrous and nitric acid can be formed and they can further react with inorganic and carbonaceous phases to the limited extent.

  19. IP-based streaming technology for interactive MPEG-4 contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Jeong, Seyoon; Cha, Jihun; Kim, Kyuheon

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, we present an MPEG-4 contents streaming system and propose MPEG-4 contents streaming scheme by using priority. The presented streaming system which consists of a server and a client supports MPEG-4 contents compliant with ISO/IEC 14496-1 and enables a user to interact with MPEG-4 contents over IP networks. The server consists of GUI, Server Management Layer, Sync Layer, and Delivery Layer. The client supports to display MPEG-4 contents stored in local storage or received through IP networks. Moreover, we propose an MPEG-4 contents streaming scheme that the object a user prefers to watch is sent first by increasing priority and objects with low priority are dropped at a server side when network bandwidth is not enough to transmit all objects that are supposed to appear in the scene. We made experiment of the proposed scheme with the presented MPEG-4 contents streaming system, and the experiment results are shown in this paper. If we use the proposed scheme for MPEG-4 contents streaming, it is possible for a user to watch a video of interest in high quality and video of indifference in low quality.

  20. A Fast Goal Recognition Technique Based on Interaction Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    E-Martin, Yolanda; R-Moreno, Maria D.; Smith, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Goal Recognition is the task of inferring an actor's goals given some or all of the actor's observed actions. There is considerable interest in Goal Recognition for use in intelligent personal assistants, smart environments, intelligent tutoring systems, and monitoring user's needs. In much of this work, the actor's observed actions are compared against a generated library of plans. Recent work by Ramirez and Geffner makes use of AI planning to determine how closely a sequence of observed actions matches plans for each possible goal. For each goal, this is done by comparing the cost of a plan for that goal with the cost of a plan for that goal that includes the observed actions. This approach yields useful rankings, but is impractical for real-time goal recognition in large domains because of the computational expense of constructing plans for each possible goal. In this paper, we introduce an approach that propagates cost and interaction information in a plan graph, and uses this information to estimate goal probabilities. We show that this approach is much faster, but still yields high quality results.

  1. Multivalent interaction based carbohydrate biosensors for signal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Chalagalla, Srinivas; Li, Tiehai; Sun, Xue-long; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    Multivalent interaction between boronic acids immobilized on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor surface and the carbohydrates modified Au - nanoparticle (AuNP) has been demonstrated for the development of a sensitive carbohydrate biosensor. Briefly, a boronic acid - containing polymer (boropolymer) as multivalent carbohydrate receptor was oriented immobilized on the cysteamine coated electrode through isourea bond formation. Carbohydrates were conjugated to AuNPs to generate a multivalent carbohydrates moiety to amplify the response signal. Thus, the binding of the carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs to the boropolymer surface are multivalent which could simultaneously increase the binding affinity and specificity. We systematically studied the binding between five carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer. Our studies show that the associate constant (Ka) was in the order of fucose < glucose < mannose < galactose < maltose. A linear response in the range from 23 µM to 3.83 mM was observed for mannose conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer recognition elements, with the lower detection limit of 1.5 µM for the carbohydrate analytes. Furthermore, the multivalent binding between carbohydrates and boronic acids are reversible and allow the regeneration of boropolymer surface by using 1M acetic acid so as to sequentially capture and release the carbohydrate analytes. PMID:20863680

  2. A sparse matrix based full-configuration interaction algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rolik, Zoltan; Szabados, Agnes; Surjan, Peter R.

    2008-04-14

    We present an algorithm related to the full-configuration interaction (FCI) method that makes complete use of the sparse nature of the coefficient vector representing the many-electron wave function in a determinantal basis. Main achievements of the presented sparse FCI (SFCI) algorithm are (i) development of an iteration procedure that avoids the storage of FCI size vectors; (ii) development of an efficient algorithm to evaluate the effect of the Hamiltonian when both the initial and the product vectors are sparse. As a result of point (i) large disk operations can be skipped which otherwise may be a bottleneck of the procedure. At point (ii) we progress by adopting the implementation of the linear transformation by Olsen et al. [J. Chem Phys. 89, 2185 (1988)] for the sparse case, getting the algorithm applicable to larger systems and faster at the same time. The error of a SFCI calculation depends only on the dropout thresholds for the sparse vectors, and can be tuned by controlling the amount of system memory passed to the procedure. The algorithm permits to perform FCI calculations on single node workstations for systems previously accessible only by supercomputers.

