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Sample records for interaction effects coupled

  1. Effective quantum dynamics of interacting systems with inhomogeneous coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Christ, H.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a single mode (particle) interacting inhomogeneously with a large number of particles and introduce an effective approach to find the accessible Hilbert space, where the dynamics takes place. Two relevant examples are given: the inhomogeneous Tavis-Cummings model (e.g., N atomic qubits coupled to a single cavity mode, or to a motional mode in trapped ions) and the inhomogeneous coupling of an electron spin to N nuclear spins in a quantum dot.

  2. Effective interaction and condensation of dipolaritons in coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Tim; Kolmakov, German V.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Dipolaritons are a three-way superposition of a photon, a direct exciton, and an indirect exciton that are formed in coupled quantum well microcavities. As is the case with exciton-polaritons, dipolaritons have a self-interaction due to direct and exchange effects of the underlying electrons and holes. Here we present a theoretical description of dipolaritons and derive simple formulas for their basic parameters. In particular, we derive the effective dipolariton-dipolariton interaction taking into account exchange effects between the excitons. We obtain a simple relation to describe the effective interaction at low densities. We find that dipolaritons should condense under suitable conditions, described by a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation. While the parameters for condensation are promising, we find that the level of tunability of the interactions is limited.

  3. Effect of Spin-Orbit Coupling to Interacting Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaoling

    2013-05-01

    The recent realization of spin-orbit (SO) coupling in neutral atoms has opened up new directions to explore novel SO effects in a diversity of new physical settings. In this talk, I shall discuss two important effects of SO coupling to interacting ultracold atoms. First, the presence of SO coupling will inevitably induce mixed scatterings and interference between different partial-waves, and as a result it could significantly affect the validity of widely-used pseudo-potentials. Explicitly, the s-wave pseudo-potential alone is approximately valid under more stringent conditions, while the p-wave pseudo-potential alone can no longer be used even near p-wave resonance. These results indicate a fundamental change of short-range physics for interacting atoms in high orbits, due to destructive interference with lower ones. Second, the presence of SO coupling will induce exotic scattering between spin-1/2 bosons confined in a quasi-one-dimensional waveguide, and lead to a Tonks gas with unique properties that have not been unveiled before. Explicitly, SO coupling will break the magnetization conservation during the scattering process, and also induce a sequence of scattering resonances (or Tonks limit) simultaneously in all scattering channels. Unlike the usual Tonks gas of identical bosons, the Tonks gas here, with strong spin-orbit entanglement, exhibits rich textures in spin and density distributions. These features can be directly observed in current cold atom experiment. This work is supported by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program and National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant No. 11104158.

  4. Effects of large vessel on temperature distribution based on photothermal coupling interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Xiyang; Li, Zuoran; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    This paper is based on the finite element analysis method for studying effects of large blood vessel on temperature based on photothermal coupling interaction model, and it couples the physical field of optical transmission with the physical field of heat transfer in biological tissue by using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4 software. The results demonstrate the cooling effect of large blood vessel, which can be potential application for the treatment of liver tumors.

  5. Coupled effects of local movement and global interaction on contagion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Da; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Zhong, Chen-Yang

    2015-10-01

    By incorporating segregated spatial domain and individual-based linkage into the SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) model, we propose a generalized epidemic model which can change from the territorial epidemic model to the networked epidemic model. The role of the individual-based linkage between different spatial domains is investigated. As we adjust the timescale parameter τ from 0 to unity, which represents the degree of activation of the individual-based linkage, three regions are found. Within the region of 0 < τ < 0.02, the epidemic is determined by local movement and is sensitive to the timescale τ. Within the region of 0.02 < τ < 0.5, the epidemic is insensitive to the timescale τ. Within the region of 0.5 < τ < 1, the outbreak of the epidemic is determined by the structure of the individual-based linkage. As we keep an eye on the first region, the role of activating the individual-based linkage in the present model is similar to the role of the shortcuts in the two-dimensional small world network. Only activating a small number of the individual-based linkage can prompt the outbreak of the epidemic globally. The role of narrowing segregated spatial domain and reducing mobility in epidemic control is checked. These two measures are found to be conducive to curbing the spread of infectious disease only when the global interaction is suppressed. A log-log relation between the change in the number of infected individuals and the timescale τ is found. By calculating the epidemic threshold and the mean first encounter time, we heuristically analyze the microscopic characteristics of the propagation of the epidemic in the present model.

  6. The Effect of Daily Challenges in Children with Autism on Parents’ Couple Problem-Solving Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Papp, Lauren M.; Blumenstock, Shari; Floyd, Frank; Goetz, Greta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability-stress-adaptation model guided this examination of the impact of daily fluctuations in the symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) on parents’ couple problem-solving interactions in natural settings and as these interactions spontaneously occur. A 14-day daily diary was completed by mothers and fathers in 176 families who had a child with ASD. On each day of the diary, parents separately reported on the child with ASD's daily level of symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems and the topic and level of negative affect in their most meaningful or important daily couple problem-solving interaction. Multilevel modeling was used to account for the within-person, within-couple nested structure of the data. Results indicated that many parents are resilient to experiencing a day with a high level of child ASD symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems and do not report more negative couple problem-solving interactions. However, household income, level of parental broader autism phenotype, and presence of multiple children with special care needs served as vulnerability factors in that they were related to a higher overall rating of negative affect in couple interactions and moderated the impact of reporting a day with a high level of child ASD symptoms and co-occurring behavior problems on next-day ratings of negative couple problem-solving interactions. The magnitude of these effects was small. Understanding mechanisms that support adaptive couple interactions in parents of children with ASD is critical for promoting best outcomes. PMID:27336179

  7. Effective magnetic interactions in spin-orbit coupled d4 Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Christopher; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal compounds with the (t2g) 4 electronic configuration are expected to be nonmagnetic atomic singlets both in the weakly interacting regime due to spin-orbit coupling, as well as in the Coulomb dominated regime with oppositely aligned L =1 and S =1 angular momenta. However, starting with the full multiorbital electronic Hamiltonian, we show the low-energy effective magnetic Hamiltonian contains isotropic superexchange spin interactions but anisotropic orbital interactions. By tuning the ratio of superexchange to spin-orbit coupling JSE/λ , we obtain a phase transition from nonmagnetic atomic singlets to novel magnetic phases depending on the strength of Hund's coupling, the crystal structure and the number of active orbitals. Spin-orbit coupling plays a non-trivial role in generating a triplon condensate of weakly interacting excitations at antiferromagnetic ordering vector k ⃗=π ⃗ , regardless of whether the local spin interactions are ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic. In the large JSE/λ regime, the localized spin and orbital moments produce anisotropic orbital interactions that are frustrated or constrained even in the absence of geometric frustration. Orbital frustration leads to frustration in the spin channel opening up the possibility of spin-orbital liquids with both spin and orbital entanglement.

  8. Differential effects of intranasal oxytocin on sexual experiences and partner interactions in couples.

    PubMed

    Behnia, Behnoush; Heinrichs, Markus; Bergmann, Wiebke; Jung, Stefanie; Germann, Janine; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hartmann, Uwe; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge about the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) on human sexual behaviors and partner interactions remains limited. Based on our previous studies, we hypothesize that OXT should be able to positively influence parameters of sexual function and couple interactions. Employing a naturalistic setting involving 29 healthy heterosexual couples (n=58 participants), we analyzed the acute effects of intranasally administered OXT (24IU) on sexual drive, arousal, orgasm and refractory aspects of sexual behavior together with partner interactions. Data were assessed by psychometric instruments (Acute Sexual Experiences Scale, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale) as well as biomarkers, such as cortisol, α-amylase and heart rate. Intranasal OXT administration did not alter "classical" parameters of sexual function, such as sexual drive, arousal or penile erection and lubrication. However, analysis of variance and a hierarchical linear model (HLM) revealed specific effects related to the orgasmic/post-orgasmic interval as well as parameters of partner interactions. According to HLM analysis, OXT increased the intensity of orgasm, contentment after sexual intercourse and the effect of study participation. According to ANOVA analysis, these effects were more pronounced in men. Men additionally indicated higher levels of sexual satiety after sexual intercourse with OXT administration. Women felt more relaxed and subgroups indicated better abilities to share sexual desires or to empathize with their partners. The effect sizes were small to moderate. Biomarkers indicated moderate psychophysiological activation but were not affected by OXT, gender or method of contraception. Using a naturalistic setting, intranasal OXT administration in couples exerted differential effects on parameters of sexual function and partner interactions. These results warrant further investigations, including subjects with sexual and relationship problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular counterion density profile with an algebraic divergence at the surfaces. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal "disorder", one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which can be quite significant even with a small degree of surface charge disorder relative to the mean surface charge. The strong coupling, disorder-induced attraction is typically far more stronger than the van der Waals interaction between the surfaces, especially within a range of several nanometers for the inter-surface separation.

  10. Coupling of isotropic and directional interactions and its effect on phase separation and self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra J.; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2016-02-01

    The interactions of molecules and particles in solution often involve an interplay between isotropic and highly directional interactions that lead to a mutual coupling of phase separation and self-assembly. This situation arises, for example, in proteins interacting through hydrophobic and charged patch regions on their surface and in nanoparticles with grafted polymer chains, such as DNA. As a minimal model of complex fluids exhibiting this interaction coupling, we investigate spherical particles having an isotropic interaction and a constellation of five attractive patches on the particle's surface. Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field calculations of the phase boundaries of this model depend strongly on the relative strength of the isotropic and patch potentials, where we surprisingly find that analytic mean-field predictions become increasingly accurate as the directional interactions become increasingly predominant. We quantitatively account for this effect by noting that the effective interaction range increases with increasing relative directional to isotropic interaction strength. We also identify thermodynamic transition lines associated with self-assembly, extract the entropy and energy of association, and characterize the resulting cluster properties obtained from simulations using percolation scaling theory and Flory-Stockmayer mean-field theory. We find that the fractal dimension and cluster size distribution are consistent with those of lattice animals, i.e., randomly branched polymers swollen by excluded volume interactions. We also identify a universal functional form for the average molecular weight and a nearly universal functional form for a scaling parameter characterizing the cluster size distribution. Since the formation of branched clusters at equilibrium is a common phenomenon in nature, we detail how our analysis can be used in experimental characterization of such associating fluids.

  11. Effect of exchange-coupling interaction on anisotropy of grain in nanoscaled magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Gao, Ru-wei; Han, Guang-bing; Liu, Min; Han, Bai-ping

    2007-01-01

    The effect of inter-grain exchange-coupling interaction on the anisotropy of grain in nanoscaled magnets has been investigated by putting forward an expression of anisotropy at grain boundary, K1ij(r), which is suitable for different coupling conditions, and expresses well the coherency between soft and hard grains. The average anisotropy of grain has been calculated based on K1ij(r) and the theory of partial exchange-coupling interaction. It has been found that the average anisotropy of hard or soft grain, or , increases with increasing grain size D monotonously when hard-hard or soft-soft grains couple. When soft-hard grains touch each other, with increasing D, the variation of average anisotropy of soft-hard grain depends on the anisotropy at grain interface K1sh(0), which denotes the affection degree of hard grain on the anisotropy of soft grain. Compared with other results, it is more reasonable that K1sh(0) ranges from 0.5K1h to 0.7K1h. The variations of anisotropy with D we calculated are consistent with those of coercivities given by other authors when K1ij(0) is fixed in a certain range.

  12. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-07

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  13. Temperature dependence of the effective interdimer exchange interaction in a weakly coupled antiferromagnetic dimer copper compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Santana, Vinicius T.; Nascimento, Otaciro R.

    2017-08-01

    We report a variation with temperature T of the effective interdimeric interaction Jeff' in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) copper dimeric organic compound Cu2[TzTs] 4 (N -thiazol-2-yl-toluenesulfonamidate CuII). This T dependence was obtained from measurements of the effects in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the proposed quantum phase transition associated with the exchange-narrowing processes. Cu2[TzTs] 4 contains exchange-coupled pairs of CuII spins SA and SB (S =1 /2 ), with intradimeric AFM exchange coupling J0=(-115 ±1 ) cm-1 (Hex=-J0SA.SB ). The variation of the EPR linewidth of single crystals with field orientation around a "magic angle" where the transitions intersect and the integrated signal intensity of the so-called U peak of the powder spectrum were measured as a function of T . Modeling these data using arguments of exchange narrowing in the adiabatic regime considering the angular variation of the single-crystal spectra and a geometric description, we find that the effective interdimeric coupling | Jeff'| associated with the exchange frequency ωex is negligible for T ≪| J0/kB| when the units are uncoupled and | Jeff'|=(0.080 ±0.005 ) cm-1 (| Jeff'/J0|=7.0 × 10-4 ) at 298 K. Within this T interval, two ranges of | Jeff'| with linear temperature variation but different slopes, with a kink at ˜80 K, are observed and discussed. This T dependence arises from the growing population of the triplet state, and its relevance to the properties of various arrays of dimeric units is discussed. Our experimental procedures and results are compared with those of previous works in ion radical salts and dimeric metal compounds. The relation between the effective coupling | Jeff'| and the real interdimeric exchange coupling | J'| related to the chemical paths connecting neighbor units is discussed.

  14. The Effects of Three Methods of Observation on Couples in Interactional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Linda J.; Merkel, William T.

    1988-01-01

    Assessed the effects of three different methods of observation of couples (one-way mirror, audio recording, and video recording) on 30 volunteer, nonclinical married couples. Results suggest that types of observation do not produce significantly different effects on nonclinical couples. (Author/ABL)

  15. Vibronic coupling effect on circular dichroism spectrum: Carotenoid-retinal interaction in xanthorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.; Balashov, Sergei P.

    2017-03-01

    The role of vibronic coupling of antenna carotenoid and retinal in xanthorhodopsin (XR) in its circular dichroism (CD) spectrum is examined computationally. A vibronic exciton model combined with a transition-density-fragment interaction (TDFI) method is developed, and applied to absorption and CD spectral calculations of XR. The TDFI method is based on the electronic Coulomb and exchange interactions between transition densities for individual chromophores [K. J. Fujimoto, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034101 (2012)], which provides a quantitative description of electronic coupling energy. The TDFI calculation reveals a dominant contribution of the Coulomb interaction to the electronic coupling energy and a negligible contribution of the exchange interaction, indicating that the antenna function of carotenoid results from the Förster type of excitation-energy transfer, not from the Dexter one. The calculated absorption and CD spectra successfully reproduce the main features of the experimental results, which allow us to investigate the mechanism of biphasic CD spectrum observed in XR. The results indicate that vibronic coupling between carotenoid and retinal plays a significant role in the shape of the CD spectrum. Further analysis reveals that the negative value of electronic coupling directly contributes to the biphasic shape of CD spectrum. This study also reveals that the C6—C7 bond rotation of salinixanthin is not the main factor for the biphasic CD spectrum although it gives a non-negligible contribution to the spectral shift. The present method is useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying the chromophore-chromophore interactions in biological systems.

  16. Effective protein separation by coupling hydrophobic interaction and reverse phase chromatography for top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Lichen; Valeja, Santosh G; Alpert, Andrew J; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2014-08-05

    One of the challenges in proteomics is the proteome's complexity, which necessitates the fractionation of proteins prior to the mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Despite recent advances in top-down proteomics, separation of intact proteins remains challenging. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) appears to be a promising method that provides high-resolution separation of intact proteins, but unfortunately the salts conventionally used for HIC are incompatible with MS. In this study, we have identified ammonium tartrate as a MS-compatible salt for HIC with comparable separation performance as the conventionally used ammonium sulfate. Furthermore, we found that the selectivity obtained with ammonium tartrate in the HIC mobile phases is orthogonal to that of reverse phase chromatography (RPC). By coupling HIC and RPC as a novel two-dimensional chromatographic method, we have achieved effective high-resolution intact protein separation as demonstrated with standard protein mixtures and a complex cell lysate. Subsequently, the separated intact proteins were identified by high-resolution top-down MS. For the first time, these results have shown the high potential of HIC as a high-resolution protein separation method for top-down proteomics.

  17. Effects of Couple Interactions and Relationship Quality on Plasma Oxytocin and Cardiovascular Reactivity: Empirical Findings and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Timothy W.; Uchino, Bert N.; MacKenzie, Justin; Hicks, Angela; Campo, Rebecca A.; Reblin, Maija; Grewen, Karen; Amico, Janet A.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular reactivity is a potential mechanism underlying associations of close relationship quality with cardiovascular disease. Two models describe oxytocin as another mechanism. The “calm and connect” model posits an association between positive relationship experiences and oxytocin levels and responses, whereas the “tend and befriend” model emphasizes the effects of negative relationship experiences in evoking oxytocin release. In this study of 180 younger couples, relationship quality had a small, marginally significant inverse association with plasma oxytocin levels, and neither positive nor negative couple interactions evoked change in plasma oxytocin. Negative couple interactions evoked significant cardiovascular reactivity, especially among women. Hence, in the largest study of these issues to date, there was little support for key tenets of the “calm and connect” model, and only very modest support for the ”tend and befriend” model. However, findings were consistent with the view that CVR contributes to the effects of relationship difficulties on health. PMID:22543270

  18. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: Effect of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as xα, depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail.

  19. Coupling of isotropic and directional interactions and its effect on phase separation and self-assembly1

    PubMed Central

    Audus, Debra J.; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of molecules and particles in solution often involve an interplay between isotropic and highly directional interactions that lead to a mutual coupling of phase separation and self-assembly. This situation arises, for example, in proteins interacting through hydrophobic and charged patch regions on their surface and in nanoparticles with grafted polymer chains, such as DNA. As a minimal model of complex fluids exhibiting this interaction coupling, we investigate spherical particles having an isotropic interaction and a constellation of five attractive patches on the particle’s surface. Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field calculations of the phase boundaries of this model depend strongly on the relative strength of the isotropic and patch potentials, where we surprisingly find that analytic mean-field predictions become increasingly accurate as the directional interactions become increasingly predominant. We quantitatively account for this effect by noting that the effective interaction range increases with increasing relative directional to isotropic interaction strength. We also identify thermodynamic transition lines associated with self-assembly, extract the entropy and energy of association, and characterize the resulting cluster properties obtained from simulations using percolation scaling theory and Flory-Stockmayer mean-field theory. We find that the fractal dimension and cluster size distribution are consistent with those of lattice animals, i.e., randomly branched polymers swollen by excluded volume interactions. We also identify a universal functional form for the average molecular weight and a nearly universal functional form for a scaling parameter characterizing the cluster size distribution. Since the formation of branched clusters at equilibrium is a common phenomenon in nature, we detail how our analysis can be used in experimental characterization of such associating fluids. PMID:26896996

  20. An analytical model of sub-Alfvénic moon-plasma interactions with application to the hemisphere coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven

    2015-09-01

    We develop a new analytical model of the Alfvén wing that is generated by the interaction between a planetary moon's ionosphere and its magnetospheric environment. While preceding analytical approaches assumed the obstacle's height-integrated ionospheric conductivities to be spatially constant, the model presented here can take into account a continuous conductance profile that follows a power law. The electric potential in the interaction region, determining the electromagnetic fields of the Alfvén wing, can then be calculated from an Euler-type differential equation. In this way, the model allows to include a realistic representation of the "suspension bridge"-like conductance profile expected for the moon's ionosphere. The major drawback of this approach is its restriction to interaction scenarios where the ionospheric Pedersen conductance is large compared to the Hall conductance, and thus, the Alfvénic perturbations are approximately symmetric between the planet-facing and the planet-averted hemispheres of the moon. The model is applied to the hemisphere coupling effect observed at Enceladus, i.e., to the surface currents and the associated magnetic discontinuities that arise from a north-south asymmetry of the obstacle to the plasma flow. We show that the occurrence of this effect is very robust against changes in the conductance profile of Enceladus' plume, and we derive upper limits for the strength of the magnetic field jumps generated by the hemisphere coupling effect. During all 11 reported detections of the hemisphere coupling currents at Enceladus, the observed magnetic field jumps were clearly weaker than the proposed limits. Our findings are also relevant for future in situ studies of putative plumes at the Jovian moon Europa.

  1. Modeling coupled blast/structure interaction with Zapotec, benchmark calculations for the Conventional Weapon Effects Backfill (CONWEB) tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Gregory Carl

    2004-09-01

    Modeling the response of buried reinforced concrete structures subjected to close-in detonations of conventional high explosives poses a challenge for a number of reasons. Foremost, there is the potential for coupled interaction between the blast and structure. Coupling enters the problem whenever the structure deformation affects the stress state in the neighboring soil, which in turn, affects the loading on the structure. Additional challenges for numerical modeling include handling disparate degrees of material deformation encountered in the structure and surrounding soil, modeling the structure details (e.g., modeling the concrete with embedded reinforcement, jointed connections, etc.), providing adequate mesh resolution, and characterizing the soil response under blast loading. There are numerous numerical approaches for modeling this class of problem (e.g., coupled finite element/smooth particle hydrodynamics, arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian methods, etc.). The focus of this work will be the use of a coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) solution approach. In particular, the development and application of a CEL capability within the Zapotec code is described. Zapotec links two production codes, CTH and Pronto3D. CTH, an Eulerian shock physics code, performs the Eulerian portion of the calculation, while Pronto3D, an explicit finite element code, performs the Lagrangian portion. The two codes are run concurrently with the appropriate portions of a problem solved on their respective computational domains. Zapotec handles the coupling between the two domains. The application of the CEL methodology within Zapotec for modeling coupled blast/structure interaction will be investigated by a series of benchmark calculations. These benchmarks rely on data from the Conventional Weapons Effects Backfill (CONWEB) test series. In these tests, a 15.4-lb pipe-encased C-4 charge was detonated in soil at a 5-foot standoff from a buried test structure. The test structure was composed of a

  2. Simulating the effects of crop growth on land-atmosphere interactions using a coupled mesoscale-dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prateek; Baidya Roy, Somnath; Kumari, Sarita; Srivastava, Ankur

    2017-04-01

    Land and atmospheric dynamics are tightly coupled. Crop growth affects local micrometeorology by influencing the exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum between the land and the atmosphere. In this study, a dynamic crop growth module is incorporated in the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model to explore effects of crop growth on land-atmosphere interactions during the growing season. The crop module is derived from the crop model SUCROS that simulates carbon assimilation by photosynthesis and its allocation into the roots, stem, leaves and storage organs of crops. The crop module is first run in a stand-alone mode and calibrated to match observed LAI from soybean fields in Nebraska and Illinois and spring wheat fields in northern India. Next, it is incorporated as a submodule in the Noah-MP land surface module of WRF. In this coupled form, the fluxes from the land surface are simulated by Noah-MP at every model timestep while the LAI and root depth required for flux calculations are updated daily by the dynamic crop submodule. This coupled model provides better simulations of crop phenology than the generic dynamic vegetation module in Noah-MP. Moreover, the coupled model is able to simulate feedbacks on surface air temperature and humidity associated with changing Bowen Ratio due to crop growth in contrast with prescribed-leaf area index (LAI)-driven methods that is typical in mesoscale models. We have introduced crop yield as a model output that potentially expands the capability of this model to provide seasonal-scale weather and crop yield outlooks.

  3. The Effect of Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Interactions and Model Resolution on Hurricane Katrina in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sensitivity of simulated strength, track, and structure of Hurricane Katrina to atmospheric model resolution, cumulus parameterization, and initialization time, as well as mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions with and without small-scale ocean-wave effect, are investigated with a fully coupled regional climate model. The atmosphere, ocean, and wave components are represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model. Uncoupled atmosphere-only simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1, 3, 9, and 27 km show that while the simulated cyclone track is highly sensitive to initialization time, its dependence on model resolution is relatively weak. Using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis as initial and boundary conditions, WRF, even at low resolution, is able to track Katrina accurately for 3 days before it made landfall on August 29, 2005. Katrina's strength, however, is much more difficult to reproduce and exhibits a strong dependence on model resolution. At its lowest resolution (27 km), WRF is only capable of simulating a maximum strength of Category 2 storm. Even at 1 km resolution, the simulated Katrina only reaches Category 4 storm intensity. Further WRF experiments with and without cumulus parameterization reveal minor changes in strength. None of the WRF-only simulations capture the observed rapid intensification of Katrina to Category 5 when it passed over a warm Loop-Current eddy (LCE) in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions involving LCEs may play a crucial role in Katrina's rapid intensification. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations are designed and carried out to investigate hurricane Katrina-LCE interactions with and without considering small-scale ocean wave processes in order to fully understand the dynamical ocean-atmosphere processes in the observed rapid cyclone intensification.

  4. Nonlinear light-Higgs coupling in superconductors beyond BCS: Effects of the retarded phonon-mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoto; Murakami, Yuta; Aoki, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    We study the contribution of the Higgs amplitude mode on the nonlinear optical response of superconductors beyond the BCS approximation by taking into account the retardation effect in the phonon-mediated attractive interaction. To evaluate the vertex correction in nonlinear optical susceptibilities that contains the effect of collective modes, we propose an efficient scheme which we call the "dotted DMFT" based on the nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory (nonequilibrium DMFT), to get around the difficulty of solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation and analytical continuation. The vertex correction is represented by the derivative of the self-energy with respect to the external driving field, which is self-consistently determined by the differentiated ("dotted") DMFT equations. We apply the method to the Holstein model, a prototypical electron-phonon-coupled system, to calculate the susceptibility for the third-harmonic generation including the vertex correction. The results show that, in sharp contrast to the BCS theory, the Higgs mode can contribute to the third-harmonic generation for general polarization of the laser field with an order of magnitude comparable to the contribution from the pair breaking or charge density fluctuations. The physical origin is traced back to the nonlinear resonant light-Higgs coupling, which has been absent in the BCS approximation.

  5. Ab-initio coupled-cluster effective interactions for the shell model: Application to neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, G. R.; Engel, Jonathan; Hagen, Gaute; Navratil, Petr; Signoracci, Angelo J.

    2014-10-03

    We derive and compute effective valence-space shell-model interactions from ab initio coupled-cluster theory and apply them to open-shell and neutron-rich oxygen and carbon isotopes. Our shell-model interactions are based on nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon forces from chiral effective-field theory. We compute the energies of ground and low-lying states, and find good agreement with experiment. In particular, our computed 2+ states are consistent with N=14,16 shell closures in 22,24O, and a weaker N=14 shell closure in 20C. We find good agreement between our coupled-cluster effective-interaction results with those obtained from standard single-reference coupled-cluster calculations for up to eight valence neutrons.

  6. Charge renormalization and other exact coupling corrections to the dipolar effective interaction in an electrolyte near a dielectric wall.

    PubMed

    Aqua, J-N; Cornu, F

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the renormalizations of the charge and screening length that appear in the large-distance behavior of the effective pairwise interaction w(alphaalpha') between two charges e(alpha) and e(alpha') in a dilute electrolyte solution, both along a dielectric wall and in the bulk. The electrolyte is described by the so-called primitive model in the framework of classical statistical mechanics and the electrostatic response of the wall is characterized by its dielectric constant. In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. E 68, 022133 (2003)] a graphic reorganization of resummed Mayer diagrammatics has been devised in order to exhibit the general structure of the 1/y3 leading tail of w(alphaalpha') (x,x',y) for two charges located at distances x and x' from the wall and separated by a distance y along the wall. When all species have the same closest approach distance b to the wall, the coefficient of the 1/y3 tail is the product Dalpha(x)Dalpha'(x') of two effective dipoles. Here we use the same graphic reorganization in order to systematically investigate the exponential large-distance behavior of w(alphaalpha') in the bulk. (We show that the reorganization also enables one to derive the basic screening rules in both cases.) Then, in a regime of high dilution and weak coupling, the exact analytical corrections to the leading tail of w(alphaalpha'), both in the bulk or along the wall, are calculated at first order in the coupling parameter epsilon and in the limit where b becomes negligible with respect to the Debye screening length. (Epsilon is proportional to the so-called plasma parameter.) The structure of corrections to the terms of order epsilon is exhibited, and the scaling regime for the validity of the Debye limit is specified. In the vicinity of the wall, we use the density profiles calculated previously [J. Stat. Phys. 105, 211 (2001)] up to order epsilon and a method devised [J. Stat. Phys. 105, 245 (2001)] for the determination of the

  7. Interaction of the focused laser beam with the grooved surface of optical disk: Evanescent coupling and vector diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung

    1999-10-01

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to present a clear physical picture and useful insights of polarization effects in the diffraction of focused beams by grooved, multilayer-coated disks. The reading process of optical disk systems significantly relies on the reaction of the incident focused beam to the disk structure, may it be the groove profile or coating materials. The resulting complex-amplitude from diffraction is the main source for the readout signal. In the presence of the periodic pattern and the focused beam, however, different polarization states usually result in different complex-amplitudes. A good understanding of polarization effects in grooved multilayer disks is thus required for the optimum design of optical data storage systems. The pursuit of high-density recording inevitably drives the optical data storage industry to reduce the wavelength of light sources, decrease the track pitch of optical disks, and increase the numerical aperture of objective lenses. The track pitch and the size of the focused spot gradually approach the optical wavelength. Under these circumstances, the analysis of the interaction of focused beams with this type of high- frequency periodic disk using conventional scalar diffraction theory is no longer adequate. Only through vector diffraction study of polarization effects in the interaction of the focused beam with the periodic pattern can the characteristics of an optical disk system be fully understood and improved. Starting from the introduction of various polarization effects in optical disk systems and basic concepts of both scalar and vector diffraction theory, we then focus on the studies of diffraction patterns at the exit pupil of the objective lens and on the disk surface. Different behavior on the baseball pattern and in the effective groove depth is observed for the two polarization states. The use of the solid immersion lens to extensively increase the area density of optical disk systems prompts

  8. Comparison of the quadratic configuration interaction and coupled cluster approaches to electron correlation including the effect of triple excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Peter R.; Lee, Timothy J.; Rendell, Alistair P.

    1990-01-01

    The recently proposed quadratic configuration interaction (QCI) method is compared with the more rigorous coupled cluster (CC) approach for a variety of chemical systems. Some of these systems are well represented by a single-determinant reference function and others are not. The finite order singles and doubles correlation energy, the perturbational triples correlation energy, and a recently devised diagnostic for estimating the importance of multireference effects are considered. The spectroscopic constants of CuH, the equilibrium structure of cis-(NO)2 and the binding energies of Be3, Be4, Mg3, and Mg4 were calculated using both approaches. The diagnostic for estimating multireference character clearly demonstrates that the QCI method becomes less satisfactory than the CC approach as non-dynamical correlation becomes more important, in agreement with a perturbational analysis of the two methods and the numerical estimates of the triple excitation energies they yield. The results for CuH show that the differences between the two methods become more apparent as the chemical systems under investigation becomes more multireference in nature and the QCI results consequently become less reliable. Nonetheless, when the system of interest is dominated by a single reference determinant both QCI and CC give very similar results.

  9. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  10. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  11. Mode-coupling approach to polymer diffusion in an unentangled melt. II. The effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farago, J.; Meyer, H.; Baschnagel, J.; Semenov, A. N.

    2012-05-01

    A mode-coupling theory (MCT) version (called hMCT thereafter) of a recently presented theory [Farago, Meyer, and Semenov, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.178301 107, 178301 (2011)] is developed to describe the diffusional properties of a tagged polymer in a melt. The hMCT accounts for the effect of viscoelastic hydrodynamic interactions (VHIs), that is, a physical mechanism distinct from the density-based MCT (dMCT) described in the first paper of this series. The two versions of the MCT yield two different contributions to the asymptotic behavior of the center-of-mass velocity autocorrelation function (c.m. VAF). We show that in most cases the VHI mechanism is dominant; for long chains and prediffusive times it yields a negative tail ∝-N-1/2t-3/2 for the c.m. VAF. The case of non-momentum-conserving dynamics (Langevin or Monte Carlo) is discussed as well. It generally displays a distinctive behavior with two successive relaxation stages: first -N-1t-5/4 (as in the dMCT approach), then -N-1/2t-3/2. Both the amplitude and the duration of the first t-5/4 stage crucially depend on the Langevin friction parameter γ. All results are also relevant for the early time regime of entangled melts. These slow relaxations of the c.m. VAF, thus account for the anomalous subdiffusive regime of the c.m. mean square displacement widely observed in numerical and experimental works.

  12. Systematic evaluation of matrix effects in hydrophilic interaction chromatography versus reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Kohler, Isabelle; Thomas, Aurélien; Nicoli, Raul; Boccard, Julien; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Schappler, Julie; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-03-25

    Reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is the gold standard technique in bioanalysis. However, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) could represent a viable alternative to RPLC for the analysis of polar and/or ionizable compounds, as it often provides higher MS sensitivity and alternative selectivity. Nevertheless, this technique can be also prone to matrix effects (ME). ME are one of the major issues in quantitative LC-MS bioanalysis. To ensure acceptable method performance (i.e., trueness and precision), a careful evaluation and minimization of ME is required. In the present study, the incidence of ME in HILIC-MS/MS and RPLC-MS/MS was compared for plasma and urine samples using two representative sets of 38 pharmaceutical compounds and 40 doping agents, respectively. The optimal generic chromatographic conditions in terms of selectivity with respect to interfering compounds were established in both chromatographic modes by testing three different stationary phases in each mode with different mobile phase pH. A second step involved the assessment of ME in RPLC and HILIC under the best generic conditions, using the post-extraction addition method. Biological samples were prepared using two different sample pre-treatments, i.e., a non-selective sample clean-up procedure (protein precipitation and simple dilution for plasma and urine samples, respectively) and a selective sample preparation, i.e., solid phase extraction for both matrices. The non-selective pretreatments led to significantly less ME in RPLC vs. HILIC conditions regardless of the matrix. On the contrary, HILIC appeared as a valuable alternative to RPLC for plasma and urine samples treated by a selective sample preparation. Indeed, in the case of selective sample preparation, the compounds influenced by ME were different in HILIC and RPLC, and lower and similar ME occurrence was generally observed in RPLC vs. HILIC for urine and plasma samples

  13. Energy transport in the three coupled α-polypeptide chains of collagen molecule with long-range interactions effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mvogo, Alain; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofané, T. C.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of three coupled α-polypeptide chains of a collagen molecule is investigated with the influence of power-law long-range exciton-exciton interactions. The continuum limit of the discrete equations reveal that the collagen dynamics is governed by a set of three coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, whose dispersive coefficient depends on the LRI parameter r. We construct the analytic symmetric and asymmetric (antisymmetric) soliton solutions, which match with the structural features of collagen related with the acupuncture channels. These solutions are used as initial conditions for the numerical simulations of the discrete equations, which reveal a coherent transport of energy in the molecule for r > 3. The results also indicate that the width of the solitons is a decreasing function of r, which help to stabilize the solitons propagating in the molecule. To confirm further the efficiency of energy transport in the molecule, the modulational instability of the system is performed and the numerical simulations show that the energy can flow from one polypeptide chain to another in the form of nonlinear waves.

  14. Interaction function of coupled bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shi; Jiadong, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    The interaction functions of electrically coupled Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neurons for different firing patterns are investigated in this paper. By applying the phase reduction technique, the phase response curve (PRC) of the spiking neuron and burst phase response curve (BPRC) of the bursting neuron are derived. Then the interaction function of two coupled neurons can be calculated numerically according to the PRC (or BPRC) and the voltage time course of the neurons. Results show that the BPRC is more and more complicated with the increase of the spike number within a burst, and the curve of the interaction function oscillates more and more frequently with it. However, two certain things are unchanged: ϕ = 0, which corresponds to the in-phase synchronization state, is always the stable equilibrium, while the anti-phase synchronization state with ϕ = 0.5 is an unstable equilibrium. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11272065 and 11472061).

  15. One-electron versus electron-electron interaction contributions to the spin-spin coupling mechanism in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: analysis of basic electronic effects.

    PubMed

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-12-22

    For the first time, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism is decomposed into one-electron and electron-electron interaction contributions to demonstrate that spin-information transport between different orbitals is not exclusively an electron-exchange phenomenon. This is done using coupled perturbed density-functional theory in conjunction with the recently developed J-OC-PSP [=J-OC-OC-PSP: Decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization)] method. One-orbital contributions comprise Ramsey response and self-exchange effects and the two-orbital contributions describe first-order delocalization and steric exchange. The two-orbital effects can be characterized as external orbital, echo, and spin transport contributions. A relationship of these electronic effects to zeroth-order orbital theory is demonstrated and their sign and magnitude predicted using simple models and graphical representations of first order orbitals. In the case of methane the two NMR spin-spin coupling constants result from totally different Fermi contact coupling mechanisms. (1)J(C,H) is the result of the Ramsey response and the self-exchange of the bond orbital diminished by external first-order delocalization external one-orbital effects whereas (2)J(H,H) spin-spin coupling is almost exclusively mitigated by a two-orbital steric exchange effect. From this analysis, a series of prediction can be made how geometrical deformations, electron lone pairs, and substituent effects lead to a change in the values of (1)J(C,H) and (2)J(H,H), respectively, for hydrocarbons.

  16. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-25

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  17. ANTENNA-COUPLED LIGHT-MATTER INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    NOVOTNY, LUKAS

    2014-01-10

    This project is focused on antenna-coupled photon emission from single quantum emitters. The properties of optical antennas are tailored to control different photophysical parameters, such as the excited state lifetime, the saturation intensity, and the quantum yield [3]. Using a single molecule coupled to an optical antenna whose position and properties can be controllably adjusted we established a detailed and quantitative understanding of light-matter interactions in nanoscale environments. We have studied various quantum emitters: single molecules [11], quantum dots [7], rareearth ions [2], and NV centers in diamond [19]. We have systematically studied the interaction of these emitters with optical antennas. The overall objective was to establish a high-level of control over the light-matter interaction. In order to eliminate the coupling to the environment, we have taken a step further and explored the possibility of levitating the quantum emitter in high vacuum. What started as a side-project soon became a main activity in our research program and led us to the demonstration of vacuum trapping and cooling of a nanoscale particle [14].

  18. Effect of surface temperature on plasma-surface interactions in an inductively coupled modified gaseous electronics conference reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Baosuo; Joseph, Eric A.; Sant, Sanket P.; Liu Yonghua; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2005-11-15

    The effect of wall temperature, from 50 to 200 deg. C, on gas phase chemistry and substrate etching rates has been studied in inductively coupled CF{sub 4} plasma under two distinctive initial wall conditions, namely 'clean' and 'seasoned'. During plasma etching, we found that the gas phase chemistry exhibits a weak dependence on the initial wall cleanliness when the wall is either cold (50 deg. C) or hot (200 deg. C). In the mid-temperature range, the wall cleanliness can strongly affect gas phase chemistry. The study of temperature dependence of the fluorocarbon film deposition on the substrate indicates that ion-assisted incorporation, direct ion incorporation and ion-assisted desorption are the major factors determining film growth and removal. Ion-assisted incorporation and desorption are surface-temperature-dependent, while direct ion incorporation is independent of the surface temperature.

  19. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Schultz, D. M.; McFiggans, G.

    2015-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 km and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average reduction of downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface of -24.7 W m-2 over the three case studies. However, around 21.7 W m-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively interacting aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase net shortwave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that largely counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was difficult to quantify, being extremely sensitive to the model resolution and use of convective parameterisation. The 1 km domain simulated clouds less horizontally spread, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Not having a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain reduced total cloud cover, but also total precipitation. BB aerosol particles acted as CCN, increasing the droplet number concentration of clouds. However, the changes to cloud properties had negligible impact on net radiative balance on either domain, with or without convective parameterisation. Sensitivity to the uncertainties relating to the semi

  20. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  1. Thermal Brownian motor coupled by Casimir interaction.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenjie; Liao, Qinghong; He, Jizhou

    2010-10-01

    We study a Feynman-like thermal Brownian motor, in which the asymmetric corrugated cylinder as the ratchet is coupled with a corrugated plate by the noncontact Casimir interaction between them. The source of driving of the system is the thermal fluctuations and its dynamic evolution is described by a set of Langevin equations. Further, the mean velocity and thermal efficiency of the motor in the overdamped limit are studied in detail as a function of the temperature of the baths, external load applied, magnitude of the Casimir interaction, and other relevant parameters by the numerical stimulation. The transport properties attained here and the essential roles of the Casimir interaction can be explicitly demonstrated by designing a Casimir Brownian motor with present nanotechnology.

  2. Coupled maps with local and global interactions.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Noriyuki Bob; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2000-06-01

    A coupled map lattice model with both local and global couplings is studied as a simple example of hierarchical pattern dynamics with different length scales of interactions. Several phases are classified according to domain structures, degree of chaotic dynamics, distribution function, and power spectra. In particular, a cascade process of formation and collapse of bubbles is found in some parameter regime. The state is characterized by spatiotemporal power-law correlation and few positive Lyapunov exponents. In a two-dimensional case, the state leads to a characteristic spatiotemporal pattern that may be regarded as a dynamic extension of a Turing pattern. The possible relevance to natural patterns is also discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Psychophysiological Reactivity in Couples During a Marital Interaction Task.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, J; Oliveira-Silva, P; Mesquita, A R; Barbosa, M; Perrone-McGovern, K M; Gonçalves, O F

    2017-09-02

    The ability to regulate our own physiological arousal when dealing with the emotional expression of our partner is crucial for satisfactory and stable intimate relationships. In previous physiological studies of marital interactions, researchers have found greater levels of psychophysiological arousal for members of the couple in conflictual interactions in comparison with positive interactions. Past researchers have established that intense and prolonged autonomic and neuroendocrine arousal during marital conflict can have negative consequences for mental and physical health. In this study we examined the physiological reactivity, as measured by skin conductance level, heart rate and cortisol levels, from both partners during a couple's interaction task consisting of a structured conversation about positive and negative aspects of their relationship. Participants were thirty-two heterosexual couples (N = 64) in a committed monogamous relationship with a minimum duration of one year. We found higher heart rate and cortisol levels during negative interaction condition when compared with the positive condition. Skin conductance was higher in the positive interaction condition, when compared with the negative interaction condition. In addition, we found a significant negative association between heart rate variability and autonomic arousal evoked by the interaction task. The implications of these findings for the effects of marital strain on health as well as for the design of risk-reducing interventions, namely biofeedback are discussed.

  4. Global MHD simulations of Mercury's magnetosphere with coupled planetary interior: Induction effect of the planetary conducting core on the global interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Slavin, James A.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Daldorff, Lars K. S.; Toth, Gabor; Holst, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Mercury's comparatively weak intrinsic magnetic field and its close proximity to the Sun lead to a magnetosphere that undergoes more direct space-weathering interactions than other planets. A unique aspect of Mercury's interaction system arises from the large ratio of the scale of the planet to the scale of the magnetosphere and the presence of a large-size core composed of highly conducting material. Consequently, there is strong feedback between the planetary interior and the magnetosphere, especially under conditions of strong external forcing. Understanding the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-interior interaction at Mercury requires not only analysis of observations but also a modeling framework that is both comprehensive and inclusive. We have developed a new global MHD model for Mercury in which the planetary interior is modeled as layers of different electrical conductivities that electromagnetically couple to the surrounding plasma environment. This new modeling capability allows us to characterize the dynamical response of Mercury to time-varying external conditions in a self-consistent manner. Comparison of our model results with observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft shows that the model provides a reasonably good representation of the global magnetosphere. To demonstrate the capability to model induction effects, we have performed idealized simulations in which Mercury's magnetosphere is impacted by a solar wind pressure enhancement. Our results show that due to the induction effect, Mercury's core exerts strong global influences on the way Mercury responds to changes in the external environment, including modifying the global magnetospheric structure and affecting the extent to which the solar wind directly impacts the surface. The global MHD model presented here represents a crucial step toward establishing a modeling framework that enables self-consistent characterization of Mercury

  5. Nonlinear interaction of meta-atoms through optical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Slobozhanyuk, A. P.; Kapitanova, P. V.; Filonov, D. S.; Belov, P. A.; Powell, D. A.; Shadrivov, I. V.; Kivshar, Yu. S.; Lapine, M.; McPhedran, R. C.

    2014-01-06

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a multi-frequency nonlinear coupling mechanism between split-ring resonators. We engineer the coupling between two microwave resonators through optical interaction, whilst suppressing the direct electromagnetic coupling. This allows for a power-dependent interaction between the otherwise independent resonators, opening interesting opportunities to address applications in signal processing, filtering, directional coupling, and electromagnetic compatibility.

  6. Interaction Patterns of Premarital Couples: Typological Assessment Over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norem, Rosalie H.; Olson, David H.

    1983-01-01

    Studied interaction styles of premarital couples (N=148) and developed a typology of couple interaction at two points in time before marriage. Results showed only 7 percent of the couples had the same type of interaction at the two testings, supporting the hypothesis that premarital relationships are fluid. (WAS)

  7. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  8. Enhancing parent-child interaction with a prenatal couple intervention.

    PubMed

    Bryan, A A

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of a prenatal couple group intervention on parent-child interaction postbirth. Quasiexperimental study. A nonrandomized convenience sample of treatment group (TG) couples (n = 35) who attended an additional prenatal three-class series was compared to a control group (CG) from childbirth education classes on measures of videotaped parent-child interaction using the NCATS tool. The intervention class series was based on individual and couple changes in meaning/identity, roles, and relationship/interaction during the transition to parenthood. It addressed mother/father roles, infant communication abilities, and patterns of the first 3 months of life in a mutually enjoyable, possibility-focused way. T-tests and ANCOVA on NCATS scores between groups showed higher TG scores for mothers in sensitivity to cues, for fathers in social-emotional growth fostering, and for couple mean scores in social-emotional growth fostering, couple mean response to child distress, caregiver total, and caregiver-child total. Higher contingency scores were also found in the TG group. Fewer TG mothers and fathers fell below NCATS lower cutoff scores. Interventions that enhance mutual parent-child interaction through increased sensitivity to cues and responsiveness to infant needs or signals are important avenues for facilitating secure attachment, father and mother involvement, optimal development, and prevention of child abuse and neglect. The positive approach to this intervention invites couples to see themselves as developing with their infants over time, and to view their infants in new ways that will help develop satisfying, self-reinforcing patterns of interaction.

  9. Direct coevolutionary couplings reflect biophysical residue interactions in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coucke, Alice; Uguzzoni, Guido; Oteri, Francesco; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Coevolution of residues in contact imposes strong statistical constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Direct-Coupling Analysis (DCA), a global statistical inference method, successfully models this variability across homologous protein families to infer structural information about proteins. For each residue pair, DCA infers 21 × 21 matrices describing the coevolutionary coupling for each pair of amino acids (or gaps). To achieve the residue-residue contact prediction, these matrices are mapped onto simple scalar parameters; the full information they contain gets lost. Here, we perform a detailed spectral analysis of the coupling matrices resulting from 70 protein families, to show that they contain quantitative information about the physico-chemical properties of amino-acid interactions. Results for protein families are corroborated by the analysis of synthetic data from lattice-protein models, which emphasizes the critical effect of sampling quality and regularization on the biochemical features of the statistical coupling matrices.

  10. Direct coevolutionary couplings reflect biophysical residue interactions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Coucke, Alice; Uguzzoni, Guido; Oteri, Francesco; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Remi; Weigt, Martin

    2016-11-07

    Coevolution of residues in contact imposes strong statistical constraints on the sequence variability between homologous proteins. Direct-Coupling Analysis (DCA), a global statistical inference method, successfully models this variability across homologous protein families to infer structural information about proteins. For each residue pair, DCA infers 21 × 21 matrices describing the coevolutionary coupling for each pair of amino acids (or gaps). To achieve the residue-residue contact prediction, these matrices are mapped onto simple scalar parameters; the full information they contain gets lost. Here, we perform a detailed spectral analysis of the coupling matrices resulting from 70 protein families, to show that they contain quantitative information about the physico-chemical properties of amino-acid interactions. Results for protein families are corroborated by the analysis of synthetic data from lattice-protein models, which emphasizes the critical effect of sampling quality and regularization on the biochemical features of the statistical coupling matrices.

  11. Interactions of coupled acoustic and vortical instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Sohn, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the past, the acoustic combustion instability was studied independently of the hydrodynamic instability induced by vortex motions. This paper is intended to combine the two different sources of energy everywhere within the spatial domain and determine the effect of one upon the other. This can be achieved by calculating the mean flow velocities and vorticities and their fluctuating parts of velocities and vortices, as well as the fluctuating pressure. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is utilized to determine the wavenumbers and unsteady stream functions from which vortically coupled acoustic instability growth constants are calculated. This process demonstrates that there are two different frequencies, acoustic and hydrodynamic, various combinations of which contribute to either damping or amplification. It is found that stability boundaries for coupled acoustic and vortical oscillations are somewhat similar to the classical hydrodynamic stability boundaries, but they occur in the form of multiple islands.

  12. Chimera states: Effects of different coupling topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Majhi, Soumen; Ghosh, Dibakar; Perc, Matjaž

    2017-04-01

    Collective behavior among coupled dynamical units can emerge in various forms as a result of different coupling topologies as well as different types of coupling functions. Chimera states have recently received ample attention as a fascinating manifestation of collective behavior, in particular describing a symmetry breaking spatiotemporal pattern where synchronized and desynchronized states coexist in a network of coupled oscillators. In this perspective, we review the emergence of different chimera states, focusing on the effects of different coupling topologies that describe the interaction network connecting the oscillators. We cover chimera states that emerge in local, nonlocal and global coupling topologies, as well as in modular, temporal and multilayer networks. We also provide an outline of challenges and directions for future research.

  13. Interface effect in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2014-06-28

    This paper intends to theoretically investigate the effect of the interfaces on the Rashba spin splitting of two coupled quantum wells. The results show that the interface related Rashba spin splitting of the two coupled quantum wells is both smaller than that of a step quantum well which has the same structure with the step quantum well in the coupled quantum wells. And the influence of the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction of the coupled quantum wells is larger than that of a step quantum well. It demonstrates that the spin relaxation time of the two coupled quantum wells will be shorter than that of a step quantum well. As for the application in the spintronic devices, a step quantum well may be better than the coupled quantum wells, which is mentioned in this paper.

  14. Exchange interactions in coupled quantum dots observed through polarized photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesundara, Kushal C.; Garrido, Mauricio; Ramanathan, Swati; Stinaff, Eric; Bracker, Allan; Gammon, Dan

    2009-03-01

    Identification and manipulation of the exchange interaction between different spin configurations may be useful for implementing quantum logic operations. Coupled quantum dots offer the possibility of controlling the exchange interaction by continuously tuning between direct and indirect excitonic configurations. The effect of the anisotropic part of the exchange energy was clearly identified from polarization dependent photoluminescence (PL) results arising from the direct and indirect configurations of the neutral exciton. We also observe direct experimental evidence of the isotropic exchange interaction via PL measurements from positive trion configurations. The isotropic exchange interactions observed to be an order of magnitude larger than the anisotropic splitting as expected. High resolution measurements of this charged exciton configurations are expected to reveal additional insight into the details of the exchange interaction.