  3. KBSIM: a system for interactive knowledge-based simulation.

    PubMed

    Hakman, M; Groth, T

    1991-01-01

    The KBSIM system integrates quantitative simulation with symbolic reasoning techniques, under the control of a user interface management system, using a relational database management system for data storage and interprocess communication. The system stores and processes knowledge from three distinct knowledge domains, viz. (i) knowledge about the processes of the system under investigation, expressed in terms of a Continuous System Simulation Language (CSSL); (ii) heuristic knowledge on how to reach the goals of the simulation experiment, expressed in terms of a Rule Description Language (RDL); and (iii) knowledge about the requirements of the intended users, expressed in terms of a User Interface Description Language (UIDL). The user works in an interactive environment controlling the simulation course with use of a mouse and a large screen containing a set of 'live' charts and forms. The user is assisted by an embedded 'expert system' module continuously watching both the system's behavior and the user's action, and producing alerts, alarms, comments and advice. The system was developed on a Hewlett-Packard 9000/350 workstation under the HP-Unix and HP-Windows operating systems, using the MIMER database management system, and Fortran, Prolog/Lisp and C as implementation languages. The KBSIM system has great potentials for supporting problem solving, design of working procedures and teaching related to management of highly dynamic systems.

  4. Kernel method based human model for enhancing interactive evolutionary optimization.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yan; Zhao, Qiangfu; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A fitness landscape presents the relationship between individual and its reproductive success in evolutionary computation (EC). However, discrete and approximate landscape in an original search space may not support enough and accurate information for EC search, especially in interactive EC (IEC). The fitness landscape of human subjective evaluation in IEC is very difficult and impossible to model, even with a hypothesis of what its definition might be. In this paper, we propose a method to establish a human model in projected high dimensional search space by kernel classification for enhancing IEC search. Because bivalent logic is a simplest perceptual paradigm, the human model is established by considering this paradigm principle. In feature space, we design a linear classifier as a human model to obtain user preference knowledge, which cannot be supported linearly in original discrete search space. The human model is established by this method for predicting potential perceptual knowledge of human. With the human model, we design an evolution control method to enhance IEC search. From experimental evaluation results with a pseudo-IEC user, our proposed model and method can enhance IEC search significantly.

  5. Drug-DNA Interaction Studies of Acridone-Based Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thimmaiah, Kuntebomanahalli; Ugarkar, Apoorva G; Martis, Elvis F; Shaikh, Mushtaque S; Coutinho, Evans C; Yergeri, Mayur C

    2015-01-01

    N10-alkylated 2-bromoacridones are a novel series of potent antitumor compounds. DNA binding studies of these compounds were carried out using spectrophotometric titrations, Circular dichroism (CD) measurements using Calf Thymus DNA (CT DNA). The binding constants were identified at a range of K=0.3 to 3.9×10(5) M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism from the spectral titrations at 28-54%. This study has identified a compound 9 with the good binding affinity of K=0.39768×10(5) M(-1) with CT DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have investigated the changes in structural and dynamic features of native DNA on binding to the active compound 9. All the synthesized compounds have increased the uptake of Vinblastine in MDR KBChR-8-5 cells to an extent of 1.25- to1.9-fold than standard modulator Verapamil of similar concentration. These findings allowed us to draw preliminary conclusions about the structural features of 2-bromoacridones and further chemical enhancement will improve the binding affinity of the acridone derivatives to CT-DNA for better drug-DNA interaction. The molecular modeling studies have shown mechanism of action and the binding modes of the acridones to DNA.

  6. Interactive virtual endoscopy in coronary arteries based on multimodality fusion.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E; Sonka, Milan

    2004-11-01

    A novel approach for platform-independent virtual endoscopy in human coronary arteries is presented in this paper. It incorporates previously developed and validated methodology for multimodality fusion of two X-ray angiographic images with pullback data from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). These modalities pose inherently different challenges than those present in many tomographic modalities that provide parallel slices. The fusion process results in a three- or four-dimensional (3-D/4-D) model of a coronary artery, specifically of its lumen/plaque and media/adventitia surfaces. The model is used for comprehensive quantitative hemodynamic, morphologic, and functional analyses. The resulting quantitative indexes are then used to supplement the model. Platform-independent visualization is achieved through the use of the ISO/IEC-standardized Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The visualization includes an endoscopic fly-through animation that enables the user to interactively select vessel location and fly-through speed, as well as to display image pixel data or quantification results in 3-D. The presented VRML virtual-endoscopy system is used in research studies of coronary atherosclerosis development, quantitative assessment of coronary morphology and function, and vascular interventions.

  7. Uncovering Phosphorylation-Based Specificities through Functional Interaction Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Wagih, Omar; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Beltrao, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are an important class of enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of their targets, which regulate key cellular processes and are typically mediated by a specificity for certain residues around the target phospho-acceptor residue. While efforts have been made to identify such specificities, only ∼30% of human kinases have a significant number of known binding sites. We describe a computational method that utilizes functional interaction data and phosphorylation data to predict specificities of kinases. We applied this method to human kinases to predict substrate preferences for 57% of all known kinases and show that we are able to reconstruct well-known specificities. We used an in vitro mass spectrometry approach to validate four understudied kinases and show that predicted models closely resemble true specificities. We show that this method can be applied to different organisms and can be extended to other phospho-recognition domains. Applying this approach to different types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and binding domains could uncover specificities of understudied PTM recognition domains and provide significant insight into the mechanisms of signaling networks. PMID:26572964

  8. Kernel Method Based Human Model for Enhancing Interactive Evolutionary Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiangfu; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A fitness landscape presents the relationship between individual and its reproductive success in evolutionary computation (EC). However, discrete and approximate landscape in an original search space may not support enough and accurate information for EC search, especially in interactive EC (IEC). The fitness landscape of human subjective evaluation in IEC is very difficult and impossible to model, even with a hypothesis of what its definition might be. In this paper, we propose a method to establish a human model in projected high dimensional search space by kernel classification for enhancing IEC search. Because bivalent logic is a simplest perceptual paradigm, the human model is established by considering this paradigm principle. In feature space, we design a linear classifier as a human model to obtain user preference knowledge, which cannot be supported linearly in original discrete search space. The human model is established by this method for predicting potential perceptual knowledge of human. With the human model, we design an evolution control method to enhance IEC search. From experimental evaluation results with a pseudo-IEC user, our proposed model and method can enhance IEC search significantly. PMID:25879050

  9. A sparse matrix based full-configuration interaction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rolik, Zoltán; Szabados, Agnes; Surján, Péter R

    2008-04-14

    We present an algorithm related to the full-configuration interaction (FCI) method that makes complete use of the sparse nature of the coefficient vector representing the many-electron wave function in a determinantal basis. Main achievements of the presented sparse FCI (SFCI) algorithm are (i) development of an iteration procedure that avoids the storage of FCI size vectors; (ii) development of an efficient algorithm to evaluate the effect of the Hamiltonian when both the initial and the product vectors are sparse. As a result of point (i) large disk operations can be skipped which otherwise may be a bottleneck of the procedure. At point (ii) we progress by adopting the implementation of the linear transformation by Olsen et al. [J. Chem Phys. 89, 2185 (1988)] for the sparse case, getting the algorithm applicable to larger systems and faster at the same time. The error of a SFCI calculation depends only on the dropout thresholds for the sparse vectors, and can be tuned by controlling the amount of system memory passed to the procedure. The algorithm permits to perform FCI calculations on single node workstations for systems previously accessible only by supercomputers.

  10. Systematic analysis of Ca(2+) homoeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on chemical-genetic interaction profiles.

    PubMed

    Ghanegolmohammadi, Farzan; Yoshida, Mitsumori; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Sukegawa, Yuko; Okada, Hiroki; Obara, Keisuke; Kihara, Akio; Suzuki, Kuninori; Kojima, Tetsuya; Yachie, Nozomu; Hirata, Dai; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2017-05-31

    We investigated the global landscape of Ca(2+) homeostasis in the budding yeast based on high-dimensional chemical-genetic interaction profiles. The morphological responses of 62 Ca(2+)-sensitive (cls) mutants were quantitatively analyzed with the image processing program CalMorph following exposure to a high concentration of Ca(2+) After a generalized linear model was applied, an analysis of covariance model was used to detect significant Ca(2+)-cls interactions. We found that high-dimensional, morphological Ca(2+)-cls interactions were mixed with positive (86%) and negative (14%) chemical-genetic interactions, while one-dimensional fitness Ca(2+)-cls interactions were all negative in principle. Clustering analysis with the interaction profiles revealed nine distinct gene groups, six of which were functionally associated. Additionally, characterization of Ca(2+)-cls interactions revealed morphology-based negative interactions are unique signatures of sensitized cellular processes and pathways. Principal component analysis was used to discriminate between suppression and enhancement of the Ca(2+)-sensitive phenotypes triggered by inactivation of calcineurin, a Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase. Finally, similarity of the interaction profiles was used to reveal a connected network among the Ca(2+) homeostasis units acting in different cellular compartments. Thus, our analyses of high-dimensional chemical-genetic interaction profiles have provided novel insights into the intracellular network of yeast Ca(2+) homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  11. Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2013-01-01