  15. Configuration interaction study including the effects of spin-orbit coupling for the electronic states of the LiX molecules (X = C, Si, Ge, Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Alekseyev, Aleksey B.; Buenker, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Ab initio multireference configuration interaction calculations including spin-orbit coupling effects have been carried out for four LiX molecules (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn). Potential energy curves of the ground and low-lying excited states have been obtained in each case as well as the corresponding spectroscopic constants. Transition moments have also been computed in order to give estimates of the radiative lifetimes of the excited states for each system. Trends in a variety of quantities such as T e values, spin-orbit splittings, equilibrium bond lengths and vibrational frequencies for this series of molecules are discussed in detail and comparison with the corresponding data reported earlier for the PbLi system is also made.

  16. Parallel spin-orbit coupled configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilson, J. L.; Ermler, W. C.; Pitzer, R. M.

    2000-06-01

    A parallel spin-orbit configuration interaction (SOCI) code has been developed. This code, named P-SOCI, is an extension of an existing sequential SOCI program and permits solution to heavy-element systems requiring both explicit spin-orbit (SO) effects and significant electron correlation. The relativistic procedure adopted here is an ab initio conventional configuration interaction (CI) method that constructs a Hamiltonian matrix in a double-group-adapted basis. P-SOCI enables solutions to problems far larger than possible with the original code by exploiting the resources of large massively parallel processing computers (MPP). This increase in capability permits not only the continued inclusion of explicit spin-orbit effects but now also a significant amount of non-dynamic and dynamic correlation as is necessary for a good description of heavy-element systems.

  17. Spin-orbit coupling and electron correlation in relativistic configuration interaction and coupled-cluster methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Inkoo; Park, Young Choon; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2012-02-01

    We studied convergence characteristics of relativistic effective core potential (RECP) based configuration interaction (CI) and coupled-cluster (CC) schemes in terms of spin-orbit coupling and electron correlation. The relativistic correlated methods can be divided into Kramers restricted (KR) and spin-orbit (SO) methods which differ by the stage of spin-orbit treatment: the KR method employs two-component Kramers restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) spinors as the one-electron basis in which spin-orbit coupling is included, whereas the SO method is based on one-component molecular orbitals generated from scalar relativistic HF and the spin-orbit interaction is then entered in post-HF step. The KR method is usually superior to the SO method for molecules containing heavy elements since spin-orbit coupling is included from the HF step. A performance calibration of the SO method against the KR method is performed by computations of the ground state energies and equilibrium bond lengths of MH (M = Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, and At). Spin-orbit coupling of each molecule was systematically increased by adjusting the spin-orbit operator of RECP to investigate its impact on the SO method. Although KRCI and SOCI converged to the same full-CI limit, for the strong spin-orbit coupling SOCI required higher levels of correlation compared to KRCI to account for the orbital relaxation effect. SOCC, in contrast, was able to recover both spin-orbit interaction and electron correlation in CC steps regardless of the spin-orbit strength, implying that SOCC could be the reliable and efficient relativistic ab initio method for moderate sized molecules containing heavy elements.

  18. Coupled multigroup cross sections for hydrogen interactions in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienke, B. R.; Morel, J. E.; Cayton, T. E.; Howell, R. B.

    1985-10-01

    Using analytical fits to the experimental cross sections for H 3 H 2, and H 2+ interactions in plasmas, developed by Gryzinski, Riviere, Jones, and Freeman, we obtain coupled multigroup cross sections and rate coefficients for hydrogen transport applications. Multigroup cross sections and rate coefficients, for specified energy group boundaries, plasma particle and temperature profiles, and cylindrical plasma confinement radius, are generated against a spatially dependent, local Maxwellian scattering background. Cross sections are formatted for direct use in production multigroup S n, Monte Carlo, or specific transport applications. Ten coupled hydrogen reactions are included and resulting cross sections for ionization, scattering, and production can be coupled or decoupled. Reactions treated include H, H 2 ionization by electrons and protons, H, H 2 charge exchange, and H 2, H 2+ dissociative mechanisms. We detail the formalism used to compute effective cross sections and rates and give practicle results for two fusion reactors.

  19. Effects of coulomb repulsion on conductivity of heterojunction carbon nanotube quantum dots with spin-orbital coupling and interacting leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogloblya, O. V.; Kuznietsova, H. M.; Strzhemechny, Y. M.

    2017-01-01

    We performed numerical studies for the conductance of a heterojunction carbon nanotube quantum dot (QD) with an extra spin orbital quantum number and a conventional QD in which the electron state is determined only by the spin quantum number. Our computational approach took into account the spin-orbit interaction and the Coulomb repulsion both between electrons on a QD as well as between the QD electron and the contacts. We utilized an approach based on the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function formalism as well as the equation of motion technique. We focused on the case of a finite Coulombic on-site repulsion and considered two possible cases of applied voltage: spin bias and conventional bias. For the system of interest we obtained bias spectroscopy diagrams, i.e. contour charts showing dependence of conductivity on two variables - voltage and the energy level position in a QD - which can be controlled by the plunger gate voltage. The finite Coulombic repulsion splits the density of states into two distinct maxima with the energy separation between them controlled by that parameter. It was also shown that an increase of either the value of the on-site Coulomb repulsion in a QD or the parameter of the Coulomb repulsion between the electrons in the QD and the contacts leads to an overall shift of the density of electronic states dependence toward higher energy values. Presence of the QD-lead interaction yields formation of a new pair of peaks in the differential conductance dependence. We also show that existence of four quantum states in a QD leads to abrupt changes in the density of states. These results could be beneficial for potential applications in nanotube-based amperometric sensors.

  20. Dynamically Coupled Oscillators: Cooperative Behavior via Dynamical Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aonishi, Toru; Okada, Masato

    2003-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for studying the cooperative behavior of dynamically coupled oscillators (DCOs) that possess dynamical interactions. Then, to clarify synchronization phenomena in networks of interneurons which possess inhibitory interactions, we propose a DCO model with dynamics of interactions that tend to cause 180^\\circ phase lags. Employing the approach developed here, we demonstrate that although our model displays synchronization at high frequencies, it does not exhibit synchronization at low frequencies because this dynamical interaction does not cause a phase lag sufficiently large to cancel the effect of the inhibition. We interpret the disappearance of synchronization in our model with decreasing frequency as describing the breakdown of synchronization in the interneuron network of the CA1 area below the critical frequency of 20 Hz.

  1. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography versus reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: effect of electrospray ionization source geometry on sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Kohler, Isabelle; Bugey, Aurélie; Bieri, Stefan; Versace, François; Staub, Christian; Guillarme, Davy

    2014-08-22

    In this study, the influence of electrospray ionization (ESI) source design on the overall sensitivity achieved in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), was investigated. State-of-the-art triple quadrupole mass analyzers from AB Sciex, Agilent Technologies and Waters equipped with brand specific source geometries were tested with various mobile phase pH on 53 pharmaceutical compounds. The design of the ESI source showed to strongly influence the gain in sensitivity that can be achieved in HILIC compared to RPLC mode. The 6460 Triple Quadrupole LC/MS system from Agilent Technologies was particularly affected by mobile phase settings. Indeed, compared to RPLC conditions, 92% of the compounds had an increased signal-to-noise ratio at a flow rate of 300 μL/min in HILIC mode at pH 6, while this percentage dropped to only 7% at 1000 μL/min and pH 3. In contrast, the influence of flow rate and mobile phase pH on the gain in sensitivity between RPLC and HILIC was found very limited with the API 5000 LC/MS/MS system from AB Sciex, as only 15 to 36% of the tested compounds showed an enhanced sensitivity in HILIC mode. With the Xevo TQ-S instrument from Waters, superior sensitivity in HILIC was noticed for 85% of the compounds with optimal conditions (i.e., pH 3 and 1000 μL/min), whereas at sub-optimal conditions (i.e. pH 6 and 300 μL/min), it represented less than 50%. The gain in sensitivity observed in HILIC was found less significant with the recent LC-MS platforms used in this study than for old-generation instruments. Indeed, the improved ESI sources equipping the recent mass analyzers allow for enhanced evaporation efficiency, mainly for RPLC mobile phases containing high proportion of water and this even at high flow rates.

  2. Illness representations and psychological adjustment of Greek couples dealing with a recently-diagnosed cancer: dyadic, interaction and perception-dissimilarity effects.

    PubMed

    Giannousi, Zoe; Karademas, Evangelos C; Dimitraki, Georgia

    2016-02-01

    The aim was to examine the impact of the dyadic, interaction and dissimilarity effects of the illness representations on the psychological health of recently diagnosed cancer patients and spouses in Greece. The sample consisted of 298 individuals nested in 149 couples. Effects were examined with the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Both actor (i.e., within person) and partner (i.e., between partners) effects were detected for both patients' and spouses' psychological symptoms. The negative association of patients' psychological symptoms with their representations of illness coherence was weak at the higher and medium levels, and stronger at the lower levels of spouse corresponding representations. Patient-partner discrepancy in perceived illness consequences was associated with more psychological symptoms in patients. Adaptation to cancer is a dyadic process within the context of which patient and partner psychological well-being is affected by each other's understanding of illness. Thus, the parallel examination of the illness representations of both partners is needed from the early phases of the illness trajectory.

  3. Three dimensional liquid chromatography coupling ion exchange chromatography/hydrophobic interaction chromatography/reverse phase chromatography for effective protein separation in top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Valeja, Santosh G; Xiu, Lichen; Gregorich, Zachery R; Guner, Huseyin; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To address the complexity of the proteome in mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down proteomics, multidimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) strategies that can effectively separate proteins with high resolution and automation are highly desirable. Although various MDLC methods that can effectively separate peptides from protein digests exist, very few MDLC strategies, primarily consisting of 2DLC, are available for intact protein separation, which is insufficient to address the complexity of the proteome. We recently demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) utilizing a MS-compatible salt can provide high resolution separation of intact proteins for top-down proteomics. Herein, we have developed a novel 3DLC strategy by coupling HIC with ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and reverse phase chromatography (RPC) for intact protein separation. We demonstrated that a 3D (IEC-HIC-RPC) approach greatly outperformed the conventional 2D IEC-RPC approach. For the same IEC fraction (out of 35 fractions) from a crude HEK 293 cell lysate, a total of 640 proteins were identified in the 3D approach (corresponding to 201 nonredundant proteins) as compared to 47 in the 2D approach, whereas simply prolonging the gradients in RPC in the 2D approach only led to minimal improvement in protein separation and identifications. Therefore, this novel 3DLC method has great potential for effective separation of intact proteins to achieve deep proteome coverage in top-down proteomics.

  4. Dip-Hump Temperature Dependence of Specific Heat and Effects of Pairing Fluctuations in the Weak-Coupling Side of a P-Wave Interacting Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inotani, Daisuke; van Wyk, Pieter; Ohashi, Yoji

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the specific heat CV at constant volume in the normal state of a p-wave interacting Fermi gas. Including p-wave pairing fluctuations within the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink, we show that, in the weak-coupling side, CV exhibits a dip-hump behavior as a function of the temperature. While the dip is associated with the pseudogap phenomenon near Tc, the hump structure is found to come from the suppression of Fermi quasiparticle scattering into a p-wave molecular state in the Fermi degenerate regime. Since the latter phenomenon does not occur in the ordinary s-wave interacting Fermi gas, it may be viewed as a characteristic phenomenon associated with a p-wave pairing interaction.

  5. Effect of driving frequency on the electron energy distribution function and electron-sheath interaction in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Sirse, N.; Kaw, P. K.; Turner, M. M.; Ellingboe, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    By using a self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation, we investigated the effect of driving frequency (27.12-70 MHz) on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and electron-sheath interaction in a low pressure (5 mTorr) capacitively coupled Ar discharge for a fixed discharge voltage. We observed a mode transition with driving frequency, changing the shape of EEDF from a strongly bi-Maxwellian at a driving frequency of 27.12 MHz to a convex type distribution at an intermediate frequency, 50 MHz, and finally becomes a weak bi-Maxwellian at a higher driving frequency, i.e., above 50 MHz. The transition is caused by the electric field transients, which is of the order of electron plasma frequency caused by the energetic "beams" of electrons ejected from near the sheath edge. Below the transition frequency, 50 MHz, these high energy electrons redistribute their energy with low energy electrons, thereby increasing the effective electron temperature in the plasma, whereas the plasma density remains nearly constant. Above the transition frequency, high-energy electrons are confined between opposite sheaths, which increase the ionization probability and therefore the plasma density increases drastically.

  6. Demand-withdraw interaction in couples with a violent husband.

    PubMed

    Berns, S B; Jacobson, N S; Gottman, J M

    1999-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between demand-withdraw interaction and battering in couples with a violent husband. The authors compared the interaction patterns of 47 couples with a violent husband with the interaction patterns of 28 distressed but nonviolent couples and 16 happily married nonviolent couples. All couples engaged in videotaped discussions of problem areas in their marriage. Both batterers and battered women showed less positive communication and more negative communication than did their nonviolent counterparts. Additionally, batterers showed significantly higher levels of both demanding and withdrawing than did other men. Battered women demanded more change than did women in nonviolent marriages but were significantly less inclined to withdraw than were their husbands. The discussion of these findings focuses on the interactional dynamics between batterers and battered women and how these interactions might be understood.

  7. A preliminary investigation of affective interaction in chronic pain couples.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Ayna Beate; Cano, Annmarie

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the extent to which affective marital interaction related to depressive symptoms in persons with chronic pain and their spouses and to pain severity in persons with pain. Couples from the community completed self-report surveys and engaged in a videotaped conversation on a topic of mutual disagreement that was coded for three affect types (i.e., anger/contempt, sadness, humor). Humor was positively related to marital satisfaction in both partners. Spouse anger/contempt and sadness were positively related to depressive symptoms in spouses. Several significant interaction effects between couple pain status (i.e., whether one or both partners reported pain) and affect also emerged. Specifically, sadness in the participant designated as the person with pain was associated with greater depressive symptoms and pain severity when only he or she reported pain whereas sadness was related to fewer depressive symptoms and less pain severity when both partners reported pain. The relationships between spouse anger and spouse depressive symptoms and between spouse humor and pain severity in the person with pain were also moderated by couple pain status. These exploratory findings can be interpreted in light of emotion regulation and pain empathy theories. For example, partners who have not experienced pain themselves may fail to empathize with persons in pain, thus preventing effective emotion regulation. When both spouses report chronic pain, expressions of negative affect may instead promote emotion regulation because the affect is experienced with a spouse who may be more empathetic.

  8. Coupling effects in optical metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Giessen, Harald

    2010-12-17

    Metamaterials have become one of the hottest fields of photonics since the pioneering work of John Pendry on negative refractive index, invisibility cloaking, and perfect lensing. Three-dimensional metamaterials are required for practical applications. In these materials, coupling effects between individual constituents play a dominant role for the optical and electronic properties. Metamaterials can show both electric and magnetic responses at optical frequencies. Thus, electric as well as magnetic dipolar and higher-order multipolar coupling is the essential mechanism. Depending on the structural composition, both longitudinal and transverse coupling occur. The intricate interplay between different coupling effects in a plasmon hybridization picture provides a useful tool to intuitively understand the evolution from molecule-like states to solid-state-like bands.

  9. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETRRCII, mol e- mol RCII-1 s-1) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal – oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETRRCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements. PMID:26171963

  10. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T; Tortell, Philippe D

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII), mol e- mol RCII(-1) s(-1)) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII): CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  11. Transfer of a weakly bound electron in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles. I. Long-range interaction effects in the ionic-covalent coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. S. Narits, A. A.

    2013-10-15

    Ion-pair formation processes are studied in collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles possessing small electron affinities. Nonadiabatic transitions from a Rydberg covalent term to an ionic term of a quasi-molecule are considered using the modified Landau-Zener theory supplemented with calculation of survival factors of an anion decaying in the Coulomb field of a positive ion core. Using the technique of irreducible tensor operators and the momentum representation of the wavefunction of a highly excited atom, exact expressions are obtained for transition matrix elements and the ionic-covalent coupling parameter. The approach developed in the paper provides the description beyond the scope of a conventional assumption about a small variation of the wavefunction of the Rydberg atom on the range of electron coordinates determined by the characteristic radius of the wavefunction of the anion. This allows one to correctly consider long-range effects of the interaction between a weakly bound electron and the neutral core of a negative ion in processes under study. It is shown by the example of thermal collisions of Xe(nf) atoms with CH{sub 3}CN molecules that this is very important for a reliable quantitative description of anion formation with a low binding energy. The results are compared with experiments and calculations performed within the framework of a number of approximate methods.

  12. Coupling effect on the Berry phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lijing; Yang, Zhi; Shi, Q. W.; Li, Qunxiang; Wang, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    The Berry phase has universal applications in various fields. Here, we explore the coupling effect on the Berry phase of a two-level system adiabatically driven by a rotating classical field and interacting with a single quantized mode. Our simulations clearly reveal that the Berry phase change is quadratic proportional to the coupling constant if it is less than the level spacing between neighboring instantaneous eigenstates. Remarkably, if the nearest neighbouring level spacing is comparable with the coupling constant, this simple quadratic dependence is lost. Around this resonance, the Berry phase can be significantly tuned by slightly adjusting the parameters, such as the coupling constant, the frequency of the quantized mode, and the transition frequency. These numerical results, agreeing well with the perturbation theory calculations, provide an alternative approach to tune the Berry phase near the resonance, which is useful in quantum information science, i.e. designing quantum logic gates.

  13. Wrapping interactions at strong coupling: The giant magnon

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, Romuald A.; Lukowski, Tomasz

    2007-12-15

    We derive generalized Luescher formulas for finite size corrections in a theory with a general dispersion relation. For the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} superstring these formulas encode leading wrapping interaction effects. We apply the generalized {mu}-term formula to calculate finite size corrections to the dispersion relation of the giant magnon at strong coupling. The result exactly agrees with the classical string computation of Arutyunov, Frolov, and Zamaklar. The agreement involved a Borel resummation of all even loop orders of the BES/BHL dressing factor thus providing a strong consistency check for the choice of the dressing factor.

  14. Interaction of solitons with a string of coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Vijendra Swami, O. P. Nagar, A. K.; Taneja, S.

    2016-05-06

    In this paper, we develop a theory for discrete solitons interaction with a string of coupled quantum dots in view of the local field effects. Discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equations are used to describe the dynamics of the string. Numerical calculations are carried out and results are analyzed with the help of matlab software. With the help of numerical solutions we demonstrate that in the quantum dots string, Rabi oscillations (RO) are self trapped into stable bright Rabi solitons. The Rabi oscillations in different types of nanostructures have potential applications to the elements of quantum logic and quantum memory.

  15. Couple Interaction: A Study of the Punctuation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Guillermo; Golann, Stuart

    1980-01-01

    Examined couples' punctuation of their own interactions. Punctuation was defined as a way of grouping sequences of interactions. Results suggested that the nature of relatedness, as defined by degree of distress, was associated with the punctuation of interactions by the communicators. (Author)

  16. Effect of Cross-Interaction between Ni and Cu on Growth Kinetics of Intermetallic Compounds in Ni/Sn/Cu Diffusion Couples during Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. K.; Ryu, J. B.; Park, C. Y.; Huh, J. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The solid-state, cross-interaction between the Ni layer on the component side and the Cu pad on the printed circuit board (PCB) side in ball grid array (BGA) solder joints was investigated by employing Ni(15 μm)/Sn(65 μm)/Cu ternary diffusion couples. The ternary diffusion couples were prepared by sequentially electroplating Sn and Ni on a Cu foil and were aged isothermally at 150, 180, and 200°C. The growth of the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the Ni side was coupled with that on the Cu side by the mass flux across the Sn layer that was caused by the difference in the Ni content between the (Cu1- x Ni x )6Sn5 layer on the Ni side and the (Cu1- y Ni y )6Sn5 layer on the Cu side. As the consequence of the coupling, the growth rate of the (Cu1- x Ni x )6 Sn5 layer on the Ni side was rapidly accelerated by decreasing Sn layer thickness and increasing aging temperature. Owing to the cross-interaction with the top Ni layer, the growth rate of the (Cu1- y Ni y )6Sn5 layer on the Cu side was accelerated at 150°C and 180°C but was retarded at 200°C, while the growth rate of the Cu3Sn layer was always retarded. The growth kinetic model proposed in an attempt to interpret the experimental results was able to reproduce qualitatively all of the important experimental observations pertaining to the growth of the IMC layers in the Ni/Sn/Cu diffusion couple.

  17. Light-matter interactions in semiconductor nanowires: Light-effect transistor and light-induced changes in electron-phonon coupling and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmon, Jason Kendrick

    This dissertation explores three related embodiments of light-matter interactions at the micro- and nano-scales, and is focused towards tangible device applications. The first topic provides a fundamentally different transistor or electronic switch mechanism, which is termed a light-effect transistor (LET). The LET, unlike exotic techniques, provides a practical and viable approach using existing fabrication processes. Electronic devices at the nanoscale operate within the ballistic regime, where the dominate source of energy loss comes from impurity scattering. As a LET does not require extrinsic doping, it circumvents this issue. Electron-phonon coupling, however, is the second largest source, and it is a pertinent and important parameter affecting electronic conductivity and energy efficiency, such as in LETs. The third topic is laser writing, or the use of a laser to perform post-growth modifications, to achieve specific optical and electrical characteristics. A LET offers electronic-optical hybridization at the component level, which can continue Moore's law to the quantum region without requiring a FET's fabrication complexity, e.g., physical gate and doping, by employing optical gating and photoconductivity. Multiple independent gates are therefore readily utilized to achieve unique functionalities without increasing chip space. LET device characteristics and novel digital and analog applications, such as optical logic gates and optical amplification, are explored. Prototype cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanowire-based LETs show output and transfer characteristics resembling advanced FETs, e.g., on/off ratios up to 1.0x10 6 with a source-drain voltage of 1.43 V, gate-power of 260 nW, and a subthreshold swing of 0.3 nW/decade (excluding losses). The LET platform offers new electronic-optical integration strategies and high speed and low energy electronic and optical computing approaches. Electron-phonon coupling is typically studied as an intrinsic property, which

  18. Acceleration effect of coupled oscillator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aonishi, Toru; Kurata, Koji; Okada, Masato

    2002-04-01

    We have developed a curved isochron clock (CIC) by modifying the radial isochron clock to provide a clean example of the acceleration (deceleration) effect. By analyzing a two-body system of coupled CICs, we determined that an unbalanced mutual interaction caused by curved isochron sets is the minimum mechanism needed for generating the acceleration (deceleration) effect in coupled oscillator systems. From this we can see that the Sakaguchi and Kuramoto (SK) model, which is a class of nonfrustrated mean field model, has an acceleration (deceleration) effect mechanism. To study frustrated coupled oscillator systems, we extended the SK model to two oscillator associative memory models, one with symmetric and the other with asymmetric dilution of coupling, which also have the minimum mechanism of the acceleration (deceleration) effect. We theoretically found that the Onsager reaction term (ORT), which is unique to frustrated systems, plays an important role in the acceleration (deceleration) effect. These two models are ideal for evaluating the effect of the ORT because, with the exception of the ORT, they have the same order parameter equations. We found that the two models have identical macroscopic properties, except for the acceleration effect caused by the ORT. By comparing the results of the two models, we can extract the effect of the ORT from only the rotation speeds of the oscillators.

  19. Exact Bremsstrahlung and effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitev, Vladimir; Pomoni, Elli

    2016-06-01

    We calculate supersymmetric Wilson loops on the ellipsoid for a large class of mathcal{N} = 2 SCFT using the localization formula of Hama and Hosomichi. From them we extract the radiation emitted by an accelerating heavy probe quark as well as the entanglement entropy following the recent works of Lewkowycz-Maldacena and Fiol-Gerchkovitz-Komargodski. Comparing our results with the mathcal{N} = 4 SYM ones, we obtain interpolating functions f ( g 2) such that a given mathcal{N} = 2 SCFT observable is obtained by replacing in the corresponding mathcal{N} = 4 SYM result the coupling constant by f ( g 2). These "exact effective couplings" encode the finite, relative renormalization between the mathcal{N} = 2 and the mathcal{N} = 4 gluon propagator and they interpolate between the weak and the strong coupling. We discuss the range of their applicability.

  20. A Preliminary Investigation of Affective Interaction in Chronic Pain Couples

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Ayna Beate; Cano, Annmarie

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to examine the extent to which affective marital interaction related to depressive symptoms in persons with chronic pain and their spouses and to pain severity in persons with pain. Couples from the community completed self-report surveys and engaged in a videotaped conversation on a topic of mutual disagreement that was coded for three affect types (i.e., anger/contempt, sadness, humor). Humor was positively related to marital satisfaction in both partners. Spouse anger/contempt and sadness were positively related to depressive symptoms in spouses. Several significant interaction effects between couple pain status (i.e., whether one or both partners reported pain) and affect also emerged. Specifically, sadness in the participant designated as the person with pain was associated with greater depressive symptoms and pain severity when only he or she reported pain whereas sadness was related to fewer depressive symptoms and less pain severity when both partners reported pain. The relationships between spouse anger and spouse depressive symptoms and between spouse humor and pain severity in the person with pain were also moderated by couple pain status. These exploratory findings can be interpreted in light of emotion regulation and pain empathy theories. For example, partners who have not experienced pain themselves may fail to empathize with persons in pain, thus preventing effective emotion regulation. When both spouses report chronic pain, expressions of negative affect may instead promote emotion regulation because the affect is experienced with a spouse who may be more empathetic. PMID:17521810

  1. Terahertz Light-Matter Interaction beyond Unity Coupling Strength.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Andreas; Pozimski, Marcel; Schambeck, Simon; Schuh, Dieter; Huber, Rupert; Bougeard, Dominique; Lange, Christoph

    2017-09-22

    Achieving control over light-matter interaction in custom-tailored nanostructures is at the core of modern quantum electrodynamics. In strongly and ultrastrongly coupled systems, the excitation is repeatedly exchanged between a resonator and an electronic transition at a rate known as the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR. For ΩR approaching the resonance frequency ωc, novel quantum phenomena including squeezed states, Dicke superradiant phase transitions, the collapse of the Purcell effect, and a population of the ground state with virtual photon pairs are predicted. Yet, the experimental realization of optical systems with ΩR/ωc ≥ 1 has remained elusive. Here, we introduce a paradigm change in the design of light-matter coupling by treating the electronic and the photonic components of the system as an entity instead of optimizing them separately. Using the electronic excitation to not only boost the electronic polarization but furthermore tailor the shape of the vacuum mode, we push ΩR/ωc of cyclotron resonances ultrastrongly coupled to metamaterials far beyond unity. As one prominent illustration of the unfolding possibilities, we calculate a ground state population of 0.37 virtual photons for our best structure with ΩR/ωc = 1.43 and suggest a realistic experimental scenario for measuring vacuum radiation by cutting-edge terahertz quantum detection.

  2. String coupling and interactions in type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the interactions of closed strings in a IIB matrix model. The basic interaction of the closed superstring is realized by the recombination of two intersecting strings. Such interaction is investigated in a IIB matrix model via two-dimensional noncommutative gauge theory in the IR limit. By estimating the probability of the recombination, we identify the string coupling g{sub s} in the IIB matrix model. We confirm that our identification is consistent with matrix string theory.

  3. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  4. Density Functional Calculations of Native Defects in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 : Effects of Spin–Orbit Coupling and Self-Interaction Error

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-04-02

    We know that native point defects play an important role in carrier transport properties of CH3NH3PbI3. However, the nature of many important defects remains controversial due partly to the conflicting results reported by recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In this Letter, we show that self-interaction error and the neglect of spin–orbit coupling (SOC) in many previous DFT calculations resulted in incorrect positions of valence and conduction band edges, although their difference, which is the band gap, is in good agreement with the experimental value. Moreover, this problem has led to incorrect predictions of defect-level positions. Hybrid density functional calculations,more » which partially correct the self-interaction error and include the SOC, show that, among native point defects (including vacancies, interstitials, and antisites), only the iodine vacancy and its complexes induce deep electron and hole trapping levels inside of the band gap, acting as nonradiative recombination centers.« less

  5. Resonance tuning due to Coulomb interaction in strong near-field coupled metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Chowdhury, Dibakar; Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-07-14

    Coulomb's law is one of the most fundamental laws of physics that describes the electrostatic interaction between two like or unlike point charges. Here, we experimentally observe a strong effect of Coulomb interaction in tightly coupled terahertz metamaterials where the split-ring resonator dimers in a unit cell are coupled through their near fields across the capacitive split gaps. Using a simple analytical model, we evaluated the Coulomb parameter that switched its sign from negative to positive values indicating the transition in the nature of Coulomb force from being repulsive to attractive depending upon the near field coupling between the split ring resonators. Apart from showing interesting effects in the strong coupling regime between meta-atoms, Coulomb interaction also allows an additional degree of freedom to achieve frequency tunable dynamic metamaterials.

  6. Chaos in generically coupled phase oscillator networks with nonpairwise interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Christian; Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana

    2016-09-15

    The Kuramoto–Sakaguchi system of coupled phase oscillators, where interaction between oscillators is determined by a single harmonic of phase differences of pairs of oscillators, has very simple emergent dynamics in the case of identical oscillators that are globally coupled: there is a variational structure that means the only attractors are full synchrony (in-phase) or splay phase (rotating wave/full asynchrony) oscillations and the bifurcation between these states is highly degenerate. Here we show that nonpairwise coupling—including three and four-way interactions of the oscillator phases—that appears generically at the next order in normal-form based calculations can give rise to complex emergent dynamics in symmetric phase oscillator networks. In particular, we show that chaos can appear in the smallest possible dimension of four coupled phase oscillators for a range of parameter values.

  7. Chaos in generically coupled phase oscillator networks with nonpairwise interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana

    2016-09-01

    The Kuramoto-Sakaguchi system of coupled phase oscillators, where interaction between oscillators is determined by a single harmonic of phase differences of pairs of oscillators, has very simple emergent dynamics in the case of identical oscillators that are globally coupled: there is a variational structure that means the only attractors are full synchrony (in-phase) or splay phase (rotating wave/full asynchrony) oscillations and the bifurcation between these states is highly degenerate. Here we show that nonpairwise coupling—including three and four-way interactions of the oscillator phases—that appears generically at the next order in normal-form based calculations can give rise to complex emergent dynamics in symmetric phase oscillator networks. In particular, we show that chaos can appear in the smallest possible dimension of four coupled phase oscillators for a range of parameter values.

  8. Microelectromechanical (MEMS) manipulators for control of nanoparticle coupling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Wiederrecht, Gary; Gosztola, David J.; Mancini, Derrick C.

    2017-01-17

    A nanopositioning system for producing a coupling interaction between a first nanoparticle and a second nanoparticle. A first MEMS positioning assembly includes an electrostatic comb drive actuator configured to selectively displace a first nanoparticle in a first dimension and an electrode configured to selectively displace the first nanoparticle in a second dimensions. Accordingly, the first nanoparticle may be selectively positioned in two dimensions to modulate the distance between the first nanoparticle and a second nanoparticle that may be coupled to a second MEMS positioning assembly. Modulating the distance between the first and second nanoparticles obtains a coupling interaction between the nanoparticles that alters at least one material property of the nanoparticles applicable to a variety of sensing and control applications.

  9. Coupling stable isotopes with bioenergetics to estimate interspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Caut, Stephane; Roemer, Gary W; Donlan, C Josh; Courchamp, Franck

    2006-10-01

    Interspecific interactions are often difficult to elucidate, particularly with large vertebrates at large spatial scales. Here, we describe a methodology for estimating interspecific interactions by combining stable isotopes with bioenergetics. We illustrate this approach by modeling the population dynamics and species interactions of a suite of vertebrates on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA: two endemic carnivores (the island fox and island spotted skunk), an exotic herbivore (the feral pig), and their shared predator, the Golden Eagle. Sensitivity analyses suggest that our parameter estimates are robust, and natural history observations suggest that our overall approach captures the species interactions in this vertebrate community. Nonetheless, several factors provide challenges to using isotopes to infer species interactions. Knowledge regarding species-specific isotopic fractionation and diet breadth is often lacking, necessitating detailed laboratory studies and natural history information. However, when coupled with other approaches, including bioenergetics, mechanistic models, and natural history, stable isotopes can be powerful tools in illuminating interspecific interactions and community dynamics.

  10. Electronic properties of single-layer antimony: Tight-binding model, spin-orbit coupling, and the strength of effective Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, A. N.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Roldán, R.

    2017-02-01

    The electronic properties of single-layer antimony are studied by a combination of first-principles and tight-binding methods. The band structure obtained from relativistic density functional theory is used to derive an analytic tight-binding model that offers an efficient and accurate description of single-particle electronic states in a wide spectral region up to the mid-UV. The strong (λ =0.34 eV) intra-atomic spin-orbit interaction plays a fundamental role in the band structure, leading to splitting of the valence band edge and to a significant reduction of the effective mass of the hole carriers. To obtain an effective many-body model of two-dimensional Sb we calculate the screened Coulomb interaction and provide numerical values for the on-site V¯00 (Hubbard) and intersite V¯i j interactions. We find that the screening effects originate predominantly from the 5 p states, and are thus fully captured within the proposed tight-binding model. The leading kinetic and Coulomb energies are shown to be comparable in magnitude, | t01|/ (V¯00-V¯01) ˜1.6 , which suggests a strongly correlated character of 5 p electrons in Sb. The results presented here provide an essential step toward the understanding and rational description of a variety of electronic properties of this two-dimensional material.

  11. Interaction of acoustic waves generated by coupled plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    When two substructures are coupled, the acoustic field generated by the motion of each of the substructures will interact with the motion of the other substructure. This would be the case of a structure enclosing an acoustic cavity. A technique to model the interaction of the generated sound fields from the two components of a coupled structure, and the influence of this interaction on the vibration of the structural components is presented. Using a mobility power flow approach, each element of the substructure is treated independently both when developing the structural response and when determining the acoustic field generated by this component. The presence of the other substructural components is introduced by assuming these components to be rigid baffles. The excitation of one of the substructures is assumed to be by an incident acoustic wave which is dependent of the motion of the substructure. The sound field generated by the motion of the substructure is included in the solution of the response.

  12. Interacting quintom dark energy with Nonminimal Derivative Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrouz, Noushin; Nozari, Kourosh; Rashidi, Narges

    2017-03-01

    Following our recent work on interacting dark energy models (Nozari and Behrouz, 2016), we study cosmological dynamics of an extended dark energy model in which gravity is non-minimally coupled to the derivatives of a quintessence and a phantom field in a quintom model. There is also a phenomenological interaction between the dark energy and dark matter components. By considering an exponential potential as a self-interaction potential for quintom model, we obtain a scaling solution to alleviate the coincidence problem. The existence and stability of the critical points are discussed in details and it has been shown that in this setup the universe experiences a phantom divide crossing. We compare the model with recent observational data and find some constraints on the model's parameters. We investigate also perturbations around the homogeneous and isotropic background in our Nonminimal Derivative Coupling (NMDC) quintom model.

  13. The effect of coupling line loss in microstrip to dielectric resonator coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bradshaw, E. S.; Trew, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a dielectric resonator and a microstrip transmission line is fundamentally a field phenomenon. However, the model of Figure 1b widely is used to represent the arrangement in Figure 1a, and predicts the behavior encountered in practice. The microstrip line of length l = n(lambda)/4 between the input and coupling planes and the lambda/4 open-circuit stub usually is assumed to be lossless. This paper considers the effect of coupling line loss on the unloaded-Q and coupling coefficient beta of the combination. It shows that transmission line loss can cause the decrease in unloaded-Q that has been observed to occur with tight coupling, and limits the coupling coefficient to a much lower value than would be obtained with a lossless coupling line.

  14. Nonlinear interaction between underwater explosion bubble and structure based on fully coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. M.; Wu, W. B.; Liu, Y. L.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between an underwater explosion bubble and an elastic-plastic structure is a complex transient process, accompanying violent bubble collapsing, jet impact, penetration through the bubble, and large structural deformation. In the present study, the bubble dynamics are modeled using the boundary element method and the nonlinear transient structural response is modeled using the explicit finite element method. A new fully coupled 3D model is established through coupling the equations for the state variables of the fluid and structure and solving them as a set of coupled linear algebra equations. Based on the acceleration potential theory, the mutual dependence between the hydrodynamic load and the structural motion is decoupled. The pressure distribution in the flow field is calculated with the Bernoulli equation, where the partial derivative of the velocity potential in time is calculated using the boundary integral method to avoid numerical instabilities. To validate the present fully coupled model, the experiments of small-scale underwater explosion near a stiffened plate are carried out. High-speed imaging is used to capture the bubble behaviors and strain gauges are used to measure the strain response. The numerical results correspond well with the experimental data, in terms of bubble shapes and structural strain response. By both the loosely coupled model and the fully coupled model, the interaction between a bubble and a hollow spherical shell is studied. The bubble patterns vary with different parameters. When the fully coupled model and the loosely coupled model are advanced with the same time step, the error caused by the loosely coupled model becomes larger with the coupling effect becoming stronger. The fully coupled model is more stable than the loosely coupled model. Besides, the influences of the internal fluid on the dynamic response of the spherical shell are studied. At last, the case that the bubble interacts with an air

  15. Tunneling Kinetics and Nonadiabatic Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Proteins: The Effect of Electric Fields and Anharmonic Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Salna, Bridget; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Russo, Douglas; Champion, Paul M

    2017-07-20

    A proper description of proton donor-acceptor (D-A) distance fluctuations is crucial for understanding tunneling in proton-coupled electron transport (PCET). The typical harmonic approximation for the D-A potential results in a Gaussian probability distribution, which does not appropriately reflect the electronic repulsion forces that increase the energetic cost of sampling shorter D-A distances. Because these shorter distances are the primary channel for thermally activated tunneling, the analysis of tunneling kinetics depends sensitively on the inherently anharmonic nature of the D-A interaction. Thus, we have used quantum chemical calculations to account for the D-A interaction and developed an improved model for the analysis of experimental tunneling kinetics. Strong internal electric fields are also considered and found to contribute significantly to the compressive forces when the D-A distance distribution is positioned below the van der Waals contact distance. This model is applied to recent experiments on the wild type (WT) and a double mutant (DM) of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO). The compressive force necessary to prepare the tunneling-active distribution in WT SLO is found to fall in the ∼ nN range, which greatly exceeds the measured values of molecular motor and protein unfolding forces. This indicates that ∼60-100 MV/cm electric fields, aligned along the D-A bond axis, must be generated by an enzyme conformational interconversion that facilitates the PCET tunneling reaction. Based on the absolute value of the measured tunneling rate, and using previously calculated values of the electronic matrix element, the population of this tunneling-active conformation is found to lie in the range 10(-5)-10(-7), indicating this is a rare structural fluctuation that falls well below the detection threshold of recent ENDOR experiments. Additional analysis of the DM tunneling kinetics leads to a proposal that a disordered (high entropy) conformation could be

  16. System-reservoir interaction with stochastic coupling parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, M.; Parrondo, J.M.R. ); de la Rubia, F.J. )

    1993-06-01

    In this work, the authors consider the problem of a system coupled to an ensemble of independent harmonic oscillators acting as a reservoir. They use an extension of the functional derivative technique to analyze some of the effects of adding stochastic terms to the system reservoir coupling parameters. Two approaches (quantum master equation and Langevin equation) are considered and their ranges of validity and differences are examined. 20 refs.

  17. SynCoPation: Interactive Synthesis-Coupled Sound Propagation.

    PubMed

    Rungta, Atul; Schissler, Carl; Mehra, Ravish; Malloy, Chris; Lin, Ming; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-04-01

    Recent research in sound simulation has focused on either sound synthesis or sound propagation, and many standalone algorithms have been developed for each domain. We present a novel technique for coupling sound synthesis with sound propagation to automatically generate realistic aural content for virtual environments. Our approach can generate sounds from rigid-bodies based on the vibration modes and radiation coefficients represented by the single-point multipole expansion. We present a mode-adaptive propagation algorithm that uses a perceptual Hankel function approximation technique to achieve interactive runtime performance. The overall approach allows for high degrees of dynamism - it can support dynamic sources, dynamic listeners, and dynamic directivity simultaneously. We have integrated our system with the Unity game engine and demonstrate the effectiveness of this fully-automatic technique for audio content creation in complex indoor and outdoor scenes. We conducted a preliminary, online user-study to evaluate whether our Hankel function approximation causes any perceptible loss of audio quality. The results indicate that the subjects were unable to distinguish between the audio rendered using the approximate function and audio rendered using the full Hankel function in the Cathedral, Tuscany, and the Game benchmarks.

  18. Effect of driving frequency on the electron-sheath interaction and electron energy distribution function in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarveshwar; Sirse, Nishant; Kaw, Predhiman; Turner, Miles; Ellingboe, Albert R.; InstitutePlasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat Team; School Of Physical Sciences; Ncpst, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The effect of driving frequency (27.12-70 MHz) on the electron-sheath interaction and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is investigated in a low pressure capacitive discharges using a self-consistent particle-in-cell simulation. At a fixed discharge voltage the EEDF evolves from a strongly bi-Maxwellian at low frequency, 27.12 MHz, to a convex type distribution at an intermediate frequency, 50 MHz, and finally becomes a weak biMaxwellian above 50 MHz. The EEDF evolution leads to a two-fold increase in the effective electron temperature up to 50 MHz, whereas the electron density remains constant in this range. After 50MHz, the electron density increases rapidly and the electron temperature decreases. The transition is caused by the transient electric field excited by bursts of high energy electrons interacting strongly with the sheath edge. Above the transition frequency, high energy electrons are confined between two sheaths which increase the ionization probability and thus the plasma density increases.

  19. Proxemics in Couple Interactions: Rekindling an Old Optic.

    PubMed

    Sluzki, Carlos E

    2016-03-01

    Utilizing as a lens the interpersonal implications of physical interpersonal distances in social contexts (a set of variables present during the professional discourse during the 1960s and 1970s, to then fade away), this article explores interactive process displayed by the protagonic couple in Bela Bartok's opera "Bluebeard Castle," an exercise aimed at underlining the value of maintaining proxemics as an explicit level of observation for clinical practice and interpersonal research.

  20. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hohn, Maryann E.; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions. PMID:25601722

  1. Analysis of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Equations for RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Maryann E; Li, Bo; Yang, Weihua

    2015-05-01

    We consider a system of coupled reaction-diffusion equations that models the interaction between multiple types of chemical species, particularly the interaction between one messenger RNA and different types of non-coding microRNAs in biological cells. We construct various modeling systems with different levels of complexity for the reaction, nonlinear diffusion, and coupled reaction and diffusion of the RNA interactions, respectively, with the most complex one being the full coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The simplest system consists of ordinary differential equations (ODE) modeling the chemical reaction. We present a derivation of this system using the chemical master equation and the mean-field approximation, and prove the existence, uniqueness, and linear stability of equilibrium solution of the ODE system. Next, we consider a single, nonlinear diffusion equation for one species that results from the slow diffusion of the others. Using variational techniques, we prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a boundary-value problem of this nonlinear diffusion equation. Finally, we consider the full system of reaction-diffusion equations, both steady-state and time-dependent. We use the monotone method to construct iteratively upper and lower solutions and show that their respective limits are solutions to the reaction-diffusion system. For the time-dependent system of reaction-diffusion equations, we obtain the existence and uniqueness of global solutions. We also obtain some asymptotic properties of such solutions.

  2. Influence of the Coulomb interaction on the exchange coupling in granular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalov, O. G.; Beloborodov, I. S.

    2017-04-01

    We develop a theory of the exchange interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) metallic grains embedded into insulating matrix by taking into account the Coulomb blockade effects. For bulk ferromagnets separated by the insulating layer the exchange interaction strongly depends on the height and thickness of the tunneling barrier created by the insulator. We show that for FM grains embedded into insulating matrix the exchange coupling additionally depends on the dielectric properties of this matrix due to the Coulomb blockade effects. In particular, the FM coupling decreases with decreasing the dielectric permittivity of insulating matrix. We find that the change in the exchange interaction due to the Coulomb blockade effects can be a few tens of percent. Also, we study dependence of the intergrain exchange interaction on the grain size and other parameters of the system.

  3. Influence of the Coulomb interaction on the exchange coupling in granular magnets.

    PubMed

    Udalov, O G; Beloborodov, I S

    2017-04-20

    We develop a theory of the exchange interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) metallic grains embedded into insulating matrix by taking into account the Coulomb blockade effects. For bulk ferromagnets separated by the insulating layer the exchange interaction strongly depends on the height and thickness of the tunneling barrier created by the insulator. We show that for FM grains embedded into insulating matrix the exchange coupling additionally depends on the dielectric properties of this matrix due to the Coulomb blockade effects. In particular, the FM coupling decreases with decreasing the dielectric permittivity of insulating matrix. We find that the change in the exchange interaction due to the Coulomb blockade effects can be a few tens of percent. Also, we study dependence of the intergrain exchange interaction on the grain size and other parameters of the system.

  4. Strongly coupled large N spectrum of two matrices coupled via a Yang-Mills interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Martin N. H.; Rodrigues, Joao P.

    2008-09-15

    We consider the large N spectrum of the quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of two Hermitian matrices coupled via a Yang-Mills interaction. In a framework where one of the matrices is treated exactly and the other is treated as a creation operator impurity, the difference equation associated with the Yang-Mills interaction is derived and solved exactly for two impurities. In this case, the full string tension corrected spectrum depends on two momenta. For a specific value of one of these momenta, the spectrum has the same structure as that of giant magnon bound states. States with general number of impurities are also discussed.

  5. Computer simulation and mode coupling theory study of the effects of specific solute-solvent interactions on diffusion: Crossover from a sub-slip to a super-stick limit of diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Groundla; Bhattacharyya, Sarika; Bagchi, Biman

    1999-03-01

    In many experimental situations, the interaction potential between the tagged solute and the solvent molecules is often different from that between the two solvent molecules. In such cases, the Stokes-Einstein relation attempts to describe the self-diffusion of the solute in terms of an effective hydrodynamic radius which, along with the hydrodynamic boundary condition (slip or stick), are varied to fit the experimental results. Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to obtain the diffusion coefficient by varying interaction between the solute and the solvent. It is found that when this interaction is more repulsive than that between solvent-solvent, the diffusion can be significantly faster, leading to a complete breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. In the limit of strong attractive interaction, we recover a dynamic version of the solvent-berg picture. The diffusion coefficient of the solute is found to depend strongly and nonlinearly on the magnitude of this specific interaction. The velocity correlation function also shows an interesting dependence on the sign and magnitude of the specific interaction. Another potentially important observation is that the specific solute-solvent interaction can induce a crossover from a sliplike to a stick-like diffusion, if one still uses the hydrodynamic language. Mode coupling theory analysis of the friction shows that the change in it originates largely from the modification of the binary component of the total friction. This is because the cage structure around the solute is modified due to the specific solute-solvent interaction, which directly affects the binary dynamics.

  6. Weyl spin-orbit-coupling-induced interactions in uniform and trapped atomic quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Reena; Singh, G. S.; Bosse, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    We establish through analytical and numerical studies of thermodynamic quantities for noninteracting atomic gases that the isotropic three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling, the Weyl coupling, induces interaction which counters “effective” attraction (repulsion) of the exchange symmetry present in zero-coupling Bose (Fermi) gas. The exact analytical expressions for the grand potential and hence for several thermodynamic quantities have been obtained for this purpose in both uniform and trapped cases. It is enunciated that many interesting features of spin-orbit-coupled systems revealed theoretically can be understood in terms of coupling-induced modifications in statistical interparticle potential. The temperature dependence of the chemical potential, specific heat, and isothermal compressibility for a uniform Bose gas is found to have signature of the incipient Bose-Einstein condensation in the very weak coupling regime although the system does not really go in the Bose-condensed phase. The transition temperature in the harmonically trapped case decreases with an increase of coupling strength consistent with the weakening of the statistical attractive interaction. Anomalous behavior of some thermodynamic quantities, partly akin to that in dimensions less than two, appears for uniform fermions as soon as the Fermi level goes down the Dirac point on increasing the coupling strength. It is suggested that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem can be utilized to verify anomalous behaviors from studies of long-wavelength fluctuations in bunching and antibunching effects.

  7. Electromagnetic interactions in a pair of coupled split-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetharaman, S. S.; King, C. G.; Hooper, I. R.; Barnes, W. L.

    2017-08-01

    Split-ring resonators (SRRs) are a fundamental building block of many electromagnetic metamaterials. Typically the response of a metamaterial is assumed to be independent of interelement interactions in the material. We show that SRRs in close proximity to each other exhibit a rich coupling that involves both electric and magnetic interactions. We study experimentally and computationally the strength and nature of the coupling between two identical SRRs as a function of their separation and relative orientation. We characterize the electric and magnetic couplings and find that, when SRRs are close enough to be in each other's near field, the electric and magnetic couplings may either reinforce each other or act in opposition. At larger separations retardation effects become important.

  8. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction and Spiral Order in Spin-orbit Coupled Optical Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Qian, Yinyin; Yan, Mi; Scarola, V. W.; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-01-01

    We show that the recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupling in ultracold atomic gases can be used to study different types of spin spiral order and resulting multiferroic effects. Spin-orbit coupling in optical lattices can give rise to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin interaction which is essential for spin spiral order. By taking into account spin-orbit coupling and an external Zeeman field, we derive an effective spin model in the Mott insulator regime at half filling and demonstrate that the DM interaction in optical lattices can be made extremely strong with realistic experimental parameters. The rich finite temperature phase diagrams of the effective spin models for fermions and bosons are obtained via classical Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26014458

  9. Coupled nucleotide covariations reveal dynamic RNA interaction patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Gultyaev, A P; Franch, T; Gerdes, K

    2000-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved structures in related RNA molecules contain coordinated variations (covariations) of paired nucleotides. Analysis of covariations is a very powerful approach to deduce phylogenetically conserved (i.e., functional) conformations, including tertiary interactions. Here we discuss conserved RNA folding pathways that are revealed by covariation patterns. In such pathways, structural requirements for alternative pairings cause some nucleotides to covary with two different partners. Such "coupled" covariations between three or more nucleotides were found in various types of RNAs. The analysis of coupled covariations can unravel important features of RNA folding dynamics and improve phylogeny reconstruction in some cases. Importantly, it is necessary to distinguish between multiple covariations determined by mutually exclusive structures and those determined by tertiary contacts. PMID:11105748

  10. Microscopic theory of Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction in pyrochlore oxides with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    Pyrochlore oxides show several fascinating phenomena, such as the formation of heavy fermions and the thermal Hall effect. Although a key to understanding some phenomena may be the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction, its microscopic origin is unclear. To clarify the microscopic origin, we constructed a t2 g-orbital model with the kinetic energy, the trigonal-distortion potential, the multiorbital Hubbard interactions, and the L S coupling, and derived the low-energy effective Hamiltonian for a d1 Mott insulator with the weak L S coupling. We first show that lack of the inversion center of each nearest-neighbor V-V bond causes the odd-mirror interorbital hopping integrals. Those are qualitatively different from the even-mirror hopping integrals, existing even with the inversion center. We next show that the second-order perturbation using the kinetic terms leads to the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions, whose competition is controllable by tuning the Hubbard interactions. Then, we show the most important result: the third-order perturbation terms using the combination of the even-mirror hopping integral, the odd-mirror hopping integral, and the L S coupling causes the DM interaction due to the mirror-mixing effect, where those hopping integrals are necessary to obtain the antisymmetric kinetic exchange and the L S coupling is necessary to excite the orbital angular momentum at one of two sites. We also show that the magnitude and sign of the DM interaction can be controlled by changing the positions of the O ions and the strength of the Hubbard interactions. We discuss the advantages in comparison with the phenomenological theory and Moriya's microscopic theory, applicability of our mechanism, and the similarities and differences between our case and the strong-L S -coupling case.

  11. Effects of boson dispersion in fermion-boson coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motome, Yukitoshi; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2000-11-01

    We study the nonlinear feedback in a fermion-boson system using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory and the quantum Monte Carlo method. In the perturbative regimes (weak-coupling and atomic limits) the effective interaction among fermions increases as the width of the boson dispersion increases. In the strong-coupling regime away from the antiadiabatic limit, the effective interaction decreases as we increase the width of the boson dispersion. This behavior is closely related to complete softening of the boson field. We elucidate the parameters that control this nonperturbative region where fluctuations of the dispersive bosons enhance the delocalization of fermions.

  12. Coupling fluid-structure interaction with phase-field fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a concept for coupling fluid-structure interaction with brittle fracture in elasticity is proposed. The fluid-structure interaction problem is modeled in terms of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian technique and couples the isothermal, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with nonlinear elastodynamics using the Saint-Venant Kirchhoff solid model. The brittle fracture model is based on a phase-field approach for cracks in elasticity and pressurized elastic solids. In order to derive a common framework, the phase-field approach is re-formulated in Lagrangian coordinates to combine it with fluid-structure interaction. A crack irreversibility condition, that is mathematically characterized as an inequality constraint in time, is enforced with the help of an augmented Lagrangian iteration. The resulting problem is highly nonlinear and solved with a modified Newton method (e.g., error-oriented) that specifically allows for a temporary increase of the residuals. The proposed framework is substantiated with several numerical tests. In these examples, computational stability in space and time is shown for several goal functionals, which demonstrates reliability of numerical modeling and algorithmic techniques. But also current limitations such as the necessity of using solid damping are addressed.

  13. Optically induced spin gates in coupled quantum dots using the electron-hole exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia E.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a fast optically induced two-qubit C-PHASE gate between two resident spins in a pair of coupled quantum dots. An excited bound state which extends over the two dots provides an effective electron-electron exchange interaction. The gate is made possible by the electron-hole exchange interaction, which isolates a single transition in the system. When combined with appropriate single-qubit rotations, this gate generates an entangled state of the two spins.

  14. Investigation of the Coupled Effects of Molecular Weight and Charge-Transfer Interactions on the Optical and Photochemical Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    McKay, Garrett; Couch, Kylie D; Mezyk, Stephen P; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-08-02

    We studied the formation of photochemically produced reactive intermediates (RI) from dissolved organic matter (DOM). Specifically, we focused on the effects of variable molecular weight and chemical reduction on the optical properties of DOM (absorbance and fluorescence) and the formation of singlet oxygen ((1)O2), DOM triplet excited states ((3)DOM*), and the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH). The data are largely evaluated in terms of a charge-transfer (CT) model, but deficiencies in the model to explain the data are pointed out when evident. A total of two sets of samples were studied that were subjected to different treatments; the first set included secondary-treated wastewaters and a wastewater-impacted stream, and the second was a DOM isolate. Treatments included size fractionation and chemical reduction using sodium borohydride. Taken as a whole, the results demonstrate that decreasing molecular weight and borohydride reduction work in opposition regarding quantum efficiencies for (1)O2 and (3)DOM* production but in concert for fluorescence and (•)OH production. The optical and photochemical data provide evidence for a limited role of CT interactions occurring in lower-molecular-weight DOM molecules. In addition, the data suggest that the observed optical and photochemical properties of DOM are a result of multiple populations of chromophores and that their relative contribution is changed by molecular-weight fractionation and borohydride reduction.

  15. Inverse Vernier effect in coupled lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Li; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2015-07-01

    In this report we study the Vernier effect in coupled laser systems consisting of two cavities. We show that depending on the nature of their coupling, not only can the "supermodes" formed at overlapping resonances of these two cavities have the lowest thresholds as previously found, leading to lasing at these overlapping resonances and a manifestation of the typical Vernier effect, but also they can have increased thresholds and are hence suppressed, which can be viewed as an inverse Vernier effect. The inverse Vernier effect can also lead to an increased free spectrum range and possibly single-mode lasing, which may explain the experimental findings in several previous studies. We illustrate this effect using two coupled micro-ring cavities and a micro-ring cavity coupled to a slab cavity, and we discuss its relation to the existence of exceptional points in coupled lasers.

  16. Nonlocal mode-coupling interactions and phase transition near tricriticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohit; Dutta, Kishore; Nandy, Malay K.

    2015-04-01

    Employing Wilson's renormalization group scheme, we investigate the critical behaviour of a modified Ginzburg-Landau model with a nonlocal mode-coupling interaction in the quartic term. Carrying out the calculations at one-loop order, we obtain the critical exponents in the leading order of ε=4-d-2ρ , where ρ is an exponent occurring in the nonlocal interaction term and d is the space dimension. Interestingly, the correlation exponent η is found to be non-zero at one-loop order and the ɛ expansion corresponds to an expansion about the tricritical mean-field theory in three dimensions, unlike the conventional Φ4 theory. The ensuing critical exponents are in good agreement with experimental values for samples close to tricriticality. Our analysis indicates that tricriticality is a feature only in three dimensions.

  17. Interaction-induced exotic vortex states in an optical lattice clock with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Pan, Jian-Song; Yi, Wei; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang

    2017-08-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [L. F. Livi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 220401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.220401], we study the ground-state properties of interacting fermions in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock with spin-orbit coupling. As the electronic and the hyperfine-spin states in the clock-state manifolds can be treated as effective sites along distinct synthetic dimensions, the system can be considered as multiple two-leg ladders with uniform magnetic flux penetrating the plaquettes of each ladder. As the interorbital spin-exchange interactions in the clock-state manifolds couple individual ladders together, we show that exotic interaction-induced vortex states emerge in the coupled-ladder system, which compete with existing phases of decoupled ladders and lead to a rich phase diagram. Adopting the density matrix renormalization group approach, we map out the phase diagram, and investigate in detail the currents and the density-density correlations of the various phases. Our results reveal the impact of interactions on spin-orbit coupled systems, and are particularly relevant to the ongoing exploration of spin-orbit coupled optical lattice clocks.

  18. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  19. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  20. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  1. Dynamic effects of magnetic multilayer interlayer coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pechan, M.J.; Xu, J. . Dept. of Physics); Kelly, D.M.; Schuller, I.K. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Coupling between magnetic layers in multilayer samples gives rise to dynamic effects which are manifest as anomalous modes in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra. According to the model presented, antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) coupling would produce such modes on the high (low) field side of the uniform FMR mode. Anomalous modes, observed in Fe/Cu and Fe/Cr multilayer samples, are analyzed to obtain coupling constants as a function of nonmagnetic layer thickness. The modes are shown to arise from 180 out-of-phase interlayer magnetization precession. The coupling is observed to be antiferromagnetic in all samples and to be an order of magnitude greater in the Cr system than in the Cu.

  2. Non-covalent π-π stacking interactions turn off non-adiabatic effects in proton-coupled electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Rugeles, Leonardo; Galano, Annia; Raúl Alvarez-Idaboy, J

    2017-03-08

    π-π stacking interactions do not necessarily change the mechanism involved in the H transfer reaction between phenol and phenoxyl radicals. We propose that, in such cases, the e(-) is transferred between the π delocalized moieties, while the H(+) is transferred between the donor and acceptor atoms.

  3. Exact non-Markovian dynamics of qubits coupled to two interacting environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. Z.; Li, D. X.; Su, Shi-Lei; Zhou, Y. H.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-09-01

    As the memory effect may be helpful in quantum information processing, non-Markovian dynamics plays an important role in the description of many-body open systems. Among these topics, the system consisting of independent qubits interacting with several coupled environments is of particular interest. In this paper, we study the exact non-Markovian dynamics of two independent qubits. Each of the qubits interacts individually with its environment, and these two environments coupled with each other. We investigate the non-Markovianity measure of the system for the whole parameter regime without the rotating-wave approximation (RWA) and compare the results with that under the RWA. We find that the non-Markovianity measure for two qubits manifests a transition from a non-Markovian to Markovian regime regardless of the coupling strength between the environments. The physical origin of this transition is revealed, and a possible observation of the prediction in superconducting quantum interference devices is discussed.

  4. Role of spin dependent f- d interaction (Hund coupling) in mixed-valence phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, N. K.; Mukherjee, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of spin dependent f- d interaction (Hund coupling) in mixed-valence phenomena has been investigated within Falicov-Kimball model extended by the spin interaction. Calculations have been performed both at zero and at finite temperatures using exact diagonalization method. It is observed that spin dependent f- d interaction (1) shifts the d-level energy and increases the width of valence transition, (2) increases disorder in the system, (3) causes both single peak and double peak structures to appear in specific heat curves, (4) increases the growth of antiferromagnetic correlations.

  5. The interaction between a single two-level atom coupled to an N-level quantum system through three couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, M. Sebawe; Ahmed, M. M. A.; Khalil, E. M.; Obada, A. S.-F.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the problem of three types of interaction between an N-level quantum system and a two-level atom where three coupling parameters are involved. The system can be deduced from the Heisenberg chain. The canonical transformation is used to remove two coupling parameters from the system and consequently it is reduced to atom-atom interaction. The wave function is calculated using the evolution operator and hence we have managed to obtain the expectation value of some dynamical operators. During our study of the atomic inversion we noted that the collapses period is shifted up when we take the effect of λ2 into consideration. While it is shifted up and down in the presence of λ3. The atomic angle plays a crucial role for controlling the degree of entanglement. For the variance squeezing we noted that the coupling parameter λ2 shows amounts of squeezing more than the case of λ3. Similar behavior is noted for the entropy squeezing.

  6. A natural framework for isogeometric fluid-structure interaction based on BEM-shell coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltai, Luca; Kiendl, Josef; DeSimone, Antonio; Reali, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between thin structures and incompressible Newtonian fluids is ubiquitous both in nature and in industrial applications. In this paper we present an isogeometric formulation of such problems which exploits a boundary integral formulation of Stokes equations to model the surrounding flow, and a non linear Kirchhoff-Love shell theory to model the elastic behaviour of the structure. We propose three different coupling strategies: a monolithic, fully implicit coupling, a staggered, elasticity driven coupling, and a novel semi-implicit coupling, where the effect of the surrounding flow is incorporated in the non-linear terms of the solid solver through its damping characteristics. The novel semi-implicit approach is then used to demonstrate the power and robustness of our method, which fits ideally in the isogeometric paradigm, by exploiting only the boundary representation (B-Rep) of the thin structure middle surface.

  7. Effects of Behavioral Marital Therapy on Couples' Communication and Problem-Solving Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahlweg, Kurt; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of behavioral marital therapy in improving communication and problem solving skills in 29 couples. Couples' problem discussions were videotaped and rated. Results showed that BMT was effective. The interaction patterns of the treated couples resembled patterns exhibited by nondistressed controls. (JAC)

  8. Coupling between electron plasma waves in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, M. J.; Lal, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Johnston, T. W.

    1996-05-01

    A Lagrangian fluid model (cold plasma, fixed ions) is developed for analyzing the coupling between electron plasma waves. This model shows that a small wave number electron plasma wave (ω2,k2) will strongly affect a large wave number electron plasma wave (ω1,k1), transferring its energy into daughter waves or sidebands at (ω1+nω2,k1+nk2) in the lab frame. The accuracy of the model is checked via particle-in-cell simulations, which confirm that the energy in the mode at (ω1,k1) can be completely transferred to the sidebands at (ω1+nω2,k1+nk2) by the presence of the electron plasma mode at (ω2,k2). Conclusive experimental evidence for the generation of daughter waves via this coupling is then presented using time- and wave number-resolved spectra of the light from a probe laser coherently Thomson scattered by the electron plasma waves generated by the interaction of a two-frequency CO2 laser with a plasma.

  9. Weighty dynamics: exploring couples' perceptions of post-weight-loss interaction.

    PubMed

    Romo, Lynsey Kluever; Dailey, René M

    2014-01-01

    Although romantic couples can use communication to help one another lose weight and maintain weight loss, the effect of weight loss on partner interaction is less understood. However, an examination of the interpersonal context in which partners manage their weight is important to help partners negotiate their weight, their relationship, and the U.S. obesity epidemic. Guided by systems theory, this study explored partners' perceptions of post-weight-loss interaction in relationships in which one partner lost weight and the other did not. Through qualitative questionnaires of 42 adults (21 romantic couples), the dyadic investigation revealed that while losing weight resulted in positive interaction for many partners (e.g., engaging in a shared healthy lifestyle), shedding weight also yielded some negative consequences (e.g., non-weight-loss partner criticism). The extent to which partners embraced new weight management rules and patterns largely influenced post-weight-loss communication and behavior.

  10. Decoherence of a single spin coupled to an interacting spin bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Fröhling, Nina; Xing, Xi; Hackmann, Johannes; Nanduri, Arun; Anders, Frithjof B.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-01-01

    Decoherence of a central spin coupled to an interacting spin bath via inhomogeneous Heisenberg coupling is studied by two different approaches, namely an exact equations of motion (EOMs) method and a Chebyshev expansion technique (CET). By assuming a wheel topology of the bath spins with uniform nearest-neighbor X X -type intrabath coupling, we examine the central spin dynamics with the bath prepared in two different types of bath initial conditions. For fully polarized baths in strong magnetic fields, the polarization dynamics of the central spin exhibits a collapse-revival behavior in the intermediate-time regime. Under an antiferromagnetic bath initial condition, the two methods give excellently consistent central spin decoherence dynamics for finite-size baths of N ≤14 bath spins. The decoherence factor is found to drop off abruptly on a short time scale and approach a finite plateau value which depends on the intrabath coupling strength nonmonotonically. In the ultrastrong intrabath coupling regime, the plateau values show an oscillatory behavior depending on whether N /2 is even or odd. The observed results are interpreted qualitatively within the framework of the EOM and perturbation analysis. The effects of anisotropic spin-bath coupling and inhomogeneous intrabath bath couplings are briefly discussed. Possible experimental realization of the model in a modified quantum corral setup is suggested.

  11. Optical control of coupled molecular states by ac Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianbing

    2014-05-01

    Quantum states with different spin multiplicity can be coupled through the interaction of the spin orbital motion of electrons. For example, the spin-orbit coupled rovibrational levels in diatomic alkali, which have different multiplicity in terms of total spin quantum number, and are classified as singlet states (if the total spin is zero) and triplet states (if the total spin is one), respectively. A transition from the singlet level can only go to singlet levels and a triplet only to triplet levels. Due to the spin-orbit coupling, however, the coupled states mix each other, therefore both states have singlet as well as triplet character. By coherently coupling the pair to an auxiliary quantum state, varying the Rabi frequency of the coupling laser and the detuning of the laser frequency, the coupling of the two mixed singlet-triplet molecular rovibrational levels can be modified by ac Stark effect. We use density matrix equations and a five-level molecular model to show that a coupled singlet-triplet pair of rovibrational levels can be used as a channel to optically control quantum states.

  12. RKKY interaction in three-dimensional electron gases with linear spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Xiong; Chang, Hao-Ran; Zhou, Jianhui

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically study the impacts of linear spin-orbit coupling (SOC) on the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction between magnetic impurities in two kinds of three-dimensional noncentrosymmetric systems. It has been found that linear SOCs lead to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the Ising interaction, in addition to the conventional Heisenberg interaction. These interactions possess distinct range functions from three-dimensional electron gases and Dirac/Weyl semimetals. In the weak SOC limit, the Heisenberg interaction dominates over the other two interactions in a moderately large region of parameters. Sufficiently strong Rashba SOC makes the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction or the Ising interaction dominate over the Heisenberg interaction in some regions. The change in topology of the Fermi surface leads to some quantitative changes in periods of oscillations of range functions. The anisotropy of Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interaction in bismuth tellurohalides family BiTe X (X =Br , Cl, and I) originates from both the specific form of Rashba SOC and the anisotropic effective mass. Our work provides some insights into understanding observed spin textures and the application of these materials in spintronics.

  13. Toward Usable Interactive Analytics: Coupling Cognition and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris; Chang, Remco; Zhou, Michelle

    2014-09-24

    Interactive analytics provide users a myriad of computational means to aid in extracting meaningful information from large and complex datasets. Much prior work focuses either on advancing the capabilities of machine-centric approaches by the data mining and machine learning communities, or human-driven methods by the visualization and CHI communities. However, these methods do not yet support a true human-machine symbiotic relationship where users and machines work together collaboratively and adapt to each other to advance an interactive analytic process. In this paper we discuss some of the inherent issues, outlining what we believe are the steps toward usable interactive analytics that will ultimately increase the effectiveness for both humans and computers to produce insights.

  14. Vacuum polarization corrections to low energy quark effective couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Ademar; Braghin, Fabio L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work corrections to low energy punctual effective quark couplings up to the eighth order are calculated by considering vacuum polarization effects with the scalar quark-antiquark condensate. The departing point is a QCD-based Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. By separating the quark field into two components, one that condenses and another one for interacting quarks, the former is integrated out with the help of usual auxiliary fields and an effective action in terms of interacting quark fields is found. The scalar auxiliary field reduces to the quark-antiquark condensate in the vacuum and the determinant is expanded in powers of the quark-antiquark bilinears generating chiral invariant effective 2N-quark interactions (N =2,3…). The corresponding coupling constants and effective masses are estimated, and the general trend is that for increasing the effective gluon mass the values of the effective coupling constants decrease. All the values are in good agreement with phenomenological fits.

  15. Time evolution of a single spin inhomogeneously coupled to an interacting spin environment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Sadiek, Gehad; Kais, Sabre

    2006-04-14

    We study the time evolution of a single spin coupled by exchange interaction to an environment of interacting spin bath modeled by the XY Hamiltonian. By evaluating the spin correlator of the single spin, we observed that the decay rate of the spin oscillations strongly depends on the relative magnitude of the exchange coupling between the single spin and its nearest neighbor J(') and coupling among the spins in the environment J. The decoherence time varies significantly based on the relative coupling magnitudes of J and J('). The decay rate law has a Gaussian profile when the two exchange couplings are of the same order J(') approximately J but converts to exponential and then a power law as we move to the regimes of J(')>J and J(')effect of varying the anisotropic parameter, external magnetic field, and temperature on the decaying rate of the spin state is also discussed.

  16. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  17. Dual coupling effective band model for polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Dominic J. J.; Stamp, Philip C. E.; Berciu, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Nondiagonal couplings to a bosonic bath completely change polaronic dynamics, from the usual diagonally coupled paradigm of smoothly varying properties. We study, using analytic and numerical methods, a model having both diagonal Holstein and nondiagonal Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) couplings. The critical coupling found previously in the pure SSH model, at which the k =0 effective mass diverges, now becomes a transition line in the coupling constant plane—the form of the line depends on the adiabaticity parameter. Detailed results are given for the quasiparticle and ground-state properties, over a wide range of couplings and adiabaticity ratios. The new paradigm involves a destabilization, at the transition line, of the simple Holstein polaron to one with a finite ground-state momentum, but with everywhere a continuously evolving band shape. No "self-trapping transition" exists in any of these models. The physics may be understood entirely in terms of competition between different hopping terms in a simple renormalized effective band theory. The possibility of further transitions is suggested by the results.

  18. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs.

  19. Nonsupersymmetric strong coupling background from the large N quantum mechanics of two matrices coupled via a Yang-Mills interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Joao P.; Zaidi, Alia

    2010-10-15

    We derive a planar sector of the large N nonsupersymmetric background of the quantum mechanical Hamiltonian of two Hermitian matrices coupled via a Yang-Mills interaction, in terms of the density of eigenvalues of one of the matrices. This background satisfies an implicit nonlinear integral equation, with a perturbative small coupling expansion and a solvable large coupling solution, which is obtained. The energy of system and the expectation value of several correlators are obtained in this strong coupling limit. They are free of infrared divergences.

  20. Transition-density-fragment interaction approach for exciton-coupled circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro J.

    2010-09-01

    A transition-density-fragment interaction (TDFI) method for exciton-coupled circular dichroism (ECCD) spectra is proposed. The TDFI method was previously developed for excitation-energy transfer, which led to the successful estimation of the electronic coupling energy between donor and accepter molecules in xanthorhodopsin [K. J. Fujimoto and S. Hayashi, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 14152 (2009)]. In the present study, the TDFI scheme is extended to the ECCD spectral calculation based on the matrix method and is applied to a dimerized retinal (all-trans N-retinylidene-L-alanine Schiff base) chromophore. Compared with the dipole-dipole and transition charge from ESP methods, TDFI has a much improved description of the electronic coupling. In addition, the matrix method combined with TDFI can reduce the computational costs compared with the full quantum-mechanical calculation. These advantages of the present method make it possible to accurately evaluate the CD Cotton effects observed in experiment.

  1. Calculation of exchange interaction for modified Gaussian coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2017-08-01

    A system of two laterally coupled quantum dots with modified Gaussian potential has been considered. Each quantum dot has an electron under electric and magnetic field. The quantum dots have been considered as hydrogen-like atoms. The physical picture has translated into the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. The Schrödinger equation using finite element method has been numerically solved. The exchange energy factor has been calculated as a functions of electric field, magnetic field, and the separation distance between the centers of the dots ( d). According to the results, it is found that there is the transition from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic for constant electric field. Also, the transition occurs from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic for constant magnetic field (B>1 T). With decreasing the distance between the centers of the dots and increasing magnetic field, the transition occurs from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic. It is found that a switching of exchange energy factor is presented without canceling the interactions of the electric and magnetic fields on the system.

  2. Calculation of exchange interaction for modified Gaussian coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2017-03-01

    A system of two laterally coupled quantum dots with modified Gaussian potential has been considered. Each quantum dot has an electron under electric and magnetic field. The quantum dots have been considered as hydrogen-like atoms. The physical picture has translated into the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. The Schrödinger equation using finite element method has been numerically solved. The exchange energy factor has been calculated as a functions of electric field, magnetic field, and the separation distance between the centers of the dots (d). According to the results, it is found that there is the transition from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic for constant electric field. Also, the transition occurs from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic for constant magnetic field (B>1 T). With decreasing the distance between the centers of the dots and increasing magnetic field, the transition occurs from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic. It is found that a switching of exchange energy factor is presented without canceling the interactions of the electric and magnetic fields on the system.

  3. Coupled modeling of cement/claystone interactions and radionuclide migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Windt, L.; Pellegrini, D.; van der Lee, J.

    2004-02-01

    The interactions between cement and a clayey host-rock of an underground repository for intermediate-level radioactive waste are studied with the reactive transport code HYTEC for supporting performance assessment. Care is taken in using relevant time scales (100,000 years) and dimensions. Based on a literature review, three hypotheses are considered with respect to the mineralogical composition of the claystone and the neo-formed phases. In the long term, the pH is buffered for all hypotheses and important mineral transformations occur both in cement and the host-rock. The destruction of the primary minerals is localized close to the cement/claystone interface and is characterized by the precipitation of secondary phases with retention properties (illite, zeolite). However, beyond the zone of intense mineral transformations, the pore water chemistry is also disturbed over a dozen meters due to an attenuated but continuous flux of hydroxyl, potassium and calcium ions. Four interdependent mechanisms control the profile in the whole system: diffusion of the alkaline plume, mineralogical buffering, ion exchange and clogging of the pore space at the cement/claystone interface. The migration of a selected group of radionuclides (Cs, Ra, Tc and U) is explicitly integrated in the simulations of the strongly coupled system. Theoretical profiles of distribution coefficient (Kd) and solubility limit values are derived from the simulations, and their sensitivity with respect to the system evolution is estimated.

  4. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-01-01

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect. PMID:27872487

  5. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-11-22

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect.

  6. Competition Between Resonant Plasmonic Coupling and Electrostatic Interaction in Reduced Graphene Oxide Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Sanjay; Mahat, Meg; Choi, Tae-Youl; Shimada, Ryoko; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-11-01

    The light emission from reduced graphene oxide quantum dots (rGO-QDs) exhibit a significant enhancement in photoluminescence (PL) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) interactions. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) coupled to rGO nanoparticles exhibit the effect of resonant LSP coupling on the emission processes. Enhancement of the radiative recombination rate in the presence of Ag-NPs induced LSP tuned to the emission energy results in a four-fold increase in PL intensity. The localized field due to the resonantly coupled LSP modes induces n-π* transitions that are not observed in the absence of the resonant interaction of the plasmons with the excitons. An increase in the density of the Ag-NPs result in a detuning of the LSP energy from the emission energy of the nanoparticles. The detuning is due to the cumulative effect of the red-shift in the LSP energy and the electrostatic field induced blue shift in the PL energy of the rGO-QDs. The detuning quenches the PL emission from rGO-QDs at higher concentration of Ag NPs due to non-dissipative effects unlike plasmon induced Joule heating that occurs under resonance conditions. An increase in Au nanoparticles concentration results in an enhancement of PL emission due to electrostatic image charge effect.

  7. Conflict and collaboration in middle-aged and older couples: I. Age differences in agency and communion during marital interaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy W; Berg, Cynthia A; Florsheim, Paul; Uchino, Bert N; Pearce, Gale; Hawkins, Melissa; Henry, Nancy J M; Beveridge, Ryan M; Skinner, Michelle A; Olsen-Cerny, Chrisanna

    2009-06-01

    Prior theory and research regarding age differences in marital interaction suggest that older couples display and experience more positivity and less negativity than middle-aged couples. However, studies of overt behavior in older couples are relatively rare and have emphasized disagreement, neglecting other important contexts for older couples such as collaboration during everyday problem solving. Further, the affiliation or communion dimension of social interaction (i.e., warmth vs. hostility) is commonly assessed but not the control or agency dimension (e.g., dominance vs. submissiveness). The present study examined affect, cognitive appraisals, and overt behavior during disagreement (i.e., discussing a current conflict) and collaboration (i.e., planning errands) in 300 middle-aged and older married couples. Older couples reported less negative affect during disagreement and rated spouses as warmer than did middle-aged couples. However, these effects were eliminated when older couples' greater marital satisfaction was controlled. For observed behavior, older couples displayed little evidence of greater positivity and reduced negativity-especially women. During collaboration, older couples displayed a unique blend of warmth and control, suggesting a greater focus on emotional and social concerns during problem solving. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Interacting spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kuei; Qu, Chunlei; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2016-02-01

    The recent experimental realization of spin-orbit (SO) coupling for spin-1 ultracold atoms opens an interesting avenue for exploring SO-coupling-related physics in large-spin systems, which is generally unattainable in electronic materials. In this paper, we study the effects of interactions between atoms on the ground states and collective excitations of SO-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in the presence of a spin-tensor potential. We find that ferromagnetic interaction between atoms can induce a stripe phase exhibiting in-phase or out-of-phase modulating patterns between spin-tensor and zero-spin-component density waves. We characterize the phase transitions between different phases using the spin-tensor density as well as the collective dipole motion of the BEC. We show that there exists a double maxon-roton structure in the Bogoliubov-excitation spectrum, attributed to the three band minima of the SO-coupled spin-1 BEC.

  9. Phonon coupling effects in proton scattering from Ca40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, R. S.; Keeley, N.

    2014-10-01

    Background: Formal optical model theory shows that coupling to vibrational nuclear states generates a nonlocal and l-dependent dynamical polarization potential (DPP). Little is established concerning the DPP, yet its properties are crucial for explaining the departures of optical model potentials (OMPs) from global behavior and for the rigorous extraction of spectroscopic information from direct reactions. Purpose: To appraise the application of channel coupling followed by S-matrix inversion for the systematic exploration of the contribution of the coupling of collective states to the nucleon OMP and to identify properties of nuclear potentials indicative of l-dependence. Methods: S-matrix to potential, Slj→V(r )+l .sVSO(r), inversion provides local potentials that precisely reproduce the elastic channel S-matrix from coupled channel (CC) calculations. Subtracting the elastic channel uncoupled (bare) potential yields a local and l-independent representation of the DPP. The dependence of this local DPP upon the nature of the coupled states and upon other parameters can be studied. Results: All components of the DPP arising from coupling to vibrational states are substantially undulatory with a point-by-point magnitude therefore disproportionate to their contribution to volume integrals. Information relating to dynamical nonlocality is found. The proton charge leads to a substantial difference between DPPs for protons and neutrons. Conclusions: Undulatory features in potentials found in precision fits to elastic scattering data are significant, are a consequence of coupling to inelastic channels and must be allowed for in phenomenology; they are indirect evidence of l-dependence. Within the model, coupling to excited states magnifies the effect of the proton charge on the difference between proton-nucleus and neutron-nucleus interactions. Coupled channel plus inversion is a procedure of wide applicability, complementary to evaluation of the Feshbach formalism.

  10. Oxytocin during the initial stages of romantic attachment: relations to couples' interactive reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Schneiderman, Inna; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna; Leckman, James F; Feldman, Ruth

    2012-08-01

    Romantic relationships can have a profound effect on adults' health and well-being whereas the inability to maintain intimate bonds has been associated with physical and emotional distress. Studies in monogamous mammalian species underscore the central role of oxytocin (OT) in pair-bonding and human imaging studies implicate OT-rich brain areas in early romantic love. To assess the role of OT in romantic attachment, we examined plasma OT in 163 young adults: 120 new lovers (60 couples) three months after the initiation of their romantic relationship and 43 non-attached singles. Twenty-five of the 36 couples who stayed together were seen again six months later. Couples were observed in dyadic interactions and were each interviewed regarding relationship-related thoughts and behaviors. OT was significantly higher in new lovers compared to singles, F(1,152)=109.33, p<.001, which may suggest increased activity of the oxytocinergic system during the early stages of romantic attachment. These high levels of OT among new lovers did not decrease six months later and showed high individual stability. OT correlated with the couples' interactive reciprocity, including social focus, positive affect, affectionate touch, and synchronized dyadic states, and with anxieties and worries regarding the partner and the relationship, findings which parallel those described for parent-infant bonding. OT levels at the first assessment differentiated couples who stayed together six months later from those who separated during this period. Regression analysis showed that OT predicted interactive reciprocity independent of sex, relationship duration, and the partner's OT. Findings suggest that OT may play an important role at the first stages of romantic attachment and lend support to evolutionary models suggesting that parental and romantic attachment share underlying bio-behavioral mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aquaporin 0 enhances gap junction coupling via its cell adhesion function and interaction with connexin 50

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialu; Xu, Ji; Gu, Sumin; Nicholson, Bruce J.; Jiang, Jean X.

    2011-01-01

    Both connexin 50 (Cx50) and aquaporin 0 (AQP0) have important roles in lens development and homeostasis, and their mutations are associated with human congenital cataracts. We have previously shown that Cx50 directly interacts with AQP0. Here, we demonstrate the importance of the Cx50 intracellular loop (IL) domain in mediating the interaction with AQP0 in the lens in vivo. AQP0 significantly increased (~20–30%) the intercellular coupling and conductance of Cx50 gap junctions. However, this increase was not observed when the IL domain was replaced with those from other lens connexins. The Cx50–AQP0 interaction had no effect on Cx50 hemichannel function. A fusion protein containing three extracellular loop domains of AQP0 efficiently blocked the cell-to-cell adhesion of AQP0 and attenuated the stimulatory effect of AQP0 on Cx50 gap junction conductance. These data suggest that the specific interaction between Cx50 and AQP0 enhances the coupling of Cx50 gap junctions, but not hemichannels, through the cell adhesion function of AQP0. This result establishes a physiological role of AQP0 in the functional regulation of gap junction channels. PMID:21172802

  12. Effective Field Theory of Interactions on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente, Manuel; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2015-12-01

    We consider renormalization of effective field theory interactions by discretizing the continuum on a tight-binding lattice. After studying the one-dimensional problem, we address s-wave collisions in three dimensions and relate the bare lattice coupling constants to the continuum coupling constants. Our method constitutes a very simple avenue for the systematic renormalization in effective field theory, and is especially useful as the number of interaction parameters increases.

  13. Decoherence dynamics of interacting qubits coupled to a bath of local optical phonons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, Muzaffar Qadir; Yarlagadda, S.

    2016-04-01

    We study decoherence in an interacting qubit system described by infinite range Heisenberg model (IRHM) in a situation where the system is coupled to a bath of local optical phonons. Using perturbation theory in polaron frame of reference, we derive an effective Hamiltonian that is valid in the regime of strong spin-phonon coupling under nonadiabatic conditions. It is shown that the effective Hamiltonian commutes with the IRHM upto leading orders of perturbation and thus has the same eigenstates as the IRHM. Using a quantum master equation with Markovian approximation of dynamical evolution, we show that the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix do not decay in the energy eigen basis of IRHM.

  14. Receptor-coupled effector systems and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the modulation of intracellular signal generation by receptor-coupled effector systems in B lymphocytes, and whether these alterations are consistent with the effects of prostaglandins. TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate) and sn-1,2,-dioctanoylglycerol (diC{sub 8}) substitute for lipid derived signals which activate protein kinase C. Pretreating splenocytes from athymic nude mice with 100nM TPA or 5 {mu}M diC{sub 8} potentiated the forskolin-induced increased in cAMP (measured by radioimmunoassay) 2.5 and 3.0 times (respectively), but they decreased the PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP rise 48% and 35% (respectively). Goat anti-mouse IgM, which activates diacylglycerol production, potentiated the forskolin-induced cAMP increase by 76%, but reduced that of PGE{sub 1} by 30%. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG, its F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragment, or goat anti-mouse IGM induced increases in the cytosolic free (Ca{sup 2+}), (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}, which TPA inhibited. In contrast, TPA potential antibody-induced {sup 3}H-thymidine (85x) and {sup 3}H-uridine (30x) uptake in B lymphocytes.

  15. Conflict and Collaboration in Middle-Aged and Older Couples: I: Age Differences in Agency and Communion during Marital Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Timothy W.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Florsheim, Paul; Uchino, Bert N.; Pearce, Gale; Hawkins, Melissa; Henry, Nancy J.M.; Beveridge, Ryan M.; Skinner, Michelle A.; Olsen-Cerny, Chrisanna

    2011-01-01

    Prior theory and research regarding age differences in marital interaction suggest that older couples display and experience more positivity and less negativity than middle-aged couples. However, studies of overt behavior in older couples are relatively rare and have emphasized disagreement, neglecting other important contexts for older couples such as collaboration during everyday problem solving. Further, the affiliation or communion dimension of social interaction (i.e., warmth vs. hostility) is commonly assessed, but not the control or agency dimension (e.g., dominance vs. submissiveness). The present study examined affect, cognitive appraisals, and overt behavior during disagreement (i.e., discussing a current conflict) and collaboration (i.e., planning errands) in 300 middle-aged and older married couples. Older couples reported less negative affect during disagreement and rated spouses as warmer than did middle-aged couples. However, these effects were eliminated when older couples’ greater marital satisfaction was controlled. For observed behavior, older couples displayed little evidence of greater positivity and reduced negativity – especially women. During collaboration, older couples displayed a unique blend of warmth and control, suggesting a greater focus on emotional and social concerns during problem solving. PMID:19485646

  16. River-Ocean Interactions: A Coupled Morphodynamic Delta Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, K. M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Murray, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Society has become increasingly reliant on deltas for agriculture, resource extraction, transportation and trade, yet these landforms and their inhabitants have become increasingly vulnerable to submergence and natural disasters (e.g., flooding, storm surges). Although we know that many 'natural' processes influence large-scale delta morphology, we do not yet know the relative importance of anthropogenic influences (e.g., climate and land-use change) in shaping modern deltas. In particular, the processes and feedbacks that shape delta morphology over large space and timescales (i.e. timescales of multiple river avulsions and the evolution of multiple delta lobes) are not well understood. To explore the long-term combined effects of sea-level rise, subsidence and anthropogenic manipulations, we have developed a new morphodynamic delta model that links fluvial, floodplain, and deltaic dynamics over large space and timescales. Using the framework and tools of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System, we couple a new river and floodplain module to the Coastline Evolution Model (CEM, Ashton and Murray, 2001). In the fluvial module, cell width is assumed to be larger than the channel belt width (including natural levees that are maintained at a bankfull channel-depth above the riverbed elevation). The river course is determined using a steepest-descent methodology, and erosion and deposition along the course is modeled as a linear diffusive process. An avulsion occurs when the riverbed becomes super-elevated above the surrounding floodplain, and the new steepest-descent path to sea level is shorter than the previous course. Floodplain deposition is modeled by blanket (uniform) deposition and crevasse splay deposition (after a 'failed' avulsion; if the riverbed is super-elevated, but the new steepest path to sea level is longer than the prior path). Preliminary results indicate that anthropogenic manipulations of the river (e.g., levees) can propagate hundreds of

  17. Simulation of Hydraulic and Natural Fracture Interaction Using a Coupled DFN-DEM Model

    SciTech Connect

    J. Zhou; H. Huang; M. Deo

    2016-03-01

    The presence of natural fractures will usually result in a complex fracture network due to the interactions between hydraulic and natural fracture. The reactivation of natural fractures can generally provide additional flow paths from formation to wellbore which play a crucial role in improving the hydrocarbon recovery in these ultra-low permeability reservoir. Thus, accurate description of the geometry of discrete fractures and bedding is highly desired for accurate flow and production predictions. Compared to conventional continuum models that implicitly represent the discrete feature, Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models could realistically model the connectivity of discontinuities at both reservoir scale and well scale. In this work, a new hybrid numerical model that couples Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method (DL-DEM) is proposed to investigate the interaction between hydraulic fracture and natural fractures. Based on the proposed model, the effects of natural fracture orientation, density and injection properties on hydraulic-natural fractures interaction are investigated.

  18. Semantic interaction for visual analytics: toward coupling cognition and computation.

    PubMed

    Endert, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Alex Endert's dissertation "Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Inferring Analytical Reasoning for Model Steering" described semantic interaction, a user interaction methodology for visual analytics (VA). It showed that user interaction embodies users' analytic process and can thus be mapped to model-steering functionality for "human-in-the-loop" system design. The dissertation contributed a framework (or pipeline) that describes such a process, a prototype VA system to test semantic interaction, and a user evaluation to demonstrate semantic interaction's impact on the analytic process. This research is influencing current VA research and has implications for future VA research.

  19. How to Optimize Binding of Coated Nanoparticles: Coupling of Physical Interactions, Molecular Organization and Chemical State.

    PubMed

    Nap, R J; Szleifer, I

    2013-08-01

    One of the key challenges in the development of nano carriers for drug delivery and imaging is the design of a system that selectively binds to target cells. A common strategy is to coat the delivery device with specific ligands that bind strongly to overexpressed receptors. However such devices are usually unable to discriminate between receptors found on benign and malignant cells. We demonstrate, theoretically, how one can achieve enhanced binding to target cells by using multiple physical and chemical interactions. We study the effective interactions between a polymer decorated nano micelle or nanoparticle with three types of model lipid membranes that differ in the composition of their outer leaflet. They are: i) lipid membranes with overexpressed receptors, ii) membranes with a given fraction of negatively charged lipids and iii) membranes with both overexpressed receptors and negatively charged lipids. The coating contains a mixtures of two short polymers, one neutral for protection and the other a polybase with a functional end-group to optimize specific binding with the overexpressed receptors and electrostatic interactions with charged lipid head-groups. The strength of the binding for the combined system is much larger than the sum of the independent electrostatic or specific interactions binding. We find a range of distances where the addition of two effective repulsive interactions become an attraction in the combined case. The changes in the strength and shape of the effective interaction are due to the coupling that exists between molecular organization, physical interactions and chemical state, e.g., protonation. The predictions provide guidelines for the design of carrier devices for targeted drug and nanoparticle delivery and give insight in the competing and highly non-additive nature of the different effective interactions in nanoscale systems in constrained environments that are ubiquitous in synthetic and biological systems.

  20. Mode coupling and wave particle interactions for unstable ion acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasi-linear and mode coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through second order terms in the wave amplitude, but without usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasi-linear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found, even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  1. Mode-coupling and wave-particle interactions for unstable ion-acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P.; Fried, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A theory for the spatial development of linearly unstable, coupled waves is presented in which both quasilinear and mode-coupling effects are treated in a self-consistent manner. Steady-state excitation of two waves is assumed at the boundary x = 0, the plasma being homogeneous in the y and z directions. Coupled equations are derived for the x dependence of the amplitudes of the primary waves and the secondary waves, correct through terms of second order in the wave amplitude, but without the usual approximation of small growth rates. This general formalism is then applied to the case of coupled ion-acoustic waves driven unstable by an ion beam streaming in the direction of the x axis. If the modifications of the ion beam by the waves (quasilinear effects) are ignored, explosive instabilities (singularities in all of the amplitudes at finite x) are found even when all of the waves have positive energy. If these wave-particle interactions are included, the solutions are no longer singular, and all of the amplitudes have finite maxima.

  2. Protein conformational transitions coupled to binding in molecular recognition of unstructured proteins: deciphering the effect of intermolecular interactions on computational structure prediction of the p27Kip1 protein bound to the cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 complex.

    PubMed

    Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2005-02-15

    The relationship between folding mechanism coupled to binding and structure prediction of the tertiary complexes is studied for the p27(Kip) (1) protein which has an intrinsically disordered unbound form and undergoes a functional folding transition during complex formation with the phosphorylated cyclin A-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) binary complex. Hierarchy of p27(Kip1) structural loss determined in our earlier studies from temperature-induced Monte Carlo simulations and subsequent characterization of the transition state ensemble (TSE) for the folding reaction have shown that simultaneous ordering of the p27(Kip1) native intermolecular interface for the beta-hairpin and beta-strand secondary structure elements is critical for nucleating a rapid kinetic transition to the native tertiary complex. In the present study, we investigate the effect of forming specific intermolecular interactions on structure prediction of the p27(Kip1) tertiary complex. By constraining different secondary structure elements of p27(Kip1) in their native bound conformations and conducting multiple simulated annealing simulations, we analyze differences in the success rate of predicting the native structure of p27(Kip1) in the tertiary complex. In accordance with the nucleation-condensation mechanism, we have found that further stabilization of the native intermolecular interface for the beta-hairpin and beta-strand elements of p27(Kip1), that become ordered in the TSE, but are hardly populated in the unbound state, results in a consistent acquisition of the native bound structure. Conversely, the excessive stablization of the local secondary structure elements, which are rarely detected in the TSE, has a detrimental effect on convergence to the native bound structure. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Surface binding of polymer coated nanoparticles: Coupling of physical interactions, molecular organization, and chemical state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nap, Rikkert; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-03-01

    A key challenge in nanomedicine is to design carrier system for drug delivery that selectively binds to target cells without binding to healthy cells. A common strategy is to end-functionalize the polymers coating of the delivery device with specific ligands that bind strongly to overexpressed receptors. Such devices are usually unable to discriminate between receptors found on benign and malignant cells. We demonstrate, theoretically, how one can achieve selective binding to target cells by using multiple physical and chemical interactions. We study the effective interactions between a polymer decorated nanosized micelle or solid nanoparticle with model lipid layers. The polymer coating contains a mixture of two polymers, one neutral for protection and the other a polybase with a functional end-group to optimize specific binding and electrostatic interactions with the charged lipid head-groups found on the lipid surface. The strength of the binding for the combined system is much larger than the sum of the independent electrostatic or specific ligand-receptor binding. The search for optimal binding conditions lead to the finding of a non-additive coupling that exists in systems where chemical equilibrium, molecular organization, and physical interactions are coupled together.

  4. The competition of particle-vibration coupling and tensor interaction in spherical nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasjev, Anatoli; Litvinova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The search for missing terms in the energy density functionals (EDF) is one of the leading directions in the development of nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Tensor force is one of possible candidates. However, despite extensive studies the questions about its effective strength and unambiguous signals still remain open. One of the main experimental benchmarks for the studies of tensor interaction is provided by the data on the single-particle states in the N = 82 and Z = 50 isotopes. The energy splittings of the proton h11 / 2 and g7 / 2 states in the Z = 50 isotopes and neutron 1i13 / 2 and 1h9 / 2 states in the N = 82 isotones are used in the definition of tensor force in the Skyrme DFT. However, in experiment these states are not ``mean-field'' states because of coupling with vibrations. Employing relativistic particle-vibration coupling (PVC) model we show that many features of these splittings can be reproduced when PVC is taken into account. This suggests the competition of PVC and tensor interaction and that tensor interaction should be weaker as compared with previous estimates. The search for missing terms in the energy density functionals (EDF) is one of the leading directions in the development of nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Tensor force is one of possible candidates. However, despite extensive studies the questions about its effective strength and unambiguous signals still remain open. One of the main experimental benchmarks for the studies of tensor interaction is provided by the data on the single-particle states in the N = 82 and Z = 50 isotopes. The energy splittings of the proton h11 / 2 and g7 / 2 states in the Z = 50 isotopes and neutron 1i13 / 2 and 1h9 / 2 states in the N = 82 isotones are used in the definition of tensor force in the Skyrme DFT. However, in experiment these states are not ``mean-field'' states because of coupling with vibrations. Employing relativistic particle-vibration coupling (PVC) model we show that

  5. Tailoring MoS2 Exciton-Plasmon Interaction by Optical Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziwei; Li, Yu; Han, Tianyang; Wang, Xingli; Yu, Ying; Tay, Bengkang; Liu, Zheng; Fang, Zheyu

    2017-02-28

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer as one of the atomic thickness two-dimensional materials has remarkable electronic and optical properties, which is an ideal candidate for a wide range of optoelectronic applications. However, the atomic monolayer thickness poses a significant challenge in MoS2 photoluminescence emission due to weak light-matter interaction. Here, we investigate the MoS2 exciton-plasmon interaction with spin-orbit coupling of light. The plasmonic spiral rings with subwavelength dimensions are designed and fabricated on hybrid substrates. MoS2 photoluminescence enhancement can be actively controlled by changing the incident optical spin states, laser powers, and the nanospiral geometries, which is arising from the change of field enhancement at near-field region. Planar light-emitting devices based on spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect were further realized and flexibly controlled by changing the polarization of light. The SOC effect is discussed by the accumulation of geometric and dynamic phases, which can be demonstrated and elaborated by the Majorana sphere model. Our results provide a way to manipulate MoS2 light-matter interaction actively and can be further applied in the spin-dependent light-emitting devices at the nanoscale.

  6. Theoretical constraints on the Higgs effective couplings.

    SciTech Connect

    Low, I.; Rattazzi, R.; Vichi, A.; High Energy Physics; Northwestern Univ; EPFL

    2010-04-01

    We derive constraints on the sign of couplings in an effective Higgs Lagrangian using prime principles such as the naturalness principle, global symmetries, and unitarity. Specifically, we study four dimension-six operators, {Omicron}{sub H}, {Omicron}{sub y}, {Omicron}{sub g}, and {Omicron}{sub {gamma}} which contribute to the production and decay of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), among other things. Assuming the Higgs is a fundamental scalar, we find: (1) the coefficient of {Omicron}{sub H} is positive except when there are triplet scalars, resulting in a reduction in the Higgs on-shell coupling from their standard model (SM) expectations if no other operators contribute, (2) the linear combination of {Omicron}{sub H} and {Omicron}{sub y} controlling the overall Higgs coupling to fermion is always reduced, (3) the sign of {Omicron}{sub g} induced by a new colored fermion is such that it interferes destructively with the SM top contribution in the gluon fusion production of the Higgs, if the new fermion cancels the top quadratic divergence in the Higgs mass, and (4) the correlation between naturalness and the sign of {Omicron}{sub {gamma}} is similar to that of {Omicron}{sub g}, when there is a new set of heavy electroweak gauge bosons. Next considering a composite scalar for the Higgs, we find the reduction in the on-shell Higgs couplings persists. If further assuming a collective breaking mechanism as in little Higgs theories, the coefficient of {Omicron}{sub H} remains positive even in the presence of triplet scalars. In the end, we conclude that the gluon fusion production of the Higgs boson is reduced from the SM rate in all composite Higgs models. Our study suggests a wealth of information could be revealed by precise measurements of the Higgs couplings, providing strong motivations for both improving on measurements at the LHC and building a precision machine such as the linear collider.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interaction between polymers and hydroxyapatite with and without coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Lu, Xiong; Leng, Yang; Fang, Liming; Qu, Shuxin; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie; Wang, Jianxin

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to study hydroxyapatite/biopolymer interface interactions in composites for biomedical applications. The study analyzed the binding energies between hydroxyapatite (HA) and three polymers: polyethylene (PE), polyamide (PA) and polylactic acid (PLA). The interactions of polymers on HA crystallographic planes (001), (100) and (110) were simulated. The effects of the silane coupling agent (A174) on interfacial binding energies were also examined. The results show that HA (110) has the highest binding energy with these polymers because of its higher planar atom density than that of HA (001) and (100). The binding energies of PA/HA and PLA/HA are much higher than that of PE/HA, which might be attributed to large number of polar groups in PA and PLA chains. The silane coupling agent A174 increases the binding energy between PE and HA, but not for the PA/HA and PLA/HA systems. The MD results can be used to guide the design of polymer/HA composites and to select proper coupling agents.

  8. Earthquake nucleation in a stochastic fault model of globally coupled units with interaction delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasović, Nebojša; Kostić, Srđan; Franović, Igor; Todorović, Kristina

    2016-09-01

    In present paper we analyze dynamics of fault motion by considering delayed interaction of 100 all-to-all coupled blocks with rate-dependent friction law in presence of random seismic noise. Such a model sufficiently well describes a real fault motion, whose prevailing stochastic nature is implied by surrogate data analysis of available GPS measurements of active fault movement. Interaction of blocks in an analyzed model is studied as a function of time delay, observed both for dynamics of individual faults and phenomenological models. Analyzed model is examined as a system of all-to-all coupled blocks according to typical assumption of compound faults as complex of globally coupled segments. We apply numerical methods to show that there are local bifurcations from equilibrium state to periodic oscillations, with an occurrence of irregular aperiodic behavior when initial conditions are set away from the equilibrium point. Such a behavior indicates a possible existence of a bi-stable dynamical regime, due to effect of the introduced seismic noise or the existence of global attractor. The latter assumption is additionally confirmed by analyzing the corresponding mean-field approximated model. In this bi-stable regime, distribution of event magnitudes follows Gutenberg-Richter power law with satisfying statistical accuracy, including the b-value within the real observed range.

  9. Effectiveness of Group Reciprocity Counseling with Married Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, David N.; Sciara, Anthony D.

    1977-01-01

    This research examined use of reciporcity procedures with married couples in a group format. Couples (N=7), enrolled in a non-credit extension course, participated in an eight-week workshop. Commitment to and optimism about marriage and ratings on three of nine areas of couple interaction significantly increased over the eight-week period. (Author)

  10. Local coupling (LoCo) vs. large-scale coupled (LsCo) land-atmosphere interactions in idealized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Lintner, B. R.; Findell, K. L.; Rochetin, N.; Sobel, A. H.; Anber, U. M.