    Employing the multiple-baseline across-subjects design, the authors examined the implementation and potential effect of a virtual-reality-based social interaction program on the interaction and communication performance of children with high functioning autism. The data were collected via behavior observation and analysis, questionnaires, and…

  12. Seven-Step Problem-Based Learning in an Interaction Design Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step problem-based learning (PBL) procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction (HCI) design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction design process. These…

  13. Learning with Web-Based Interactive Objects: An Investigation into Student Perceptions of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.; Perschbacher, Susanne; Cash, Mindy; Talwar, Reena; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Mount, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    In its efforts to continue the modernization of its curriculum, the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto has developed a series of web-based interactive learning applications. This article presents the production cycle of these new interactive learning objects and the preliminary study conducted to measure the students' perception of…

  14. Evaluation of the Interactivity of Web-Based Learning Systems: Principles and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris; Sabry, Khaled

    2003-01-01

    Considers the process of evaluating the interactivity of Web-based learning systems (WBLSs), adapting a heuristic approach usually employed for usability evaluations. Proposes a three-way model of interactivity, reports an evaluation using three different WBLSs, and concludes that heuristic evaluation provides a cheap, intuitive and practical…

  15. Learning with Web-Based Interactive Objects: An Investigation into Student Perceptions of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.; Perschbacher, Susanne; Cash, Mindy; Talwar, Reena; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Mount, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    In its efforts to continue the modernization of its curriculum, the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto has developed a series of web-based interactive learning applications. This article presents the production cycle of these new interactive learning objects and the preliminary study conducted to measure the students' perception of…

  16. Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2013-01-01

    Employing the multiple-baseline across-subjects design, the authors examined the implementation and potential effect of a virtual-reality-based social interaction program on the interaction and communication performance of children with high functioning autism. The data were collected via behavior observation and analysis, questionnaires, and…

  17. Corrective Feedback and Noticing in Text-Based Second Language Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Therese Örnberg

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "noticing" (Schmidt, 1990; cf. Smith, 2010) in relation to text-based second language interaction (instant messaging). Data has been collected at an upper secondary school, where students of English as a foreign language interact with the researcher, providing feedback on language and content. In…

  18. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  19. Spin current source based on a quantum point contact with local spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.

    2013-11-11

    Proposal for construction of a source of spin-polarized current based on quantum point contact (QPC) with local spin-orbit interaction is presented. We show that spin-orbit interaction present within the narrowing acts like a spin filter. The spin polarization of the current is discussed as a function of the Fermi energy and the width of the QPC.

  20. Virtual Reality Simulations and Animations in a Web-Based Interactive Manufacturing Engineering Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, S. K.; Mannan, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based interactive teaching package that provides a comprehensive and conducive yet dynamic and interactive environment for a module on automated machine tools in the Manufacturing Division at the National University of Singapore. The use of Internet technologies in this teaching tool makes it possible to conjure…

  1. Research on Teachers' Characteristics in Relation to a Cognitive-Learning Based Interactive Videodisc System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Martha B.; Cambre, Marjorie A.

    This pilot study explored teacher characteristics as they influenced the use of "Exploring Nepal," a cognitive learning-based interactive video system for middle school students. Specifically, the study sought to narrow down a variety of teacher characteristics that may influence the quality of their interaction with the videodisk. The…

  2. An Instructional Design Theory for Interactions in Web-Based Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Miyoung; Paulus, Trena

    This study developed and formatively evaluated an instructional design theory to guide designers in selecting when and how to utilize interactions as instructional methods in a Web-based distance learning higher education environment. Research questions asked: What are the types and outcomes of interactions between participants in a Web-based…

  3. Seven-Step Problem-Based Learning in an Interaction Design Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step problem-based learning (PBL) procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction (HCI) design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction design process. These…