    2014-12-01

    We will present two idealized epxeriments/methodologies to investigate local (LoCo) and large-scale (LsCo) coupling between the surface and the atmsophere: the contiental Radiative-Convective Equilibrium (RCE) and the continental Weak Temperature Gradient (WTG). The RCE defines an equilibrium state of coupling between the surafce and the atmosphere isolated from any large-scale dependence, which were investigated within the single column model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD) coupled to a simple bucket land model. This studies emphasizes the role of low-level cloud and the diurnal cylce of the boundary layer on the final state of the system. In the WTG we investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere during the dry and wet season of the Amazon with the WRF model coupled to the NOAH land-surface model. Large-scale coupling is obtained with the WTG. The dry and wet season demonstrate very fundamental behavior: in the dry season deep convection is generated by radiative cooling in the higher troposhere and is disconnected from the surface. In the wet season the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere is much tighter. We suggest that the WTG is a powerful tool to investigate the coupling between the surface and the atmosphere, which solves two major issues: the limited resolution of convection in GCMs and the lack of large-scale coupling in CRM. Later investigation will look at the effect of deforestation, water table and distance from the ocean.

  11. Effective Potential Theory for Transport Coefficients across Coupling Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas in several modern experiments, including dense, ultracold and dusty plasmas, can reach strong coupling where the Coulomb potential energy of interacting particles exceeds their average kinetic energy. Understanding how the many-body physics of correlations affects plasma transport properties in this regime is interesting both from a basic physics standpoint and as a practical matter. Transport coefficients are essential input required for accurate hydrodynamic modeling of these systems, which can include weakly coupled and strongly coupled components simultaneously. We discuss a physically motivated extension of plasma transport theory that is computationally efficient and versatile enough that it can be applied to essentially any transport property. Like conventional plasma theories, ours is based on a binary collision picture, but where particles interact via an effective potential that accounts for average affects of the intervening medium. This includes both correlations and screening. Hypernetted chain (HNC) theory, which is a well-established approximation for the pair correlation function, is used to derive the effective potential. The theory is shown to compare well with ion velocity relaxation in an ultracold plasma experiment, as well as classical molecular dynamics simulations of temperature relaxation in electron-ion plasmas, and diffusion in both one-component plasmas and ionic mixtures. This research was conducted in collaboration with Jerome Daligault and was supported by a Richard P. Feynman Postdoctoral Fellowship and the LDRD program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Interaction driven quantum phases in spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, Jedediah; Natu, Stefan; Cole, William; Rizzi, Matteo; Spielman, Ian

    2016-05-01

    We study the interplay of spin orbit coupling and strong correlations present for ultra cold spin-1 bosons on a square optical lattice. In addition to the conventional spinful Mott and superfluid phases contained in the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model, we find new lattice symmetry breaking phases. For weak interactions, the interplay between the lattice momentum and the spin-orbit wave-vector induces a phase transition from a uniform superfluid to a phase where bosons simultaneously condense at the center and edge of the Brillouin zone. This state is characterized by spin density wave order, which arises from the spin-1 nature of the system. Interactions suppress this spin density wave order, and for sufficiently strong interactions the system becomes a Mott insulator. Inside the Mott lobes with an odd-integer filling we derive the effective low energy magnetic Hamiltonian. Focusing on the quasi-one-dimensional limit we solve the strongly coupled magnetic model in three ways: in its classical limit, with a spin-wave analysis, and using the density matrix renormalization group.

  13. Density Functional Calculations of Native Defects in CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 : Effects of Spin–Orbit Coupling and Self-Interaction Error

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-04-02

    We know that native point defects play an important role in carrier transport properties of CH3NH3PbI3. However, the nature of many important defects remains controversial due partly to the conflicting results reported by recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In this Letter, we show that self-interaction error and the neglect of spin–orbit coupling (SOC) in many previous DFT calculations resulted in incorrect positions of valence and conduction band edges, although their difference, which is the band gap, is in good agreement with the experimental value. Moreover, this problem has led to incorrect predictions of defect-level positions. Hybrid density functional calculations, which partially correct the self-interaction error and include the SOC, show that, among native point defects (including vacancies, interstitials, and antisites), only the iodine vacancy and its complexes induce deep electron and hole trapping levels inside of the band gap, acting as nonradiative recombination centers.

  14. Wave-wave and wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere measured with Van Allen Probes: cross coupling between wave modes and its effect on radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Cattell, C. A.; Broughton, M.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We will show observations of waveform bursts using the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) burst data on the Van Allen Probes satellites with intermediate frequency waves such as whistler mode, magnetosonic and lower hybrid. These observations show very strong modulation of these waves by lower frequency waves such as EMIC or ULF. We are analyzing the burst data and cross coupling between wave modes to determine how prevalent the cross coupling between wave modes is and under what conditions it occurs. To supplement the EFW data, each satellite is also equipped with a full complement of particle instruments, including the HOPE instrument measuring lower energy (1 eV - 50 keV) particles and MagEIS instruments measuring higher energy (20 keV - 5 MeV) particles. The energy and angular resolution of these detectors are sufficient to resolve the scattering and energization arising from the distinct wave modes, using the signatures in the trapped electron populations predicted by theory for the various mechanisms. Comparison of the burst waveform data with the electron data from HOPE and MagEIS, for times with and without coupling between the wave modes, will allow us to identify how the cross coupling affects electron dynamics in the radiation belts. The significance of wave-particle interactions in the formation and depletion of the radiation belts has long been established, but is still not completely understood. Specifically, pitch angle scattering from waves such as plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron [EMIC] waves near the duskside plasmapause is known to contribute to electron loss from the radiation belts, primarily through precipitation into the atmosphere. Higher frequency waves such as whistler mode chorus and magnetosonic waves observed near the equator in the lower hybrid frequency range are widely believed to be primary means for electron energization. However, these and other competing processes often occur simultaneously, and an accurate model

  15. Dynamic interactions mediated by nonredundant signaling mechanisms couple circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer A; Leise, Tanya L; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Davidson, Alec J

    2013-11-20

    Interactions among suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are required for robust circadian rhythms entrained to local time. To investigate these signaling mechanisms, we developed a functional coupling assay that uniquely captures the dynamic process by which SCN neurons interact. As a population, SCN neurons typically display synchronized rhythms with similar peak times, but will peak 6-12 hr apart after in vivo exposure to long days. Once they are removed from these conditions, SCN neurons resynchronize through a phase-dependent coupling process mediated by both vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and GABAA signaling. Notably, GABAA signaling contributes to coupling when the SCN network is in an antiphase configuration, but opposes synchrony under steady-state conditions. Further, VIP acts together with GABAA signaling to couple the network in an antiphase configuration, but promotes synchrony under steady-state conditions by counteracting the actions of GABAA signaling. Thus, SCN neurons interact through nonredundant coupling mechanisms influenced by the state of the network.

  16. A critical phase induced by interplay of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook; Xu, Cenke; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon

    2013-03-01

    We study long range Coulomb interaction effect on the Luttinger Hamiltonian in three spatial dimensions, which describes strong spin orbit coupling intrinsically. The Hamiltonian has energy spectrum of inverted band gap semiconductors as in well-known HgTe; only one quadratic band touching point exists at the gamma point in Brillouin zone protected by the cubic and time reversal symmetries. Using controlled renormalization group techniques, we find that long-range Coulomb interaction converts the quadratic band touching state into a non-Fermi liquid (NFL) state, in some ways analogous to the Luttinger liquid state in one dimension. Consequently, all physical quantities become scale invariant and show deviations from non-interacting electrons' properties. Temperature and field dependence of various thermodynamic functions are obtained. Moreover, our ground state can be viewed as a parent state of topological insulators, magnetic metals, and Weyl semi-metals by breaking either cubic symmetry or time-reversal symmetry. The strong Coulomb interaction changes phase boundaries qualitatively and phase diagrams with the Coulomb interaction are provided. Applications to iridium-oxides materials are also discussed.

  17. A model to explain specific cellular communications and cellular harmony:- a hypothesis of coupled cells and interactive coupling molecules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The various cell types and their relative numbers in multicellular organisms are controlled by growth factors and related extracellular molecules which affect genetic expression pathways. However, these substances may have both/either inhibitory and/or stimulatory effects on cell division and cell differentiation depending on the cellular environment. It is not known how cells respond to these substances in such an ambiguous way. Many cellular effects have been investigated and reported using cell culture from cancer cell lines in an effort to define normal cellular behaviour using these abnormal cells. A model is offered to explain the harmony of cellular life in multicellular organisms involving interacting extracellular substances. Methods A basic model was proposed based on asymmetric cell division and evidence to support the hypothetical model was accumulated from the literature. In particular, relevant evidence was selected for the Insulin-Like Growth Factor system from the published data, especially from certain cell lines, to support the model. The evidence has been selective in an attempt to provide a picture of normal cellular responses, derived from the cell lines. Results The formation of a pair of coupled cells by asymmetric cell division is an integral part of the model as is the interaction of couplet molecules derived from these cells. Each couplet cell will have a receptor to measure the amount of the couplet molecule produced by the other cell; each cell will be receptor-positive or receptor-negative for the respective receptors. The couplet molecules will form a binary complex whose level is also measured by the cell. The hypothesis is heavily supported by selective collection of circumstantial evidence and by some direct evidence. The basic model can be expanded to other cellular interactions. Conclusions These couplet cells and interacting couplet molecules can be viewed as a mechanism that provides a controlled and balanced division

  18. A model to explain specific cellular communications and cellular harmony:- a hypothesis of coupled cells and interactive coupling molecules.

    PubMed

    Craven, Cyril J

    2014-09-14

    The various cell types and their relative numbers in multicellular organisms are controlled by growth factors and related extracellular molecules which affect genetic expression pathways. However, these substances may have both/either inhibitory and/or stimulatory effects on cell division and cell differentiation depending on the cellular environment. It is not known how cells respond to these substances in such an ambiguous way. Many cellular effects have been investigated and reported using cell culture from cancer cell lines in an effort to define normal cellular behaviour using these abnormal cells.A model is offered to explain the harmony of cellular life in multicellular organisms involving interacting extracellular substances. A basic model was proposed based on asymmetric cell division and evidence to support the hypothetical model was accumulated from the literature. In particular, relevant evidence was selected for the Insulin-Like Growth Factor system from the published data, especially from certain cell lines, to support the model. The evidence has been selective in an attempt to provide a picture of normal cellular responses, derived from the cell lines. The formation of a pair of coupled cells by asymmetric cell division is an integral part of the model as is the interaction of couplet molecules derived from these cells. Each couplet cell will have a receptor to measure the amount of the couplet molecule produced by the other cell; each cell will be receptor-positive or receptor-negative for the respective receptors. The couplet molecules will form a binary complex whose level is also measured by the cell. The hypothesis is heavily supported by selective collection of circumstantial evidence and by some direct evidence. The basic model can be expanded to other cellular interactions. These couplet cells and interacting couplet molecules can be viewed as a mechanism that provides a controlled and balanced division-of-labour between the two progeny cells

  19. Multi-disciplinary coupling effects for integrated design of propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Effective computational simulation procedures are described for modeling the inherent multi-disciplinary interactions which govern the accurate response of propulsion systems. Results are presented for propulsion system responses including multi-disciplinary coupling effects using coupled multi-discipline thermal, structural, and acoustic tailoring; an integrated system of multi-disciplinary simulators; coupled material behavior/fabrication process tailoring; sensitivities using a probabilistic simulator; and coupled materials, structures, fracture, and probabilistic behavior simulator. The results demonstrate that superior designs can be achieved if the analysis/tailoring methods account for the multi-disciplinary coupling effects. The coupling across disciplines can be used to develop an integrated coupled multi-discipline numerical propulsion system simulator.

  20. Interaction of chimera states in a multilayered network of nonlocally coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goremyko, M. V.; Maksimenko, V. A.; Makarov, V. V.; Ghosh, D.; Bera, B.; Dana, S. K.; Hramov, A. E.

    2017-08-01

    The processes of formation and evolution of chimera states in the model of a multilayered network of nonlinear elements with complex coupling topology are studied. A two-layered network of nonlocally intralayer-coupled Kuramoto-Sakaguchi phase oscillators is taken as the object of investigation. Different modes implemented in this system upon variation of the degree of interlayer interaction are demonstrated.

  1. Do the Naive Know Best? The Predictive Power of Naive Ratings of Couple Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucom, Katherine J. W.; Baucom, Brian R.; Christensen, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We examined the utility of naive ratings of communication patterns and relationship quality in a large sample of distressed couples. Untrained raters assessed 10-min videotaped interactions from 134 distressed couples who participated in both problem-solving and social support discussions at each of 3 time points (pre-therapy, post-therapy, and…

  2. Do the Naive Know Best? The Predictive Power of Naive Ratings of Couple Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucom, Katherine J. W.; Baucom, Brian R.; Christensen, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We examined the utility of naive ratings of communication patterns and relationship quality in a large sample of distressed couples. Untrained raters assessed 10-min videotaped interactions from 134 distressed couples who participated in both problem-solving and social support discussions at each of 3 time points (pre-therapy, post-therapy, and…

  3. Extension of NHWAVE to Couple LAMMPS for Modeling Wave Interactions with Arctic Ice Floes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Interactions with Arctic Ice Floes Fengyan Shi and James T. Kirby Center for Applied Coastal Research Department of Civil and Environmental...Award Number: N00014-14-1-0569 http://www.coastal.udel.edu/~fyshi LONG-TERM GOALS 1. Developing and testing a tightly-coupled wave- ice model...wave interactions with arctic ice floes. 2. Using the coupled NHWAVE and LAMMPS/LIGGGHTS models to investigate the relative importance of key

  4. Effective Hamiltonian for non-minimally coupled scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meşe, Emine; Pirinççiog˜Lu, Nurettin; Açıkgöz, Irfan; Binbay, Figen

    2009-01-01

    In the post Newtonian limit, a non-relativistic Hamiltonian is derived for scalar fields with quartic self-interaction and non-minimal coupling to the curvature scalar of the background spacetime. These effects are found to contribute to the non-relativistic Hamiltonian by adding nonlinearities and by modifying the gravitational Darwin term. As we discuss briefly in the text, the impact of these novel structures can be sizable in dense media like neutron star core, and can have observable signatures in phase transitions, for example.

  5. Time Delay Effect in a Living Coupled Oscillator System with the Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Fujii, Teruo; Endo, Isao

    2000-08-01

    A living coupled oscillator system was constructed by a cell patterning method with a plasmodial slime mold, in which parameters such as coupling strength and distance between the oscillators can be systematically controlled. Rich oscillation phenomena between the two-coupled oscillators, namely, desynchronizing and antiphase/in-phase synchronization were observed according to these parameters. Both experimental and theoretical approaches showed that these phenomena are closely related to the time delay effect in interactions between the oscillators.

  6. Strong interactive massive particles from a strong coupled theory

    SciTech Connect

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-03-15

    Minimal walking technicolor models can provide a nontrivial solution for cosmological dark matter, if the lightest technibaryon is doubly charged. Technibaryon asymmetry generated in the early Universe is related to baryon asymmetry, and it is possible to create an excess of techniparticles with charge (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by {sup 4}He, creating techni-O-helium tOHe atoms, as soon as {sup 4}He is formed in big bang nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. Because of the large mass of technibaryons, the tOHe ''atomic'' gas decouples from the baryonic matter and plays the role of dark matter in large scale structure formation, while structures in small scales are suppressed. Nuclear interactions with matter slow down cosmic techni-O-helium in the Earth below the threshold of underground dark matter detectors, thus escaping severe cryogenic dark matter search constraints. On the other hand, these nuclear interactions are not sufficiently strong to exclude this form of strongly interactive massive particles by constraints from the XQC experiment. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are possible in the search for tOHe in balloon-borne experiments (or on the ground) and for its charged techniparticle constituents in cosmic rays and accelerators. The tOHe atoms can cause cold nuclear transformations in matter and might form anomalous isotopes, offering possible ways to exclude (or prove?) their existence.

  7. A socio-emotional approach to couple therapy: linking social context and couple interaction.

    PubMed

    Knudson-Martin, Carmen; Huenergardt, Douglas

    2010-09-01

    This paper introduces Socio-Emotional Relationship Therapy (SERT), an approach designed to intervene in socio-cultural processes that limit couples' ability to develop mutually supportive relationships, especially within heterosexual relationships. SERT integrates recent advances in neurobiology and the social context of emotion with social constructionist assumptions regarding the fluid and contextual nature of gender, culture, personal identities, and relationship patterns. It advances social constructionist practice through in-session experiential work focused on 4 conditions foundational to mutual support--mutual influence, shared vulnerability, shared relationship responsibility, and mutual attunement. In contrast to couple therapy models that mask power issues, therapist neutrality is not considered possible or desirable. Instead, therapists position themselves to counteract social inequalities. The paper illustrates how empathic engagement of a socio-culturally attuned therapist sets the stage for new socio-cultural experience as it is embodied neurologically and physically in the relationship and discusses therapy as societal intervention. 2010 © FPI, Inc.

  8. Incoherent chimera and glassy states in coupled oscillators with frustrated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Chol-Ung; Ri, Ji-Song; Kim, Ryong-Son

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a site disorder model that describes the population of identical oscillators with quenched random interactions for both the coupling strength and coupling phase. We obtain the reduced equations for the suborder parameters, on the basis of Ott-Antonsen ansatz theory, and present a complete bifurcation analysis of the reduced system. New effects include the appearance of the incoherent chimera and glassy state, both of which are caused by heterogeneity of the coupling phases. In the incoherent chimera state, the system displays an exotic symmetry-breaking behavior in spite of the apparent structural symmetry where the oscillators for both of the two subpopulations are in a frustrated state, while the phase distribution for each subpopulation approaches a steady state that differs from each other. When the incoherent chimera undergoes Hopf bifurcation, the system displays a breathing incoherent chimera. The glassy state that occurs on a surface of three-dimensional parameter space exhibits a continuum of metastable states with zero value of the global order parameter. Explicit formulas are derived for the system's Hopf, saddle-node, and transcritical bifurcation curves, as well as the codimension-2 crossing points, including the Takens-Bogdanov point.

  9. Incoherent chimera and glassy states in coupled oscillators with frustrated interactions.

    PubMed

    Choe, Chol-Ung; Ri, Ji-Song; Kim, Ryong-Son

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a site disorder model that describes the population of identical oscillators with quenched random interactions for both the coupling strength and coupling phase. We obtain the reduced equations for the suborder parameters, on the basis of Ott-Antonsen ansatz theory, and present a complete bifurcation analysis of the reduced system. New effects include the appearance of the incoherent chimera and glassy state, both of which are caused by heterogeneity of the coupling phases. In the incoherent chimera state, the system displays an exotic symmetry-breaking behavior in spite of the apparent structural symmetry where the oscillators for both of the two subpopulations are in a frustrated state, while the phase distribution for each subpopulation approaches a steady state that differs from each other. When the incoherent chimera undergoes Hopf bifurcation, the system displays a breathing incoherent chimera. The glassy state that occurs on a surface of three-dimensional parameter space exhibits a continuum of metastable states with zero value of the global order parameter. Explicit formulas are derived for the system's Hopf, saddle-node, and transcritical bifurcation curves, as well as the codimension-2 crossing points, including the Takens-Bogdanov point.

  10. Optical conditional gates in laterally coupled quantum dots: the role of electron-hole exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia; Reinecke, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    We propose a fast, optically induced two-qubit C-PHASE gate in laterally coupled quantum dots. We use a model potential with two asymmetric local minima to account for the difference in size and composition of the two dots. By making use of the excited bound states of the total potential, which extend over both dots and which gives rise to an effective coupling between the two resident electron spins, we avoid the need for an external bias, such as that typically used in vertically coupled dots. The electron-hole exchange interaction is shown to play an important role in our proposal. By lowering the symmetry of the eigenstates, it allows for a simple design of a fast (about 50 ps) C-PHASE gate. The dissipative dynamics of the excited states have been taken into account in our numerical simulation of the fidelity. The calculated fidelity depends on the values of the decay rates. Our proposal is consistent with the single qubit rotations we proposed [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 217401 (2007)], and the combination of the two allows for universal quantum gates.

  11. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chenguang; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple "shark fins" and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  12. Electronic transport through a Majorana bound state coupled to a T-shaped quantum-dot system with Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Dong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Using the Green's function technique, we respectively investigate the electron transport properties of two spin components through the system of a T-shaped double quantum dot structure coupled to a Majorana bound state, in which only one quantum dot is connected with two metallic leads. We explore the interplay between the Fano effect and the MBSs for different dot-MBS coupling strength λ, dot-dot coupling strength t, and MBS-MBS coupling strength ɛM in the noninteracting case. Then the Coulomb interaction and magnetic field effect on the conductance spectra are investigated. Our results indicate that G↓(ω) is not affected by the Majorana bound states, but a "0.5" conductance signature occurs in the vicinities of Fermi level of G↑(ω). This robust property persists for a wide range of dot-dot coupling strength and dot-MBS coupling strength, but it can be destroyed by Coulomb interaction in quantum dots. By adjusting the size and direction of magnetic field around the quantum dots, the "0.5" conductance signature damaged by U can be restored. At last, the spin magnetic moments of two dots by applying external magnetic field are also predicted.

  13. Self-interacting asymmetric dark matter coupled to a light massive dark photon

    SciTech Connect

    Petraki, Kalliopi; Pearce, Lauren; Kusenko, Alexander E-mail: lpearce@ucla.edu

    2014-07-01

    Dark matter (DM) with sizeable self-interactions mediated by a light species offers a compelling explanation of the observed galactic substructure; furthermore, the direct coupling between DM and a light particle contributes to the DM annihilation in the early universe. If the DM abundance is due to a dark particle-antiparticle asymmetry, the DM annihilation cross-section can be arbitrarily large, and the coupling of DM to the light species can be significant. We consider the case of asymmetric DM interacting via a light (but not necessarily massless) Abelian gauge vector boson, a dark photon. In the massless dark photon limit, gauge invariance mandates that DM be multicomponent, consisting of positive and negative dark ions of different species which partially bind in neutral dark atoms. We argue that a similar conclusion holds for light dark photons; in particular, we establish that the multi-component and atomic character of DM persists in much of the parameter space where the dark photon is sufficiently light to mediate sizeable DM self-interactions. We discuss the cosmological sequence of events in this scenario, including the dark asymmetry generation, the freeze-out of annihilations, the dark recombination and the phase transition which gives mass to the dark photon. We estimate the effect of self-interactions in DM haloes, taking into account this cosmological history. We place constraints based on the observed ellipticity of large haloes, and identify the regimes where DM self-scattering can affect the dynamics of smaller haloes, bringing theory in better agreement with observations. Moreover, we estimate the cosmological abundance of dark photons in various regimes, and derive pertinent bounds.

  14. Effective field theory of weakly coupled inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sypsas, Spyros E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl E-mail: spyridon.sypsas@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    The application of Effective Field Theory (EFT) methods to inflation has taken a central role in our current understanding of the very early universe. The EFT perspective has been particularly useful in analyzing the self-interactions determining the evolution of co-moving curvature perturbations (Goldstone boson modes) and their influence on low-energy observables. However, the standard EFT formalism, to lowest order in spacetime differential operators, does not provide the most general parametrization of a theory that remains weakly coupled throughout the entire low-energy regime. Here we study the EFT formulation by including spacetime differential operators implying a scale dependence of the Goldstone boson self-interactions and its dispersion relation. These operators are shown to arise naturally from the low-energy interaction of the Goldstone boson with heavy fields that have been integrated out. We find that the EFT then stays weakly coupled all the way up to the cutoff scale at which ultraviolet degrees of freedom become operative. This opens up a regime of new physics where the dispersion relation is dominated by a quadratic dependence on the momentum ω ∼ p{sup 2}. In addition, provided that modes crossed the Hubble scale within this energy range, the predictions of inflationary observables — including non-Gaussian signatures — are significantly affected by the new scales characterizing it.

  15. Interaction of two optically coupled whole blood samples during respiratory burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikov, Vladimir L.; Novikov, Cyril N.

    1997-05-01

    To study a possibility of interaction of two optically, but not chemically coupled samples of whole human blood the following experimental setup was used. A quartz cuvette with either nondiluted blood or saline was placed inside a glass vial. Saline diluted whole blood was poured into the vial and respiratory burst (RB) was initiated in it with phorbol ether or zymosan. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (LCL) was registered using liquid scintillation counter (coincident circuit off). Effect of blood placed in the cuvette upon photon emission from blood placed in the vial was evaluated. It was shown that blood of some donors consistently attenuated photon emission from the sample in which RB was induced. Blood of another group of donors enhanced photon emission from the `partner' sample. Some properties of blood taken from the cuvette after being in the contact with the sample in which RB was induced changed in comparison with the same blood that was contacting with the non-stimulated sample. Exposed blood has lost the ability to attenuate light emission from the fresh portion of blood in which RB was induced. Its own LCL in response to addition of zymoscan was different from that of the parallel sample of same blood not exposed to sample undergoing RB. These results suggest that two chemically separated but optically coupled samples of blood can interact.

  16. Modelling Tropical Cyclones-Ocean interactions: the role of the Atmophere - Ocean coupling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gualdi, Silvio; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between Tropical Cyclones (TCs) and ocean is a major mechanism responsible for energy exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. TCs affect the thermal and dynamical structure of the ocean, but the magnitude of the impact is still uncertain. Very few CMIP5 models demonstrated ability in representing TCs, mainly due to their horizontal resolution. We aim to improve TCs representation in next CMIPs experiments through the new CMCC-CM2VHR General Circulation Model, having a horizontal resolution of 1/4 degree in both atmospheric and ocean components. The model is capable to represent realistically TCs up to Cat-5 Typhoons. A good representation of the TC-Ocean interaction strongly depends on the coupling frequency between the atmospheric and the ocean components. In this work, we found that a better representation of the negative Sea Surface Temperature - TC induced feedback, through a high (hourly) coupling frequency, ensures the reduction of the TC induced Power Dissipation Index (PDI) bias of one order of magnitude. In addition, a cat-5 storm case study is deeply investigated also in terms of TC effects on the deep ocean.

  17. Collective Dynamics on a Two-Lane Asymmetrically Coupled TASEP with Mutually Interactive Langmuir Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arvind Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental observations on clustering of motor proteins on microtubule filament, we study an open system of two parallel totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes under asymmetric coupling conditions, which incorporates the mutual interaction with the surrounding environment through Langmuir Kinetics (LK) in both the lanes. In the modified LK, the attachment and detachment rates depends on the configuration of nearest neighboring sites. We analyse the model within the framework of continuum mean-field theory and the phase diagrams along with density profiles are obtained using boundary layer analysis. The effect of mutual interactions on the phase diagram for two different situations of attachment and detachment (LK) rates is discussed. Under the symmetric LK dynamics, the topological structure of the phase diagram remains similar to the one in without mutual interaction; while for the antisymmetric case, after a certain critical value of attractive/repulsive mutual attraction, significant changes are found in the qualitative nature of phase diagram. Moreover, it is shown that the type of mutual interaction affects the dynamic properties of motor proteins. The theoretical findings are examined by extensive Monte-Carlo simulations.

  18. Galaxy bachelors, couples, spouses: Star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Barger, Kathleen; Richstein, Hannah; SDSS-IV/MaNGA

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the star formation activity in three galaxy systems in different stages of interaction to determine how the environment of galaxies affects their star forming ability and potential. These systems include an isolated galaxy, a pair of interacting galaxies, and a pair of merging galaxies. All of the target galaxies in these systems have similar stellar masses and similar radii and are at similar redshifts. We trace the star formation activity over the past 1-2 Gyr using spatially and kinematically resolved H-alpha emission, H-alpha equivalent width, and 4000-Angstrom break maps. This work is based on data from the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV)/Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), and is part of the Project No.0285 in SDSS-IV.

  19. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    ocean waves and sea ice interact, for use in operational models of the Arctic Basin and the adjacent seas; – improve the forecasting capacities of...spectra and modify their directional spread. Being the primary focus of the current project, we are developing innovative methods to model these...during WIFAR (Waves-in-Ice Forecasting for Arctic Operators), a partnership between the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in

  20. Coupling of tt¯ and γγ with a strongly interacting Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Rafael L.

    2017-03-01

    We report the coupling of an external γγ or tt¯ state to a strongly interacting EWSBS satisfying unitarity. We exploit perturbation theory for those coupling of the external state, whereas the EWSBS is taken as strongly interacting. We use a modified version of the IAM unitarization procedure to model such a strongly interacting regime. The matrix elements VLVL → VLVL, VLVL ↔ hh, hh → hh, VLVL ↔ γγ, tt¯, hh ↔ γγ, tt¯ are all computed to NLO in perturbation theory with the Nonlinear Effective Field Theory of the EWSBS, within the Equivalence Theorem. This allows us to describe resonances of the electroweak sector that may be found at the LHC and their effect on other channels such as γγ or tt¯ where they may be discovered.

  1. Configuration interaction studies on the spectroscopic properties of PbO including spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luo; Rui, Li; Zhiqiang, Gai; RuiBo, Ai; Hongmin, Zhang; Xiaomei, Zhang; Bing, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Lead oxide (PbO), which plays the key roles in a range of research fields, has received a great deal of attention. Owing to the large density of electronic states and heavy atom Pb including in PbO, the excited states of the molecule have not been well studied. In this work, high level multireference configuration interaction calculations on the low-lying states of PbO have been carried out by utilizing the relativistic effective core potential. The effects of the core-valence correlation correction, the Davidson modification, and the spin-orbital coupling on the electronic structure of the PbO molecule are estimated. The potential energy curves of 18 Λ-S states correlated to the lowest dissociation limit (Pb (3Pg) + O(3Pg)) are reported. The calculated spectroscopic parameters of the electronic states below 30000 cm-1, for instance, X1Σ+, 13Σ+, and 13Σ-, and their spin-orbit coupling interaction, are compared with the experimental results, and good agreements are derived. The dipole moments of the 18 Λ-S states are computed with the configuration interaction method, and the calculated dipole moments of X1Σ+ and 13Σ+ are consistent with the previous experimental results. The transition dipole moments from 11Π, 21Π, and 21Σ+ to X1Σ+ and other singlet excited states are estimated. The radiative lifetime of several low-lying vibrational levels of 11Π, 21Π, and 21Σ+ states are evaluated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404180 and 11574114), the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. A2015010), the University Nursing Program for Young Scholars with Creative Talents in Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. UNPYSCT-2015095), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150101003JC).

  2. Calculation of excited-state properties using general coupled-cluster and configuration-interaction models.

    PubMed

    Kállay, Mihály; Gauss, Jürgen

    2004-11-15

    Using string-based algorithms excitation energies and analytic first derivatives for excited states have been implemented for general coupled-cluster (CC) models within CC linear-response (LR) theory which is equivalent to the equation-of-motion (EOM) CC approach for these quantities. Transition moments between the ground and excited states are also considered in the framework of linear-response theory. The presented procedures are applicable to both single-reference-type and multireference-type CC wave functions independently of the excitation manifold constituting the cluster operator and the space in which the effective Hamiltonian is diagonalized. The performance of different LR-CC/EOM-CC and configuration-interaction approaches for excited states is compared. The effect of higher excitations on excited-state properties is demonstrated in benchmark calculations for NH(2) and NH(3). As a first application, the stationary points of the S(1) surface of acetylene are characterized by high-accuracy calculations.

  3. Dynamic aperture effects due to linear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling introduced by the random a{sub 1} can produce considerable distortion of the betatron motion. For a given initial x{sub o}, x{sub o}{prime}, y{sub o}, y{sub o}{prime}, the maximum x and the maximum y for the subsequent motion can be considerably larger when coupling is present. The maximum x and y can be used as a measure of the betatron distortion. One effect of this betatron distortion shows up in the dynamic aperture, in a loss in the stability limit, A{sub SL}, found by tracking. The betatron distortion causes the particle to move further out in the magnets, where it sees stronger non-linear fields. Previous tracking showed a loss in A{sub SL} due to random a{sub 1} and b{sub 1}. It was noticed then that the loss in A{sub SL} was associated with a betatron motion distortion which was primarily a linear effect. For a given initial x, x{prime}, y, y{prime} the x{sub max} and y{sub max} in the high-{Beta} magnets were considerably larger for those random a{sub 1} distributions which produced the smaller A{sub SL}. The studies described in this report show that the stability limit, A{sub SL}, depends on the starting location around the ring. This variation in A{sub SL} around the ring can be correlated with the variation in the betatron distortion for particles starting at different places around the ring. It is proposed that the average of the A{sub SL} found by starting at each of the QF, the focusing quadrupoles in the arcs, can be taken as a measure of the dynamic aperture. It is found that the average A{sub SL} is reduced by about 15% by the random a{sub 1} multipoles expected in RHIC.

  4. Phase diagram of weakly coupled Heisenberg spin chains subject to a uniform Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wen; Starykh, Oleg A.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on spin chain materials K2CuSO4Cl2 and K2CuSO4Br2 , we theoretically investigate the problem of weakly coupled spin chains (chain exchange J , interchain J') subject to a staggered between chains, but uniform within a given chain, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction of magnitude D . In the experimentally relevant limit J'≪D ≪J of the strong DM interaction the spins on the neighboring chains are forced to rotate in opposite directions, effectively resulting in a cancellation of the interchain interaction between components of spins in the plane normal to the vector D . This has the effect of promoting a two-dimensional collinear spin density wave state, which preserves U(1) symmetry of rotations about the D axis. We also investigate response of this interesting system to an external magnetic field h and obtain the h-D phase diagrams for the two important configurations h ∥D and h ⊥D .

  5. Evidence for Anisotropic Electronic Coupling of Charge Transfer States in Weakly Interacting Organic Semiconductor Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Belova, Valentina; Beyer, Paul; Meister, Eduard; Linderl, Theresa; Halbich, Marc-Uwe; Gerhard, Marina; Schmidt, Stefan; Zechel, Thomas; Meisel, Tino; Generalov, Alexander V; Anselmo, Ana Sofia; Scholz, Reinhard; Konovalov, Oleg; Gerlach, Alexander; Koch, Martin; Hinderhofer, Alexander; Opitz, Andreas; Brütting, Wolfgang; Schreiber, Frank

    2017-06-28

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the charge-transfer (CT) effect in weakly interacting organic semiconductor mixtures. The donor-acceptor pair diindenoperylene (DIP) and N,N'-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-1,7-dicyanoperylene-3,4/9,10-bis(dicarboxyimide) (PDIR-CN2) has been chosen as a model system. A wide range of experimental methods was used in order to characterize the structural, optical, electronic, and device properties of the intermolecular interactions. By detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the partial CT in this weakly interacting mixture does not have a strong effect on the ground state and does not generate a hybrid orbital. We also find a strong CT transition in light absorption as well as in photo- and electroluminescence. By using different layer sequences and compositions, we are able to distinguish electronic coupling in-plane vs out-of-plane and, thus, characterize the anisotropy of the CT state. Finally, we discuss the impact of CT exciton generation on charge-carrier transport and on the efficiency of photovoltaic devices.

  6. Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Toward Coupling Cognition and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The dissertation discussed in this article [1] was written in the midst of an era of digitization. The world is becoming increasingly instrumented with sensors, monitoring, and other methods for generating data describing social, physical, and natural phenomena. Thus, data exist with the potential of being analyzed to uncover, or discover, the phenomena from which it was created. However, as the analytic models leveraged to analyze these data continue to increase in complexity and computational capability, how can visualizations and user interaction methodologies adapt and evolve to continue to foster discovery and sensemaking?

  7. Assessing Context-Specific Attributions During Couples' Conflict Interactions.

    PubMed

    Backer-Fulghum, Lindsey M; Anders, Cecily; Sanford, Keith

    2016-08-09

    Two studies were conducted to develop and validate a six-item scale for measuring context-specific attributions regarding the extent to which people either blame or exonerate partners during couples' conflicts. Context-specific attributions pertain to appraisals made during a single episode of relationship conflict, and the scale was expected to be distinct from existing attribution scales measuring people's schemas regarding the types of attributions they typically make. Study 1 included 2,452 people in marriage or cohabitating relationships; Study 2 included 172 people in dating relationships, and participants in both studies completed Internet questionnaires. Item response theory was used to create an attribution scale using the fewest number of items to discriminate reliably across the full range of attribution levels. The resulting scale produced an expected pattern of convergent and divergent correlations with other context-specific measures, including two types of underlying concerns and three types of emotion. The context-specific attribution scale explained variance in these criterion variables that could not be explained by other existing scales that assess attributions at the schematic level. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Simulating coupled thermal-mechanical interactions in morphing radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagne, Christopher L.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Hartl, Darren J.; Whitcomb, John D.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal control is an important aspect of every spacecraft. The thermal control system (TCS) must maintain the temperature of all other systems within acceptable limits in spite of changes in environmental conditions or heat loads. Most thermal control systems used in crewed vehicles use a two-fluid-loop architecture in order to achieve the flexibility demanded by the mission. The two-loop architecture provides sufficient performance, but it does so at the cost of additional mass. A recently-proposed radiator concept known as a morphing radiator employs shape memory alloys in order to achieve the performance necessary to use a single-loop TCS architecture. However, modeling the behavior of morphing radiators is challenging due to the presence of a unique and complex thermomechanical coupling. In this work, a partitioned analysis procedure is implemented with existing finite element solvers in order to explore the behavior of a possible shape memory alloy-based morphing radiator in a mission-like thermal environment. The results help confirm the theory of operation and demonstrate the ability of this method to support the design and development of future morphing radiators.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Non-linear Coupled Interacting Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Zhang, J.; Wyborn, D.

    2009-04-01

    coupled fluid effects and the geomechanical energy conversion for the pure/coupled thermal analysis. • Pandas/Fluid is a finite element method based module for simulating the fluid flow in the fractured porous media; the fluid flow velocity and pressure are calculated from energy equilibrium equations without/together with the coupling effects of the thermal and solid rock deformation for an independent/coupled fluid flow analysis; • Pandas/Post is to visualise the simulation results through the integration of VTK and/or Patran. All the above modules can be used independently/together to simulate individual/coupled phenomena (such as interacting fault system dynamics, heat flow and fluid flow) without/with coupling effects. PANDAS has been applied to the following issues: • visualisation of the microseismic events to monitor and determine where/how the underground rupture proceeds during a hydraulic stimulation, to generate the mesh using the recorded data for determining the domain of the ruptured zone and to evaluate the material parameters (i.e. the permeability) for the further numerical analysis; • interacting fault system simulation to determine the relevant complicated dynamic rupture process. • geomechanical-fluid flow coupling analysis to investigate the interactions between fluid flow and deformation in the fractured porous media under different loading conditions. • thermo-fluid flow coupling analysis of a fractured geothermal reservoir system. PANDAS will be further developed for a multiscale simulation of multiphase dynamic behaviour for a certain fractured geothermal reservoir. More details and additional application examples will be given during the presentation. References [1] Xing, H. L., Makinouchi, A. and Mora, P. (2007). Finite element modeling of interacting fault system, Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 163, 106-121.doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2007.05.006 [2] Xing, H. L., Mora, P., Makinouchi, A. (2006). An unified friction

  10. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-01-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis–Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites. PMID:24223436

  11. A coupled hidden Markov model for disease interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Chris; Xifara, Tatiana; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Mike

    2013-08-01

    To investigate interactions between parasite species in a host, a population of field voles was studied longitudinally, with presence or absence of six different parasites measured repeatedly. Although trapping sessions were regular, a different set of voles was caught at each session, leading to incomplete profiles for all subjects. We use a discrete time hidden Markov model for each disease with transition probabilities dependent on covariates via a set of logistic regressions. For each disease the hidden states for each of the other diseases at a given time point form part of the covariate set for the Markov transition probabilities from that time point. This allows us to gauge the influence of each parasite species on the transition probabilities for each of the other parasite species. Inference is performed via a Gibbs sampler, which cycles through each of the diseases, first using an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings step to sample from the conditional posterior of the covariate parameters for that particular disease given the hidden states for all other diseases and then sampling from the hidden states for that disease given the parameters. We find evidence for interactions between several pairs of parasites and of an acquired immune response for two of the parasites.

  12. Stripe phase and double-roton excitations in interacting spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kuei; Qu, Chunlei; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Chuanwei

    Spin-orbit (SO) coupling plays a major role in many important phenomena in condensed matter physics. However, the SO coupling physics in high-spin systems, especially with superfluids, has not been well explored because of the spin half of electrons in solids. In this context, the recent experimental realization of spin-orbit coupling in spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has opened a completely new avenue for exploring SO-coupled high-spin superfluids. Nevertheless, the experiment has only revealed the single-particle physics of the system. Here, we study the effects of interactions between atoms on the ground states and collective excitations of SO-coupled spin-1 BECs in the presence of a spin-tensor potential. We find that ferromagnetic interaction between atoms can induce a stripe phase exhibiting two modulating patterns. We characterize the phase transitions between different phases using the spin-tensor density as well as the collective dipole motion of the BEC. We show that there exists a new type of double maxon-roton structure in the Bogoliubov-excitation spectrum, attributing to the three band minima of the SO-coupled spin-1 BEC. Our work could motivate further theoretical and experimental study along this direction.

  13. Twisted spin vortices in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and dipole-dipole interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masaya; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Sasaki, Daichi; Saito, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    We consider a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate with Rashba spin-orbit coupling and dipole-dipole interaction confined in a cigar-shaped trap. Due to the combined effects of spin-orbit coupling, dipole-dipole interaction, and trap geometry, the system exhibits a rich variety of ground-state spin structures, including twisted spin vortices. The ground-state phase diagram is determined with respect to the strengths of the spin-orbit coupling and dipole-dipole interaction.

  14. Quantifying interactions between real oscillators with information theory and phase models: Application to cardiorespiratory coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yenan; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Dick, Thomas E.; Jacono, Frank J.; Galán, Roberto F.

    2013-02-01

    Interactions between oscillators can be investigated with standard tools of time series analysis. However, these methods are insensitive to the directionality of the coupling, i.e., the asymmetry of the interactions. An elegant alternative was proposed by Rosenblum and collaborators [M. G. Rosenblum, L. Cimponeriu, A. Bezerianos, A. Patzak, and R. Mrowka, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.041909 65, 041909 (2002); M. G. Rosenblum and A. S. Pikovsky, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.64.045202 64, 045202 (2001)] which consists in fitting the empirical phases to a generic model of two weakly coupled phase oscillators. This allows one to obtain the interaction functions defining the coupling and its directionality. A limitation of this approach is that a solution always exists in the least-squares sense, even in the absence of coupling. To preclude spurious results, we propose a three-step protocol: (1) Determine if a statistical dependency exists in the data by evaluating the mutual information of the phases; (2) if so, compute the interaction functions of the oscillators; and (3) validate the empirical oscillator model by comparing the joint probability of the phases obtained from simulating the model with that of the empirical phases. We apply this protocol to a model of two coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators and show that it reliably detects genuine coupling. We also apply this protocol to investigate cardiorespiratory coupling in anesthetized rats. We observe reciprocal coupling between respiration and heartbeat and that the influence of respiration on the heartbeat is generally much stronger than vice versa. In addition, we find that the vagus nerve mediates coupling in both directions.

  15. Quantifying interactions between real oscillators with information theory and phase models: Application to cardiorespiratory coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yenan; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Dick, Thomas E.; Jacono, Frank J.; Galán, Roberto F.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between oscillators can be investigated with standard tools of time series analysis. However, these methods are insensitive to the directionality of the coupling, i.e., the asymmetry of the interactions. An elegant alternative was proposed by Rosenblum and collaborators [M. G. Rosenblum, L. Cimponeriu, A. Bezerianos, A. Patzak, and R. Mrowka, Phys. Rev. E 65, 041909 (2002); M. G. Rosenblum and A. S. Pikovsky, Phys. Rev. E 64, 045202 (2001)] which consists in fitting the empirical phases to a generic model of two weakly coupled phase oscillators. This allows one to obtain the interaction functions defining the coupling and its directionality. A limitation of this approach is that a solution always exists in the least-squares sense, even in the absence of coupling. To preclude spurious results, we propose a three-step protocol: (1) Determine if a statistical dependency exists in the data by evaluating the mutual information of the phases; (2) if so, compute the interaction functions of the oscillators; and (3) validate the empirical oscillator model by comparing the joint probability of the phases obtained from simulating the model with that of the empirical phases. We apply this protocol to a model of two coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators and show that it reliably detects genuine coupling. We also apply this protocol to investigate cardiorespiratory coupling in anesthetized rats. We observe reciprocal coupling between respiration and heartbeat and that the influence of respiration on the heartbeat is generally much stronger than vice versa. In addition, we find that the vagus nerve mediates coupling in both directions. PMID:23496550

  16. Multi-shell effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-02-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. The commonly used unperturbed basis functions are given by the harmonic oscillator. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell like the sd shell or the pf shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line requires, however, larger shell-model spaces. Because the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate models spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective nucleon-nucleon interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to nondegenerate model spaces. This has important consequences, in particular for intershell matrix elements of effective interactions. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of a many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa method. Our method enables us to microscopically construct effective interactions not only in one oscillator shell but also for several oscillator shells. Results: We present numerical results using effective interactions within (i) a single oscillator shell (a so-called degenerate model space) like the sd shell or the pf shell and (ii) two major shells (nondegenerate model space) like the sdf7p3 shell or the pfg9 shell. We also present energy levels of several nuclei that have two valence nucleons on top of a given closed-shell core. Conclusions: Our results show that the present method works excellently in shell-model spaces that comprise several oscillator shells, as well as in a single oscillator

  17. Coupling phosphoryl transfer and substrate interactions in protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Lieser, Scot A; Aubol, Brandon E; Wong, Lilly; Jennings, Patricia A; Adams, Joseph A

    2005-12-30

    Protein kinases control cell signaling events through the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in protein targets. The recognition of these protein substrates by the kinases relies on two principal factors: proper subcellular co-localization and molecular interactions between the kinase and substrate. In this review, we will focus on the kinetic role of the latter in conveying favorable substrate recognition. Using rapid mixing technologies, we demonstrate that the intrinsic thermodynamic affinities of two protein substrates for their respective kinases (Csk with Src and Sky1p with Npl3) are weak compared to their apparent affinities measured in traditional steady-state kinetic assays (i.e.--Km < Kd). The source of the high apparent affinities rests in a very fast and highly favorable phosphoryl transfer step that serves as a clamp for substrate recognition. In this mechanism, both Csk and Sky1p utilize this step to draw the substrate toward product, thereby, converting a high Kd into a low Km. We propose that this one form of substrate recognition employed by protein kinases is advantageous since it simultaneously facilitates high apparent substrate affinity and fast protein turnover.

  18. Interactive coupling of electronic and optical man-made devices to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozden, Ilker

    Fireflies blink synchronously, lasers are "mode-locked" for amplification, cardiac pacemaker cells maintain a steady heartbeat, and crickets chirps get in step. These are examples of coupled oscillators. Coupled non-linear limit-cycle oscillator models are used extensively to provide information about the collective behavior of many physical and biological systems. Depending on the system parameters, namely, the coupling coefficient and the time delay in the coupling, these coupled limit-cycle oscillator exhibit several interesting phenomena; they either synchronize to a common frequency, or oscillate completely independent of each other, or drag each other to a standstill i.e., show "amplitude death". Many neuronal systems exhibit synchronized limit-cycle oscillations in network of electrically coupled cells. The inferior olivary (IO) neuron is an example of such a system. The inferior olive has been widely studied by neuroscientists as it exhibits spontaneous oscillations in its membrane potential, typically in the range of 1--10 Hz. Located in the medulla, the inferior olive is believed to form the neural basis for precise timing and learning in motor circuits by making strong synaptic connections onto Purkinjee cells in the cerebellum. In this thesis work, we report on work, which focuses on the implementation and study of coupling of a biological circuit, which is the inferior olivary system, with a man-made electronic oscillator, the so-called Chua's circuit. We were able to study the interaction between the two oscillators over a wide range coupling conditions. With increasing coupling strength, the oscillators become phase-locked, or synchronized, but with a phase relationship which is either in- or out-of-phase depending on the detailed adjustment in the coupling. Finally, the coupled system reaches the conditions for amplitude death, a rather fundamental result given that the interaction has taken place between purely biological and man-made circuit

  19. Comparison of one-way and two-way coupled analyses of electromagnetic machines considering magnetic and structural interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jahyun; Kang, Chiho; Song, Jeongyong; Jang, Gunhee

    2017-05-01

    We compared one-way and two-way coupled analyses of electromagnetic machines considering magnetic and structural interaction to identify the frequency components of magnetic excitation and to determine the structural coupling effects predicted only by the two-way coupled analysis. We developed finite element models of a C-core switch and an electric motor. In the two-way coupled analysis method, the magnetic force calculated by using the Maxwell stress tensor was applied to the structural finite element model to determine the elastic deformation, and the magnetic finite element model was rearranged by means of the moving mesh method to represent the structural elastic deformation. We showed that two-way coupled analysis predicted the excitation frequency of 80 Hz (4 times the input current frequency) of magnetic force in the C-core switch and the excitation frequency of 667 Hz (the first natural frequency of the rotor, corresponding to the translational mode) of magnetic force in the electric motor undergoing rotor eccentricity. We showed that two-way coupled analysis predicted magnetic excitation and its corresponding structural response more accurately than the one-way coupled analysis, especially for electromagnetic machines in which the structural deformation affects magnetic field through variation of the air gap length.

  20. A study on air-sea interaction on the simulated seasonal climate in an ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Suryun; Hong, Song-You; Park, Suhee

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of air-sea interaction upon simulated tropical climatology, focusing on the boreal summer mean precipitation and the embedded intra-seasonal oscillation (ISO) signal. Both the daily coupling of ocean-atmosphere and the diurnal variation of sea surface temperature (SST) at every time step by accounting for the ocean mixed layer and surface-energy budget at the ocean surface are considered. The ocean-atmosphere coupled model component of the global/regional integrated model system has been utilized. Results from the coupled model show better precipitation climatology than those from the atmosphere-only model, through the inclusion of SST-cloudiness-precipitation feedback in the coupled system. Cooling the ocean surface in the coupled model is mainly responsible for the improved precipitation climatology, whereas neither the coupling itself nor the diurnal variation in the SST influences the simulated climatology. However, the inclusion of the diurnal cycle in the SST shows a distinct improvement of the simulated ISO signal, by either decreasing or increasing the magnitude of spectral powers, as compared to the simulation results that exclude the diurnal variation of the SST in coupled models.

  1. Nuclear collective motion with a coherent coupling interaction between quadrupole and octupole modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, N.; Yotov, P.; Drenska, S.; Scheid, W.; Bonatsos, D.; Lenis, D.; Petrellis, D.

    2006-04-01

    A collective Hamiltonian for the rotation-vibration motion of nuclei is considered in which the axial quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom are coupled through the centrifugal interaction. The potential of the system depends on the two deformation variables β2 and β3. The system is considered to oscillate between positive and negative β3 values by rounding an infinite potential core in the (β2,β3) plane with β2>0. By assuming a coherent contribution of the quadrupole and octupole oscillation modes in the collective motion, the energy spectrum is derived in an explicit analytic form, providing specific parity shift effects. On this basis several possible ways in the evolution of quadrupole-octupole collectivity are outlined. A particular application of the model to the energy levels and electric transition probabilities in alternating parity spectra of the nuclei Nd150, Sm152, Gd154, and Dy156 is presented.

  2. The Systemic Interaction of Attachment on Psychophysiological Arousal in Couple Conflict.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nathan C; Seedall, Ryan B; Robinson, W David; Bradford, Kay

    2017-05-15

    Attachment in adult romantic relationships has long been linked to conflict styles. Psychophysiological measures have provided additional insight into this association by accessing less conscious and controlled responses to conflict. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance, and the interaction between attachment styles on skin conductance responses during conflict and recovery from conflict. Using dyadic analysis of 50 heterosexual couples, we found evidence of a systemic effect of attachment, where psychophysiological arousal increased when one partner had higher levels of attachment anxiety and the other partner had higher levels of attachment avoidance. Attachment avoidance was also negatively associated with increased levels of arousal. Relationship and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  3. Configuration interaction study of electronic structures of CdCl including spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shutao; Cui, Jicheng; Li, Rui; Yan, Bing

    2017-06-01

    Adiabatic potential energy curves (PECs) and the dipole moments (DMs) for the 14 low-lying Λ-S states of CdCl were computed at configuration interaction method including Davidson correction (+Q). To quantitatively evaluate the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effect, the SOC integrals involving the X2Σ+ and 22Σ+ were investigated. The spectroscopic constants of 9 bound Λ-S states and 4 lowest bound Ω states were derived. Moreover, the radiative lifetimes of the vibrational levels of bound states were predicted for the first time. Finally, the feasibility and challenges of laser cooling of CdCl were discussed based on a three-laser cooling scheme.

  4. [Interactive effects between allelochemical substitutes].

    PubMed

    He, Huaqin; Shen, Lihua; Song, Biqing; Guo, Yuchun; Liang, Yiyuan; Liang, Kangjing; Lin, Wenxiong

    2005-05-01

    In order to understand the allelopathic mechanisms of rice on weed, the allelochemical substitutes salicylic acid, p-hydroxybenzonic acid, cinnamic acid, vanillic acid and ferulic acid were used in an orthogonally gyrating regression experiment to study their interactive effects on the growth of barnyardgrass. The results indicated that whether the interactive effects between two substitutes, e.g., between salicylic and cinnamic acid or between salicylic and p-hydrobanzonic acid, were synergistic or antagonistic depended on the concentrations of each substitutes in the mixture. In the mixture of salicylic acid and p-hydrobanzonic acid, the effect of salicylic acid was synergistic at < 0.14 mmol.L(-1) but antagonistic at > 0.14 mmol.L(-1), while p-hydrobanzonic acid showed an antagonistic effect at > 0.425 mmol.L(-1). Salicylic acid at all test concentrations exhibited antagonism to cinnamic acid, while cinnamic acid had a synergistic at < 0.14 mmol.L(-1), but an antagonistic effect at >0.14 mmol.L(-1) on alicylic acid. The interactive effects between cinnamic and ferulic acid were all synergistic at test concentrations.

  5. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  6. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Mark Alan

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  7. Mirroring and beyond: coupled dynamics as a generalized framework for modelling social interactions.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Uri; Frith, Chris D

    2016-05-05

    When people observe one another, behavioural alignment can be detected at many levels, from the physical to the mental. Likewise, when people process the same highly complex stimulus sequences, such as films and stories, alignment is detected in the elicited brain activity. In early sensory areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to the low-level properties of the stimulus (shape, motion, volume, etc.), while in high-order brain areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to high-levels aspects of the stimulus, such as meaning. Successful social interactions require such alignments (both behavioural and neural), as communication cannot occur without shared understanding. However, we need to go beyond simple, symmetric (mirror) alignment once we start interacting. Interactions are dynamic processes, which involve continuous mutual adaptation, development of complementary behaviour and division of labour such as leader-follower roles. Here, we argue that interacting individuals are dynamically coupled rather than simply aligned. This broader framework for understanding interactions can encompass both processes by which behaviour and brain activity mirror each other (neural alignment), and situations in which behaviour and brain activity in one participant are coupled (but not mirrored) to the dynamics in the other participant. To apply these more sophisticated accounts of social interactions to the study of the underlying neural processes we need to develop new experimental paradigms and novel methods of data analysis.

  8. Mirroring and beyond: coupled dynamics as a generalized framework for modelling social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Uri; Frith, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    When people observe one another, behavioural alignment can be detected at many levels, from the physical to the mental. Likewise, when people process the same highly complex stimulus sequences, such as films and stories, alignment is detected in the elicited brain activity. In early sensory areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to the low-level properties of the stimulus (shape, motion, volume, etc.), while in high-order brain areas, shared neural patterns are coupled to high-levels aspects of the stimulus, such as meaning. Successful social interactions require such alignments (both behavioural and neural), as communication cannot occur without shared understanding. However, we need to go beyond simple, symmetric (mirror) alignment once we start interacting. Interactions are dynamic processes, which involve continuous mutual adaptation, development of complementary behaviour and division of labour such as leader–follower roles. Here, we argue that interacting individuals are dynamically coupled rather than simply aligned. This broader framework for understanding interactions can encompass both processes by which behaviour and brain activity mirror each other (neural alignment), and situations in which behaviour and brain activity in one participant are coupled (but not mirrored) to the dynamics in the other participant. To apply these more sophisticated accounts of social interactions to the study of the underlying neural processes we need to develop new experimental paradigms and novel methods of data analysis PMID:27069044

  9. Effects of diversity and coupling on transport properties of globally coupled active Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dan; Zhu, Shiqun

    2013-03-01

    Based on recent work [B. Lindner and E. M., Nicola, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 (2008) 190603], the transport of N globally coupled Brownian motors with diversity is investigated. By applying the mean-field approximation, the effects of the diversity disturbance and the coupling strength on the transport of the coupled system are discussed both theoretically and numerically. It is found that the diversity reduces the diffusion dramatically for small bias and increases the diffusion gradually for large bias. The collective motion shows a resonant dependence on the coupling strength in a region of small bias.

  10. Stable collective dynamics of two-level systems coupled by dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmee, C. D.; Cooper, N. R.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a set of two-level systems coupled by dipolar interactions under a resonant external Rabi drive. The two-level systems are prepared initially in a coherent product state, and we ask how the nonequilibrium conditions caused by the drive affect this coherence. We study the full nonlinear dynamics of the coupled two-level systems within a classical approximation by analyzing numerically the equations of motion and determining the stability of the collective coherent state within classical Floquet theory. We establish the behavior analytically in the high Rabi coupling limit by employing a Magnus expansion and spin-wave analysis. Our results show that, typically, the dipole interactions between the two-level systems lead to instabilities that cause a breakdown of the collective Rabi oscillations. However, we identify parameter regimes for which the two-level systems undergo collective coherent Rabi oscillations even in the presence of the dipole interactions.

  11. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  12. A state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group method.

    PubMed

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-06-21

    We describe a state interaction spin-orbit (SISO) coupling method using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) wavefunctions and the spin-orbit mean-field (SOMF) operator. We implement our DMRG-SISO scheme using a spin-adapted algorithm that computes transition density matrices between arbitrary matrix product states. To demonstrate the potential of the DMRG-SISO scheme we present accurate benchmark calculations for the zero-field splitting of the copper and gold atoms, comparing to earlier complete active space self-consistent-field and second-order complete active space perturbation theory results in the same basis. We also compute the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the spin-ladder of the iron-sulfur dimer complex [Fe2S2(SCH3)4](3-), determining the splitting of the lowest quartet and sextet states. We find that the magnitude of the zero-field splitting for the higher quartet and sextet states approaches a significant fraction of the Heisenberg exchange parameter.

  13. Fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model of reed valves in a multi-cylinder reciprocating piston compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, F.; Nieter, J.; Lifson, A.; Reba, R.; Sishtla, V.

    2017-08-01

    For years compressor researchers have tried to account for the fluid interaction effect of the working fluid on valve motion in displacement compressors. In recent years, the computing capacities and available CFD and FEA programs have allowed fully coupled interaction of fluids and moving structures to be modelled more comprehensively. This paper describes our experience and results from developing a model of a multi-cylinder reciprocating piston compressor with suction and discharge valve systems that are fully coupled with the pressure pulsation in the adjacent plenum. Valve dynamics are captured by the model that affects compressor performance. The results show that higher running speed causes more discharge valve delay on closing due to higher pressure pulsation in discharge plenum. The acoustic property of the discharge plenum as it relates to valve motion is studied by the developed cost-effective standalone model.

  14. A facile way to realize exchange coupling interaction in hard/soft magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyun; Wang, Fan; Xia, Ailin; Zhang, Lijiao; Li, Tingting; Jin, Chuangui; Liu, Xianguo

    2016-11-01

    SrFe12O19/CoFe2O4 and SrFe12O19/Fe-B hard/soft magnetic composites were obtained by using powders synthesized via a hydrothermal and a molten salt method, respectively. The exchange coupling interaction was found to exist in the composites after a facile grinding according to the results of magnetic hysteresis loops and irreversible sloping recoil loops. It can be found that different grinding time affects their magnetic properties slightly. Our study proves that the conditions of realizing exchange coupling interaction may not be so stringent.

  15. Spatio-temporal coupling of random electromagnetic pulses interacting with reflecting gratings.

    PubMed

    Yao, Min; Cai, Yangjian; Korotkova, Olga; Lin, Qiang; Wang, Zhaoying

    2010-10-11

    Matrix optics is applied to a class of random, in time and space, electromagnetic pulsed beam-like (REMPB) radiation interacting with linear optical elements. A 6×6 order matrix describing transformation of a six-dimensional state vector including four spatial and two temporal positions within the field is used to derive conditions for spatio-temporal coupling. An example is included which deals with a spatio-temporal coupling in a typical REMPB on reflection from a reflecting grating. Electromagnetic nature of such interaction is explored via considering dependence of the degree of polarization of the reflected REMPB on its source and on the structure of the grating.

  16. Couples coping with chronic pain: How do intercouple interactions relate to pain coping?

    PubMed

    Prenevost, Mathilde Hallingstad; Reme, Silje Endresen

    2017-07-01

    Pain is not merely an isolated experience occurring within the person. It takes place in a wider social context, including the immediate social relationships that the person is a part of. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of how intercouple interactions might influence pain coping in couples coping with chronic pain. Four different approaches to understanding the influence of intercouple interactions have been proposed in the literature. In this review, we present and discuss the empirical support for each of these models. A literature search on all studies published up until May 2017 (PubMed and PsycINFO) was performed. The search string consisted of 3 steps: Chronic pain AND couple interaction*/partner validation/marital interaction/chronic pain couple*/spouse response* AND coping/adjustment/disability/function/work participation/sick leave/sickness absence/work disability. The operant model views partner responses from the perspective of conditioned learning and focuses on how such responses might increase or decrease the occurrence of pain behaviour. The notion that partner responses can reinforce pain behaviour generally finds support in the literature. However, when it comes to negative partner responses results are mixed, and the model paints a limited picture of the range of interactions that takes place in a couple. The communal coping model focuses on one specific type of coping (i.e. catastrophizing), and emphasizes the interpersonal aspect of pain coping. There is some evidence that a tendency to catastrophize is related both to couple interactions and pain coping, but it has proved difficult to test this model empirically. The interpersonal process model of intimacy is concerned with patient disclosures of distress and subsequent validating and invalidating partner responses. There is some preliminary support that such mechanisms of validation and invalidation can be linked to pain coping. A dyadic approach focuses on processes where the

  17. Response of different regional online coupled models to aerosol-radiation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Balzarini, Alessandra; Brunner, Dominik; Baró, Rocio; Curci, Gabriele; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2016-04-01

    The importance of aerosol-meteorology interactions and their representation in online coupled regional atmospheric chemistry-meteorology models was investigated in COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem, http://eumetchem.info/). Case study results from different models (COSMO-Muscat, COSMO-ART, and different configurations of WRF-Chem), which were applied for Europe as a coordinated exercise for the year 2010, are analyzed with respect to inter-model variability and the response of the different models to direct and indirect aerosol-radiation interactions. The main focus was on two episodes - the Russian heat wave and wildfires episode in July/August 2010 and a period in October 2010 with enhanced cloud cover and rain and including an of Saharan dust transport to Europe. Looking at physical plausibility the decrease in downward solar radiation and daytime temperature due to the direct aerosol effect is robust for all model configurations. The same holds for the pronounced decrease in cloud water content and increase in solar radiation for cloudy conditions and very low aerosol concentrations that was found for WRF-Chem when aerosol cloud interactions were considered. However, when the differences were tested for statistical significance no significant differences in mean solar radiation and mean temperature between the baseline case and the simulations including the direct and indirect effect from simulated aerosol concentrations were found over Europe for the October episode. Also for the fire episode differences between mean temperature and radiation from the simulations with and without the direct aerosol effect were not significant for the major part of the modelling domain. Only for the region with high fire emissions in Russia, the differences in mean solar radiation and temperature due to the direct effect were found to be significant during the second half of the fire episode - however only for a significance level of 0.1. The few observational data indicate that

  18. Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, A.; Zen, Freddy P.

    2015-04-16

    Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator is investigated. The systems are two coupled harmonic oscillator with the different masses. The dissipative effect is studied based on the quantum state diffusion formalism. The result show that the anharmonic effect increase the amplitude but the lifetime of the oscillation depend on the damping coefficient and do not depend on the temperature.

  19. Unified theory of effective interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    2016-09-15

    We present a unified description of effective interaction theories in both algebraic and graphic representations. In our previous work, we have presented the Rayleigh–Schrödinger and Bloch perturbation theories in a unified fashion by introducing the main frame expansion of the effective interaction. In this work, we start also from the main frame expansion, and present various nonperturbative theories in a coherent manner, which include generalizations of the Brandow, Brillouin–Wigner, and Bloch–Horowitz theories on the formal side, and the extended Krenciglowa–Kuo and the extended Lee–Suzuki methods on the practical side. We thus establish a coherent and comprehensive description of both perturbative and nonperturbative theories on the basis of the main frame expansion.

  20. Unified theory of effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    We present a unified description of effective interaction theories in both algebraic and graphic representations. In our previous work, we have presented the Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Bloch perturbation theories in a unified fashion by introducing the main frame expansion of the effective interaction. In this work, we start also from the main frame expansion, and present various nonperturbative theories in a coherent manner, which include generalizations of the Brandow, Brillouin-Wigner, and Bloch-Horowitz theories on the formal side, and the extended Krenciglowa-Kuo and the extended Lee-Suzuki methods on the practical side. We thus establish a coherent and comprehensive description of both perturbative and nonperturbative theories on the basis of the main frame expansion.

  1. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Couple Therapy for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Candice M.; Fredman, Steffany J.; Macdonald, Alexandra; Pukay-Martin, Nicole D.; Resick, Patricia A.; Schnurr, Paula P.

    2015-01-01

    .21; 95% CI, −37.87 to −8.55). Similarly, patients’ intimate relationship satisfaction (score range, 0–151) was significantly more improved in couple therapy than in the wait-list condition (mean change difference, 9.43; 95% CI, 0.04–18.83). The time×condition interaction effect in the multilevel model predicting PTSD symptoms (t37.5=−3.09; P =.004) and patient-reported relationship satisfaction (t68.5=2.00; P=.049) revealed superiority of the couple therapy compared with the wait list. Treatment effects were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Conclusion Among couples in which one partner was diagnosed as having PTSD, a disorder-specific couple therapy, compared with a wait list for the therapy, resulted in decreased PTSD symptom severity and patient comorbid symptom severity and increased patient relationship satisfaction. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00669981 PMID:22893167

  2. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  3. Coupling of PAK-interacting exchange factor PIX to GIT1 promotes focal complex disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z S; Manser, E; Loo, T H; Lim, L

    2000-09-01

    The p21-activated kinase PAK is targeted to focal complexes (FCs) through interactions with the SH3 domains of the PAK-interacting exchange factor PIX and Nck. PIX is a Rac GTP exchange factor that also binds the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein known as GIT1. Overexpression of GIT1 in fibroblasts or epithelial cells causes a loss of paxillin from FCs and stimulates cell motility. This is due to the direct interaction of a C-terminal 125-residue domain of GIT1 with paxillin, under the regulation of PIX. In its activated state, GIT1 can promote FC disassembly independent of actin-myosin contractile events. Additionally, GIT directly couples to a key component of FCs, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), via a conserved Spa2 homology domain. We propose that GIT1 and FAK cooperate to promote motility both by directly regulating focal complex dynamics and by the activation of Rac.

  4. Spatial-symmetry-induced dark states and charge trapping effects in the coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, N. S.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Arseev, P. I.

    2016-06-15

    In a system of N interacting single-level quantum dots (QDs), we study the relaxation dynamics and the current–voltage characteristics determined by symmetry properties of the QD arrangement. Different numbers of dots, initial charge configurations, and various coupling regimes to reservoirs are considered. We reveal that effective charge trapping occurs for particular regimes of coupling to the reservoir when more than two dots form a ring structure with the C{sub N} spatial symmetry. We reveal that the effective charge trapping caused by the C{sub N} spatial symmetry of N coupled QDs depends on the number of dots and the way of coupling to the reservoirs. We demonstrate that the charge trapping effect is directly connected with the formation of dark states, which are not coupled to reservoirs due to the system spatial symmetry C{sub N}. We also reveal the symmetry blockade of the tunneling current caused by the presence of dark states.

  5. Determination of the interaction impedance of coupled cavity slow wave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The interaction impedance of coupled cavity slow wave structures can be measured by perturbing the resonances of a shorted length of the structure using a dielectric rod. An analysis of this procedure is presented. The analysis retains radial as well as axial electric fields and all significant space harmonics. The results obtained are easily programmed formulas for calculating total interaction impedance or Pierce impedance using the experimental data.

  6. Effective Interactions for Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bryan R.

    The G-matrix technique in which one is able to easily calculate ground and excited states of many-body systems is used to calculate the ground state energies and some excited levels of ^3H and ^4He. Energy independent effective interactions are obtained for these nuclei using the technique of Suzuki and Lee which requires the G-matrix and its derivatives with respect to starting energy. It is found that accurate energy derivatives of the G-matrix are necessary to obtain energy independence and thus analytic expressions are presented for these derivatives in both center-of-mass/relative and shell model coordinate systems. Several rules of thumb are given pertaining to the convergence criteria in both coordinate systems. Further, since the G-matrix includes only intra -channel two-body correlations outside the active space, we explore the effect on the binding energies when the active space is enlarged to include several major shells. By enlarging the active space, we hope to include the most important many-body correlations explicitly. It is found that when the active space includes more than 2 major shells, the effective interaction is well approximated by the G-matrix. Our results essentially agree with exact Faddeev calculations for ^3 H but underbind by about.5 MeV in ^4 He as compared to exact Yabukovsky and Green function Monte Carlo calculations. A possible reason for this underbinding, the inclusion of unlinked diagrams in the energy expansion, is studied. The energy independent G-matrix technique is then applied to the p-shell (^5He, ^6Li and ^7Li) where the active space includes all excitations up to 2 hbaromega. Zero, one, two and three -body effective interactions are extracted and it is found that a schematic two-parameter three-body potential can be used to approximate the effective three-body potential that results from the truncation of the active space.

  7. Single-photon frequency conversion via interaction with a three-level atom coupled to a microdisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, M.; Andrianov, S. N.; Kalachev, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    The frequency conversion of light has proved to be an important instrument for communication, spectroscopy, imaging and information processing. We theoretically study the frequency conversion of a single photon via its interaction with a Λ -type atom coupled to a microdisk. We show that the frequency conversion efficiency approaches unity even in the case of an interaction between clockwise and counterclockwise modes in the microdisk due to surface imperfections. By the use of the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, we get an effective Hamiltonian that allows us to investigate the dynamics of the system and obtain time and probability of frequency conversion in different conditions.

  8. Deep-subwavelength magnetic-coupling-dominant interaction among magnetic localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic coupling is generally much weaker than electric Coulomb interaction. This also applies to the well-known magnetic "meta-atoms," or split-ring resonators (SRRs) as originally proposed by Pendry et al. [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999), 10.1109/22.798002], in which the associated electric dipole moments usually dictate their interaction. As a result, stereometamaterials, a stack of identical SRRs, were found with electric coupling so strong that the dispersion from merely magnetic coupling was overturned. Recently, other workers have proposed a new concept of magnetic localized surface plasmons, supported on metallic spiral structures (MSSs) at a deep-subwavelength scale. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that a stack of these magnetic "meta-atoms" can have dominant magnetic coupling in both of its two configurations. This allows magnetic-coupling-dominant energy transport along a one-dimensional stack of MSSs, as demonstrated with near-field transmission measurement. Our work not only applies this type of magnetic "meta-atom" into metamaterial construction, but also provides possibilities of magnetic metamaterial design in which the electric interaction no longer takes precedence.

  9. Coupling and surface effects in magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedoun, M.; Bouslykhane, K.; Bakrim, H.; Hourmatallah, A.; Benzakour, N.

    2005-12-01

    Using the high-temperature series expansions technique, we have analyzed the phase transition and the critical phenomena of a ferromagnetic thin film through three models: Heisenberg, XY and Ising. The critical reduced temperature is studied as a function of the exchange interaction in the bulk and within the surfaces Jb, Js and J⊥, respectively. The dependence of τc on the thickness L of the film has been investigated. A critical value of the surface exchange interaction in the film above which the surface magnetism appears is obtained. The shifts of the critical temperatures Tc(L) from the bulk value [(Tc(∞)/Tc(L))-1] can be described by a power law L, where λ is the inverse of the correlation length exponent. The obtained values are λ=1.34, λ=1.253 and λ=1.21 for Heisenberg, XY and Ising models, respectively. The critical exponent γ associated with the magnetic susceptibility is studied as a function of Jb, Js and J⊥. In a defined range of the exchange interactions, the values of γ are comparable to the universal ones and are independent of the film thickness. The asymmetry of the structure and the competition of the effects of the exchange coupling, are important for the magnetic properties of the system.

  10. Three-loop Standard Model effective potential at leading order in strong and top Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2014-01-08

    I find the three-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field, in the approximation that the strong and top Yukawa couplings are large compared to all other couplings, using dimensional regularization with modified minimal subtraction. Checks follow from gauge invariance and renormalization group invariance. I also briefly comment on the special problems posed by Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential, and on the numerical impact of the result on the relations between the Higgs vacuum expectation value, mass, and self-interaction coupling.

  11. Evolution of a G protein-coupled receptor response by mutations in regulatory network interactions

    PubMed Central

    Di Roberto, Raphaël B.; Chang, Belinda; Trusina, Ala; Peisajovich, Sergio G.

    2016-01-01

    All cellular functions depend on the concerted action of multiple proteins organized in complex networks. To understand how selection acts on protein networks, we used the yeast mating receptor Ste2, a pheromone-activated G protein-coupled receptor, as a model system. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2 is a hub in a network of interactions controlling both signal transduction and signal suppression. Through laboratory evolution, we obtained 21 mutant receptors sensitive to the pheromone of a related yeast species and investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this newfound sensitivity. While some mutants show enhanced binding affinity to the foreign pheromone, others only display weakened interactions with the network's negative regulators. Importantly, the latter changes have a limited impact on overall pathway regulation, despite their considerable effect on sensitivity. Our results demonstrate that a new receptor–ligand pair can evolve through network-altering mutations independently of receptor–ligand binding, and suggest a potential role for such mutations in disease. PMID:27487915

  12. Computer simulation of the coupling slots effects for on-axis coupled accelerating structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salakhoutdinov, A. F.; Shvedunov, V. I.

    1997-05-01

    The presence of coupling elements in accelerating structures leads to the violation of axial symmetry of accelerating field and it may cause displacement, defocusing and non-linear distortion of phase space. As a result the growth of transverse emittance occures. From the other hand, these effects may be used for designing of RF- focusing accelerating structure for electron accelerators of various types. The numerical simulation of electrodynamical properties of on-axis coupled accelerating structure taking into account the coupling slots have been made. The characteristics of fields excited within the coupling cell have been investigated. The numerical estimations of various multipolarity components of transverse forces acting upon a particle inside the coupling cell have been achieved.

  13. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-10-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon - exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed ``transparency dips'' correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature.

  14. Spin-orbit interaction induced current dip in a single quantum dot coupled to a spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giavaras, G.

    2017-03-01

    Experiments on semiconductor quantum dot systems have demonstrated the coupling between electron spins in quantum dots and spins localized in the neighboring area of the dots. Here we show that in a magnetic field the electrical current flowing through a single quantum dot tunnel-coupled to a spin displays a dip at the singlet-triplet anticrossing point which appears due to the spin-orbit interaction. We specify the requirements for which the current dip is formed and examine the properties of the dip for various system parameters, such as energy detuning, spin-orbit interaction strength, and coupling to leads. We suggest a parameter range in which the dip could be probed.

  15. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-01-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon – exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed “transparency dips” correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature. PMID:24166360

  16. Parallel Exploration of Interaction Space by BioID and Affinity Purification Coupled to Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Geoffrey G; Youn, Ji-Young; Samavarchi-Tehrani, Payman; Raught, Brian; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Complete understanding of cellular function requires knowledge of the composition and dynamics of protein interaction networks, the importance of which spans all molecular cell biology fields. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches are instrumental in this process, with affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) now widely used for defining interaction landscapes. Traditional AP-MS methods are well suited to providing information regarding the temporal aspects of soluble protein-protein interactions, but the requirement to maintain protein-protein interactions during cell lysis and AP means that both weak-affinity interactions and spatial information is lost. A more recently developed method called BioID employs the expression of bait proteins fused to a nonspecific biotin ligase, BirA*, that induces in vivo biotinylation of proximal proteins. Coupling this method to biotin affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry negates many of the solubility and interaction strength issues inherent in traditional AP-MS methods, and provides unparalleled spatial context for protein interactions. Here we describe the parallel implementation of both BioID and FLAG AP-MS allowing simultaneous exploration of both spatial and temporal aspects of protein interaction networks.

  17. Effective Student Learning of Fractions with an Interactive Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology, when coupled with reform-based teaching practices, has been shown to be an effective way to support student learning of mathematics. The quality of the technology itself, as well as how it is used, impacts how much students learn. Interactive simulations are dynamic virtual environments similar to virtual manipulatives that…

  18. Effective Student Learning of Fractions with an Interactive Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine K.

    2015-01-01

    Computer technology, when coupled with reform-based teaching practices, has been shown to be an effective way to support student learning of mathematics. The quality of the technology itself, as well as how it is used, impacts how much students learn. Interactive simulations are dynamic virtual environments similar to virtual manipulatives that…

  19. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    , but also improve the description of the rooting environment. Until now there have been no attempts to couple root architecture and pore network models. In our work we present a first attempt to join both types of models using the root architecture model of Leitner et al., (2010) and a pore network model presented by Raoof et al. (2010). The two main objectives of coupling both models are: (i) Representing the effect of root induced biopores on flow and transport processes: For this purpose a fixed root architecture created by the root model is superimposed as a secondary root induced pore network to the primary soil network, thus influencing the final pore topology in the network generation. (ii) Representing the influence of pre-existing pores on root branching: Using a given network of (rigid) pores, the root architecture model allocates its root axes into these preexisting pores as preferential growth paths with thereby shape the final root architecture. The main objective of our study is to reveal the potential of using a pore scale description of the plant growth medium for an improved representation of interaction processes at the interface of root and soil. References Raoof, A., Hassanizadeh, S.M. 2010. A New Method for Generating Pore-Network Models. Transp. Porous Med. 81, 391-407. Leitner, D, Klepsch, S., Bodner, G., Schnepf, S. 2010. A dynamic root system growth model based on L-Systems. Tropisms and coupling to nutrient uptake from soil. Plant Soil 332, 177-192.

  20. Re-visit local coupling correction in the interaction regions of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Zimmer, C.

    2011-11-01

    In this article we will re-visit the local coupling correction in the interaction regions (IRs) of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We will review the measurement data of triplet quadrupole rolls, the local coupling correction strengths in the RHIC control system, and the methods for the local coupling correction with local skew quadrupole correctors. Based on the in-turnnel measurement data of triplet roll errors in 2011, we will analytically calculate and simulate IR-bump method to find out the local skew correction strengths and compare them at store and at injection with the Blue and Yellow ring lattices in the 2011 polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au runs. The vertical dispersion from the triplet roll errors, local and global coupling correction skew quadrupoles, and the vertical dipole correctors are calculated and discussed.

  1. Coupling Data Mining and Laboratory Experiments to Discover Drug Interactions Causing QT Prolongation.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, Tal; Sampson, Kevin J; Chang, Jeremy B; Iyer, Vivek; Woosley, Raymond L; Kass, Robert S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2016-10-18

    QT interval-prolonging drug-drug interactions (QT-DDIs) may increase the risk of life-threatening arrhythmia. Despite guidelines for testing from regulatory agencies, these interactions are usually discovered after drugs are marketed and may go undiscovered for years. Using a combination of adverse event reports, electronic health records (EHR), and laboratory experiments, the goal of this study was to develop a data-driven pipeline for discovering QT-DDIs. 1.8 million adverse event reports were mined for signals indicating a QT-DDI. Using 1.6 million electrocardiogram results from 380,000 patients in our institutional EHR, these putative interactions were either refuted or corroborated. In the laboratory, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology to measure the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel block (the primary mechanism by which drugs prolong the QT interval) to evaluate our top candidate. Both direct and indirect signals in the adverse event reports provided evidence that the combination of ceftriaxone (a cephalosporin antibiotic) and lansoprazole (a proton-pump inhibitor) will prolong the QT interval. In the EHR, we found that patients taking both ceftriaxone and lansoprazole had significantly longer QTc intervals (up to 12 ms in white men) and were 1.4 times more likely to have a QTc interval above 500 ms. In the laboratory, we found that, in combination and at clinically relevant concentrations, these drugs blocked the hERG channel. As a negative control, we evaluated the combination of lansoprazole and cefuroxime (another cephalosporin), which lacked evidence of an interaction in the adverse event reports. We found no significant effect of this pair in either the EHR or in the electrophysiology experiments. Class effect analyses suggested this interaction was specific to lansoprazole combined with ceftriaxone but not with other cephalosporins. Coupling data mining and laboratory experiments is an efficient method for identifying QT

  2. Quasiconfigurations and the theory of effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1981-05-01

    Perturbation theory is reformulated. Schrödinger's equation is recast as a non linear integral equation which yields by Neumann expansion a linked cluster series for the degenerate, quasi degenerate or non degenerate problem. An effective interaction theory emerges that can be formulated in a biorthogonal basis leading to a non Hermitian secular problem. Hermiticity can be recovered in a clear and rigorous way. As the mathematical form of the theory is dictated by the request of physical clarity the latter is obtained naturally. When written in diagrammatic many body language, the integral equation produces a set of linked coupled equations for the degenerate case. The classic summations (Brueckner, Bethe-Faddeev and RPA) emerge naturally. Possible extensions of nuclear matter theory are suggested.

  3. Global fits of the dark matter-nucleon effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu

    2014-09-01

    The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions, but also the remaining velocity and momentum dependent couplings predicted by the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. For current experiments associated with a null result, we find strong correlations between some pairs of coupling constants. For experiments that claim a signal (i.e., CoGeNT and DAMA), we find that pairs of coupling constants produce degenerate results.

  4. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; Hilpert, M.; Bouwer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  5. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J.; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  6. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  7. Two coupled qubits interacting with a thermal bath: A comparative study of different models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deçordi, G. L.; Vidiella-Barranco, A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two interacting two-level systems (qubits) having one of them isolated and the other coupled to a large number of modes of the quantized electromagnetic field (thermal reservoir). We consider two different models of system-reservoir interaction: (i) a "microscopic" model, according to which the corresponding master equation is derived taking into account the interaction between the two subsystems (qubits); (ii) a naive "phenomenological" model, in which such interaction is neglected in the derivation of the master equation. We study the dynamics of quantities such as bipartite entanglement, quantum discord and the linear entropy of the isolated qubit in both the strong and weak coupling regimes of the inter-qubit interaction. We also consider different temperatures of the reservoir. We find significant disagreements between the results obtained from the two models even in the weak coupling regime. For instance, we show that according to the phenomenological model, the isolated qubit would approach a maximally mixed state more slowly for higher temperatures (unphysical result), while the microscopic model predicts the opposite behaviour (correct result).

  8. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Amo, A.; Sagnes, I.; Le Gratiet, L.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons--mixed light-matter quasiparticles--can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems.

  9. Interaction-induced hopping phase in driven-dissipative coupled photonic microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Amo, A.; Sagnes, I.; Le Gratiet, L.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Bose-Hubbard model (BHM) describes bosons hopping across sites and interacting on-site. Inspired by the success of BHM simulators with atoms in optical lattices, proposals for implementing the BHM with photons in coupled nonlinear cavities have recently emerged. Two coupled semiconductor microcavities constitute a model system where the hopping, interaction and decay of exciton polaritons—mixed light-matter quasiparticles—can be engineered in combination with site-selective coherent driving to implement the driven-dissipative two-site optical BHM. Here we explore the interplay of interference and nonlinearity in this system, in a regime where three distinct density profiles can be observed under identical driving conditions. We demonstrate how the phase acquired by polaritons hopping between cavities can be controlled through polariton-polariton interactions. Our results open new perspectives for synthesizing density-dependent gauge fields using polaritons in two-dimensional multicavity systems. PMID:27307038

  10. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  11. Detecting effective connectivity in networks of coupled neuronal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Boykin, Erin R; Khargonekar, Pramod P; Carney, Paul R; Ogle, William O; Talathi, Sachin S

    2012-06-01

    The application of data-driven time series analysis techniques such as Granger causality, partial directed coherence and phase dynamics modeling to estimate effective connectivity in brain networks has recently gained significant prominence in the neuroscience community. While these techniques have been useful in determining causal interactions among different regions of brain networks, a thorough analysis of the comparative accuracy and robustness of these methods in identifying patterns of effective connectivity among brain networks is still lacking. In this paper, we systematically address this issue within the context of simple networks of coupled spiking neurons. Specifically, we develop a method to assess the ability of various effective connectivity measures to accurately determine the true effective connectivity of a given neuronal network. Our method is based on decision tree classifiers which are trained using several time series features that can be observed solely from experimentally recorded data. We show that the classifiers constructed in this work provide a general framework for determining whether a particular effective connectivity measure is likely to produce incorrect results when applied to a dataset.

  12. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan Ahluwalia, P. K.; Chand, Shyam

    2015-06-24

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ε + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  13. Fano effect dominance over Coulomb blockade in transport properties of parallel coupled quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan; Chand, Shyam; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical study of the Coulomb blockade effect on transport properties (Transmission Probability and I-V characteristics) for varied configuration of coupled quantum dot system has been studied by using Non Equilibrium Green Function(NEGF) formalism and Equation of Motion(EOM) method in the presence of magnetic flux. The self consistent approach and intra-dot Coulomb interaction is being taken into account. As the key parameters of the coupled quantum dot system such as dot-lead coupling, inter-dot tunneling and magnetic flux threading through the system can be tuned, the effect of asymmetry parameter and magnetic flux on this tuning is being explored in Coulomb blockade regime. The presence of the Coulomb blockade due to on-dot Coulomb interaction decreases the width of transmission peak at energy level ɛ + U and by adjusting the magnetic flux the swapping effect in the Fano peaks in asymmetric and symmetric parallel configuration sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect.

  14. The numerical calculation for the coupling of multiple propeller discrete noise and its interaction with the fuselage boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongqing; Sheng, Yuansheng; Zhou, Sheng

    This paper presents a numerical method for calculating multiple subsonic propeller discrete noise with the influence of rigid fuselage boundary condition of arbitrary shape, the method described unites the multiple propeller discrete noise coupling effect with the effect caused by its interaction with the fuselage boundary. The interaction of the discrete noise of the Y12 scaled propeller model with a cylindrical fuselage model boundary was calculated. The interpretation of every terms of the governing equation and the discussion of the calculation results illustrated that the mathematical model is acceptable. Substantially, the method can be used to calculate the interaction of any known harmonic sound sources and rigid boundary. The calculation results explain the propeller's sychronizer role, and its applicable principles.

  15. Global constraints on vector-like WIMP effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernández-Martínez, Enrique; Machado, Pedro A.N.; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: pcoloma@fnal.gov E-mail: pedro.machado@uam.es

    2016-04-01

    In this work we combine information from relic abundance, direct detection, cosmic microwave background, positron fraction, gamma rays, and colliders to explore the existing constraints on couplings between Dark Matter and Standard Model constituents when no underlying model or correlation is assumed. For definiteness, we include independent vector-like effective interactions for each Standard Model fermion. Our results show that low Dark Matter masses below 20 GeV are disfavoured at the 3 σ  level with respect to higher masses, due to the tension between the relic abundance requirement and upper constraints on the Dark Matter couplings. Furthermore, large couplings are typically only allowed in combinations which avoid effective couplings to the nuclei used in direct detection experiments.

  16. Global constraints on vector-like WIMP effective interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; ...

    2016-04-07

    In this work we combine information from relic abundance, direct detection, cosmic microwave background, positron fraction, gamma rays, and colliders to explore the existing constraints on couplings between Dark Matter and Standard Model constituents when no underlying model or correlation is assumed. For definiteness, we include independent vector-like effective interactions for each Standard Model fermion. Our results show that low Dark Matter masses below 20 GeV are disfavoured at the 3 σ  level with respect to higher masses, due to the tension between the relic abundance requirement and upper constraints on the Dark Matter couplings. Lastly, large couplings are typically onlymore » allowed in combinations which avoid effective couplings to the nuclei used in direct detection experiments.« less

  17. Global constraints on vector-like WIMP effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Coloma, Pilar; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2016-04-07

    In this work we combine information from relic abundance, direct detection, cosmic microwave background, positron fraction, gamma rays, and colliders to explore the existing constraints on couplings between Dark Matter and Standard Model constituents when no underlying model or correlation is assumed. For definiteness, we include independent vector-like effective interactions for each Standard Model fermion. Our results show that low Dark Matter masses below 20 GeV are disfavoured at the 3 σ  level with respect to higher masses, due to the tension between the relic abundance requirement and upper constraints on the Dark Matter couplings. Lastly, large couplings are typically only allowed in combinations which avoid effective couplings to the nuclei used in direct detection experiments.

  18. Spin-orbit coupled potential energy surfaces and properties using effective relativistic coupling by asymptotic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndome, Hameth; Eisfeld, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    A new method has been reported recently [H. Ndome, R. Welsch, and W. Eisfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 034103 (2012)], 10.1063/1.3675846 that allows the efficient generation of fully coupled potential energy surfaces (PESs) including derivative and spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The method is based on the diabatic asymptotic representation of the molecular fine structure states and an effective relativistic coupling operator and therefore is called effective relativistic coupling by asymptotic representation (ERCAR). The resulting diabatic spin-orbit coupling matrix is constant and the geometry dependence of the coupling between the eigenstates is accounted for by the diabatization. This approach allows to generate an analytical model for the fully coupled PESs without performing any ab initio SO calculations (except perhaps for the atoms) and thus is very efficient. In the present work, we study the performance of this new method for the example of hydrogen iodide as a well-established test case. Details of the diabatization and the accuracy of the results are investigated in comparison to reference ab initio calculations. The energies of the adiabatic fine structure states are reproduced in excellent agreement with reference ab initio data. It is shown that the accuracy of the ERCAR approach mainly depends on the quality of the underlying ab initio data. This is also the case for dissociation and vibrational level energies, which are influenced by the SO coupling. A method is presented how one-electron operators and the corresponding properties can be evaluated in the framework of the ERCAR approach. This allows the computation of dipole and transition moments of the fine structure states in good agreement with ab initio data. The new method is shown to be very promising for the construction of fully coupled PESs for more complex polyatomic systems to be used in quantum dynamics studies.

  19. Coupling R and PHREEQC: an interactive and extensible environment for efficient programming of geochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    manipulations and visualization in a powerful high level language, and benefiting from an enormous amount of third-party open source R extensions. The possibility to rapidly prototype complex algorithms involving geochemical modelling is in our opinion a huge advantage. A demonstration is given by the successful evaluation of a strategy to reduce the CPU-time needed to perform reactive transport simulations in a sequential coupling scheme. The idea is the "reduction" of the number of actual chemical simulations to perform at every time step, by searching for "duplicates" of each chemical simulations in the grid: such comparison involves typically a huge number of elements (one chemical simulation for grid element for time step) and a quite large number of variables (concentrations and mineral abundances). However, through the straightforward implementation of the prototype algorithm through the R/PHREEQC interface, we found out that the scan is extremely cost-effective in terms of CPU-time and typically allows a relevant speedup for simulations starting from a homogeneous or zone-homogeneous state. This speedup can even greatily exceed that of parallelization in some favorable but not unfrequent case. This feature should therefore be implemented in reactive transport simulators. References [1] Parkhurst D, Appelo C (1999) Users guide to PHREEQC (version 2). Tech. rep, U.S. Geological Survey. [2] Beyer C, Li D, De Lucia M, Kühn M, Bauer S (2012): Modelling CO2-induced fluid-rock interactions in the Altensalzwedel gas reservoir. Part II: coupled reactive transport simulation. Environ. Earth Sci., 67, 2, 573-588. [3] R Core Team (2012) R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. ISBN 3-900051-07-0, URL http://www.R-project.org/. [4] Kühn M, Münch U (2012) CLEAN: CO2 Large-Scale Enhanced Gas Recovery. GEOTECHNOLOGIEN Science Report No. 19. Series: Advanced. Technologies in Earth Sciences, 199 p, ISBN 978-3-642-31676-0.

  20. Interaction effects in comorbid psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Keeley, Jared W; Chmielewski, Michael S; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-07-01

    Comorbidity in psychopathology is the norm. Despite some initial evidence, few studies have examined if the presence of comorbid conditions changes the expression of the pathology, either through increased severity of the syndrome(s) or by expanding to symptoms beyond the syndrome(s) (i.e., symptom overextension). The following report provides an illustration of interactive effects and overextension in comorbid pathology. A large pool of patients from a university hospital were assessed using SCID-I/P interviews. Of these, 230 patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder, social phobia, or both were included in the study. Symptoms not belonging to either index condition (major depressive disorder or social phobia) reliably overextended in comorbid cases (odds ratios between 2.82 and 15.75). Current research methodologies (e.g., structured interviews) do not allow for the examination of overextended symptoms. The authors make a call for future psychopathological research to search systematically for interactive effects by adopting more inclusive or flexible assessments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Energy coupling between DNA binding and subunit association is responsible for the specificity of DNA-Arc interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. L.; Silveira, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of several DNA molecules on the free energy of subunit association of Arc repressor were measured. The association studies under equilibrium conditions were performed by the dissociating perturbation of hydrostatic pressure. The magnitude of stabilization of the subunit interaction was determined by the specificity of the protein-DNA interaction. Operator DNA stabilized the free energy of association by about 2.2 kcal/mol of monomeric unit, whereas poly(dG-dC) stabilized the subunit interaction by only 0.26 kcal. Measurements of the stabilizing free energy at different DNA concentrations revealed a stoichiometry of two dimers per 21 bp for the operator DNA sequence and for the nonspecific DNA poly(dA-dT). However, the maximum stabilization was much larger for operator sequence (delta p = 1,750 bar) as compared for poly(dA-dT) (delta p = 750 bar). The importance of the free-energy linkage for the recognition process was corroborated by its absence in a mutant Arc protein (PL8) that binds to operator and nonspecific DNA sequences with equal, low affinity. We conclude that the coupling accounts for the high specificity of the Arc-operator DNA interaction. We hypothesize a mutual coupling between the protein subunits and the two DNA strands, in which the much higher persistency of the associated form when Arc is bound to operator would stabilize the interactions between the two DNA strands. PMID:8318899

  2. Transonic Shock Oscillations and Wing Flutter Calculated with an Interactive Boundary Layer Coupling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1996-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interactive coupling method is used for the computation of unsteady transonic flows involving separation and reattachment. A lag-entrainment integral boundary layer method is used with the transonic small disturbance potential equation in the CAP-TSDV (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code. Efficient and robust computations of steady and unsteady separated flows, including steady separation bubbles and self-excited shock-induced oscillations are presented. The buffet onset boundary for the NACA 0012 airfoil is accurately predicted and shown computationally to be a Hopf bifurcation. Shock-induced oscillations are also presented for the 18 percent circular arc airfoil. The oscillation onset boundaries and frequencies are accurately predicted, as is the experimentally observed hysteresis of the oscillations with Mach number. This latter stability boundary is identified as a jump phenomenon. Transonic wing flutter boundaries are also shown for a thin swept wing and for a typical business jet wing, illustrating viscous effects on flutter and the effect of separation onset on the wing response at flutter. Calculations for both wings show limit cycle oscillations at transonic speeds in the vicinity of minimum flutter speed indices.

  3. Effect of resource constraints on intersimilar coupled networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shai, S.; Dobson, S.

    2012-12-01

    Most real-world networks do not live in isolation but are often coupled together within a larger system. Recent studies have shown that intersimilarity between coupled networks increases the connectivity of the overall system. However, unlike connected nodes in a single network, coupled nodes often share resources, like time, energy, and memory, which can impede flow processes through contention when intersimilarly coupled. We study a model of a constrained susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) process on a system consisting of two random networks sharing the same set of nodes, where nodes are limited to interact with (and therefore infect) a maximum number of neighbors at each epidemic time step. We obtain that, in agreement with previous studies, when no limit exists (regular SIR model), positively correlated (intersimilar) coupling results in a lower epidemic threshold than negatively correlated (interdissimilar) coupling. However, in the case of the constrained SIR model, the obtained epidemic threshold is lower with negatively correlated coupling. The latter finding differentiates our work from previous studies and provides another step towards revealing the qualitative differences between single and coupled networks.

  4. Indirect air-sea interactions simulated with a coupled turbulence-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esau, Igor

    2014-05-01

    A turbulence-resolving parallelized atmospheric large-eddy simulation model (PALM) has been applied to study turbulent interactions between the humid atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the salt water oceanic mixed layer (OML). The most energetic three-dimensional turbulent eddies in the ABL-OML system (convective cells) were explicitly resolved in these simulations. This study considers a case of shear-free convection in the coupled ABL-OML system. The ABL-OML coupling scheme used the turbulent fluxes at the bottom of the ABL as upper boundary conditions for the OML and the sea surface temperature at the top of the OML as lower boundary conditions for the ABL. The analysis of the numerical experiment confirms that the ABL-OML interactions involve both the traditional direct coupling mechanism and much less studied indirect coupling mechanism (Garrett Dyn Atmos Ocean 23:19-34, 1996). The direct coupling refers to a common flux-gradient representation of the air-sea exchange, which is controlled by the temperature difference across the air-water interface. The indirect coupling refers to thermal instability of the Rayleigh-Benard convection, which is controlled by the temperature difference across the entire mixed layer through formation of the large convective eddies or cells. The indirect coupling mechanism in these simulations explained up to 45 % of the ABL-OML co-variability on the turbulent scales. Despite relatively small amplitude of the sea surface temperature fluctuations, persistence of the OML cells organizes the ABL convective cells. Water downdrafts in the OML cells tend to be collocated with air updrafts in the ABL cells. The study concludes that the convective structures in the ABL and the OML are co-organized. The OML convection controls the air-sea turbulent exchange in the quasi-equilibrium convective ABL-OML system.

  5. Tuning the Spin Coupling Interactions in the Nitroxide-Based Bisphenol-Like Diradicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Meiyu; Song, Xinyu; Bu, Yuxiang

    2017-07-24

    The intramolecular spin coupling interactions of bisphenol-like trinary-bridged diradicals [nitroxide-(para/meta)phenylene-X-phenylene(para/meta)-nitroxide, X=C=CH2 , O, BH, NH and SO2 ] were explored with an emphasis on the tuning role of the X coupler at the (U)B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. Our results indicate that all designed trinary-bridged diradicals featuring a V-type structure with a bending angle of 104-130° and torsional angles of two phenylene rings being 20-90° exhibit different diradical character and magnetism, depending on the structures and properties of the X bridges. More interestingly, although meta/para-phenylene supports a ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) coupling, their combinations by using X as a trinary bridge can mediate spin coupling, but the coupling magnitude strongly depends on X. In general, a para/para or meta/meta combination with X leads to an open-shell singlet ground state and thus AFM, but the meta/meta combination considerably decreases the spin coupling interaction. In contrast, a para/meta combination with X produces a triplet ground state and FM. Their combination with a single-electron conjugation end coupler (C=CH2 ) leads to an inverse coupling regularity. All results can be reasonably explained by the spin alternation rule, molecular structures, and properties. In particular, detailed spin coupling mechanisms are suggested to involve cooperative through-space and through-bond pathways with different levels of cooperativity. This is rationalized with the X-induced bending of the diradicals not only modifying the through-bond (extended π conjugation) pathway but also provididng a through-space (face-to-face vs. side-to-side π-π interaction) possibility for spin coupling, in conjunction with twisting of the phenylene rings. Different contributions of the through-space and through-bond couplings are quantitatively distinguished and depend on the structure and property of the X coupler. Clearly, this work reports

  6. Multiscale Coupling of Monte Carlo Binary-Collision-Approximation Codes with Particle-in-Cells for Plasma-Material Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Davide; Lindquist, Kyle; Ruzic, David N.

    2013-10-01

    Techniques based on Monte Carlo Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) are widely used for the evaluation of particle interactions with matter, but rarely coupled with a consistent kinetic plasma solver like a Particle-in-Cell. The TRIM code [Eckstein; Biersack and Haggmark, 1980] and its version including dynamic-composition TRIDYN [Moller and Eckstein, 1984] are two popular implementations of BCA, where single-particle projectiles interact with a target of amorphous material according to the classical Carbon-Krypton interaction potential. The effect of surface roughness can be included as well, thanks to the Fractal-TRIM method [Ruzic and Chiu, 1989]. In the present study we couple BCA codes with Particles-in-Cells. The Lagrangian treatment of particle motion usually implemented in PiC codes suggests a natural coupling of PiC's with BCA's, even if a number of caveats has to be taken into account, related to the discrete nature of computational particles, to the difference between the two approaches and most important to the multiple spatial and temporal scales involved. The break down of BCA at low energies (unless the projectiles are channeling through an oriented crystal layer [Hobler and Betz, 2001]) has been supplemented by Yamamura's semi-empirical relations.