  4. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  5. Virtual Reality Simulations and Animations in a Web-Based Interactive Manufacturing Engineering Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, S. K.; Mannan, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based interactive teaching package that provides a comprehensive and conducive yet dynamic and interactive environment for a module on automated machine tools in the Manufacturing Division at the National University of Singapore. The use of Internet technologies in this teaching tool makes it possible to conjure…

  6. Managing Mutual Orientation in the Absence of Physical Copresence: Multiparty Voice-Based Chat Room Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenks, Christopher Joseph; Brandt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the interactional work involved in ratifying mutual participation in online, multiparty, voice-based chat rooms. The purpose of this article is to provide a preliminary sketch of how talk and participation is managed in a spoken communication environment that comprises interactants who are not physically copresent but are…

  7. Enhancing L2 Interaction in Avatar-Based Virtual Worlds: Student Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Jun-Jie; Tsai, Ya-Hsun; Chao, Rih-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) multi-user virtual environments (3-D MUVEs) have been used to provide language learners with realistic scenarios in which verbal and non-verbal interactions are simulated. However, little is known of the underlying factors that shape interaction in avatar-based virtual worlds. This study examined the perceptions of 38…

  8. Enhancing L2 Interaction in Avatar-Based Virtual Worlds: Student Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Jun-Jie; Tsai, Ya-Hsun; Chao, Rih-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) multi-user virtual environments (3-D MUVEs) have been used to provide language learners with realistic scenarios in which verbal and non-verbal interactions are simulated. However, little is known of the underlying factors that shape interaction in avatar-based virtual worlds. This study examined the perceptions of 38…

  9. Text-Based Negotiated Interaction of NNS-NNS and NNS-NS Dyads on Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Sarah Hsueh-Jui

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to determine the difference in text-based negotiated interaction between non-native speakers of English (NNS-NNS) and between non-native and natives (NNS-NS) in terms of the frequency of negotiated instances, successfully resolved instances, and interactional strategy use when the dyads collaborated on Facebook. It involved 10…

  10. Computer-based Approaches for Training Interactive Digital Map Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC: Jean L. Dyer 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): Five computer-based training approaches for learning digital skills...Training assessment Exploratory Learning Guided ExploratoryTraining Guided Discovery SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF 19. LIMITATION OF 20. NUMBER 21...the other extreme of letting Soldiers learn a digital interface on their own. The research reported here examined these two conditions and three other

  11. A Cell-Based Method for Screening RNA-Protein Interactions: Identification of Constitutive Transport Element-Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Robert L.; Landt, Stephen G.; Mai, Emily; Nejim, Jemiel; Chen, Lily; Frankel, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This “Tat-hybrid” screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) constitutive transport element (CTE), a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes. PMID:23133567

  12. A novel interacting multiple model based network intrusion detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Ruichi; Venkatasubramanian, Vijay; Leung, Henry

    2006-04-01

    In today's information age, information and network security are of primary importance to any organization. Network intrusion is a serious threat to security of computers and data networks. In internet protocol (IP) based network, intrusions originate in different kinds of packets/messages contained in the open system interconnection (OSI) layer 3 or higher layers. Network intrusion detection and prevention systems observe the layer 3 packets (or layer 4 to 7 messages) to screen for intrusions and security threats. Signature based methods use a pre-existing database that document intrusion patterns as perceived in the layer 3 to 7 protocol traffics and match the incoming traffic for potential intrusion attacks. Alternately, network traffic data can be modeled and any huge anomaly from the established traffic pattern can be detected as network intrusion. The latter method, also known as anomaly based detection is gaining popularity for its versatility in learning new patterns and discovering new attacks. It is apparent that for a reliable performance, an accurate model of the network data needs to be established. In this paper, we illustrate using collected data that network traffic is seldom stationary. We propose the use of multiple models to accurately represent the traffic data. The improvement in reliability of the proposed model is verified by measuring the detection and false alarm rates on several datasets.