  7. Fluid-solid interaction: benchmarking of an external coupling of ANSYS with CFX for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Hose, D R; Lawford, P V; Narracott, A J; Penrose, J M T; Jones, I P

    2003-01-01

    Fluid-solid interaction is a primary feature of cardiovascular flows. There is increasing interest in the numerical solution of these systems as the extensive computational resource required for such studies becomes available. One form of coupling is an external weak coupling of separate solid and fluid mechanics codes. Information about the stress tensor and displacement vector at the wetted boundary is passed between the codes, and an iterative scheme is employed to move towards convergence of these parameters at each time step. This approach has the attraction that separate codes with the most extensive functionality for each of the separate phases can be selected, which might be important in the context of the complex rheology and contact mechanics that often feature in cardiovascular systems. Penrose and Staples describe a weak coupling of CFX for computational fluid mechanics to ANSYS for solid mechanics, based on a simple Jacobi iteration scheme. It is important to validate the coupled numerical solutions. An extensive analytical study of flow in elastic-walled tubes was carried out by Womersley in the late 1950s. This paper describes the performance of the coupling software for the straight elastic-walled tube, and compares the results with Womersley's analytical solutions. It also presents preliminary results demonstrating the application of the coupled software in the context of a stented vessel.

  8. Dynamical aspects of coupled Rossler systems: effects of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravitha, R.; Indic, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2002-02-01

    Nonlinear time series analysis is employed to study the complex behaviour exhibited by a coupled pair of Rossler systems. Dimensional analysis with emphasis on the topological correlation dimension and the Kolmogorov entropy of the system is carried out in the coupling parameter space. The regime of phase synchronization is identified and the extent of synchronization between the systems constituting the coupled system is quantified by the phase synchronization index. The effect of noise on the coupling between the systems is also investigated. An exhaustive study of the topological, dynamical and synchronization properties of the nonlinear system under consideration in its characteristic parameter space is attempted.

  9. Effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu

    2000-01-01

    Under pure shear loading, an off-axis element of orthotropic material such as pure wood undergoes both shear and normal deformations. The ratio of the shear strain to a normal strain is defined as the shear coupling coefficient associated with the direction of the normal strain. The effects of shear coupling on shear properties of wood as predicted by the orthotropic...

  10. Effect of random charge fluctuation on strongly coupled dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Issaad, M.; Rouiguia, L.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-07

    Modeling the interaction between particles is an open issue in dusty plasma. We dealt with strongly coupled dust particles in two dimensional confined system. For small number of clusters, we investigate the effect of random charge fluctuation on background configuration. The study is conducted for a short rang as well as a long rang potential interaction. Numerical simulation is performed using Monte-Carlo simulation in the presence of parabolic confinement and at low temperature. We have studied the background configurations for a dust particles with constant charge and in the presence of random charge fluctuation due to the discrete nature of charge carriers. The latter is studied for a positively charged dust when the dominant charging process is due to photo-emission from the dust surface. It is found, for small classical cluster consisting of small number of particles, short rang potential gives the same result as long rang one. It is also found that the random charge fluctuation affect the background configurations.

  11. Effect of coupling line design on the performance of direct coupled high-Tc SQUID magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Seon; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Park, Yong Ki

    2004-03-01

    YBCO dc SQUID magnetometers based on bicrystal Josephson junctions on 10 mm × 10 mm STO substrates have been fabricated. We have designed 16-parallel-loop pickup coil SQUID magnetometers with 50 μ m line width for use under a magnetically disturbed environment. The magnetometers exhibit stable flux locked loop operation under magnetically very noisy laboratory environment. We modified the coupling scheme between pickup coil and SQUID washer to replace the conventional narrow and long interconnection lines to reduce the residual inductance of the coupling lines. With the coupling line modification the effective area increased more than 12%. Finally, we could obtain optimized direct coupled YBCO SQUID magnetometer design having field sensitivity B_Φ of 4.5 nT/Φ 0 and magnetic field noise BN of 30 fT/Hz^1/2 measured at 100 Hz.

  12. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  13. Enhancement of Kondo effect through Rashba spin-orbit interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandler, Nancy; Zarea, Mehdi; Ulloa, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    The role of Rashba spin-orbit (RSO) interactions on the Kondo regime has been a topic of debate since resistivity measurements on Pt doped Cu:Mn compounds were interpreted as evidence for suppression of the Kondo effect by SO scattering. Subsequent theoretical and experimental activity has yielded conflicting results. Thus, the question: what is the role of SO interactions in the Kondo regime? remains open. To provide a definite answer we obtain an exact solution of an Anderson magnetic impurity model in a two-dimensional metallic host with RSO interactions. We show that the Hamiltonian reduces to an effective two-band Anderson model coupled to a S=1/2 impurity. An appropriate Schrieffer-Wolff transformation produces an effective 2-channel Kondo model plus a Dzyaloshiinski-Moriya (DM) interaction term. The exact solution reveals that the impurity couples to the bath with ferro- and antiferromagnetic couplings. DM interactions, that vanish at half-filling and at the Hubbard U-infinity limits, introduce an exponential increase in the value of the Kondo temperature. Supported by NSF-PIRE and MWN/CIAM.

  14. Non-Markovian Dynamics for a Two-Atom-Coupled System Interacting with Local Reservoir at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-03-01

    By using the effective non-Markovian measure (Breuer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 210401 2009) we investigate non-Markovian dynamics of a pair of two-level atoms (TLAs) system, each of which interacting with a local reservoir. We show that subsystem dynamics can be controlled by manipulating the coupling between TLAs, temperature and relaxation rate of the atoms. Moreover, the correlation between non-Markovianity of subsystem and entanglement between the subsystem and the structured bath is investigated, the results show that the emergence of non-Markovianity has a negative effect on the entanglement.

  15. Ionic Hamiltonians for transition metal atoms: effective exchange coupling and Kondo temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2017-02-01

    An ionic Hamiltonian for describing the interaction between a metal and a d-shell transition metal atom having an orbital singlet state is introduced and its properties analyzed using the Schrieffer-Wolf transformation (exchange coupling) and the poor man’s scaling method (Kondo temperature). We find that the effective exchange coupling between the metal and the atom has an antiferromagnetic or a ferromagnetic interaction depending on the kind of atomic fluctuations, either S\\to S-1/2 or S\\to S+1/2 , associated with the metal-atom coupling. We present a general scheme for all those processes and calculate, for the antiferromagnetic interaction, the corresponding Kondo-temperature.

  16. Coupled Hydrogeophysical Inversion for Characterizing Heterogeneous Permeability Field at a Groundwater-River Water Interaction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Johnson, T. C.; Hammond, G. E.; Zachara, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the groundwater and river water interface are largely controlled by the exchange dynamics between the two water bodies. Accurate characterization of the heterogeneous permeability field at such interface is critical for modeling the bulk flow as well as the biogeochemical processes that are coupled with the flow. Taking advantage of the distinct conductivities in groundwater and rive water, time lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can provide rich spatial and temporal data for characterizing the permeability field, by imaging the change in subsurface electric conductivity driven by river water intrusion and retreat. We installed a large-scale (300 m by 300 m) 3-dimensional ERT array to monitor river water intrusion and retreat through time at a major river corridor, and the 4-dimensional electrical geophysical data is assimilated to invert for the underlying permeability field using ensemble-based algorithms (e.g., ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble smoother). We developed a new high-performance hydrogeophysical code by coupling an ERT imaging code E4D (Johnson et al., 2010) with a site-scale flow and transport code, PFLOTRAN (Hammond et al., 2012). The coupled code provides the key modeling capability of multi-physics processes, parallel efficiency, and multi-realization simulation capability for hydrogeophysical inversion. We assimilated both well-based point measurements of water table and specific conductance and spatially continuous ERT images in a sequential Bayesian way. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness of joint hydrogeophysical inversion for large-scale characterization of subsurface properties in the groundwater and river water interaction zone. Our investigation of spatial versus temporal data assimilation strategies have inspired systematic data worth analyses to identify the most valuable data sets for hydrogeophysical inversion. The high performance computing is performed on the Hopper

  17. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2007-07-01

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q{sup 2} data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q{sup 2}-behavior over the complete Q{sup 2}-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  18. Theory of coupled spin-charge transport due to spin-orbit interaction in inhomogeneous two-dimensional electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ka; Raimondi, R.; Vignale, G.

    2014-12-01

    Spin-orbit interactions in two-dimensional electron liquids are responsible for many interesting transport phenomena in which particle currents are converted to spin polarizations and spin currents and vice versa. Prime examples are the spin Hall effect, the Edelstein effect, and their inverses. By similar mechanisms, it is also possible to partially convert an optically induced electron-hole density wave to a spin density wave and vice versa. In this paper, we present a unified theoretical treatment of these effects based on quantum kinetic equations that include not only the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling from the band structure of the host material, but also the spin-orbit coupling due to an external electric field and a random impurity potential. The drift-diffusion equations we derive in the diffusive regime are applicable to a broad variety of experimental situations, both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous, and include on equal footing "skew scattering" and "side jump" from electron-impurity collisions. As a demonstration of the strength and usefulness of the theory we apply it to the study of several effects of current experimental interest: the inverse Edelstein effect, the spin-current swapping effect, and the partial conversion of an electron-hole density wave to a spin density wave in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings, subject to an electric field.

  19. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz; Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  20. Synchronization and plateau splitting of coupled oscillators with long-range power-law interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Huan-Yu; Wu, Kuo-An

    2015-12-01

    We investigate synchronization and plateau splitting of coupled oscillators on a one-dimensional lattice with long-range interactions that decay over distance as a power law. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the dynamics of systems of coupled oscillators with power-law exponent α ≤1 is identical to that of the all-to-all coupling case. For α >1 , oscillatory behavior of the phase coherence appears as a result of single plateau splitting into multiple plateaus. A coarse-graining method is used to investigate the onset of plateau splitting. We analyze a simple oscillatory state formed by two plateaus in detail and propose a systematic approach to predict the onset of plateau splitting. The prediction of breaking points of plateau splitting is in quantitatively good agreement with numerical simulations.

  1. Identification of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Through a Combined Measurement of Axial and Scalar Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, G.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Collar, J. I.; Odom, B.

    2007-10-01

    We study the prospects for detecting weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that, in case of detection, a comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF3I and C4F10 bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  2. Simulation of fluid-structure interaction in micropumps by coupling of two commercial finite element programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Andreas; Gerlach, Gerald

    1998-09-01

    This paper deals with the simulation of the fluid-structure interaction phenomena in micropumps. The proposed solution approach is based on external coupling of two different solvers, which are considered here as `black boxes'. Therefore, no specific intervention is necessary into the program code, and solvers can be exchanged arbitrarily. For the realization of the external iteration loop, two algorithms are considered: the relaxation-based Gauss-Seidel method and the computationally more extensive Newton method. It is demonstrated in terms of a simplified test case, that for rather weak coupling, the Gauss-Seidel method is sufficient. However, by simply changing the considered fluid from air to water, the two physical domains become strongly coupled, and the Gauss-Seidel method fails to converge in this case. The Newton iteration scheme must be used instead.

  3. Interactions among the Imagination, Expertise Reversal, and Element Interactivity Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Wayne; Sweller, John

    2005-01-01

    Interactions among the imagination, expertise reversal, and element interactivity effects were investigated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, less knowledgeable primary school students learning to use a bus timetable produced better performance under study than imagination conditions, but an increase in their experience reversed the result,…

  4. Surface coupling effects on the capacitance of thin insulating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Tayeb; Farahani, S. Vasheghani; Jannesar, Mona; Palasantzas, George; Jafari, G. R.

    2015-05-01

    A general form for the surface roughness effects on the capacitance of a capacitor is proposed. We state that a capacitor with two uncoupled rough surfaces could be treated as two capacitors in series which have been divided from the mother capacitor by a slit. This is in contrast to the case where the two rough surfaces are coupled. When the rough surfaces are coupled, the type of coupling decides the modification of the capacitance in comparison to the uncoupled case. It is shown that if the coupling between the two surfaces of the capacitor is positive (negative), the capacitance is less (higher) than the case of two uncoupled rough plates. Also, we state that when the correlation length and the roughness exponent are small, the coupling effect is not negligible.

  5. P -wave coupled channel effects in electron-positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Meng-Lin; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    P -wave coupled channel effects arising from the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds in e+e- annihilations are systematically studied. We provide an exploratory study by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with short-ranged contact potentials obtained in the heavy quark limit. These contact potentials can be extracted from the P -wave interactions in the e+e- annihilations, and then be employed to investigate possible isosinglet P -wave hadronic molecules. In particular, such an investigation may provide information about exotic candidates with quantum numbers JPC=1-+ . In the mass region of the D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , and D*D¯* thresholds, there are two quark model bare states, i.e. the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ), which are assigned as (13D1) and (31S1) states, respectively. By an overall fit of the cross sections of e+e-→D D ¯, D D¯ *+c .c . , D*D¯*, we determine the physical coupling constants to each channel and extract the pole positions of the ψ (3770 ) and ψ (4040 ). The deviation of the ratios from that in the heavy quark spin symmetry (HQSS) limit reflects the HQSS breaking effect due to the mass splitting between the D and the D*. Besides the two poles, we also find a pole a few MeV above the D D¯ *+c .c . threshold which can be related to the so-called G (3900 ) observed earlier by BABAR and Belle. This scenario can be further scrutinized by measuring the angular distribution in the D*D¯* channel with high luminosity experiments.

  6. Opioid desensitization: interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, C D; Williams, J T

    1996-02-15

    In rat locus coeruleus (LC) neurons, alpha 2 adrenoceptors, mu-opioid and somatostatin receptors all activate the same potassium conductance. Chronic treatment with morphine causes a loss of sensitivity that is specific to the mu-opioid response, with no change in the alpha 2 adrenoceptor-mediated response. Acute desensitization induced by opioid, somatostatin, and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists was studied in brain slices of rat LC using intracellular recording. A supramaximal concentration of the opioid agonist Met5-enkephalin induced a profound homologous desensitization but little heterologous desensitization to an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist (UK 14304) or somatostatin. All desensitized currents showed partial recovery. A supramaximal concentration of UK14304 caused a relatively small amount of desensitization. Although little interaction was observed among inhibitory G-protein-coupled receptors, activation of an excitatory receptor had marked effects on inhibitory responses. Muscarinic agonists, which produce an inward current in LC neurons, reduced the magnitude of agonist-induced outward currents and increased both the rate and amount of opioid desensitization. Muscarinic activation did not alter desensitization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor responses. Acute desensitization shares several characteristics with the tolerance induced by chronic morphine treatment of animals.

  7. Final Report. Coupled simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/ocean interactions using POP and CISM

    SciTech Connect

    Asay-Davis, Xylar Storm

    2015-12-30

    The project performed under this award, referred to from here on as CLARION (CoupLed simulations of Antarctic Ice-sheet/Ocean iNteractions), included important advances in two models of ice sheet and ocean interactions. Despite its short duration (one year), the project made significant progress on its three major foci. First, together with collaborator Daniel Martin at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), I developed the POPSICLES coupled ice sheet-ocean model to the point where it could perform a number of pan-Antarctic simulations under various forcing conditions. The results were presented at a number of major conferences and workshops worldwide, and are currently being incorporated into two manuscripts in preparation.

  8. A coupled wire model of topological Weyl and Dirac semimetal I: topological insulating texture and gapping interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Syed; Sirota, Alexander; Teo, Jeffrey

    Weyl and Dirac semimetals in three dimensions have semi-robust massless electronic structures. We mimic these gapless systems using an array of coupled Dirac wires, and analytically study the gapping effect of many-body interactions. The Dirac wires are arranged in a way so that the charge conserving model exhibits an antiferromagnetic time reversal symmetry as well as a p2mg wallpaper group symmetry, which contains twofold rotations, reflections and glide planes. The gapless electrons can aquire a mass upon symmetry breaking dimerizations, or more interestingly, symmetry preserving many-body interactions. This involves the introduction of a topological insulating texture in the bulk supported by layers of gapped symmetric interacting surfaces of topological insulators. The resulting massive system is a three dimensional geometric topological state.

  9. Entropy and variance squeezing of two coupled modes interacting with a two-level atom: Frequency converter type

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, E.M.; Abdalla, M. Sebawe . E-mail: m.sebawe@physics.org; Obada, A.S.-F.

    2006-02-15

    A modified Jaynes-Cummings model which consists of a two-level atom interacting with two modes of the electromagnetic field is introduced. More precisely we have considered a Hamiltonian model that includes two types of interaction: One is the field-field (frequency converter type) and the other is the atom-field interaction. By invoking a canonical transformation an exact solution of the wave function in the Schroedinger picture is obtained. The result presented in this context is used to discuss the atomic inversion as well as the entropy squeezing and variance squeezing phenomena. We have shown that the existence of the second field coupling parameter reduces the amount of squeezing in all quadratures, while the effect of the detuning parameter would lead to the superstructure phenomenon which becomes more pronounced upon increasing the mean photon numbers, in the states which are taken to be converter states.

  10. The impact of laterally coupled grating microstructure on effective coupling coefficients.

    PubMed

    Millett, R; Hinzer, K; Benhsaien, A; Hall, T J; Schriemer, H

    2010-04-02

    Lithographic fabrication may be used to define laterally coupled gratings of high refractive index contrast on waveguide ridges, eliminating the need for regrowth steps in such distributed feedback lasers. These may be made more amenable to fabrication by employing higher-order gratings. Reliable exploration of the laser design space requires that the radiating partial waves be accurately incorporated in numerical simulations. We modify the coupled-mode approach to fully consider the two-dimensional cross section, analyzing rectangular, sinusoidal, triangular and trapezoidal grating shapes. Effective coupling coefficients are determined for grating orders from first to third. We show that, by tailoring the grating microstructure, effective coupling coefficients up to double that of a 0.5 duty cycle rectangular grating can be achieved. The actual grating microstructure of an as-fabricated grating was analyzed and its effective coupling coefficient predicted as [Formula: see text]. This was found to be in excellent agreement with the value extracted from the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum, [Formula: see text].

  11. Coupled quintessence and the impossibility of an interaction: a dynamical analysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Fabrízio F.; Landim, Ricardo G.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the coupled quintessence in the light of the linear dynamical systems theory, with two different interactions: (1) proportional to the energy density of the dark energy and (2) proportional to the sum of the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy. The results presented here enlarge the previous analyses in the literature, wherein the interaction has been only proportional to the energy density of the dark matter. In the first case it is possible to get the well-known sequence of cosmological eras. For the second interaction only the radiation and the dark-energy era can be described by the fixed points. Therefore, from the point of view of dynamical system theory, the interaction proportional to the sum of the energy densities of the dark matter and dark energy does not describe the universe we live in.

  12. Analytic derivative couplings between configuration-interaction-singles states with built-in electron-translation factors for translational invariance.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Shervin; Alguire, Ethan; Shao, Yihan; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2011-12-21

    We present a method for analytically calculating the derivative couplings between a pair of configuration-interaction-singles (CIS) excited states obtained in an atom-centered basis. Our theory is exact and has been derived using two completely independent approaches: one inspired by the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and the other following from direct differentiation. (The former is new, while the latter is in the spirit of existing approaches in the literature.) Our expression for the derivative couplings incorporates all Pulay effects associated with the use of an atom-centered basis, and the computational cost is minimal, roughly comparable to that of a single CIS energy gradient. We have validated our method against CIS finite-difference results and have applied it to the lowest lying excited states of naphthalene; we find that naphthalene derivative couplings include Pulay contributions sufficient to have a qualitative effect. Going beyond standard problems in analytic gradient theory, we have also constructed a correction, based on perturbative electron-translation factors, for including electronic momentum and eliminating spurious components of the derivative couplings that break translational symmetry. This correction is general and can be applied to any level of electronic structure theory.

  13. Who gives to whom? Testing the support gap hypothesis with naturalistic observations of couple interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wen; Repetti, Rena L

    2016-06-01

    We examined sex differences in explicitly supportive behavior exchanges between husbands and wives using naturalistic video-recordings of everyday couple interactions inside the home. Thirty dual-earner, middle class, heterosexual couples with school-age children were recorded in their homes over 4 days. Specific instances of face-to-face explicit couple support in the video-recordings were identified, and the support role assumed by each partner (recipient vs. provider), the method of support initiation (solicitations vs. offers), and the type of support (instrumental vs. emotional) in each interaction were coded. Paired samples t tests examined sex differences in husbands' and wives' supportive behavior, and bivariate correlations tested the associations among spouses' support initiation behaviors. Findings counter prior research that has largely found a "support gap" favoring husbands as support recipients. Instead, results indicate that wives received significantly more support of an instrumental nature from husbands (than husbands did from wives), a finding driven by wives' active support-soliciting behavior. Among husbands, a tendency to be the solicitor of support was positively correlated with a tendency to offer support. Within couples, rates of offers of support by 1 spouse were correlated with offers by the partner. Naturalistic observations highlight processes that may not be detected by self-reports or laboratory data, in an ecologically valid context in which social behavior reflects the natural rhythms and pulls of everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Rearrangements of DNA-protein interactions in animal cells coupled with cellular growth-quiescence transitions.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, A V; Sjakste, N I; Zaboykin, M M; Shapot, V S

    1982-01-01

    Overall DNA-protein interactions in animal cells undergo drastic changes coupled with cellular transitions from quiescence to growth and reversely as revealed by nucleoprotein-Celite chromatography. DNA of chromatin was found to exist in one of the two sharply distinct alternative forms, namely, either tightly or weakly bound to protein moiety. These forms are specific for cycling and quiescent cells, respectively. The tight DNA-protein interactions characterize all cycling cells independent of the cell cycle phase. Transition of DNA of cycling cells from one form to another was observed as a result of treatment of isolated nuclei with DNase I. PMID:7063419

  15. Coupled wire model of symmetric Majorana surfaces of topological superconductors I: 4-fermion gapping interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sharmistha; Zhang, Zhao; Teo, Jeffrey

    Time reversal symmetric topological superconductors in three spatial dimensions carry gapless surface Majorana fermions. They are robust against any time reversal symmetric single-body perturbation weaker than the bulk energy gap. We mimic the massless surface Majorana's by coupled wire models in two spatial dimensions. We introduce explicit many-body interwire interactions that preserve time reversal symmetry and give energy gaps to all low energy degrees of freedom. The gapping 4-fermion interactions are constructed by interwire Kac-Moody current backscattering and rely on the fractionalization or conformal embedding of the Majorana wires.

  16. Free-Energy Landscape of Protein-Ligand Interactions Coupled with Protein Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2017-02-02

    Protein-ligand interactions are frequently coupled with protein structural changes. Focusing on the coupling, we present the free-energy surface (FES) of the ligand-binding process for glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP) and its ligand, glutamine, in which glutamine binding accompanies large-scale domain closure. All-atom simulations were performed in explicit solvents by multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES), which adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to achieve enhanced sampling of systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. The structural ensemble derived from the MSES simulation yielded the FES of the coupling, described in terms of both the ligand's and protein's degrees of freedom at atomic resolution, and revealed the tight coupling between the two degrees of freedom. The derived FES led to the determination of definite structural states, which suggested the dominant pathways of glutamine binding to GlnBP: first, glutamine migrates via diffusion to form a dominant encounter complex with Arg75 on the large domain of GlnBP, through strong polar interactions. Subsequently, the closing motion of GlnBP occurs to form ligand interactions with the small domain, finally completing the native-specific complex structure. The formation of hydrogen bonds between glutamine and the small domain is considered to be a rate-limiting step, inducing desolvation of the protein-ligand interface to form the specific native complex. The key interactions to attain high specificity for glutamine, the "door keeper" existing between the two domains (Asp10-Lys115) and the "hydrophobic sandwich" formed between the ligand glutamine and Phe13/Phe50, have been successfully mapped on the pathway derived from the FES.

  17. Solution of the problem of interaction between capacitive coupled radio-frequency discharge and a sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebakova, V. Ju; Gaisin, A. F.; Zheltukhin, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    The numerical study of interaction between the capacitive coupled radio frequency (CCRF) discharge and materials is performed. A nonlinear problem, which includes initialboundary value problems for electron, ion, neutral atom, metastable atom, gas temperature and Poisson's equation is solved. A harmonic voltage on the loaded electrodes and Ohm's law for the sample is assumed. A results of calculations of the model problem at pressure p=760 Torr, frequency of generator f=13.76 MHz in local approximation are presented.

  18. Speciation of cisplatin in environmental water samples by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, Janja; Martinčič, Anže; Milačič, Radmila; Ščančar, Janez

    2015-06-01

    Cisplatin is still widely used for treatment of numerous types of tumours. Different speciation methods have been applied to study behaviour of the intact drug and its individual biotransformation species in various clinical samples. These methods are mainly based on electrophoresis, size exclusion (SEC) or ion chromatography (IC) techniques coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC), which is a common technique for separation of polar substances, was rarely applied for separation of cisplatin and its hydrolysed metabolites. There is also a lack of information available on the occurrence of cisplatin and its hydrolysed complexes in the environmental waters. In the present study the concentrations of Pt were determined in hospital wastewaters by ICP-MS. A procedure for separation of cisplatin and its aqueous hydrolysed complexes by the use of HILIC column was optimized. Quantification of separated Pt species was performed by isotope dilution (ID)-ICP-MS procedure. Low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were obtained for cisplatin and its hydrolysed complexes ranging from 0.0273 to 0.1726 ng Pt/mL and from 0.0909 to 0.5753 ng Pt/mL, respectively. Good repeatability of the procedure with relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than ±2.3% was obtained. The column recoveries, which ranged from 95 to 101%, indicated that the procedure developed enabled quantitative speciation analysis of aqueous cisplatin complexes. The ZIC-HILIC-ID-ICP-MS procedure was successfully applied in speciation of cisplatin in spiked hospital wastewater samples.

  19. Quantification of causal couplings via dynamical effects: a unifying perspective.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Dmitry A

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative characterization of causal couplings from time series is crucial in studies of complex systems of different origin. Various statistical tools for that exist and new ones are still being developed with a tendency to creating a single, universal, model-free quantifier of coupling strength. However, a clear and generally applicable way of interpreting such universal characteristics is lacking. This work suggests a general conceptual framework for causal coupling quantification, which is based on state space models and extends the concepts of virtual interventions and dynamical causal effects. Namely, two basic kinds of interventions (state space and parametric) and effects (orbital or transient and stationary or limit) are introduced, giving four families of coupling characteristics. The framework provides a unifying view of apparently different well-established measures and allows us to introduce new characteristics, always with a definite "intervention-effect" interpretation. It is shown that diverse characteristics cannot be reduced to any single coupling strength quantifier and their interpretation is inevitably model based. The proposed set of dynamical causal effect measures quantifies different aspects of "how the coupling manifests itself in the dynamics," reformulating the very question about the "causal coupling strength."

  20. Understanding Surface water Ground water Interactions in Arkansas-Red River Basin using Coupled Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface water exists primarily as groundwater and also in small quantity as soil water in the unsaturated zone. This soil water plays a vital role in the hydrologic cycle by supporting plant growth, regulating the amount of water lost to evapo-transpiration and affecting the surface water groundwater interaction to a certain extent. As such, the interaction between surface water and groundwater is complex and little understood. This study aims at investigating the surface water groundwater interaction in the Arkansas-Red river basin, using a coupled modeling platform. For this purpose, an ecohydrological model (SWAP) has been coupled with the groundwater model (MODFLOW). Inputs to this coupled model are collected from NEXRAD precipitation data at a resolution of ~4 km, meteorological forcings from Oklahoma mesonet and NCDC sites, STATSGO soil property data, LAI (Leaf Area Index) data from MODIS at a resolution of ~1 km, and DEM (Digital Elevation Model). For numerical modeling, a spatial resolution of ~1 km and a temporal resolution of one day is used. The modeled base flow and total groundwater storage change would be tested using ground water table observation data. The modeled ground water storage is further improved using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite data at a resolution of ~400 km, with the help of appropriate data assimilation technique.

  1. A coupled mitral valve-left ventricle model with fluid-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Feng, Liuyang; Qi, Nan; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interaction between the valves and walls of the heart is important in assessing and subsequently treating heart dysfunction. This study presents an integrated model of the mitral valve (MV) coupled to the left ventricle (LV), with the geometry derived from in vivo clinical magnetic resonance images. Numerical simulations using this coupled MV-LV model are developed using an immersed boundary/finite element method. The model incorporates detailed valvular features, left ventricular contraction, nonlinear soft tissue mechanics, and fluid-mediated interactions between the MV and LV wall. We use the model to simulate cardiac function from diastole to systole. Numerically predicted LV pump function agrees well with in vivo data of the imaged healthy volunteer, including the peak aortic flow rate, the systolic ejection duration, and the LV ejection fraction. In vivo MV dynamics are qualitatively captured. We further demonstrate that the diastolic filling pressure increases significantly with impaired myocardial active relaxation to maintain a normal cardiac output. This is consistent with clinical observations. The coupled model has the potential to advance our fundamental knowledge of mechanisms underlying MV-LV interaction, and help in risk stratification and optimisation of therapies for heart diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. An intimate coupling of ocean-atmospheric interaction over the extratropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Wu, Lixin; Wang, Qi; Qu, Liwei; Zhang, Liping

    2009-05-01

    The inter-basin teleconnection between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific ocean-atmosphere interaction is studied using a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. In the model, an idealized oceanic temperature anomaly is initiated over the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream extension region to track the coupled evolution of ocean and atmosphere interaction, respectively. The experiments explicitly demonstrate that both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions are intimately coupled through an inter-basin atmospheric teleconnection. This fast inter-basin communication can transmit oceanic variability between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific through local ocean-to-atmosphere feedbacks. The leading mode of the extratropical atmospheric internal variability plays a dominant role in shaping the hemispheric-scale response forced by oceanic variability over the North Atlantic and Pacific. Modeling results also suggest that a century (two centuries) long observations are necessary for the detection of Pacific response to Atlantic forcings (Atlantic response to Pacific forcing).

  3. A Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    A capability to couple NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the installed coupling software to demonstrate/investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) between pressure wave and flexible inhibitor inside reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM). First a unified governing equation for both fluid and structure is presented, then an Eulerian-Lagrangian framework is described to satisfy the interfacial continuity requirements. The features of fluid solver, Loci/CHEM and structural solver, CoBi, are discussed before the coupling methodology of the solvers is described. The simulation uses production level CFD LES turbulence model with a grid resolution of 80 million cells. The flexible inhibitor is modeled with full 3D shell elements. Verifications against analytical solutions of structural model under steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic condition of modal analysis show excellent agreements in terms of displacement distribution and eigen modal frequencies. The preliminary coupled result shows that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor.

  4. The effect of side motion in the dynamics of interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midha, Tripti; Gupta, Arvind Kumar; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2017-07-01

    To mimic the collective motion of interacting molecular motors, we propose and discuss an open two-lane symmetrically coupled interactive TASEP model that incorporates interaction in the thermodynamically consistent fashion. We study the effect of both repulsive and attractive interaction on the system’s dynamical properties using various cluster mean field analysis and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The interactions bring correlations into the system, which were found to be reduced due to the side motion of particles. We produce the steady-state phase diagrams for symmetrically split interaction strength. The behavior of the maximal particle current with respect to the interaction energy E is analyzed for different coupling rates and interaction splittings. The results suggest that for strong coupling and large splittings, the maximal flow of the motors occurs at a weak attractive interaction strength which matches with the known experimental results on kinesin motor protein.

  5. Hierarchical equations of motion approach to transport through an Anderson impurity coupled to interacting Luttinger liquid leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Jun-ichi; Mathey, Ludwig; Härtle, Rainer

    2016-12-01

    We generalize the hierarchical equations of motion method to study electron transport through a quantum dot or molecule coupled to one-dimensional interacting leads that can be described as Luttinger liquids. Such leads can be realized, for example, by quantum wires or fractional quantum Hall edge states. In comparison to noninteracting metallic leads, Luttinger liquid leads involve many-body correlations and the single-particle tunneling density of states shows a power-law singularity at the chemical potential. Using the generalized hierarchical equations of motion method, we assess the importance of the singularity and the next-to-leading order many-body correlations. To this end, we compare numerically converged results with second- and first-order results of the hybridization expansion that is inherent to our method. As a test case, we study transport through a single-level quantum dot or molecule that can be described by an Anderson impurity model. Cotunneling effects turn out to be most pronounced for attractive interactions in the leads or repulsive ones if an excitonic coupling between the dot and the leads is realized. We also find that an interaction-induced negative differential conductance near the Coulomb blockade thresholds is slightly suppressed as compared to a first-order and/or rate equation result. Moreover, we find that the two-particle (n -particle) correlations enter as a second-order (n -order) effect and are, thus, not very pronounced at the high temperatures and parameters that we consider.

  6. Effects of second neighbor interactions on skyrmion lattices in chiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E A S; Silva, R L; Silva, R C; Pereira, A R

    2017-05-24

    In this paper we investigate the influences of the second neighbor interactions on a skyrmion lattice in two-dimensional chiral magnets. Such a system contains the exchange and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya for the spin interactions and therefore, we analyse three situations: firstly, the second neighbor interaction is present only in the exchange coupling; secondly, it is present only in the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya coupling. Finally, the second neighbor interactions are present in both exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya couplings. We show that such effects cause important modifications to the helical and skyrmion phases when an external magnetic field is applied.

  7. Effects of structural coupling on mistuned cascade flutter and response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielb, R. E.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of structural coupling on mistuned cascade flutter and response are analytically investigated using an extended typical section model. This model includes both structural and aerodynamic coupling between the blades. The model assumes that the structurally coupled system natural modes were determined and are represented in the form of N bending and N torsional uncoupled modes for each blade, where N is the number of blades and, hence, is only valid for blade dominated motion. The aerodynamic loads are calculated by using two dimensional unsteady cascade theories in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes. The results show that the addition of structural coupling can affect both the aeroelastic stability and frequency. The stability is significantly affected only when the system is mistuned. The resonant frequencies can be significantly changed by structural coupling in both tuned and mistuned systems, however, the peak response is significantly affected only in the latter.

  8. Self-organization of grafted polyelectrolyte layers via the coupling of chemical equilibrium and physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; de la Cruz, Mónica Olvera; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-03-23

    The competition between chemical equilibrium, for example protonation, and physical interactions determines the molecular organization and functionality of biological and synthetic systems. Charge regulation by displacement of acid-base equilibrium induced by changes in the local environment provides a feedback mechanism that controls the balance between electrostatic, van der Waals, steric interactions and molecular organization. Which strategies do responsive systems follow to globally optimize chemical equilibrium and physical interactions? We address this question by theoretically studying model layers of end-grafted polyacids. These layers spontaneously form self-assembled aggregates, presenting domains of controlled local pH and whose morphologies can be manipulated by the composition of the solution in contact with the film. Charge regulation stabilizes micellar domains over a wide range of pH by reducing the local charge in the aggregate at the cost of chemical free energy and gaining in hydrophobic interactions. This balance determines the boundaries between different aggregate morphologies. We show that a qualitatively new form of organization arises from the coupling between physical interactions and protonation equilibrium. This optimization strategy presents itself with polyelectrolytes coexisting in two different and well-defined protonation states. Our results underline the need of considering the coupling between chemical equilibrium and physical interactions due to their highly nonadditive behavior. The predictions provide guidelines for the creation of responsive polymer layers presenting self-organized patterns with functional properties and they give insights for the understanding of competing interactions in highly inhomogeneous and constrained environments such as those relevant in nanotechnology and those responsible for biological cells function.

  9. Study and selection of in vivo protein interactions by coupling bimolecular fluorescence complementation and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Morell, Montse; Espargaro, Alba; Aviles, Francesc Xavier; Ventura, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    We present a high-throughput approach to study weak protein-protein interactions by coupling bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) to flow cytometry (FC). In BiFC, the interaction partners (bait and prey) are fused to two rationally designed fragments of a fluorescent protein, which recovers its function upon the binding of the interacting proteins. For weak protein-protein interactions, the detected fluorescence is proportional to the interaction strength, thereby allowing in vivo discrimination between closely related binders with different affinity for the bait protein. FC provides a method for high-speed multiparametric data acquisition and analysis; the assay is simple, thousands of cells can be analyzed in seconds and, if required, selected using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The combination of both methods (BiFC-FC) provides a technically straightforward, fast and highly sensitive method to validate weak protein interactions and to screen and identify optimal ligands in biologically synthesized libraries. Once plasmids encoding the protein fusions have been obtained, the evaluation of a specific interaction, the generation of a library and selection of active partners using BiFC-FC can be accomplished in 5 weeks.

  10. Heavy quark potential from QCD-related effective coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; González, Pedro; Vento, Vicente

    2016-12-01

    We implement our past investigations of quark-antiquark interaction through a non-perturbative running coupling defined in terms of a gluon mass function, similar to that used in some Schwinger-Dyson approaches. This coupling leads to a quark-antiquark potential, which satisfies not only asymptotic freedom but also describes linear confinement correctly. From this potential, we calculate the bottomonium and charmonium spectra below the first open flavor meson-meson thresholds and show that for a small range of values of the free parameter determining the gluon mass function an excellent agreement with data is attained.

  11. Exchange coupling interaction in L10-FePd/α-Fe nanocomposite magnets with large maximum energy products.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Noritsugu; Ohshima, Tsubasa; Shoji, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Yoshihito; Sato, Ryota; Wachi, Ayako; Kato, Akira; Kawai, Yoichiro; Manabe, Akira; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2011-04-26

    Nanocomposite magnets (NCMs) consisting of hard and soft magnetic phases are expected to be instrumental in overcoming the current theoretical limit of magnet performance. In this study, structural analyses were performed on L1(0)-FePd/α-Fe NCMs with various hard/soft volume fractions, which were formed by annealing Pd/γ-Fe(2)O(3) heterostructured nanoparticles and pure Pd nanoparticles. The sample with a hard/soft volume ratio of 82/18 formed by annealing at 773 K had the largest maximum energy product (BH(max) = 10.3 MGOe). In such a sample, the interface between the hard and soft phases was coherent and the phase sizes were optimized, both of which effectively induced exchange coupling. This exchange coupling was directly observed by visualizing the magnetic interaction between the hard and soft phases using a first-order reversal curve diagram, which is a valuable tool to improve the magnetic properties of NCMs.

  12. Self-organized network of phase oscillators coupled by activity-dependent interactions.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takaaki; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2011-12-01

    We investigate a network of coupled phase oscillators whose interactions evolve dynamically depending on the relative phases between the oscillators. We found that this coevolving dynamical system robustly yields three basic states of collective behavior with their self-organized interactions. The first is the two-cluster state, in which the oscillators are organized into two synchronized groups. The second is the coherent state, in which the oscillators are arranged sequentially in time. The third is the chaotic state, in which the relative phases between oscillators and their coupling weights are chaotically shuffled. Furthermore, we demonstrate that self-assembled multiclusters can be designed by controlling the weight dynamics. Note that the phase patterns of the oscillators and the weighted network of interactions between them are simultaneously organized through this coevolving dynamics. We expect that these results will provide new insight into self-assembly mechanisms by which the collective behavior of a rhythmic system emerges as a result of the dynamics of adaptive interactions.

  13. The Quantum Phase-Dynamical Properties of the Squeezed Vacuum State Intensity-Couple Interacting with the Atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, An-Fu; Sun, Nian-Chun; Zhou, Xin

    1996-01-01

    The Phase-dynamical properties of the squeezed vacuum state intensity-couple interacting with the two-level atom in an ideal cavity are studied using the Hermitian phase operator formalism. Exact general expressions for the phase distribution and the associated expectation value and variance of the phase operator have been derived. we have also obtained the analytic results of the phase variance for two special cases-weakly and strongly squeezed vacuum. The results calculated numerically show that squeezing has a significant effect on the phase properties of squeezed vacuum.

  14. Immediate effect of couple relationship education on low-satisfaction couples: a randomized clinical trial plus an uncontrolled trial replication.

    PubMed

    Kim Halford, W; Pepping, Christopher A; Hilpert, Peter; Bodenmann, Guy; Wilson, Keithia L; Busby, Dean; Larson, Jeffry; Holman, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Couple relationship education (RE) usually is conceived of as relationship enhancement for currently satisfied couples, with a goal of helping couples sustain satisfaction. However, RE also might be useful as a brief, accessible intervention for couples with low satisfaction. Two studies were conducted that tested whether couples with low relationship satisfaction show meaningful gains after RE. Study 1 was a three-condition randomized controlled trial in which 182 couples were randomly assigned to RELATE with Couple CARE (RCC), a flexible delivery education program for couples, or one of two control conditions. Couples with initially low satisfaction receiving RCC showed a moderate increase in relationship satisfaction (d=0.50) relative to the control. In contrast, couples initially high in satisfaction showed little change and there was no difference between RCC and the control conditions. Study 2 was an uncontrolled trial of the Couple Coping Enhancement Training (CCET) administered to 119 couples. Couples receiving CCET that had initially low satisfaction showed a moderate increase in satisfaction (g=.44), whereas initially highly satisfied couples showed no change. Brief relationship education can assist somewhat distressed couples to enhance satisfaction, and has potential as a cost-effective way of enhancing the reach of couple interventions.

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptors in cancer: biochemical interactions and drug design.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Yves; Picault, François-Xavier; Chaves-Almagro, Carline; Masri, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) share the same topology made of seven-transmembrane segments and represent the largest family of membrane receptors. Initially associated with signal transduction in differentiated cells, GPCRs and heterotrimeric G proteins were shown to behave as proto-oncogenes whose overexpression or activating mutations confer transforming properties. The first part of this review focuses on the link between biochemical interactions of a GPCR with other receptors, such as dimerization or multiprotein complexes, and their oncogenic properties. Alteration of these interactions or deregulation of transduction cascades can promote uncontrolled cell proliferation or cell transformation that leads to tumorigenicity and malignancy. The second part concerns the design of drugs specifically targeting these complex interactions and their promise in cancer therapy.

  16. Controlled exchange interaction for quantum logic operations with spin qubits in coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Moskal, S.; Bednarek, S.; Adamowski, J.

    2007-09-15

    A two-electron system confined in two coupled semiconductor quantum dots is investigated as a candidate for performing quantum logic operations with spin qubits. We study different processes of swapping the electron spins by a controlled switching on and off of the exchange interaction. The resulting spin swap corresponds to an elementary operation in quantum-information processing. We perform direct simulations of the time evolution of the two-electron system. Our results show that, in order to obtain the full interchange of spins, the exchange interaction should change smoothly in time. The presence of jumps and spikes in the time characteristics of the confinement potential leads to a considerable increase of the spin-swap time. We propose several mechanisms to modify the exchange interaction by changing the confinement potential profile and discuss their advantages and disadvantages.

  17. Self-organized network of fractal-shaped components coupled through statistical interaction.

    PubMed

    Ugajin, R

    2001-09-01

    A dissipative dynamics is introduced to generate self-organized networks of interacting objects, which we call coupled-fractal networks. The growth model is constructed based on a growth hypothesis in which the growth rate of each object is a product of the probability of receiving source materials from faraway and the probability of receiving adhesives from other grown objects, where each object grows to be a random fractal if isolated, but connects with others if glued. The network is governed by the statistical interaction between fractal-shaped components, which can only be identified in a statistical manner over ensembles. This interaction is investigated using the degree of correlation between fractal-shaped components, enabling us to determine whether it is attractive or repulsive.

  18. Indirect exchange interaction in Rashba-spin-orbit-coupled graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoofard, Hossein; Semiromi, Ebrahim Heidari

    2016-10-01

    We study the indirect exchange interaction, named Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling, between localized magnetic impurities in graphene nanoflakes with zig-zag edges in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). We calculate the isotropic and anisotropic RKKY amplitudes by utilizing the tight-binding (TB) model. The RSOI, as a gate tunable variable, is responsible for changes of the RKKY amplitude. We conclude that there is not any switching of the magnetic order (from ferro- to antiferro-magnetic and vice versa) in such a system through the RSOI. The dependence of the RKKY amplitude on the positions of the magnetic impurities and the size of the system is studied. The symmetry breaking, which can occur due to the Rashba interaction, leads to spatial anisotropy in the RKKY amplitude and manifests as collinear and noncollinear terms. Our results show the possibility of control and manipulation of spin correlations in carbon spin-based nanodevices.

  19. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  20. Effect of spin rotation coupling on spin transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Debashree Basu, B.

    2013-12-15

    We have studied the spin rotation coupling (SRC) as an ingredient to explain different spin-related issues. This special kind of coupling can play the role of a Dresselhaus like coupling in certain conditions. Consequently, one can control the spin splitting, induced by the Dresselhaus like term, which is unusual in a semiconductor heterostructure. Within this framework, we also study the renormalization of the spin-dependent electric field and spin current due to the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} perturbation, by taking into account the interband mixing in the rotating system. In this paper we predict the enhancement of the spin-dependent electric field resulting from the renormalized spin rotation coupling. The renormalization factor of the spin electric field is different from that of the SRC or Zeeman coupling. The effect of renormalized SRC on spin current and Berry curvature is also studied. Interestingly, in the presence of this SRC-induced SOC it is possible to describe spin splitting as well as spin galvanic effect in semiconductors. -- Highlights: •Studied effect of spin rotation coupling on the spin electric field, spin current and Berry curvature. •In the k{sup →}⋅p{sup →} framework we study the renormalization of spin electric field and spin current. •For an inertial system we have discussed the spin splitting. •Expression for the Berry phase in the inertial system is discussed. •The inertial spin galvanic effect is studied.

  1. A numerical coupled model for studying air-sea-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Le Ngoc

    1995-10-01

    A numerical coupled model of air-sea-wave interaction is developed to study the influence of ocean wind waves on dynamical, turbulent structures of the air-sea system and their impact on coupled modeling. The model equations for both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers include equations for: (1) momentum, (2) a k-ɛ turbulence scheme, and (3) stratification in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The model equations are written in the same form for both the atmosphere and ocean. In this model, wind waves are considered as another source of turbulent energy in the upper layer of the ocean besides turbulent energy from shear production. The dissipation ɛ at the ocean surface is written as a linear combination of terms representing dissipation from mean flow and breaking waves. The ɛ from breaking waves is estimated by using similarity theory and observed data. It is written in terms of wave parameters such as wave phase speed, height, and length, which are then expressed in terms of friction velocity. Numerical experiments are designed for various geostrophic winds, wave heights, and wave ages, to study the influence of waves on the air-sea system. The numerical simulations show that the vertical profiles of ɛ in the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers (AOBL) are similar. The magnitudes of ɛ in the oceanic surface zone are much larger than those in the atmospheric surface zone and in the interior of the oceanic boundary layer (OBL). The model predicts ɛ distributions with a surface zone of large dissipation which was not expected from similarity scaling based on observed wind stress and surface buoyancy. The simulations also show that waves have a strong influence on eddy viscosity coefficients (EVC) and momentum fluxes, and have a dominated effect on the component of fluxes in the direction of the wind. The depth of large changes in flux magnitudes and EVC in the ocean can reach to 10-20 m. The simulations of surface drift currents confirm that

  2. Autaptic effects on synchrony of neurons coupled by electrical synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngtae

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effects of a special synapse known as autapse on synchronization of population of Morris-Lecar (ML) neurons coupled by electrical synapses. Several configurations of the ML neuronal populations such as a pair or a ring or a globally coupled network with and without autapses are examined. While most of the papers on the autaptic effects on synchronization have used networks of neurons of same spiking rate, we use the network of neurons of different spiking rates. We find that the optimal autaptic coupling strength and the autaptic time delay enhance synchronization in our neural networks. We use the phase response curve analysis to explain the enhanced synchronization by autapses. Our findings reveal the important relationship between the intraneuronal feedback loop and the interneuronal coupling.

  3. Independent Noise Can Synchronize Interacting Networks of Pulse-Coupled Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riecke, Hermann; Meng, John

    Structured networks comprised of subnetwork modules are ubiquitous. Motivated by the observation of rhythms and their interaction in different brain areas, we study a network consisting of two subnetworks of pulse-coupled integrate-fire neurons. Through mutual inhibition the neurons in the individual subnetworks can become synchronized and each subnetwork can exhibit coherent oscillatory dynamics, e.g. an ING-rhythm. In the absence of coupling between the networks the rhythms will in general have different frequencies. We investigate the interaction between these different rhythms. Strikingly, we find that increasing the noise level in the input to the individual neurons can synchronize the rhythms of the two networks, even though the inputs to different neurons are uncorrelated, sharing no common component. A heuristic phase model for the coupled networks shows that this synchronization hinges on the fact that only a fraction of the neurons may spike in a given cycle. Thus, the synchronization of the network rhythms differs qualitatively from that of individual oscillators. Supported by NSF-CMMI 1435358.

  4. Effects of interchain coupling on photoexcitation in two coupled polymer chains in the presence of an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Y.; An, Z.

    2010-04-01

    Within an extended Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model including interchain interactions and the extended Hubbard model (EHM), the dynamical relaxation of photoexcitations in the presence of an external electric field is investigated using a nonadiabatic evolution method. Under the action of the interchain interactions both intrachain excitons and interchain excitons are generated after photoexcitation in two coupled polymer chains. Our results show that the field required to dissociate the excitons depends sensitively on the strength of the interchain coupling. As the interchain coupling strength increases, the dissociation field decreases. By analyzing the relation between the yield of intrachain and interchain excitons and the interchain coupling strength, we explain the dependence between the dissociation field and the strength of the interchain interactions. The theoretical results are expected to provide useful predictions concerning which polymers with properly strong interchain interactions are likely to be most suitable for use in organic solar cells.

  5. Effect of mesoscale wind stress-SST coupling on the Kuroshio extension jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanzhou; Zhang, Ronghua; Wang, Hongna; Kang, Xianbiao

    2017-08-01

    Effect of mesoscale wind stress-SST coupling on the Kuroshio extension jet is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System. The mesoscale wind stress perturbation (τMS) is diagnostically determined from modelled mesoscale SST perturbation (SSTMS) by using their empirical relationship derived from corresponding observation. From comparing two experiments with and without the τMS feedback, it is found that the interactively represented τMS-SSTMS coupling can modulate the kinetic energy along the Kuroshio extension jet, with little effect on the Kuroshio pathway. Similar results are also obtained in three additional sensitivity experiments, which consider half strength of the τMS, and the momentum flux and heat flux effect induced by τMS, respectively. That means simply taking into account the τMS-SSTMS coupling has little effect on improving the simulation of the Kuroshio Current system.

  6. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions.

    PubMed

    Berman, P R; Ford, G W; Milonni, P W

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r(-4), a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called "remarkable formula" for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O'Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  7. Action-effect coupling in pianists.

    PubMed

    Drost, Ulrich C; Rieger, Martina; Brass, Marcel; Gunter, Thomas C; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    Recent theories have stressed the role of effect anticipation in action control. Such a mechanism requires the prior acquisition of integrated action-effect associations. The strength of such associations should directly depend on the amount of learning, and therefore be most pronounced in motor experts. Using an interference paradigm, we investigated whether evidence of such representations can be demonstrated in expert pianists. Participants were required to play chords on a keyboard in response to imperative visual stimuli. Concurrently, task-irrelevant auditory stimuli ("potential" action effects) were presented that were congruent or incongruent with the chords to be played. In Experiment 1 we found evidence that expert pianists, compared with non-musicians, have acquired such action-effects representations. Response times were slower when the auditory stimulus was incongruent with the required response. In order to ascertain the locus of interference, we varied imperative stimuli and responses in Experiments 2 and 3. The results indicate that, for the most part, interference occurs on the response level rather than on an abstract level. However, the perception of action effects also evokes processing of abstract features, like the concept of major-minor mode.