  13. Development of StopAdvisor: A theory-based interactive internet-based smoking cessation intervention.

    PubMed

    Michie, Susan; Brown, Jamie; Geraghty, Adam W A; Miller, Sascha; Yardley, Lucy; Gardner, Benjamin; Shahab, Lion; McEwen, Andy; Stapleton, John A; West, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Reviews of internet-based behaviour-change interventions have shown that they can be effective but there is considerable heterogeneity and effect sizes are generally small. In order to advance science and technology in this area, it is essential to be able to build on principles and evidence of behaviour change in an incremental manner. We report the development of an interactive smoking cessation website, StopAdvisor, designed to be attractive and effective across the social spectrum. It was informed by a broad motivational theory (PRIME), empirical evidence, web-design expertise, and user-testing. The intervention was developed using an open-source web-development platform, 'LifeGuide', designed to facilitate optimisation and collaboration. We identified 19 theoretical propositions, 33 evidence- or theory-based behaviour change techniques, 26 web-design principles and nine principles from user-testing. These were synthesised to create the website, 'StopAdvisor' (see http://www.lifeguideonline.org/player/play/stopadvisordemonstration). The systematic and transparent application of theory, evidence, web-design expertise and user-testing within an open-source development platform can provide a basis for multi-phase optimisation contributing to an 'incremental technology' of behaviour change.

  14. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  15. Unusual Base-Pairing Interactions in Monomer–Template Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many high-resolution crystal structures have contributed to our understanding of the reaction pathway for catalysis by DNA and RNA polymerases, but the structural basis of nonenzymatic template-directed RNA replication has not been studied in comparable detail. Here we present crystallographic studies of the binding of ribonucleotide monomers to RNA primer–template complexes, with the goal of improving our understanding of the mechanism of nonenzymatic RNA copying, and of catalysis by polymerases. To explore how activated ribonucleotides recognize and bind to RNA templates, we synthesized an unreactive phosphonate-linked pyrazole analogue of guanosine 5′-phosphoro-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG), a highly activated nucleotide that has been used extensively to study nonenzymatic primer extension. We cocrystallized this analogue with structurally rigidified RNA primer–template complexes carrying single or multiple monomer binding sites, and obtained high-resolution X-ray structures of these complexes. In addition to Watson–Crick base pairing, we repeatedly observed noncanonical guanine:cytidine base pairs in our crystal structures. In most structures, the phosphate and leaving group moieties of the monomers were highly disordered, while in others the distance from O3′ of the primer to the phosphorus of the incoming monomer was too great to allow for reaction. We suggest that these effects significantly influence the rate and fidelity of nonenzymatic RNA replication, and that even primitive ribozyme polymerases could enhance RNA replication by enforcing Watson–Crick base pairing between monomers and primer–template complexes, and by bringing the reactive functional groups into closer proximity. PMID:28058281

  16. Size-dependent interaction of cells and hemoglobin-albumin based oxygen carriers prepared using the SPG membrane emulsification technique.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yao-Tong; Ohta, Seiichi; Akamatsu, Kazuki; Nakao, Shin-Ichi; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Ito, Taichi

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) of various sizes have been developed so far, but their optimum size has not been clarified yet. Here, we examined the effect of HBOCs size on their interaction with cells using Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane emulsification technique, which enables precise tuning of particle size. Microspheres composed of bovine hemoglobin (bHb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was fabricated with the average diameters of 1.2-18.3 μm and the coefficient of variation of below 13%. Cellular uptake of the microspheres by RAW264.7 was observed at a diameter below 5 μm; however, uptake of the microspheres by HepG2 and HUVEC were not observed at any diameter. No enhancement of the generation of reactive oxygen species in the cytoplasm was detected at diameters above 9.8 μm in the three cell lines, due to their low cellular uptake. In addition, cytotoxicity of the microspheres decreased with increasing microsphere diameter in the three cell lines and microspheres of 18.3 μm showed good cellular compatibility regardless of the oxyhemoglobin percentage. Since cytotoxicity is a crucial factor in their applications, our systemic investigation would provide a new insight into the design of HBOCs. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Customizable Computer-Based Interaction Analysis for Coaching and Self-Regulation in Synchronous CSCL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based interaction analysis (IA) is an automatic process that aims at understanding a computer-mediated activity. In a CSCL system, computer-based IA can provide information directly to learners for self-assessment and regulation and to tutors for coaching support. This article proposes a customizable computer-based IA approach for a…

  18. A Theoretical Analysis of Social Interactions in Computer-based Learning Environments: Evidence for Reciprocal Understandings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvela, Sanna; Bonk, Curtis Jay; Lehtinen, Erno; Lehti, Sirpa

    1999-01-01

    Presents a theoretical and empirical analysis of social interactions in computer-based learning environments. Explores technology use to support reciprocal understanding between teachers and students based on three technology-based learning environments in Finland and the United States, and discusses situated learning, cognitive apprenticeships,…

  19. An application of fragment interaction analysis based on local MP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Yuji; Amari, Shinji; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a method named 'fragment interaction analysis based on local MP2' (abbreviated as FILM). This method enables us to decompose the interaction energy associated with dispersion interactions into contributions of localized occupied orbitals. In this study, the basis set dependence of the results derived from FILM was examined. The results suggested that the individual ratio of pair correlation energies of selected orbital pairs to the total dispersion interaction was almost independent of the basis set size. As an illustrative example, detailed analysis was performed on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease complexed with lopinavir molecule.

  20. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  1. Grandmaster: Interactive text-based analytics of social media

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, Nathan D.; Davis, Warren Leon,; Raybourn, Elaine M.; Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    People use social media resources like Twitter, Facebook, forums etc. to share and discuss various activities or topics. By aggregating topic trends across many individuals using these services, we seek to construct a richer profile of a person’s activities and interests as well as provide a broader context of those activities. This profile may then be used in a variety of ways to understand groups as a collection of interests and affinities and an individual’s participation in those groups. Our approach considers that much of these data will be unstructured, free-form text. By analyzing free-form text directly, we may be able to gain an implicit grouping of individuals with shared interests based on shared conversation, and not on explicit social software linking them. In this paper, we discuss a proof-of-concept application called Grandmaster built to pull short sections of text, a person’s comments or Twitter posts, together by analysis and visualization to allow a gestalt understanding of the full collection of all individuals: how groups are similar and how they differ, based on their text inputs.

  2. A Study and Taxonomy of Vulnerabilities in Web Based Animation and Interactivity Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A STUDY AND TAXONOMY...OF VULNERABILITIES IN WEB BASED ANIMATION AND INTERACTIVITY SOFTWARE by David M. Post September 2010 Thesis Co-Advisors: Chris Eagle...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Study and Taxonomy of Vulnerabilities in Web Based Animation and Interactivity Software 6

  3. "Convince Me!" Valuing Multimodal Literacies and Composing Public Service Announcements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selfe, Richard J.; Selfe, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    For some teachers, the increasing attention to digital and multimodal composing in English and Language Arts classrooms has brought into sharp relief the profession's investment in print as the primary means of expression. Although new forms of communication that combine words, still and moving images, and animation have begun to dominate digital…

  4. Composing with New Technology: Teacher Reflections on Learning Digital Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David L.; Chiu, Ming Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study explores teachers' reflections on their learning to compose with new technologies in the context of teacher education and/or teacher professional development. English language arts (ELA) teachers (n = 240) in 15 courses learned to use digital video (DV), completed at least one DV group project, and responded to open-ended survey…

  5. Beyond the Enthymeme: Sorites, Critical Thinking, and the Composing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Carolyn

    A teacher presents a writing exercise designed to facilitate audience-directed, critical thinking during the process of composing, that starts students thinking in terms of sorites and enthymemes. Students first read a CIA manual, "Psychological Operations in Guerrilla Warfare," that instructs the Contra guerrillas in illegal acts and…

  6. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  7. A Composer Teams with Student Lyricists to Make History Live.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtmann, Curtis; Lewis, Barbara

    1985-01-01

    The ballad is a primary medium for the reliving of historic events. Described is a joint music and social studies project in which junior high school students research historic events and write song lyrics. A composer gives a lesson on lyric writing, verse forms, and rhyme schemes. (RM)

  8. Composing the Career Portfolio and the Classed Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I consider how subjectivities are composed and assessed within the boundaries of a career-focused portfolio program. First, by examining how portfolio composition is taught in senior English courses, I identify the qualities of the subject position students are called to occupy. Next, I present discourse analyses of portfolio…

  9. Page composer to translate binary electrical data to optical form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. A.; Cosentino, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    Composer converts binary data to optical form for storage as hologram. Device consists of an array of deformable metal membranes controlled by MOSFET's. Device is fast, produces high contrast ratios, does not degrade with extended use, and can be addressed from diverse angles.

  10. Composing Styles as Predicted by Personality Style Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanski, Virginia G.