  8. Rashba spin-orbit coupling effects in armchair graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, S.; Melnik, R.; Sebetci, A.

    2015-03-30

    We study the influence of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling effects on the electronic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). By utilizing both analytical and numerical schemes, we show that the finite width of the graphene nanoribbon breaks its energy spectrum into an infinite number of bands. By considering the Rashba spin-orbit coupling term as a perturbation, we show that zero energy bands between electron and hole states at Dirac points are lifted into a finite bandgap.

  9. Effects of administered alcohol on intimate partner interactions in a conflict resolution paradigm.

    PubMed

    Testa, Maria; Crane, Cory A; Quigley, Brian M; Levitt, Ash; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2014-03-01

    Although couples' alcohol use has been associated with intimate partner aggression and poorer marital functioning, few studies have examined the proximal effects of alcohol on couple interactions. The current experimental study examined the effects of alcohol, administered independently to male and female intimate partners, on positive and negative interaction behaviors within a naturalistic conflict resolution paradigm. Married and cohabiting couples (n = 152) were recruited from the community and each partner randomly assigned to receive either alcohol (target dose: .08 mg/kg) or no alcohol. They engaged in two 15-minute interactions regarding current disagreements in their relationship, one before and one after beverage administration. Videotaped interactions were coded by trained observers using the Rapid Marital Interaction Coding System, and positive and negative interaction behaviors were analyzed using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model. Participants displayed decreased negativity and increased positivity following alcohol consumption when their partners were sober but no differences in negativity or positivity when their partners also consumed alcohol. There were no gender differences. Although participants with a history of perpetrating intimate partner aggression displayed more negativity, prior aggression did not interact with beverage condition. The immediate effects of alcohol consumption on couple interaction behaviors appeared more positive than negative. Contrary to hypotheses, congruent partner drinking had neither particularly positive nor particularly negative effects. These unique findings represent a rare glimpse into the immediate consequences of alcohol consumption on couple interaction and stand in contrast to its delayed or long-term effects.

  10. Linking magnon-cavity strong coupling to magnon-polaritons through effective permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Paul; Bai, Lihui; Harder, Michael; Dyck, Christopher; Hu, Can-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Strong coupling in cavity-magnon systems has shown great potential for use in spintronics and information processing technologies due to the low damping rates and long coherence times. Although such systems are conceptually similar to those coupled by magnon-polaritons (MPs), the link between magnon-cavity coupling and MPs has not been explicitly defined. In this work we establish such a connection by studying the frequency-wave-vector dispersion of a strongly coupled magnon-cavity system, using a height-adjustable microwave cavity, and by modeling the observed behavior through the system's effective permeability. A polariton gap between the upper and lower coupled modes of the magnon-cavity system is defined, and is seen to be dependent on the system's effective filling factor. This gap is equal to the MP polariton gap in the limit where filling factor = 1, corresponding to the removal of the microwave cavity. Thus our work clarifies the connection between magnon-cavity and MP coupling, improving our understanding of magnon-photon interactions in coupled systems.

  11. Bimanual coupling effects during arm immobilization and passive movements.

    PubMed

    Garbarini, Francesca; Rabuffetti, Marco; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Solito, Gianluca; Berti, Anna

    2015-06-01

    When humans simultaneously perform different movements with both hands, each limb movement interferes with the contralateral limb movement (bimanual coupling). Previous studies on both healthy volunteers and patients with central or peripheral nervous lesions suggested that such motor constraints are tightly linked to intentional motor programs, rather than to movement execution. Here, we aim to investigate this phenomenon, by using a circles-lines task in which, when subjects simultaneously draw lines with the right hand and circles with the left hand, both the trajectories tend to become ovals (bimanual coupling effect). In a first group, we immobilized the subjects' left arm with a cast and asked them to try to perform the bimanual task. In a second group, we passively moved the subjects' left arm and asked them to perform voluntary movements with their right arm only. If the bimanual coupling arises from motor intention and planning rather than spatial movements, we would expect different results in the two groups. In the Blocked group, where motor intentionality was required but movements in space were prevented by immobilization of the arm, a significant coupling effect (i.e., a significant increase of the ovalization index for the right hand lines) was found. On the contrary, in the Passive group, where movements in space were present but motor intentionality was not required, no significant coupling effect was observed. Our results confirmed, in healthy subjects, the central role of the intentional and predictive operations, already evidenced in pathological conditions, for the occurrence of bimanual coupling.

  12. Effect of capacitive coupling in a miniature inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2012-11-01

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell simulations with a Monte Carlo collision algorithm (PIC-MCC) have been conducted to investigate the effect of capacitive coupling in a miniature inductively coupled plasma source (mICP) by using two models: an inductive model and a hybrid model. The mICP is 3 mm in radius and 6 mm in height with a three-turn planar coil, where argon plasma is sustained. In the inductive model, the coil is assumed to be electrostatically shielded, and thus the discharge is purely inductive coupling. In the hybrid model, we assume that the different turns of the coil act like electrodes in capacitive discharge to include the effect of capacitive coupling. The voltage applied to these electrodes decreases linearly from the powered end of the coil towards the grounded end. The numerical analysis has been performed for rf frequencies in the range of 100-1000 MHz, and the power absorbed by the plasma in the range of 5-50 mW at a fixed pressure of 500 mTorr. The PIC-MCC results show that potential oscillations at the plasma-dielectric interface are not negligible, and thus the major component of the absorbed power is caused by the axial motion of electrons in the hybrid model, although almost all of the power absorption is due to the azimuthal motion of electrons in the inductive model. The effect of capacitive coupling is more significant at lower rf frequencies and at higher absorbed powers under the calculation conditions examined. Moreover, much less coil currents are required in the hybrid model.

  13. Analysis on Patterns of Globally Coupled Phase Oscillators with Attractive and Repulsive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Ruan, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Zhong-Bin; Fu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The Hong-Strogatz (HS) model of globally coupled phase oscillators with attractive and repulsive interactions reflects the fact that each individual (oscillator) has its own attitude (attractive or repulsive) to the same environment (mean field). Previous studies on HS model focused mainly on the stable states on Ott-Antonsen (OA) manifold. In this paper, the eigenvalues of the Jacobi matrix of each fixed point in HS model are explicitly derived, with the aim to understand the local dynamics around each fixed point. Phase transitions are described according to relative population and coupling strength. Besides, the dynamics off OA manifold is studied. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2015CB057301, the Applied Research Project of Public Welfare Technology of Zhejiang Province under Grant No. 201SC31109 and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2014M560483

  14. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  15. Spin motive force induced by Rashba interaction in the strong sd coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen; Nakabayashi, Noriyuki; Lee, Kyun-Jin

    2013-02-01

    Spin motive force induced by the Rashba interaction in the presence of strong sd interaction between conduction electron and localized spin is theoretically studied. The motive force is calculated by evaluating the time derivative of the current density on the basis of microscopic formalism. It is shown that there are two motive forces, one proportional to ER×ṅ, the other, perpendicular component proportional to ER×(n×ṅ), where ER and n are the Rashba electric field and localized spin direction, respectively. The second type arises in the strong sd coupling regime from the spin relaxation. The appearance of perpendicular component from the spin relaxation is understood from the analogy with the current-induced torques. In the case of domain wall motion, the two contributions to the spin motive force are the same order of magnitude, while the first term dominates in the case of precession of uniform magnetization. Our result explains the appearance of the perpendicular component in the weak sd coupling limit, recently discussed in the context of spin damping monopole. Detection of ac voltage induced by the precession of uniform magnetization serves as a experimental evidence of the Rashba interaction in films and wires.

  16. Resonant interactions between discrete phonons in quinhydrone driven by nonlinear electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.

    2016-06-01

    This study reports experimental, computational, and theoretical evidence for a previously unobserved coherent phonon-phonon interaction in an organic solid that can be described by the application of Fano's analysis to a case without the presence of a continuum. Using Raman spectroscopy of the hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer material quinhydrone, two peaks appear near 700 cm-1 we assign as phonons whose position and line-shape asymmetry depend on the sample temperature and light scattering excitation energy. Density functional theory calculations find two nearly degenerate phonons possessing frequencies near the values found in experiment that share similar atomic motion out of the aromatic plane of electron donor and acceptor molecules of quinhydrone. Further analytical modeling of the steady-state light scattering process using the Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonian and time-dependent perturbation theory motivates assignment of the physical origin of the asymmetric features of each peak's line shape to an interaction between two discrete phonons via nonlinear electron-phonon coupling. In the context of analytical model results, characteristics of the experimental spectra upon 2.33 eV excitation of the Raman scattering process are used to qualify the temperature dependence of the magnitude of this coupling in the valence band of quinhydrone. These results broaden the range of phonon-phonon interactions in materials in general while also highlighting the rich physics and fundamental attributes specific to organic solids that may determine their applicability in next generation electronics and photonics technologies.

  17. Palladium-Catalysed Cross-Coupling Reactions Controlled by Noncovalent Zn⋅⋅⋅N Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Mohamed; Hou, Jingran; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Bechki, Lazhar; Miloudi, Abdellah; Bruneau, Christian; Gramage-Doria, Rafael

    2017-04-11

    Non-covalent interactions between halopyridine substrates and catalytically inert building blocks, namely zinc(II)-porphyrins and zinc(II)-salphens, influence the catalytic outcome of Suzuki-Miyaura and Mizoroki-Heck palladium-catalysed cross-coupling reactions. The weak Zn⋅⋅⋅N interactions between halopyridine substrates and zinc(II)-containing porphyrins and salphens, respectively, were studied by a combination of (1) H NMR spectroscopy, UV/Vis studies, Job-Plot analysis and, in some cases, X-ray diffraction studies. Additionally, the former studies revealed unique supramolecular polymeric and dimeric rearrangements in the solid state featuring weak Br⋅⋅⋅N (halogen bonding), C-H⋅⋅⋅π, Br⋅⋅⋅π and π⋅⋅⋅π interactions. The reactivity of halopyridine substrates in homogeneous palladium-catalysed cross-coupling reactions was found to correlate with the binding strength between the zinc(II)-containing scaffolds and the corresponding halopyridine. Such observation is explained by the unfavourable formation of inactive over-coordinated halopyridine⋅⋅⋅palladium species. The presented approach is particularly appealing for those cases in which substrates and/or products deactivate (or partially poison) a transition-metal catalyst. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A systematic approach to vertically excited states of ethylene using configuration interaction and coupled cluster techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, David Peterson, Kirk A.; Davidson, Ernest R.

    2014-09-14

    A systematic sequence of configuration interaction and coupled cluster calculations were used to describe selected low-lying singlet and triplet vertically excited states of ethylene with the goal of approaching the all electron, full configuration interaction/complete basis set limit. Included among these is the notoriously difficult, mixed valence/Rydberg {sup 1}B{sub 1u} V state. Techniques included complete active space and iterative natural orbital configuration interaction with large reference spaces which led to variational spaces of 1.8 × 10{sup 9} parameters. Care was taken to avoid unintentionally biasing the results due to the widely recognized sensitivity of the V state to the details of the calculation. The lowest vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials to the {sup 2}B{sub 3u} and {sup 2}B{sub 3} states were also determined. In addition, the heat of formation of twisted ethylene {sup 3}A{sub 1} was obtained from large basis set coupled cluster theory calculations including corrections for core/valence, scalar relativistic and higher order correlation recovery.

  19. A systematic approach to vertically excited states of ethylene using configuration interaction and coupled cluster techniques.

    PubMed

    Feller, David; Peterson, Kirk A; Davidson, Ernest R

    2014-09-14

    A systematic sequence of configuration interaction and coupled cluster calculations were used to describe selected low-lying singlet and triplet vertically excited states of ethylene with the goal of approaching the all electron, full configuration interaction/complete basis set limit. Included among these is the notoriously difficult, mixed valence/Rydberg (1)B(1u) V state. Techniques included complete active space and iterative natural orbital configuration interaction with large reference spaces which led to variational spaces of 1.8 × 10(9) parameters. Care was taken to avoid unintentionally biasing the results due to the widely recognized sensitivity of the V state to the details of the calculation. The lowest vertical and adiabatic ionization potentials to the (2)B(3u) and (2)B3 states were also determined. In addition, the heat of formation of twisted ethylene (3)A1 was obtained from large basis set coupled cluster theory calculations including corrections for core/valence, scalar relativistic and higher order correlation recovery.

  20. Finite coupling effects in double quantum dots near equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiansong; Thingna, Juzar; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    A weak coupling quantum master equation provides reliable steady-state results only in the van Hove limit, i.e., when the system-lead coupling approaches zero. Recently, J. Thingna et al. [Phys. Rev. E 88, 052127 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.88.052127] proposed an alternative approach, based on an analytic continuation of the Redfield solution, to evaluate the steady-state reduced density matrix up to second order in the system-bath coupling. The approach provides accurate results for harmonic oscillator and spin-bosonic systems. We apply this approach to study steady-state fermionic systems and the calculation on an exactly solvable double quantum dot system shows that the method is rigorously valid up to second order in system-lead coupling only near equilibrium, i.e., linear response regime. We further compare to the Redfield and the secular Redfield (Lindblad-type) master equations that are inaccurate in all parameter regimes. Lastly, we consider the nontrivial problem of strong Coulomb interaction and illustrate the interplay between system-lead coupling, interdot tunneling, and Coulomb strength that can be captured only via the analytic continuation method.

  1. Induced interactions in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juhee; Kim, Dong-Hee

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the Gorkov-Melik-Barkhudarov (GM) correction to superfluid transition temperature in two-dimensional Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) across the SOC-driven BCS-BEC crossover. In the calculation of the induced interaction, we find that the spin-component mixing due to SOC can induce both of the conventional screening and additional antiscreening contributions that interplay significantly in the strong SOC regime. While the GM correction generally lowers the estimate of transition temperature, it turns out that at a fixed weak interaction, the correction effect exhibits a crossover behavior where the ratio between the estimates without and with the correction first decreases with SOC and then becomes insensitive to SOC when it goes into the strong SOC regime. We demonstrate the applicability of the GM correction by comparing the zero-temperature condensate fraction with the recent quantum Monte Carlo results.

  2. Similarity-transformed perturbation theory on top of truncated local coupled cluster solutions: Theory and applications to intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Richard Julian Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-05-28

    Your correspondents develop and apply fully nonorthogonal, local-reference perturbation theories describing non-covalent interactions. Our formulations are based on a Löwdin partitioning of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian into a zeroth-order intramonomer piece (taking local CCSD solutions as its zeroth-order eigenfunction) plus a first-order piece coupling the fragments. If considerations are limited to a single molecule, the proposed intermolecular similarity-transformed perturbation theory represents a frozen-orbital variant of the “(2)”-type theories shown to be competitive with CCSD(T) and of similar cost if all terms are retained. Different restrictions on the zeroth- and first-order amplitudes are explored in the context of large-computation tractability and elucidation of non-local effects in the space of singles and doubles. To accurately approximate CCSD intermolecular interaction energies, a quadratically growing number of variables must be included at zeroth-order.

  3. Magnetic dipolar coupling and collective effects for binary information codification in cost-effective logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiolerio, Alessandro; Allia, Paolo; Graziano, Mariagrazia

    2012-09-01

    Physical limitations foreshadow the eventual end to traditional Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) scaling. Therefore, interest has turned to various materials and technologies aimed to succeed to traditional CMOS. Magnetic Quantum dot Cellular Automata (MQCA) are one of these technologies. Working MQCA arrays require very complex techniques and an excellent control on the geometry of the nanomagnets and on the quality of the magnetic thin film, thus limiting the possibility for MQCA of representing a definite solution to cost-effective, high density and low power consumption device demand. Counter-intuitively, moving towards bigger sizes and lighter technologies it is still possible to develop multi-state logic devices, as we demonstrated, whose main advantage is cost-effectiveness. Applications may be seen in low cost logic devices where integration and computational power are not the main issue, eventually using flexible substrates and taking advantage of the intrinsic mechanical toughness of systems where long range interactions do not need wirings. We realized cobalt micrometric MQCA arrays by means of Electron Beam Lithography, exploiting cost-effective processes such as lift-off and RF sputtering that usually are avoided due to their low control on array geometry and film roughness. Information relative to the magnetic configuration of MQCA elements including their eventual magnetic interactions was obtained from Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) images, enhanced by means of a numerical procedure and presented in differential maps. We report the existence of bi-stable magnetic patterns, as detected by MFM while sampling the z-component of magnetic induction field, arising from dipolar inter-element magnetostatic coupling, able to store and propagate binary information. This is achieved despite the array quality and element magnetic state, which are low and multi-domain, respectively. We discuss in detail shape, inter-element spacing and dot profile

  4. Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Wang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Studying urban land-atmospheric interactions by coupling an urban canopy model with a single column atmospheric models Jiyun Song and Zhi-Hua Wang School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, PO Box 875306, Tempe, AZ 85287-5306 Landuse landcover changes in urban area will modify surface energy budgets, turbulent fluxes as well as dynamic and thermodynamic structures of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to study urban land-atmospheric interactions, we coupled a single column atmospheric model (SCM) to a cutting-edge single layer urban canopy model (SLUCM). Modification of surface parameters such as the fraction of vegetation and engineered pavements, thermal properties of building and pavement materials, and geometrical features of street canyon, etc. in SLUCM dictates the evolution of surface balance of energy, water and momentum. The land surface states then provide lower boundary conditions to the overlying atmosphere, which in turn modulates the modification of ABL structure as well as vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and tracer gases. The coupled SLUCM-SCM model is tested against field measurements of surface layer fluxes as well as profiles of temperature and humidity in the mixed layer under convective conditions. After model test, SLUCM-SCM is used to simulate the effect of changing urban land surface conditions on the evolution of ABL structure and dynamics. Simulation results show that despite the prescribed atmospheric forcing, land surface states impose significant impact on the physics of the overlying vertical atmospheric layer. Overall, this numerical framework provides a useful standalone modeling tool to assess the impacts of urban land surface conditions on the local hydrometeorology through land-atmospheric interactions. It also has potentially far-reaching implications to urban ecohydrological services for cities under future expansion and climate challenges.

  5. Effects of interleaflet coupling on the morphologies of multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funkhouser, Chloe M.; Mayer, Michael; Solis, Francisco J.; Thornton, K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamical and stationary compositional and surface morphologies in macroscopically phase-separating multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes using a computational model. We employ a phase-field method for the description of the coexisting phases and treat the two leaflets individually while including interleaflet interactions. The compositional evolution of the two leaflets is coupled to the shape evolution of the membrane via a Helfrich free energy with a composition-dependent spontaneous curvature. We investigate the effects of the interleaflet interaction on the dynamics and stationary states of a system favoring nonzero spontaneous curvatures. Morphological phase diagrams are mapped in composition space using three different interleaflet coupling strengths. We find that characteristics sensitive to the coupling strength include the time required to develop regions of fully separated phases, the prevalence of a stripe morphology, and the shifting of phase compositions to accommodate energetically favorable interactions across leaflets. Characteristics found to be robust with respect to coupling strength include (1) the stripe morphology is favored at nearly equal mixtures and (2) phase separation is prevented in systems where a pair of phases that preferentially interact across leaflets together occupy nearly all or none of the membrane.

  6. Hot electron energy coupling in ultra-intense laser matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, A J; Sentoku, Y; Tabak, M

    2008-04-15

    We investigate the hydrodynamic response of plasma gradients during the interaction with ultra-intense energetic laser pulses, using one-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. As energetic laser pulses are capable of compressing the preformed plasma over short times, the coupling efficiency as well as the temperature of hot electrons drop, leading to localized heating near the point of absorption. We describe the cause of this drop, explain the electron spectra and identify the parametric region where strong compression occurs. Finally, we discuss implications for fast ignition and other applications.

  7. Quantifying the allosteric interactions within a G-protein-coupled receptor heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Giraldo, Jesús

    2017-07-27

    G-protein-coupled receptors are central to signal transduction and cell communication. The possibility that cells use receptor heteromerization to modulate individual receptor pathways is a surmise that cannot be precluded. Given the complexity of these processes, mathematical models contribute to understanding how receptors and their respective ligands regulate signaling. Here, a mathematical model is presented that quantifies the allosteric interactions within a receptor heterodimer. The model is based on the operational model of allosterism including constitutive receptor activity, which provides the pharmacological analysis of heteromerization with well-established and widely used modeling and fitting procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Linear response theory for a pair of coupled one-dimensional condensates of interacting atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsev, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2007-05-01

    We use the quantum sine-Gordon model to describe the low-energy dynamics of a pair of coupled one-dimensional condensates of interacting atoms. We show that the nontrivial excitation spectrum of the quantum sine-Gordon model, which includes soliton and breather excitations, can be observed in experiments with time-dependent modulation of the tunneling amplitude, potential difference between condensates, or phase of tunneling amplitude. We use the form-factor approach to compute structure factors corresponding to all three types of perturbations.

  9. Plasma ionization through wave-particle interaction in a capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Vender, D.; Czarnetzki, U.; Boswell, R.

    2007-03-15

    Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy, with high temporal resolution, shows that wave-particle interactions play a fundamental role in sustaining capacitively coupled rf plasmas. The measurements are in excellent agreement with a simple particle-in-cell simulation. Excitation and ionization mechanisms are dominated by beam-like electrons, energized through the advancing and retreating electric fields of the rf sheath. The associated large-amplitude electron waves, driven by a form of two-stream instability, result in power dissipation through electron trapping and phase mixing.

  10. Coupled-cluster theory of a gas of strongly-interacting electrons in the dilute limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bodgan; Cardenas, Andres L

    2008-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a dilute gas of strongly-interacting fermions in the framework of the coupled-cluster expansion (CCE). We demonstrate that properties such as universality, opening of a gap in the excitation spectrum and applicability of s-wave approximations appear naturally in the CCE approach. In the zero-density limit, we show that the ground-state energy density depends on only one parameter which in turn may depend at most on the spatial dimensionality of the system.

  11. Dynamics of coupled mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, and their implications for ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Georgelin, E; Loeuille, N

    2014-04-07

    Understanding the interplay of antagonistic and mutualistic interactions is an important challenge for predicting the fate of ecological communities. So far, studies of propagation of disturbances have focused on a single interaction type (antagonistic or mutualistic), leaving out part of the natural diversity. We develop a model that describes the dynamics of a plant species interacting with one antagonistic (e.g. an herbivore) and one mutualistic (e.g. a pollinator) species confronted to a perturbation to assess how each interaction type will affect the other. We analyze the effect of additional mortality as a press perturbation acting on the plant's partners. We study how the intensity of the disturbance and the relative sensitivities of partner species determine community structure, as well as extinction orders. We show that due to indirect effects between the two types of interactions, additional mortality on both pollinators and herbivores can either decrease or increase their densities. The presence of pollinators can stabilize the antagonistic interaction by preventing cyclic dynamics in the plant-herbivore system. We propose explanatory mechanisms based on indirect effects and discuss the implications of our results for the conservation of interactions and communities. Our results suggest that, in agricultural landscapes, direct effects of insecticides on herbivore densities can be fully offset by indirect effects mediated through pollinators. The loss of pollinators, due to insecticide use, can also destabilize the dynamics of insect herbivores.

  12. Interplay between spin-orbit coupling and Hubbard interaction in SrIrO3 and related Pbnm perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeb, M. Ahsan; Kee, Hae-Young

    2012-08-01

    There has been a rapidly growing interest in the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the Hubbard interaction U in correlated materials. A current consensus is that the stronger the SOC, the smaller is the critical interaction Uc required for a spin-orbit Mott insulator, because the atomic SOC splits a band into different total angular momentum bands, narrowing the effective bandwidth. It was further claimed that at large enough SOC, the stronger the SOC, the weaker the Uc, because in general the effective SOC is enhanced with increasing electron-electron interaction strength. Contrary to this expectation, we find that, in orthorhombic perovskite oxides (Pbnm), the stronger the SOC, the bigger the Uc. This originates from a line of Dirac nodes in Jeff=1/2 bands near the Fermi level, inherited from a combination of the lattice structure and a large SOC. Due to this protected line of nodes, there are small hole and electron pockets in SrIrO3, and such a small density of states makes the Hubbard interaction less efficient in building a magnetic insulator. The full phase diagram in U vs SOC is obtained, where nonmagnetic semimetal, magnetic metal, and magnetic insulator are found. Magnetic ordering patterns beyond Uc are also presented. We further discuss implications of our finding in relation to other perovskites such as SrRhO3 and SrRuO3.

  13. A battery model that fully couples mechanics and electrochemistry at both particle and electrode levels by incorporation of particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Lu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    This paper develops a multi-scale mechanical-electrochemical model which enables fully coupled mechanics and electrochemistry at both particle and electrode levels. At the particle level, solid diffusion is modeled using a generalized chemical potential to capture the effects of mechanical stress and phase transformation. At the electrode level, the stress arising from particle interaction is incorporated in a continuum model. This particle interaction stress is in addition to the traditional concept of intercalation stress inside isolated particles. The particle and continuum electrode levels are linked by the particle interaction stress as loads on the particle surface, and by consideration of stress on the electrochemical reaction rate on the particle surface. The effect of mechanical stress on electrochemical reaction results in a stress-dependent over-potential between particle and electrolyte. Stress gradient in an electrode leads to inhomogeneous intercalation/deintercalation currents for particles depending on their interaction stress with neighbors, resulting in stress gradient induced inhomogeneous state of charge. Conversely, non-uniform intercalation/deintercalation currents in an electrode lead to stress between particles. With this model we have an important finding: an electrochemically inactive region in an electrode causes stress built-up. This model provides a powerful tool to address various problems such as fracture in-between particles.

  14. Screening for low molecular weight compounds in fish meal solubles by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simple analytical method using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was developed to screen for low molecular weight compounds in enzyme treated and untreated Alaskan pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) stickwater (SW) generated from processing fish meal with po...

  15. Coupled Quantum Dots in the Kondo regime: interference and filtering effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Silva, Luis; Sandler, Nancy; Ingersent, Kevin; Ulloa, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    Double quantum-dot systems (DQDs) provide a vast array of possibilities for both theoretical and experimental investigations of the Kondo regime. In this work, we propose DQDs as a possible experimental realization of a Kondo impurity coupled to an effective structured (non-constant) density of states (DoS). We consider a DQD in parallel configuration coupled to metallic leads. By changing the lead-dot and dot-dot couplings, the effective hybridization function for an individual dot displays sharp resonances and/or pseudogaps, allowing for an experimental probe into the transition between both regimes. Using numerical renormalization group methods, we calculate the dot's spectral function in different regimes. For a dot weakly coupled to the leads and strongly coupled to the second dot, the effective DoS has a sharp resonance with width δ and the spectral density shows a splitting in the Kondo resonance for TK>δ, although the Kondo singlet is preserved. Furthermore, for small inter-dot coupling, second order dot-dot interactions through the conduction electrons lead to the formation of a pseudo-gap. The spectral density goes to zero as a power-law |ɛ-ɛF|^2 and the Kondo screening is suppressed. Supported by NFS-NIRT.

  16. Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict.

    PubMed

    Ditzen, Beate; Nater, Urs M; Schaer, Marcel; La Marca, Roberto; Bodenmann, Guy; Ehlert, Ulrike; Heinrichs, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Unhappy couple relationships are associated with impaired individual health, an effect thought to be mediated through ongoing couple conflicts. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms regulating psychobiological stress, and particularly autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity, during negative couple interaction. In this study, we tested the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin on ANS reactivity during couple conflict in a standardized laboratory paradigm. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 47 heterosexual couples (total n = 94) received oxytocin or placebo intranasally prior to instructed couple conflict. Participants' behavior was videotaped and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a measure of sympathetic activity, and emotional arousal were repeatedly measured during the experiment. Oxytocin significantly reduced sAA during couple conflict in women, whereas men showed increases in sAA levels (sex × group interaction: B = -49.36, t = -2.68, P = 0.009). In men, these increases were related to augmented emotional arousal (r = 0.286, P = 0.028) and more positive behavior (r = 0.291, P = 0.026), whereas there was no such association in women. Our results imply sex-specific effects of oxytocin on sympathetic activity, to negative couple interaction, with the neuropeptide reducing sAA responses and emotional arousal in women while increasing them in men.

  17. Sex-specific effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic nervous system and emotional responses to couple conflict

    PubMed Central

    Nater, Urs M.; Schaer, Marcel; La Marca, Roberto; Bodenmann, Guy; Ehlert, Ulrike; Heinrichs, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Unhappy couple relationships are associated with impaired individual health, an effect thought to be mediated through ongoing couple conflicts. Little is known, however, about the underlying mechanisms regulating psychobiological stress, and particularly autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity, during negative couple interaction. In this study, we tested the effects of the neuropeptide oxytocin on ANS reactivity during couple conflict in a standardized laboratory paradigm. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 47 heterosexual couples (total n = 94) received oxytocin or placebo intranasally prior to instructed couple conflict. Participants’ behavior was videotaped and salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a measure of sympathetic activity, and emotional arousal were repeatedly measured during the experiment. Oxytocin significantly reduced sAA during couple conflict in women, whereas men showed increases in sAA levels (sex × group interaction: B = −49.36, t = −2.68, P = 0.009). In men, these increases were related to augmented emotional arousal (r = 0.286, P = 0.028) and more positive behavior (r = 0.291, P = 0.026), whereas there was no such association in women. Our results imply sex-specific effects of oxytocin on sympathetic activity, to negative couple interaction, with the neuropeptide reducing sAA responses and emotional arousal in women while increasing them in men. PMID:22842905

  18. Effect of Coriolis coupling in chemical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-05-14

    It is essential to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effect in molecular reaction dynamics. Here we consider Coriolis coupling effect in quantum reactive scattering calculations in the context of both adiabaticity and nonadiabaticity, with particular emphasis on examining the role of Coriolis coupling effect in reaction dynamics of triatomic molecular systems. We present the results of our own calculations by the time-dependent quantum wave packet approach for H + D2 and F(2P3/2,2P1/2) + H2 as well as for the ion-molecule collisions of He + H2 +, D(-) + H2, H(-) + D2, and D+ + H2, after reviewing in detail other related research efforts on this issue.

  19. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  20. Exact solutions for a type of electron pairing model with spin-orbit interactions and Zeeman coupling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Han, Qiang; Shao, L B; Wang, Z D

    2011-07-08

    A type of electron pairing model with spin-orbit interactions or Zeeman coupling is solved exactly in the framework of the Richardson ansatz. Based on the exact solutions for the case with spin-orbit interactions, it is shown rigorously that the pairing symmetry is of the p + ip wave and the ground state possesses time-reversal symmetry, regardless of the strength of the pairing interaction. Intriguingly, how Majorana fermions can emerge in the system is also elaborated. Exact results are illustrated for two systems, respectively, with spin-orbit interactions and Zeeman coupling.

  1. Weakly interacting spinor Bose-Einstein condensates with three-dimensional spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu-Wei, Song; Rui, Sun; Hong, Zhao; Xuan, Wang; Bao-Zhong, Han

    2016-04-01

    Starting from the Hamiltonian of the second quantization form, the weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate with spin-orbit coupling of Weyl type is investigated. It is found that the SU(2) nonsymmetric term, i.e., the spin-dependent interaction, can lift the degeneracy of the ground states with respect to the z component of the total angular momentum J z , casting the ground condensate state into a configuration of zero J z . This ground state density profile can also be affirmed by minimizing the full Gross-Pitaevskii energy functional. The spin texture of the zero J z state indicates that it is a knot structure, whose fundamental group is π 3(M) ≅ π 3(S 2) = Z. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11447178).

  2. Discrete and continuum links to a nonlinear coupled transport problem of interacting populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, M. H.; Muntean, A.; Richardson, O. M.

    2017-02-01

    We are interested in exploring interacting particle systems that can be seen as microscopic models for a particular structure of coupled transport flux arising when different populations are jointly evolving. The scenarios we have in mind are inspired by the dynamics of pedestrian flows in open spaces and are intimately connected to cross-diffusion and thermo-diffusion problems holding a variational structure. The tools we use include a suitable structure of the relative entropy controlling TV-norms, the construction of Lyapunov functionals and particular closed-form solutions to nonlinear transport equations, a hydrodynamics limiting procedure due to Philipowski, as well as the construction of numerical approximates to both the continuum limit problem in 2D and to the original interacting particle systems.

  3. Discrete and continuum links to a nonlinear coupled transport problem of interacting populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, M. H.; Muntean, A.; Richardson, O. M.

    2017-07-01

    We are interested in exploring interacting particle systems that can be seen as microscopic models for a particular structure of coupled transport flux arising when different populations are jointly evolving. The scenarios we have in mind are inspired by the dynamics of pedestrian flows in open spaces and are intimately connected to cross-diffusion and thermo-diffusion problems holding a variational structure. The tools we use include a suitable structure of the relative entropy controlling TV-norms, the construction of Lyapunov functionals and particular closed-form solutions to nonlinear transport equations, a hydrodynamics limiting procedure due to Philipowski, as well as the construction of numerical approximates to both the continuum limit problem in 2D and to the original interacting particle systems.

  4. Generation and evolution of entanglement in coupled quantum dots interacting with a quantized cavity field

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Arnab; Vyas, Reeta; Erenso, Daniel

    2007-11-15

    The generation of entanglement between two identical, interacting quantum dots - initially in ground states--by a coherent field and the subsequent time evolution of the entanglement are studied by calculating the concurrence between the two dots. The results predict that while it is possible to generate entanglement (or entanglement of formation, as defined for a mixed state) between the two dots, at no time do the dots become fully entangled to each other or is a maximally entangled Bell state ever achieved. We also observe that the degree of entanglement increases with an increase in the photon number inside the cavity and a decrease in the dot-photon coupling. The behavior of the two-dot system, initially prepared in an entangled state and interacting with thermal light, is also studied.

  5. Measuring binding kinetics of biomolecular interactions using a localized surface plasmon couple fluorescence fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Su, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we describe a novel method for analyzing protein-protein binding kinetics at ultra-low concentration (1 pg/mL) using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor (LSPCF-FOB). The association and dissociation rate constants, ka and kd, respectively, for the binding kinetics of the mouse IgG/ anti-mouse IgG interaction have been calculated to be ka = (5.9928+/-3.1540)x106 M-1s-1 and kd = (1.0587+/-0.5572)x10-3 s-1. The theoretical basis of this analytical approach is a rapid-mixing model integrated with a two-compartment model; has been experimentally verified in this study as well. The LSPCF-FOB provides a potentially alternative option for characterizing the interaction of biomolecules at ultra-low concentrations.

  6. Polarizable interaction potential for water from coupled cluster calculations. I. Analysis of dimer potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukowski, Robert; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; van der Avoird, Ad

    2008-03-01

    A six-dimensional interaction potential for the water dimer has been fitted to ab initio interaction energies computed at 2510 dimer configurations. These energies were obtained by combining the supermolecular second-order energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit from up to quadruple-zeta quality basis sets with the contribution from the coupled-cluster method including single, double, and noniterative triple excitations computed in a triple-zeta quality basis set. All basis sets were augmented by diffuse functions and supplemented by midbond functions. The energies have been fitted using an analytic form with the induction component represented by a polarizable term, making the potential directly transferable to clusters and the bulk phase. Geometries and energies of stationary points on the potential surface agree well with the results of high-level ab initio geometry optimizations.

  7. High Fidelity Aeroelasticity Simulations of Aircraft and Turbomachinery with Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jiaye

    The purpose of this research is to develop high fidelity numerical methods to investigate the complex aeroelasticity fluid-structural problems of aircraft and aircraft engine turbomachinery. Unsteady 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinates are solved to simulate the complex fluid dynamic problems in aeroelasticity. An efficient and low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme designed to minimize numerical dissipation is used as a Riemann solver to capture shock waves in transonic and supersonic flows. An improved hybrid turbulence modeling, delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES), is implemented to simulate shock induced separation and rotating stall flows. High order accuracy (3rd and 5th order) weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes for inviscid flux and a conservative 2nd and 4th order viscous flux differencing are employed. To resolve the nonlinear interaction between flow and vibrating blade structures, a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) procedure that solves the structural modal equations and time accurate Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously is adopted. A rotor/stator sliding interpolation technique is developed to accurately capture the blade rows interaction at the interface with general grid distribution. Phase lag boundary conditions (BC) based on the time shift (direct store) method and the Fourier series phase lag BC are applied to consider the effect of phase difference for a sector of annulus simulation. Extensive validations are conducted to demonstrate high accuracy and robustness of the high fidelity FSI methodology. The accuracy and robustness of RANS, URANS and DDES turbulence models with high order schemes for predicting the lift and drag of the DLR-F6 configuration are verified. The DDES predicts the drag very well whereas the URANS model significantly over predicts the drag. DDES of a finned projectile base flows is conducted to further validate the high fidelity methods with vortical flow. The

  8. Quantitative characterization of Tob interactions provides the thermodynamic basis for translation termination-coupled deadenylase regulation.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Lin; Osawa, Masanori; Hosoda, Nao; Imai, Shunsuke; Machiyama, Asako; Katada, Toshiaki; Hoshino, Shin-ichi; Shimada, Ichio

    2010-09-03

    Translation termination-coupled deadenylation is the first and often the rate-limiting step of eukaryotic mRNA decay in which two deadenylases, Ccr4-Caf1 and Pan2, play key roles. One of the deadenylases, Caf1, associates with Tob, which recruits Caf1 to the poly(A) tail through interactions with a cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABPC1). We previously proposed that the competition between Tob and eRF3 (a translation termination factor that interacts with PABPC1) is responsible for the regulation of deadenylase activity. However, the molecular mechanism of the regulation should be addressed by investigating the binding affinity and the cellular levels of these proteins. In this work, we characterized the human Tob interactions with Caf1 and a C-terminal domain of PABPC1 (PABC). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Western blot analyses revealed that Tob consists of a structured N-terminal BTG-Tob domain and an unstructured C-terminal region with two conserved PAM2 (PABPC1-interacting motif 2) motifs. The BTG-TOB domain associates with Caf1, whereas the C-terminal PAM2 motif binds to PABC, with a K(d) value of 20 microM. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the levels of eRF3 and Tob in HeLa cells are 4-5 microM and less than 0.2 microM, respectively. On the basis of these results, we propose a thermodynamic mechanism for the translation termination-coupled deadenylation mediated by the Tob-Caf1 complex.

  9. Beyond the rainbow: Effects from pion back-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Christian S.; Williams, Richard

    2008-10-01

    We investigate hadronic unquenching effects in light quarks and mesons. To this end, we take into account the back-coupling of the pion onto the quark propagator within the nonperturbative continuum framework of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDE) and Bethe-Salpeter equations (BSE). We improve on a previous approach by explicitly solving both the coupled system of SDEs and BSEs in the complex plane and the normalization problem for Bethe-Salpeter kernels depending on the total momentum of the meson. As a result of our study, we find considerable unquenching effects in the spectrum of light pseudoscalar, vector and axial-vector mesons.

  10. Simulation of Wave-Current Interaction Using a Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Model Coupled With a Phase Averaged Wave Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsooli, R.; Orton, P. M.; Georgas, N.; Blumberg, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    The Stevens Institute of Technology Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Model (sECOM) has been coupled with a more advanced surface wave model to simulate wave‒current interaction, and results have been validated in estuarine and nearshore waters. sECOM is a three‒dimensional, hydrostatic, free surface, primitive equation model. It solves the Navier‒Stokes equations and the conservation equations for temperature and salinity using a finite‒difference method on an Arakawa C‒grid with a terrain‒following (sigma) vertical coordinate and orthogonal curvilinear horizontal coordinate system. The model is coupled with the surface wave model developed by Mellor et al. (2008), which solves the spectral equation and takes into account depth and current refraction, and deep and shallow water. The wave model parameterizes the energy distribution in frequency space and the wave‒wave interaction process by using a specified spectrum shape. The coupled wave‒hydrodynamic model considers the wave‒current interaction through wave‒induced bottom stress, depth‒dependent radiation stress, and wave effects on wind‒induced surface stress. The model is validated using the data collected at a natural sandy beach at Duck, North Carolina, during the DUCK94 experiment. This test case reveals the capability of the model to simulate the wave‒current interaction in nearshore coastal systems. The model is further validated using the data collected in Jamaica Bay, a semi‒enclosed body of water located in New York City region. This test reveals the applicability of the model to estuarine systems. These validations of the model and comparisons to its prior wave model, the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) wave model (Donelan 1977), are presented and discussed. ReferencesG.L. Mellor, M.A. Donelan, and L‒Y. Oey, 2008, A Surface Wave Model for Coupling with Numerical Ocean Circulation Models. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 25, 1785‒1807.Donelan, M. A 1977. A

  11. Uncertainty quantification of effective nuclear interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2016-03-02

    We give a brief review on the development of phenomenological NN interactions and the corresponding quanti cation of statistical uncertainties. We look into the uncertainty of effective interactions broadly used in mean eld calculations through the Skyrme parameters and effective eld theory counter-terms by estimating both statistical and systematic uncertainties stemming from the NN interaction. We also comment on the role played by different tting strategies on the light of recent developments.

  12. The geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled-quantum-wires structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafee, Vahdat

    2016-03-01

    The geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled cylindrical quantum wires system is investigated. The corrected random phase approximation by the zero-temperature static Hubbard correction is employed to calculate dielectric function of the system. The geometry effect on energy transfer rate is studied for statically and dynamically screened electron-electron interaction. Both the linear and nonlinear regimes correspond respectively to weak and strong external field are considered. The calculations show that increasing wire radius increases energy transfer rate in both the static and dynamic screening approximations for electron-electron interactions. Moreover, the same trend is predicted by the calculations for both the linear and nonlinear regimes.

  13. Couple Interaction and Predicting Vulnerability to Domestic Violence in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh P; Singh, Kaushalendra K; Singh, Neha

    2014-08-01

    Domestic violence, when conducted against women, is a type of gender-based violence that negatively impacts a woman's physical and psychological health, causing insecurity, lack of safety, and loss of health and self-worth. Domestic violence is an important consideration for sexual, reproductive, and child health, as it can affect contraceptive behaviors of couples as well as levels of infant mortality. In the present analysis, an attempt has been made to study the relationship between women's experience of domestic violence and couple interaction after controlling for certain socioeconomic and demographic variables using logistic regression. This study looks at data from the National Family Health Survey-III conducted from 2005 to 2006 in Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state of India. Findings reveal that 43% of women suffer from domestic violence in the society as a whole; however, if a couple makes joint decisions in household matters, the prevalence of domestic violence is observed to be 24% less. Education and occupation of women, standard of living, media exposure, and partner's alcoholic behaviors are also found to be possible predictors of domestic violence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Standing wave plasmon modes interact in an antenna-coupled nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Jared; Large, Nicolas; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi

    2015-03-01

    In a standing wave optical cavity, the coupling of cavity modes, e.g. through a nonlinear medium, results in a rich variety of nonlinear dynamical phenomena, such as frequency pushing and pulling, mode-locking and pulsing, and modal instabilities. Metallic nanowires of finite length support a hierarchy of longitudinal surface plasmon modes with standing wave properties: the plasmonic analog of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Here we show that positioning the nanowire within the gap of a plasmonic nanoantenna introduces a passive, hybridization-based coupling of the standing-wave nanowire plasmon modes with the antenna structure, mediating an interaction between the nanowire plasmon modes themselves. Frequency pushing and pulling, and the enhancement and suppression of specific plasmon modes, can be controlled and manipulated by nanoantenna position and shape. Dark-field spectroscopy, CL spectroscopy and imaging, and finite-difference time-domain calculations are performed to investigate these surface plasmon ``drift.'' Near-field coupling of nanoantennas to nanowire optical cavities shows that plasmon hybridization is a powerful strategy for controlling the radiative LDOS of nanowires, and could ultimately enable strategies for active control of emission properties in nanowire-based devices. Work funded by the Welch Foundation (C-1220, C-1222), the NSSEFF (N00244-09-1-0067), the ONR (N00014-10-1-0989), and the NSF (ECCS-1040478, CNS-0821727).

  15. Effects of relationship education on couple communication and satisfaction: A randomized controlled trial with low-income couples.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Hannah C; Altman, Noemi; Hsueh, JoAnn; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2016-02-01

    Although preventive educational interventions for couples have been examined in more than 100 experimental studies, the value of this work is limited by reliance on economically advantaged populations and by an absence of data on proposed mediators and moderators. Data from the Supporting Healthy Marriage Project-a randomized, controlled trial of relationship education for couples living with low incomes-were therefore analyzed to test whether intervention effects on relationship satisfaction would be mediated by observational assessments of relationship communication and whether any such effects would be moderated by couples' pretreatment risk. Within the larger sample of Supporting Healthy Marriage Project couples randomized to a relationship education or no-treatment control condition, the present analyses focus on the 1,034 couples who provided (a) data on sociodemographic risk at baseline, (b) observational data on couple communication 12 months after randomization, and (c) reports of relationship satisfaction 30 months after randomization. Intervention couples reported higher satisfaction at 30 months than control couples, regardless of their level of pretreatment risk. Among higher risk couples, the intervention improved observed communication as well. Contrary to prediction, treatment effects on satisfaction were not mediated by improvements in communication, and improvements in communication did not translate into greater satisfaction. Relationship education programs produce small improvements in relationship satisfaction and communication, particularly for couples at elevated sociodemographic risk. The absence of behavioral effects on satisfaction indicates, however, that the mechanisms by which couples may benefit from relationship education are not yet well understood. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. The application of Biological-Hydraulic coupled model for Tubificidae-microorganism interaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xiao; Sun, Peide; Song, Yingqi; Wang, Ruyi; Fang, Zhiguo

    2010-11-01

    Based on the fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), the novel model Tubificidae -Fully Coupled Activated Sludge Model-hydraulic (T-FCASM-Hydro), has been developed in our previous work. T-FCASM-Hydro not only describe the interactive system between Tubificidae and functional microorganisms for the sludge reduction and nutrient removal simultaneously, but also considere the interaction between biological and hydraulic field, After calibration and validation of T-FCASM-Hydro at Zhuji Feida-hongyu Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Zhejiang province, T-FCASM-Hydro was applied for determining optimal operating condition in the WWTP. Simulation results showed that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed efficiently, and the efficiency of NH4+-N removal enhanced with increase of DO concentration. At a certain low level of DO concentration in the aerobic stage, shortcut nitrification-denitrification dominated in the process of denitrification in the novel system. However, overhigh agitation (>6 mgṡL-1) could result in the unfavorable feeding behavior of Tubificidae because of the strong flow disturbance, which might lead to low rate of sludge reduction. High sludge reduction rate and high removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus could be obtained in the new-style oxidation ditch when DO concentration at the aerobic stage with Tubificidae was maintained at 3.6 gṡm-3.

  17. Interaction-driven exotic quantum phases in spin-orbit-coupled spin-1 bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Natu, Stefan S.; Spielman, I. B.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-02-01

    We study the interplay between large-spin, spin-orbit coupling, and superfluidity for bosons in a two-dimensional optical lattice, focusing on the spin-1 spin-orbit-coupled system recently realized at the Joint Quantum Institute [Campbell et al., arXiv:1501.05984]. We find a rich quantum phase diagram where, in addition to the conventional phases—superfluid and insulator—contained in the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model, there are new lattice symmetry breaking phases. For weak interactions, the interplay between two length scales, the lattice momentum and the spin-orbit wave vector, induce a phase transition from a uniform superfluid to a phase where bosons simultaneously condense at the center and edge of the Brillouin zone at a nonzero spin-orbit strength. This state is characterized by spin-density-wave order, which arises from the spin-1 nature of the system. Interactions suppress spin-density-wave order, and favor a superfluid only at the Brillouin zone edge. This state has spatially oscillating mean-field order parameters, but a homogeneous density. We show that the spin-density-wave superfluid phase survives in a two-dimensional harmonic trap, and thus establish that our results are directly applicable to experiments on 87Rb,7Li, and 41K.

  18. Spontaneous emission spectra and quantum light-matter interactions from a strongly coupled quantum dot metal-nanoparticle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vlack, C.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Hughes, S.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the quantum optical properties of a quantum-dot dipole emitter coupled to a finite-size metal nanoparticle using a photon Green-function technique that rigorously quantizes the electromagnetic fields. We first obtain pronounced Purcell factors and photonic Lamb shifts for both a 7- and 20-nm-radius metal nanoparticle, without adopting a dipole approximation. We then consider a quantum-dot photon emitter positioned sufficiently near the metal nanoparticle so that the strong-coupling regime is possible. Accounting for nondipole interactions, quenching, and photon transport from the dot to the detector, we demonstrate that the strong-coupling regime should be observable in the far-field spontaneous emission spectrum, even at room temperature. The vacuum-induced emission spectra show that the usual vacuum Rabi doublet becomes a rich spectral triplet or quartet with two of the four peaks anticrossing, which survives in spite of significant nonradiative decays. We discuss the emitted light spectrum and the effects of quenching for two different dipole polarizations.

  19. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT-rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. PMID:25311862

  20. Rashbon Bound States Associated with a Spherical Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Ultracold Fermi Gas with an s-Wave Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Inotani, D.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the formation of rashbon bound states and strong-coupling effects in an ultracold Fermi gas with a spherical spin-orbit interaction, H_so=λ {\\varvec{p}}\\cdot {σ } (where {σ }=(σ _x,σ _y,σ _z) are Pauli matrices). Extending the strong-coupling theory developed by Nozières and Schmitt-Rink (NSR) to include this spin-orbit coupling, we determine the superfluid phase transition temperature T_c, as functions of the strength of a pairing interaction U_s, as well as the spin-orbit coupling strength λ . Evaluating poles of the NSR particle-particle scattering matrix describing fluctuations in the Cooper channel, we clarify the region where rashbon bound states dominate the superfluid phase transition in the U_s-λ phase diagram. Since the antisymmetric spin-orbit interaction H_so breaks the inversion symmetry of the system, rashbon bound states naturally have not only a spin-singlet and even-parity symmetry, but also a spin-triplet and odd-parity symmetry. Thus, our results would be also useful for the study of this parity-mixing effect in the BCS-BEC crossover regime of a spin-orbit coupled Fermi gas.

  1. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  2. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  3. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  4. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  5. Tropical Cyclones-Ocean Interactions in a High Resolution GCM: the Role of the Coupling Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccimarro, E.; Fogli, P. G.; Masina, S.; Gualdi, S.; Navarra, A.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between Tropical Cyclones (TCs) and ocean is a major mechanism responsible for energy exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. TCs affect the thermal and dynamical structure of the ocean, but the magnitude of the impact is still uncertain. Very few CMIP5 models demonstrated ability in representing TCs, mainly due to their horizontal resolution. We aim to improve TCs representation in next CMIPs experiments through the new CMCC-CESM-NEMO General Circulation Model, having a horizontal resolution of ¼ degree in both atmospheric and ocean components. The model is capable to represent realistically TCs up to Cat-4 Typhoons. The wind structure associated with TCs is responsible for two important atmosphere-ocean feedbacks: the first feedback — positive — is driven by the latent heat associated with the enhanced evaporation rate and leads to an increase of the available energy for TC. The second feedback — negative — is due to the cold water upwelling induced by the increased wind stress at the ocean surface and by the shear-induced mixing at the base of the mixed layer. The second feedback is responsible for a significant cooling of the sea surface, leading to a weakening of the cyclone intensity due to the reduction of the total heat flux into the atmosphere. Furthermore TC intensification, intensity, and lifetime strongly depend on their transitional speed. A good representation of the TC-Ocean interaction strongly depends on the coupling frequency between the atmospheric and the ocean components, especially when simulating fast moving TCs. In this work, we investigate the role of the coupling frequency in representing the two mentioned feedbacks using the new fully coupled General Circulation Model developed at CMCC.