    To determine students' different but equally valid ways of dealing with the composing process, a college instructor developed a questionnaire assessing personality styles. The questionnaire distinguishes between (1) approaches to the writing process, (2) preferences for types of instruction, (3) preferences for types of writing and organizational…

  11. Beyond the Enthymeme: Sorites, Critical Thinking, and the Composing Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Carolyn

    A teacher presents a writing exercise designed to facilitate audience-directed, critical thinking during the process of composing, that starts students thinking in terms of sorites and enthymemes. Students first read a CIA manual, "Psychological Operations in Guerrilla Warfare," that instructs the Contra guerrillas in illegal acts and…

  12. When Did Classic Composers Make Their Best Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franses, Philip Hans

    2016-01-01

    This Research Note shows that classic composers created their best works when they were at a similar age when creators in other domains did their best work, namely when they were at an age that represented around 60% of their life span. This finding is very similar to earlier results for painters and authors.

  13. Non-Logical Discourse: Key to the Composing Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Richard C.

    One niche in which scholars have not looked for keys to the composing process is the sometimes illusory but vital area of nonlogical discourse, which includes fantasy, hallucination, dream, reverie, vision, trance, and meditation. Abundant evidence exists about the genesis, importance, and use of nonlogical discourse, but this evidence comes…

  14. Composing Cinquain Poems with Basic Parts of Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    The writing program described in this lesson plan guides students in grades 3 through 8 in composing cinquain poems, a five-line form that uses the syllable count of two-four-six-eight-two. During the two 50-minute lessons, students will: describe the basic conventions of cinquain; interpret examples of cinquain; characterize the relationship…

  15. When Did Classic Composers Make Their Best Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franses, Philip Hans

    2016-01-01

    This Research Note shows that classic composers created their best works when they were at a similar age when creators in other domains did their best work, namely when they were at an age that represented around 60% of their life span. This finding is very similar to earlier results for painters and authors.

  16. Teaching Effective Communication Skills with ACE: Analyzing, Composing, & Evaluating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa Gueldenzoph; Shwom, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Most business communication classes teach students to use a writing process to compose effective documents. Students practice the process by applying it to various types of writing with various purposes-reports, presentations, bad news letters, persuasive memos, etc. However, unless students practice that process in other contexts outside of the…

  17. An Analysis of the Composing Processes of Three Black Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Robert J.

    The study described in this paper was designed to compare the composing processes of three black adolescent females--a low, a moderate, and a high user of nonstandard dialect. After explaining the procedures used in selecting the subjects on the basis of their degree of usage of nonstandard dialect features, the paper describes the research…

  18. Preparing Performers and Composers for Effective Educational Work with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Music education programs stand to gain important benefits from the collaborative work of performing musicians with specialist music teachers and classroom teachers. To be effective, performers and composers must have their knowledge and skills for education cultivated within the context of their essential identities as musicians. Given…

  19. Steady-State and Kinetics-Based Affinity Determination in Effector-Effector Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, André; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Dissecting the functional basis of pathogenicity and resistance in the context of plant innate immunity benefits greatly from detailed knowledge about biomolecular interactions, as both resistance and virulence depend on specific interactions between pathogen and host biomolecules. While in vivo systems provide biological context to host-pathogen interactions, these experiments typically cannot provide quantitative biochemical characterization of biomolecular interactions. However, in many cases, the biological function does not only depend on whether an interaction occurs at all, but rather on the "intensity" of the interaction, as quantified by affinity. Specifically, microbial effector proteins may bind more than one host target to exert virulence functions, and looking at these interactions more closely than would be possible in a purely black-and-white qualitative assay (as classically based on plant or yeast systems) can reveal new insights into the evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Recent advances in biomolecular interaction assays that can be performed in vitro allow quantification of binding events with ever greater fidelity and application range. Here, we describe assays based on microscale thermophoresis (MST) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Using these technologies allows affinity determination both in steady-state and in kinetic configurations, providing two conceptually independent pathways to arrive at quantitative affinity data describing the interactions of pathogen and host biomolecules.

  20. Polypyrrole-based conducting polymers and interactions with biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ateh, D.D; Navsaria, H.A; Vadgama, P

    2006-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a conjugated polymer that displays particular electronic properties including conductivity. In biomedical applications, it is usually electrochemically generated with the incorporation of any anionic species including also negatively charged biological macromolecules such as proteins and polysaccharides to give composite materials. In biomedical research, it has mainly been assessed for its role as a reporting interface in biosensors. However, there is an increasing literature on the application of PPy as a potentially electrically addressable tissue/cell support substrate. Here, we review studies that have considered such PPy based conducting polymers in direct contact with biological tissues and conclude that due to its versatile functional properties, it could contribute to a new generation of biomaterials. PMID:17015302