  6. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  7. PIP2-dependent coupling is prominent in Kv7.1 due to weakened interactions between S4-S5 and S6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimova, Marina A.; Zaydman, Mark A.; Cui, Jianmin; Tarek, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    Among critical aspects of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels' functioning is the effective communication between their two composing domains, the voltage sensor (VSD) and the pore. This communication, called coupling, might be transmitted directly through interactions between these domains and, as recently proposed, indirectly through interactions with phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a minor lipid of the inner plasma membrane leaflet. Here, we show how the two components of coupling, mediated by protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions, both contribute in the Kv7.1 functioning. On the one hand, using molecular dynamics simulations, we identified a Kv7.1 PIP2 binding site that involves residues playing a key role in PIP2-dependent coupling. On the other hand, combined theoretical and experimental approaches have shown that the direct interaction between the segments of the VSD (S4-S5) and the pore (S6) is weakened by electrostatic repulsion. Finally, we conclude that due to weakened protein-protein interactions, the PIP2-dependent coupling is especially prominent in Kv7.1.

  8. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup −4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called “remarkable formula” for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. O’Connell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  9. CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2010-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel located primarily at the apical or luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, kidney, sweat gland, as well as male reproductive tract, where it plays a crucial role in transepithelial fluid homeostasis. CFTR dysfunction can be detrimental and may result in life-threatening disorders. CFTR hypofunctioning because of genetic defects leads to cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, whereas CFTR hyperfunctioning resulting from various infections evokes secretory diarrhea, the leading cause of mortality in early childhood. Therefore, maintaining a dynamic balance between CFTR up-regulating processes and CFTR down-regulating processes is essential for maintaining fluid and body homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions play a critical role in the fine-tuned regulation of CFTR function. A growing number of proteins have been reported to interact directly or indirectly with CFTR chloride channel, suggesting that CFTR might be coupled spatially and temporally to a wide variety of interacting partners including ion channels, receptors, transporters, scaffolding proteins, enzyme molecules, signaling molecules, and effectors. Most interactions occur primarily between the opposing terminal tails (amino or carboxyl) of CFTR protein and its binding partners, either directly or mediated through various PDZ scaffolding proteins. These dynamic interactions impact the channel function, as well as localization and processing of CFTR protein within cells. This article reviews the most recent progress and findings about the interactions between CFTR and its binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins, as well as the spatiotemporal regulation of CFTR-containing macromolecular signaling complexes in the apical compartments of polarized cells lining the secretory epithelia.

  10. Magnetic field effects on the DOS of a Kondo quantum dot coupled to LL leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; Qin, Chang-Dong; Wang, Huai-Yu; Wang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the joint effects of a magnetic field and electron-electron interaction on the tunneling density of states (DOS) of a quantum dot coupled to the Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime. We find that for intralead electron interaction, the DOS develops two peaks deviated from the origin by the Zeeman energy. With the increase of the intralead interaction, a phase transition occurs. For moderately strong interaction, the Zeeman splitting peaks develop into two dips. The splitting of the Kondo peak and dip is not symmetric with respect to up and down spins. In the limit of strong interaction the Zeeman splitting behavior disappears and there appears a power-law scaling behavior.

  11. Two-step spin conversion and other effects in the atom-phonon coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser, J. A.; Boukheddaden, K.; Linares, J.

    2004-05-01

    We study an atom-phonon coupling model introduced recently for spin-conversion phenomenon. The originality of this model, performed on a linear chain of atoms, is that the elastic force constant values of the spring linking two atoms depends on their electronic states. This leads to introduce naturally in the chain long- and short-range interactions, which appear respectively like a Zeeman and an exchange interactions. The exchange-like interaction can be ferro-, antiferro- or equal to zero. The effects of long-range interactions have already been studied. Here we study those of the short-range interaction. Some parts of the chain phase diagram are analysed and the main features of the experimental behaviours of spin conversion compounds are qualitatively reproduced.

  12. Skin to skin interactions. Does the infant massage improve the couple functioning?

    PubMed Central

    Gnazzo, Antonio; Guerriero, Viviana; Di Folco, Simona; Zavattini, Giulio C.; de Campora, Gaia

    2015-01-01

    Transition to parenthood is a critical stage of life due to several changes the couple has to handle. A large body of studies described how transition to parenthood can be linked to the onset of depressive symptoms, as well as the perception of a low social support, and an increased stress, representing a risk for the early mother–baby relationship. Infant massage (IM) emerged as a helpful tool to improve maternal skills in interacting with the baby, and leading toward a decreasing of post-partum symptoms. However, a growing body of literature highlights that men also may experience post-partum diseases, representing an additional risk for the development of the baby. To date, no study observed the impact of the IM on both partners. The aim of the current qualitative research is to observe the impact of the IM on a single couple of parents at childbirth. Pre (Time 1) and post-intervention (Time 3) procedure has been established to observe the changes occurring over the time in the couple. In particular, each member of the couple filled out the EPDS, the BDI-II, the MSPSS, and the PSI-SF both at Time 1 and at Time 3. The treatment (Time 2) was represented by the IM training, and lasted 4 weeks. Findings revealed a decrease in depressive symptoms in both partners, as well as an improvement of their perception of stress related to parental role. No changes has been detected with respect to the perception of social support. The IM seems to be a helpful approach to prevent the establishment of pathological conditions in new parents. Although no direct measures on the child were used, the current qualitative data seem to suggest that the IM may represent a valuable tool to prevent the onset of early negative outcomes of the baby. Further investigations and empirical data are needed to improve the knowledge in this field. PMID:26441813

  13. Extracting Effective Higgs Couplings in the Golden Channel

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Yi; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2014-04-08

    Kinematic distributions in Higgs decays to four charged leptons, the so called ‘golden channel, are a powerful probe of the tensor structure of its couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons. In this study we construct the first part of a comprehensive analysis framework designed to maximize the information contained in this channel in order to perform direct extraction of the various possible Higgs couplings. We first complete an earlier analytic calculation of the leading order fully differential cross sections for the golden channel signal and background to include the 4e and 4μ final states with interference between identical final states.more » We also examine the relative fractions of the different possible combinations of scalar-tensor couplings by integrating the fully differential cross section over all kinematic variables as well as show various doubly differential spectra for both the signal and background. From these analytic expressions we then construct a ‘generator level’ analysis framework based on the maximum likelihood method. Then, we demonstrate the ability of our framework to perform multi-parameter extractions of all the possible effective couplings of a spin-0 scalar to pairs of neutral electroweak gauge bosons including any correlations. Furthermore, this framework provides a powerful method for study of these couplings and can be readily adapted to include the relevant detector and systematic effects which we demonstrate in an accompanying study to follow.« less

  14. Extracting Effective Higgs Couplings in the Golden Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Vega-Morales, Roberto

    2014-04-08

    Kinematic distributions in Higgs decays to four charged leptons, the so called ‘golden channel, are a powerful probe of the tensor structure of its couplings to neutral electroweak gauge bosons. In this study we construct the first part of a comprehensive analysis framework designed to maximize the information contained in this channel in order to perform direct extraction of the various possible Higgs couplings. We first complete an earlier analytic calculation of the leading order fully differential cross sections for the golden channel signal and background to include the 4e and 4μ final states with interference between identical final states. We also examine the relative fractions of the different possible combinations of scalar-tensor couplings by integrating the fully differential cross section over all kinematic variables as well as show various doubly differential spectra for both the signal and background. From these analytic expressions we then construct a ‘generator level’ analysis framework based on the maximum likelihood method. Then, we demonstrate the ability of our framework to perform multi-parameter extractions of all the possible effective couplings of a spin-0 scalar to pairs of neutral electroweak gauge bosons including any correlations. Furthermore, this framework provides a powerful method for study of these couplings and can be readily adapted to include the relevant detector and systematic effects which we demonstrate in an accompanying study to follow.

  15. Visualization of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) interactions in living cells using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC).

    PubMed

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Przybyla, Julie A; Hu, Cheng-Deng; Watts, Val J

    2010-04-01

    Members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily have been shown to homo- and hetero-oligomerize both in vitro and in vivo. Although the functional and pharmacological significance of GPCR oligomerization is far from being completely understood, evidence suggests that, depending on the receptor, oligomerization may influence ligand binding, G protein coupling, and receptor targeting. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a technique based on the complementation of fragments from fluorescent proteins that allows the measurement and visualization of protein interactions in living cells. It can be extended to the simultaneous detection of distinct protein-protein interactions using a multicolor setup. This unit describes the application of BiFC and multicolor BiFC to the visualization of GPCR oligomerization in a neuronal cell model. Oligomerization of GPCR fusions to BiFC tags is visualized and measured using fluorescence microscopy and fluorometry. The effect of ligands on the relative formation of distinct oligomeric species is monitored with a ratiometric multicolor BiFC approach.

  16. Coupling approaches for groundwater-soil-atmosphere interaction in a pre-Alpine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fersch, B.; Wagner, S.; Rummler, T.; Gochis, D. J.; Kunstmann, H.

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between groundwater and soil-moisture and its implications for the exchange of water and energy with the atmosphere has recently gained increasing attention, especially when groundwater levels are shallow. Most of the current land-surface-models (LSMs) like the Noah-LSM of the WRF-ARW model neglect processes of interaction among groundwater, soil-moisture and atmosphere. Therefore, the complex, nonlinear exchange processes and the feedback between these compartments cannot be sufficiently captured. Historically, hydrological and atmospheric (including LSM) models were developed by separate research communities. Their unification should enable the analysis of complex cross-compartment interaction among groundwater, soil-moisture, and atmosphere, capturing also the lateral water transport within the saturated zone. However, it is of crucial importance how the interface between saturated zone (groundwater model) and the soil layers of the LSM is specified. We present a comparison of different approaches for a two-way coupled representation of the water transport between saturated zone and soil moisture in a groundwater/Noah-LSM type modeling system that enhances the NCAR Distributed Hydrological Modeling System (NDHMS). The applied approaches range from straightforward methods (e.g. assuming a linear gradient in the deep unsaturated zone) to more sophisticated ones assuming quasi-equilibrium conditions (modified Zeng and Decker, 2008) or the Darcy equation-based flux parameterization of Bogaart et al. (2008). The sensitivity and impact of the different coupling approaches is tested and evaluated in a single-column study using extensive observations from the TERENO pre-Alpine observatory (http://tereno.net). Furthermore, the sensitivity of the coupling is examined in a 2D application of the NDHMS model for the Ammer/Rott catchment in Southern Germany. Bogaart P., Teuling A., Troch P. (2008): A state-dependent parametrization of saturated

  17. Novel effects of spin-orbit interaction in interacting electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianmin

    Over the last several years there has been a remarkable growth in research activity in the physical properties of mesoscopic systems. Significant results, which were obtained by both theoretical and experimental studies, together with the enormous promise of nano-technology applications, contribute to this interest. In mesoscopic systems, there are 1023 or so electrons with strong Coulomb interaction. The length scale governing the electrons motion is small enough to cause quantization of the energy levels. In this work we study such quantum systems: quantum wires, quantum dots. During the last decade several experimental techniques have been developed for manufacturing both kinds of devices, which are currently an important tool for understanding low dimensions physics. The finite spin-orbit coupling is very natural, and, strictly speaking, unavoidable, in semiconducting quantum wires due to pronounced structural asymmetry inherent in the fabrication process. Thus the interplay between Coulomb interaction and spin-orbit coupling is important to investigate. The magnetic field also plays an important role which breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the Hamiltonian and splits the band of free electrons into two, corresponding to up-spin and down-spin electrons, reducing spin-rotational symmetry of the system from SU(2) to U(1). The dissertation takes account of the effect of the spin-orbit coupling interactions in the properties of mesoscopic systems. The manuscript is divided in four Chapters. In Chapter 1, the field theory in mesoscopic system is introduced. I present the relations between bosonic and fermionic operators in one dimension. These relations are used to bosonize spin 1/2 interaction fermion system. I show how to derive the RG equations around a fixed-point from the Operator Product Expansion (OPE). In Chapter 2, I present analysis of the interacting quantum wire problem in the presence of magnetic field and spin-orbital interaction. I show that an

  18. Effective interactions of DNA-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaurrea Velasco, Clara; Likos, Christos N.; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    We put forward a model that allows the calculation of the effective potential of two interacting DNA-stars, i.e., three-armed, Y-shaped, charged macromolecules, built up by three intertwined single-stranded DNAs. These particles are assumed to float on a flat interface separating two media with different dielectric properties. As the only input, our model requires the charge density along the branches and the interaction between two infinitesimally short segments, along two interacting rods. With this effective interaction at hand, a detailed investigations of the self-assembly scenarios of these molecules either via computer simulations or via theoretical frameworks comes within reach.

  19. The effects of nonequilibrium chemistry on hypersonic viscous interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallgren, W. F.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium, chemically reacting flow on classic hypersonic viscous interaction are investigated. The full Navier-stokes equations, including multicomponent diffusion, are solved for the flow over a sharp flat plate at zero incidence; an explicit-difference time marching scheme is used. Results show that finite-rate chemistry significantly reduces the effects of hypersonic viscous interaction, as predicted by a calorically perfect solution. Additionally, the results for both a calorically perfect and a chemically reacting gas positively confirm the hypothesis (based on an order-of-magnitude reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations) that at hypersonic speeds the pressure gradient through the boundary layer is not necessarily equal to zero. Furthermore, results and/or correlations derived from coupling an inviscid outer flow to a boundary layer are inaccurate in strong viscous interaction regions with a fully viscous shock layer.

  20. Effective gravitational couplings for cosmological perturbations in generalized Proca theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Mukohyama, Shinji; Tsujikawa, Shinji; Zhang, Ying-li

    2016-08-01

    We consider the finite interactions of the generalized Proca theory including the sixth-order Lagrangian and derive the full linear perturbation equations of motion on the flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background in the presence of a matter perfect fluid. By construction, the propagating degrees of freedom (besides the matter perfect fluid) are two transverse vector perturbations, one longitudinal scalar, and two tensor polarizations. The Lagrangians associated with intrinsic vector modes neither affect the background equations of motion nor the second-order action of tensor perturbations, but they do give rise to nontrivial modifications to the no-ghost condition of vector perturbations and to the propagation speeds of vector and scalar perturbations. We derive the effective gravitational coupling Geff with matter density perturbations under a quasistatic approximation on scales deep inside the sound horizon. We find that the existence of intrinsic vector modes allows a possibility for reducing Geff. In fact, within the parameter space, Geff can be even smaller than the Newton gravitational constant G at the late cosmological epoch, with a peculiar phantom dark energy equation of state (without ghosts). The modifications to the slip parameter η and the evolution of the growth rate f σ8 are discussed as well. Thus, dark energy models in the framework of generalized Proca theories can be observationally distinguished from the Λ CDM model according to both cosmic growth and expansion history. Furthermore, we study the evolution of vector perturbations and show that outside the vector sound horizon the perturbations are nearly frozen and start to decay with oscillations after the horizon entry.

  1. Visco-elastic effects in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    We report on experimental evidence of visco-elastic effects in a strongly coupled dusty plasma through investigations of the propagation characteristics of low frequency dust acoustic waves and by excitations of transverse shear waves in a DC discharge Argon plasma.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on charge-coupled imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killiany, J. M.; Baker, W. D.; Saks, N. S.; Barbe, D. F.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on three different charge coupled imagers have been investigated. Device performance was evaluated as a function of total gamma ray dose. The principal failure mechanisms have been identified for each particular device structure. The clock and bias voltages required for high total dose operation of the devices are presented.

  3. Kondo effect in a quantum wire with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, G. R.; Silva, Joelson F.; Vernek, E.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of spin-orbit interactions on the Kondo effect has been under debate recently. Studies conducted recently on a system composed of an Anderson impurity on a two-dimensional electron gas with a Rashba spin orbit have shown that it can enhance or suppress the Kondo temperature (TK), depending on the relative energy level position of the impurity with respect to the particle-hole symmetric point. Here, we investigate a system composed of a single Anderson impurity, side coupled to a quantum wire with spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We derive an effective Hamiltonian in which the Kondo coupling is modified by the SOC. In addition, the Hamiltonian contains two other scattering terms, the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, known to appear in these systems, and another one describing processes similar to the Elliott-Yafet scattering mechanisms. By performing a renormalization group analysis on the effective Hamiltonian, we find that the correction on the Kondo coupling due to the SOC favors the enhancement of the Kondo temperature even in the particle-hole symmetric point of the Anderson model, agreeing with the numerical renormalization group results. Moreover, away from the particle-hole symmetric point, TK always increases with the SOC, accordingly with a previous renormalization group analysis.

  4. Effect of finite magnetic film thickness on Néel coupling in spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kools, J. C. S.; Kula, W.; Mauri, Daniele; Lin, Tsann

    1999-04-01

    Spin valves are widely studied due to their application as magnetoresistive material in magnetic recording heads and other magnetic field sensors. An important film property is the interlayer coupling field (called offset field Ho or ferromagnetic coupling field Hf). It has been shown that the Néel model for orange-peel coupling can be applied successfully to describe this interlayer coupling. The waviness associated with the developing granular structure is thereby taken as the relevant waviness. The original Néel model describes the ferromagnetic magnetostatic interaction between two ferromagnetic layers, of infinite thickness, separated by a nonmagnetic spacer with a correlated interface waviness. In this article, this physical picture is refined to account for the effect of the finite thickness of the magnetic films in a spin valve. Magnetic poles created at the outer surfaces of the magnetic layers result in an antiferromagnetic interaction with the poles at the inner surface of the opposite layer. A simple model is presented for the different interactions in a top spin valve (columnar structure with cumulative waviness on a flat substrate) and for a bottom spin valve (columnar structure with conformal waviness on a way substrate). Comparison to experimental data, shows that the free and pinned layer thickness dependence can be understood from this refined picture.

  5. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  6. Fast quantification of endogenous carbohydrates in plasma using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Li, Xituo; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Dai, Jieyu; Wang, Guiming; Cheng, Yu; Yan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous carbohydrates in biosamples are frequently highlighted as the most differential metabolites in many metabolomics studies. A simple, fast, simultaneous quantitative method for 16 endogenous carbohydrates in plasma has been developed using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. In order to quantify 16 endogenous carbohydrates in plasma, various conditions, including columns, chromatographic conditions, mass spectrometry conditions, and plasma preparation methods, were investigated. Different conditions in this quantified analysis were performed and optimized. The reproducibility, precision, recovery, matrix effect, and stability of the method were verified. The results indicated that a methanol/acetonitrile (50:50, v/v) mixture could effectively and reproducibly precipitate rat plasma proteins. Cold organic solvents coupled with vortex for 1 min and incubated at -20°C for 20 min were the most optimal conditions for protein precipitation and extraction. The results, according to the linearity, recovery, precision, matrix effect, and stability, showed that the method was satisfactory in the quantification of endogenous carbohydrates in rat plasma. The quantified analysis of endogenous carbohydrates in rat plasma performed excellently in terms of sensitivity, high throughput, and simple sample preparation, which met the requirement of quantification in specific expanded metabolomic studies after the global metabolic profiling research.

  7. [The method of personal interaction laboratories applied to groups of married couples].

    PubMed

    Pérez Upegui, P

    1975-03-01

    The aim of Personal Interaction Laboratories is not to overcome or to solve any marriage problem or maladjustment. They provide an intense, quick experience, in which the participants get a rare chance to examine the way they are interacting with each other's partner, and the degree of mutual adaptation. A peculiar atmosphere of trust and reliability is usually created in the group, and grows steadily according to the increasing willingness of all members to share a higher degree of intimacy. This climate allows for deep emotional exchanges through which persons and couples gain a fresh view of themselves, allowing a long lasting drive for improving their life patterns. This report briefs the results of four Laboratories for married couples sponsored by the Human Welfare Foundation ("Fundación para el Bienestar Humano"), at Medellín-Colombia, in 1971 and 1972; they included 8, 10, 6 and 12 couples, that is, 36 in all. Participation in the Laboratories was set on a strictly voluntary basis; information was provided to personnel of the main industrial and commercial corporations, and interested prospective candidates applied for admission. The couples were selected according to their socio-economical level (medium and lower-medium), their educational background (at least two years of high school), and their lack of apparent mental symptoms. A special country resort was selected for the Laboratories, in order to guarantee adequate isolation for the group and no possible contacts with the familiar environment. Sessions were started on Wednesdays at 8 pm and closed on Sundays at 1.30 pm. The available time was completely devoted to Laboratory activities, allowing only short breaks for meals. T-group sessions took most of the time. They were given special attention, being at the core of group development. Each session was 90 to 120 minutes long; a total of nine were programmed. There were complementary activities, such as lectures on marriage counseling, group

  8. Dynamical Coupled-channels Effects on Pion Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B; Lee, T -S. H.; Matsuyama, A; Sato, T; Smith, L C

    2007-12-18

    The electromagnetic pion production reactions are investigated within the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in {\\bf Physics Reports, 439, 193 (2007)}. The meson-baryon channels included in this study are $\\gamma N$, $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, and the $\\pi\\Delta$, $\\rho N$ and $\\sigma N$ resonant components of the $\\pi\\pi N$ channel. With the hadronic parameters of the model determined in a recent study of $\\pi N$ scattering, we show that the pion photoproduction data up to the second resonance region can be described to a very large extent by only adjusting the bare $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ helicity amplitudes, while the non-resonant electromagnetic couplings are taken from previous works. It is found that the coupled-channels effects can contribute about 10 - 20 $\\%$ of the production cross sections in the $\\Delta$ (1232) resonance region, and can drastically change the magnitude and shape of the cross sections in the second resonance region. The importance of the off-shell effects in a dynamical approach is also demonstrated. The meson cloud effects as well as the coupled-channels contributions to the $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ form factors are found to be mainly in the low $Q^2$ region. For the magnetic M1 $\\gamma N \\rightarrow \\Delta$ (1232) form factor, the results are close to that of the Sato-Lee Model. Necessary improvements to the model and future developments are discussed.

  9. Study of An Extended Interaction Oscillator with A Rectangular Reentrance Coupled-cavity in Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaichun; Wu, Zhenhua; Liu, Shenggang

    2009-04-01

    An extended interaction oscillator (EIO) generating Terahertz (THz) wave is presented by theoretical study and simulation study in this paper. A rectangular reentrant coupled-cavity is proposed as its slow-wave structure (SWS). The equivalent circuit method (ECM) is adopted to calculate the dispersion relation and circuit parameters of the SWS. The beam-wave interaction of the EIO is theoretically studied in detail, including the beam loading conductance, the conversion efficiency and the optimal gap number. The dependence is investigated of the beam loading conductance and the conversion efficiency on the gap number and the beam velocity. Some properties of the cold circuit are simulated by CST software, including the dispersion relation and the filed distribution. These simulation results agree well with those of ECM. The operating mode of EIO is chosen very close to the β L = 2π point with corresponding frequency about 0.225 THz, when the beam voltage is 13 kV, the current 105 mA, the cavity was designed with the period 0.3 mm, 14-gap, the height 1.6 mm and the width 0.76 mm . Simulation results of beam-wave interaction with PIC codes show that the excited frequency is 0.225 THz and peak output power 44 W.

  10. Study of G-protein-coupled receptor-protein interactions by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Karen M; Eidne, Karin A

    2004-01-01

    Complex networks of protein-protein interactions are key determinants of cellular function, including those regulated by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Formation of either stable or transitory complexes are involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding through to signal transduction, desensitization, resensitization and downregulation. Today, 50% of all recently launched drugs are targeted against GPCRs. This particular class of proteins is extremely useful as a drug target because the receptors are partly located outside the cell, simplifying bioavailability and delivery of drugs directed against them. However, being located within the cell membrane causes difficulties for the study of GPCR function and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), a naturally occurring phenomenon, represents a newly emerging, powerful tool with which to investigate and monitor dynamic interactions involving this receptor class. BRET is a noninvasive, highly sensitive technique, performed as a simple homogeneous assay. involving the proximity-dependent transfer of energy from an energy donor to acceptor resulting in the emission of light. This technology has several advantages over alternative approaches as the detection occurs within live cells, in real time, and is not restricted to a particular cellular compartment. The use of such biophysical techniques as BRET, will not only increase our understanding of the nature of GPCR regulation and the protein complexes involved, but could also potentially lead to the development of novel therapeutics that modulate these interactions.

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, M B; Venema, V J; Ju, H; He, H; Liang, H; Caldwell, R B; Venema, R C

    1999-01-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is activated in response to stimulation of endothelial cells by a number of vasoactive substances including, bradykinin (BK), angiotensin II (Ang II), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ATP. In the present study we have used in vitro activity assays of purified eNOS and in vitro binding assays with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins to show that the capacity to bind and inhibit eNOS is a common feature of membrane-proximal regions of intracellular domain 4 of the BK B2, the Ang II AT1 and the ET-1 ETB receptors, but not of the ATP P2Y2 receptor. Phosphorylation of serine or tyrosine residues in the eNOS-interacting region of the B2 receptor results in a loss of eNOS inhibition due to a decrease in the binding affinity of the receptor domain for the eNOS enzyme. Furthermore, the B2 receptor is transiently phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in cultured endothelial cells in response to BK stimulation. Phosphorylation occurs during the time in which eNOS transiently dissociates from the receptor accompanied by a transient increase in nitric oxide production. Taken together, these data support the hypotheses that eNOS is regulated in endothelial cells by reversible and inhibitory interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors and that these interactions can be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. PMID:10510297

  12. A dyadic analysis of relationships and health: does couple-level context condition partner effects?

    PubMed

    Barr, Ashley B; Simons, Ronald L

    2014-08-01

    Adding to the growing literature explicating the links between romantic relationships and health, this study examined how both couple-level characteristics, particularly union type (e.g., dating, cohabiting, or marriage) and interracial pairing, and interpersonal characteristics (e.g., partner strain and support), predicted young adults' physical and mental health. Using dyadic data from a sample of 249 young, primarily Black couples, we hypothesized and found support for the importance of couple-level context, partner behavior, and their interaction in predicting health. Interracial couples (all Black/non-Black pairings) reported worse health than monoracial Black couples. Union type, however, did not directly predict health but was a significant moderator of partner strain. That is, the negative association between partner strain and self-reported health was stronger for cohabiting and married couples versus their dating counterparts, suggesting that coresidence, more so than marital status, may be important for understanding partner effects on physical health. For psychological distress, however, partner support proved equally beneficial across union types.

  13. Effect of Induced Spin-orbit Coupling in Cold Atomic Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Borunda, Mario F.; Liu, Xin; Sinova, Jairo

    2009-03-01

    Spin-orbit (SO) coupling effect in semiconductors has emerged in the solid-state community as a very active field of research, fueled in part by the field of spintronics, e.g. spin current injection with spin Hall effect [1]. Recently, new schemes are developed to generate the SO interaction in cold atoms [2], which opens new possibilities in studying Spintronics in atomic systems. Here we shall report our recent proposal of SO coupling effects in Fermi atomic systems via optical method [3]. The induced SO coupling can be of the Dresselhaus and Rashba type with a Zeeman term. We show that the optically induced SO coupling can lead to a spin-dependent effective mass under proper condition, with one of them able to be tuned between positive and negative effective masses. As a direct observable we show that in the expansion dynamics of the atomic cloud the initial atomic cloud can split into two or four clouds depending on the effective mass regimes. Reference: [1] S. Murakami et al., Science 301, 1348 (2003); J. Sinova et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 126603 (2004). [2] X.-J. Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 026602 (2007); S.-L. Zhu et al., ibid, 97, 240401 (2006); T. D. Stanescu et al., ibid, 99, 110403 (2007). [3] X.-J. Liu, M. F. Borunda, X. Liu, J. Sinova, submitted to PRL for publication, arxiv:0808.4137 (2008).

  14. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy on Sexual Satisfaction and Marital Adjustment of Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Najafi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Hoseini Kamkar, Elnaz; Mahboubi, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of emotionally focused couples therapy (EFT-C) on enhancement of marital adjustment in infertile couples. This was a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design. We selected 30 infertile couples (60 subjects) by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly assigned to two groups, sample and control. Each group consisted of 15 couples who had marital maladjustment and low sexual satisfaction. Couples answered the marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction questionnaires at baseline after which the sample group received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results of pre-test and post-test showed that EFT-C significantly impacted marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction. EFT-C had a significant effect on enhancement of satisfaction, cohesion and affectional expression. This approach impacted physical and emotional sexual satisfaction of infertile couples.

  15. The Effectiveness of Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy on Sexual Satisfaction and Marital Adjustment of Infertile Couples with Marital Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Najafi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Javidi, Nasirudin; Hoseini Kamkar, Elnaz; Mahboubi, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation is to determine the efficacy of emotionally focused couples therapy (EFT-C) on enhancement of marital adjustment in infertile couples. Materials and Methods This was a semi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design. We selected 30 infertile couples (60 subjects) by purposive sampling. Couples were randomly assigned to two groups, sample and control. Each group consisted of 15 couples who had marital maladjustment and low sexual satisfaction. Couples answered the marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction questionnaires at baseline after which the sample group received 10 sessions of EFT-C. Results Results of pre-test and post-test showed that EFT-C significantly impacted marital adjustment and sexual satisfaction. Conclusion EFT-C had a significant effect on enhancement of satisfaction, cohesion and affectional expression. This approach impacted physical and emotional sexual satisfaction of infertile couples. PMID:26644864

  16. The polarized Debye sheath effect on Kadomtsev-Petviashvili electrostatic structures in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Alinejad, H.

    2015-04-15

    We give a theoretical investigation on the dynamics of nonlinear electrostatic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with strong electrostatic interaction between dust grains in the presence of the polarization force (i.e., the force due to the polarized Debye sheath). Adopting a reductive perturbation method, we derived a three-dimensional Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation that describes the evolution of weakly nonlinear electrostatic localized waves. The energy integral equation is used to study the existence domains of the localized structures. The analysis provides the localized structure existence region, in terms of the effects of strong interaction between the dust particles and polarization force.

  17. Effect of Inter-particle Interactions on Pair Correlations of One-Dimensional Anyon Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; He, Zhi

    2015-10-01

    The pair correlation function of the one-dimensional interacting anyonic system in its ground state is investigated based on the exact Bethe ansatz solution for arbitrary coupling constant () and statistics parameter (). We discuss the effects of the inter-particle interactions and the fractional statistics on the pair correlations in both position and momentum spaces. The pair correlations of anyons with coupling constant c and statistical parameter in position space are identical to that of the Lieb-Liniger Bose model with effective coupling constant . Besides the effect of renormalized coupling, the correlations in momentum space reveal more effects induced by the statistics parameter. The anyonic statistics results in the nonsymmetric correlation when the statistics parameter deviates from 0 (Bose statistics) and (Fermi statistics) for any coupling constant c. The correlations display peaks and dips, representing the bunching and antibunching of atoms, respectively. The correlations show crossover from bunching behavior of bosons to antibunching behavior of fermions as varies from 0 to for arbitrary coupling constant. Besides the fractional effect, we also observe the effects induced by the inter-particle interactions in the momentum correlations. With the increase of the coupling constant, the bunching effect between particles weakens and the antibunching points in the correlations shift.

  18. Constraining gravitational interactions in the M theory effective action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Anirban

    2014-08-01

    We consider purely gravitational interactions of the type {{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} in the effective action of M theory in 11 dimensional flat spacetime. The duality between M theory on S 1 and type IIA string theory relates them to the type IIA interactions of the form {{e}^{2n{{\\phi }_{A}}}}{{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} where {{\\phi }_{A}} is the type IIA dilaton. The coefficients of the M theory interactions are determined by the strongly coupled type IIA theory. Given the nature of the dilaton dependence, it is plausible that for low values of n, the coefficient has a similar structure as the genus (n+1) string amplitude of the type IIA {{D}^{6n}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interaction, namely the transcendental nature. Assuming this, and focussing on the even-even spin structure part of the type IIA string amplitude, this coefficient is given by the type IIB genus (n+1) amplitude, which we constrain using supersymmetry, S-duality and maximal supergravity. The source terms of the Poisson equations satisfied by the S-duality invariant IIB couplings play a central role in the analysis. This procedure yields partial contributions to several multi-loop type IIB string amplitudes, from which we extract the transcendental nature of the corresponding M theory couplings. For n\\leqslant 2, all possible source terms involve only BPS couplings. While the {{{ R}}^{4}} and {{D}^{6}}{{{ R}}^{4}} M theory couplings agree with known results, the coefficient of the {{D}^{12}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interaction takes the form \\zeta {{(2)}^{3}}({{\\Omega }_{1}}+{{\\Omega }_{2}}\\zeta (3)). We also analyze the {{D}^{18}}{{{ R}}^{4}} and {{D}^{24}}{{{ R}}^{4}} interactions, and show that their coefficients have at least the terms \\zeta {{(2)}^{4}}({{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{1}}+{{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{2}}\\zeta (3)+{{\\tilde{\\Omega }}_{3}}\\zeta (5)) and \\zeta {{(2)}^{5}}({{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{1}}+{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{2}}\\zeta (3)+{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{3}}\\zeta (5) +\\;{{\\underline{\\Omega }}_{4

  19. Collisional interactions between self-interacting nonrelativistic boson stars: Effective potential analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotner, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Scalar particles are a common prediction of many beyond the Standard Model theories. If they are light and cold enough, there is a possibility they may form Bose-Einstein condensates, which will then become gravitationally bound. These boson stars are solitonic solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations but may be approximated in the nonrelativistic regime with a coupled Schrödinger-Poisson system. General properties of single soliton states are derived, including the possibility of quartic self-interactions. Binary collisions between two solitons are then studied, and the effects of different mass ratios, relative phases, self-couplings, and separation distances are characterized, leading to an easy conceptual understanding of how these parameters affect the collision outcome in terms of conservation of energy. Applications to dark matter are discussed.

  20. Scales of benthic–pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: From recruitment limitation to top-down control

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Sergio A.; Wieters, Evie A.; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29°S and 35°S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at ≈32°-33°S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies. PMID:16332959

  1. Scales of benthic-pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: from recruitment limitation to top-down control.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Sergio A; Wieters, Evie A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-12-13

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29 degrees S and 35 degrees S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at approximately 32 degrees -33 degrees S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies.

  2. Hyperfine interaction, spin polarization, and spin delocalization as probes of donor-bridge-acceptor interactions in exchange-coupled biradicals.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Martin L; Shultz, David A; Habel-Rodriguez, Diana; Schmidt, Robert D; Sullivan, Ubie

    2010-11-18

    Computations and EPR spectroscopy are used to probe the spin distribution of donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) biradical complexes: Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-NN) (1), Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-1,4-Ph-NN) (2), Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-2,5-TP-NN) (3), and Tp(Cum,Me)Zn(SQ-2,5-Xyl-NN) (4) (SQ = orthosemiquinone and NN = nitronylnitroxide). These complexes are ground-state analogs of the charge-separated excited states formed in photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The intraligand magnetic exchange interaction (J) in these complexes is mediated by the bridges and has been found to stabilize the triplet ground states of 1 and 2. Detailed spectroscopic and bonding calculations have been used to elucidate the role of the bridge fragment (B) and its conformation relative to donor (SQ) and acceptor (NN) on spin density distributions. The computed results correlate well with experimental nitrogen hyperfine coupling constants.

  3. Effective dipole moment for the mode coupling instability: Mapping of self-consistent wake models

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, T. B.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.

    2012-07-15

    The theory of the mode coupling instability operating in two-dimensional plasma crystals is generalized, by employing the linear plasma response formalism to describe the interparticle interactions self-consistently. In this approach, the underlying ion distribution function is calculated from first principles. Subthermal and suprathermal regimes of the ion flow are considered. A mapping procedure is proposed, which relates the self-consistent coupling coefficients to the effective dipole moment of the wake-the parameter which characterizes the mode coupling in the framework of the conventionally used Yukawa/point-wake model. The importance of the self-consistent approach is demonstrated by comparing the theoretically obtained dipole moments with the values deduced from experiments.

  4. Kondo effect in a quantum dot side-coupled to a topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minchul; Lim, Jong Soo; López, Rosa

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical and transport features of a Kondo dot side coupled to a topological superconductor (TS). The Majorana fermion states (MFSs) formed at the ends of the TS are found to be able to alter the Kondo physics profoundly: For an infinitely long wire where the MFSs do not overlap (ɛm=0) a finite dot-MFS coupling (Γm) reduces the unitary-limit value of the linear conductance by exactly a factor 3/4 in the weak-coupling regime (Γmcoupling regime (Γm>TK), on the other hand, the spin-split Kondo resonance takes place due to the MFS-induced Zeeman splitting, which is a genuine many-body effect of the strong Coulomb interaction and the topological superconductivity. We find that the original Kondo resonance is fully restored once the MFSs are strongly hybridized (ɛm>Γm). This unusual interaction between the Kondo effect and the MFS can thus serve to detect the Majorana fermions unambiguously and quantify the degree of overlap between the MFSs in the TS.

  5. Fluid-structural interactions using Navier-Stokes flow equations coupled with shell finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Byun, Chansup

    1993-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented to study fluid-structural interaction problems for three-dimensional aerospace structures. The flow is modeled using the three-dimensional unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes equations and solved using the finite-difference approach. The three dimensional structure is modeled using shell/plate finite-element formulation. The two disciplines are coupled using a domain decomposition approach. Accurate procedures both in time and space are developed to combine the solutions from the flow equations with those of the structural equations. Time accuracy is maintained using aeroelastic configuration-adaptive moving grids that are computed every time step. The work done by aerodynamic forces due to structural deformations is preserved using consistent loads. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  6. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  7. A fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Hsu, M.-C.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, W.; Liang, X.; Kvamsdal, T.; Brekken, R.; Isaksen, J. G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a computational vascular fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology and its application to patient-specific aneurysm models of the middle cerebral artery bifurcation. A fully coupled fluid-structural simulation approach is reviewed, and main aspects of mesh generation in support of patient-specific vascular FSI analyses are presented. Quantities of hemodynamic interest such as wall shear stress and wall tension are studied to examine the relevance of FSI modeling as compared to the rigid arterial wall assumption. We demonstrate the importance of including the flexible wall modeling in vascular blood flow simulations by performing a comparison study that involves four patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms varying in shape and size.

  8. Static black hole solutions with a self-interacting conformally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Dotti, Gustavo; Gleiser, Reinaldo J.; Martinez, Cristian

    2008-05-15

    We study static, spherically symmetric black hole solutions of the Einstein equations with a positive cosmological constant and a conformally coupled self-interacting scalar field. Exact solutions for this model found by Martinez, Troncoso, and Zanelli were subsequently shown to be unstable under linear gravitational perturbations, with modes that diverge arbitrarily fast. We find that the moduli space of static, spherically symmetric solutions that have a regular horizon--and satisfy the weak and dominant energy conditions outside the horizon--is a singular subset of a two-dimensional space parametrized by the horizon radius and the value of the scalar field at the horizon. The singularity of this space of solutions provides an explanation for the instability of the Martinez, Troncoso, and Zanelli spacetimes and leads to the conclusion that, if we include stability as a criterion, there are no physically acceptable black hole solutions for this system that contain a cosmological horizon in the exterior of its event horizon.

  9. Quasi-particle spectrum in trilayer graphene: Role of onsite coulomb interaction and interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Stacking dependent quasi-particle spectrum and density of states (DOS) in trilayer (ABC-, ABA- and AAA-stacked) graphene are analyzed using mean-field Green's function equations of motion method. Interlayer coupling (t1) is found to be responsible for the splitting of quasi-particle peaks in each stacking order. Coulomb interaction suppresses the trilayer splitting and generates a finite gap at Fermi level in ABC- while a tiny gap in ABA-stacked trilayer graphene. Influence of t⊥ is prominent for AAA-stacking as compared to ABC- and ABA-stacking orders. The theoretically obtained quasi-particle energies and DOS has been viewed in terms of recent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopic (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopic (STM) data available on these systems.

  10. Coulomb-interaction induced coupling of Landau levels in intrinsic and modulation-doped quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J.; Stevens, C. E.; Zhang, H.; Dey, P.; McGinty, D.; McGill, S. A.; Smith, R. P.; Reno, J. L.; Turkowski, V.; Perakis, I. E.; Hilton, D. J.; Karaiskaj, D.

    2017-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy on intrinsic and modulation doped quantum wells in external magnetic fields up to 10 T. In the undoped sample, the strong Coulomb interactions and the increasing separations of the electron and hole charge distributions with increasing magnetic fields lead to a nontrivial in-plane dispersion of the magneto-excitons. Thus, the discrete and degenerate Landau levels are coupled to a continuum. The signature of this continuum is the emergence of elongated spectral line shapes at the Landau level energies, which are exposed by the multidimensional nature of our technique. Surprisingly, the elongation of the peaks is completely absent in the lowest Landau level spectra obtained from the modulation doped quantum well at high fields.

  11. Emergence of global scaling behaviour in the coupled Earth-atmosphere interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Bijan; Saberi, Abbas Ali; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Scale invariance property in the global geometry of Earth may lead to a coupled interactive behaviour between various components of the climate system. One of the most interesting correlations exists between spatial statistics of the global topography and the temperature on Earth. Here we show that the power-law behaviour observed in the Earth topography via different approaches, resembles a scaling law in the global spatial distribution of independent atmospheric parameters. We report on observation of scaling behaviour of such variables characterized by distinct universal exponents. More specifically, we find that the spatial power-law behaviour in the fluctuations of the near surface temperature over the lands on Earth, shares the same universal exponent as of the global Earth topography, indicative of the global persistent role of the static geometry of Earth to control the steady state of a dynamical atmospheric field. Such a universal feature can pave the way to the theoretical understanding of the chaotic nature of the atmosphere coupled to the Earth’s global topography. PMID:27666675

  12. Emergence of global scaling behaviour in the coupled Earth-atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Bijan; Saberi, Abbas Ali; Sodoudi, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    Scale invariance property in the global geometry of Earth may lead to a coupled interactive behaviour between various components of the climate system. One of the most interesting correlations exists between spatial statistics of the global topography and the temperature on Earth. Here we show that the power-law behaviour observed in the Earth topography via different approaches, resembles a scaling law in the global spatial distribution of independent atmospheric parameters. We report on observation of scaling behaviour of such variables characterized by distinct universal exponents. More specifically, we find that the spatial power-law behaviour in the fluctuations of the near surface temperature over the lands on Earth, shares the same universal exponent as of the global Earth topography, indicative of the global persistent role of the static geometry of Earth to control the steady state of a dynamical atmospheric field. Such a universal feature can pave the way to the theoretical understanding of the chaotic nature of the atmosphere coupled to the Earth’s global topography.

  13. Discriminating the structure of exo-2-aminonorbornane using nuclear quadrupole coupling interactions.

    PubMed

    Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Millán, Judith; Basterretxea, Francisco; Fernández, José A; Castaño, Fernando

    2011-04-28

    The intrinsic conformational and structural properties of the bicycle exo-2-aminonorbornane have been probed in a supersonic jet expansion using Fourier-transform microwave (FT-MW) spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The rotational spectrum revealed two different conformers arising from the internal rotation of the amino group, exhibiting small (MHz) hyperfine patterns originated by the (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling interaction. Complementary ab initio (MP2) and DFT (B3LYP and M05-2X) calculations provided comparative predictions for the structural properties, rotational and centrifugal distortion data, hyperfine parameters, and isomerization barriers. Due to the similarity of the rotational constants, the structural assignment of the observed rotamers and the calculation of the torsion angles of the amino group were based on the conformational dependence of the (14)N nuclear quadrupole coupling hyperfine tensor. In the most stable conformation (ss), the two amino N-H bonds are staggered with respect to the adjacent C-H bond. In the second conformer (st), only one of the N-H bonds is staggered and the other is trans. A third predicted conformer (ts) was not detected, consistent with a predicted conformational relaxation to conformer ss through a low barrier of 5.2 kJ mol(-1).

  14. Closed system of coupling effects in generalized thermo-elastoplasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śloderbach, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the field equations of the generalized coupled thermoplasticity theory are derived using the postulates of classical thermodynamics of irreversible processses. Using the Legendre transformations two new thermodynamics potentials P and S depending upon internal thermodynamic forces Π are introduced. The most general form for all the thermodynamics potentials are assumed instead of the usually used additive form. Due to this assumption, it is possible to describe all the effects of thermomechanical couples and also the elastic-plastic coupling effects observed in such materials as rocks, soils, concretes and in some metalic materials. In this paper not only the usual postulate of existence of a dissipation qupotential (the Gyarmati postulate) is used to derive the velocity equation. The plastic flow constitutive equations have the character of non-associated flow laws even when the Gyarmati postulate is assumed. In general formulation, the plastic strain rate tensor is normal to the surface of the generalized function of plastic flow defined in the the space of internal thermodynamic forces Π but is not normal to the yield surface. However, in general formulation and after the use the Gyarmati postulate, the direction of the sum of the plastic strain rate tensor and the coupled elastic strain rate tensor is normal to the yield surface.

  15. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-06-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, Vda, in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate Vda for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the Vda matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the Vda matrix elements are also analyzed.

  16. Electromechanical coupling in piezoelectric nanobeams due to the flexoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. D.; Yang, C. P.; Su, Y. X.; Huang, R.; Lin, X. L.

    2017-09-01

    The flexoelectric effect is a coupling of polarization and strain gradient, which exists in a wide variety of materials and may lead to strong size-dependent properties at the nanoscale. Based on an extension to the classical beam model, this paper investigates the electromechanical coupling response of piezoelectric nanobeams with different electrical boundary conditions including the effect of flexoelectricity. The electric Gibbs free energy and the variational principle are used to derive the governing equations with three types of electrical boundary conditions. Closed-form solutions are obtained for static bending of cantilever beams. The results show that the normalized effective stiffness increases with decreasing beam thickness in the open circuit electrical boundary conditions with or without surface electrodes. The induced electric potential due to the flexoelectric effect is obtained under the open circuit conditions, which may be important for sensing or energy harvesting applications. An intrinsic thickness depending on the material properties is identified for the maximum induced electric potential. The present results also show that flexoelectricity has a more significant effect on the electroelastic responses than piezoelectricity at the nanoscale. Our analysis in the present study can be useful for understanding of the electromechanical coupling in nanobeams with flexoelectricity.

  17. Meissner effect and a stringlike interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Choudhury, Ishita Dutta; Lahiri, Amitabha

    2017-05-01

    We find that a recently proposed interaction involving the vorticity current of electrons, which radiatively induces a photon mass in 3+1 dimensions in the low-energy effective theory, corresponds to confining strings (linear potential) between electrons.

  18. Integer quantum Hall effect of interacting electrons in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Zhong; Ting, C. S.

    2017-02-01

    By taking into account the charge and spin orderings and the exchange interactions between all the Landau levels, we investigate the integer quantum Hall effect of electrons in graphene using the mean-field theory. We find that the fourfold degeneracy of the Landau levels cannot be completely lifted by the Coulomb interactions. In particular, at fillings ν =4 n +2 with n =0 ,1 ,... , there is no splitting between the fourfold degenerated Landau levels. We show that with doping the degenerated lowest empty level can be sequentially filled one by one; the filled level is lower than the empty ones because of the Coulomb-exchange interactions. This result explains the step Δ ν =1 in the quantized Hall conductivity. We present a highly efficient method for dealing with a huge number of the Coulomb couplings between all the Landau levels of the Dirac fermions.

  19. Dynamics of interacting electrons under effect of a Morse potential.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, J L L; Sales, M O; Neto, A Ranciaro; de Moura, F A B F

    2017-05-01

    We consider interacting electrons moving in a nonlinear Morse lattice. We set the initial conditions as follows: electrons were initially localized at the center of the chain and a solitonic deformation was produced by an impulse excitation on the center of the chain. By solving quantum and classical equations for this system numerically, we found that a fraction of electronic wave function was trapped by the solitonic excitation, and trapping specificities depend on the degree of interaction among electrons. Also, there is evidence that the effective electron velocity depends on Coulomb interaction and electron-phonon coupling in a nontrivial way. This association is explained in detail along this work. In addition, we briefly discuss the dependence of our results with the type of initial condition we choose for the electrons and lattice.

  20. Propulsive effects of vortex coupling between parallel pulsed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios; Hart, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    For vehicles that use pulsed jet propulsion, nature provides inspiration for different ways to improve propulsive performance. Communities of marine invertebrates called salps improve the efficiency of cruising locomotion by aggregating into large multi-animal chains. In this process, the cylindrical animals physically connect to each other side-by-side to form an array of individual pulsed jets whose synchronous pulsing propels the entire chain forward. Some benefits of this chaining behavior can be described using existing models of pulsed jet propulsion for steady, cruising conditions. However, during unsteady conditions such as impulsive maneuvering at low speeds, it remains unclear how interactions between neighboring jets will affect the chain's propulsive performance. Using bench-top experiments, we investigate the unsteady interactions between two parallel pulsed jets. Under some conditions, the pulsed jets form vortex rings that coalesce before vortex formation is complete, coupling the hydrodynamics of the independent jets. We measure how different degrees of vortex coupling alter the energy and momentum transfer in the two-jet system. Finally, we explore the energy and momentum scalings that would guide the design of a vehicle using multi-jet maneuvering techniques. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Plasma interactions and surface/material effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, M.; Chutjian, A.; Hall, W.; Leung, P.; Robinson, P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion on plasma interactions and surface/material effects is summarized. The key issues in this area were: (1) the lack of data on the material properties of common spacecraft surface materials; (2) lack of understanding of the contamination and decontamination processes; and (3) insufficient analytical tools to model synergistic phenomena related to plasma interactions. Without an adequate database of material properties, accurate system performance predictions cannot be made. The interdisciplinary nature of the surface-plasma interactions area makes it difficult to plan and maintain a coherent theoretical and experimental program. The shuttle glow phenomenon is an excellent example of an unanticipated, complex interaction involving synergism between surface and plasma effects. Building an adequate technology base for understanding and predicting surface-plasma interactions will require the coordinated efforts of engineers, chemists, and physicists. An interdisciplinary R and D program should be organized to deal with similar problems that the space systems of the 21st century may encounter.

  2. Coupled-mode theory for the interaction between acoustic waves and spin waves in magnonic-phononic crystals: Propagating magnetoelastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graczyk, Piotr; Krawczyk, Maciej

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated codirectional and contradirectional couplings between spin wave and acoustic wave in a one-dimensional periodic structure (the so-called magphonic crystal). The system consists of two ferromagnetic layers alternating in space. We have taken into consideration materials commonly used in magnonics: yttrium iron garnet, CoFeB, permalloy, and cobalt. The coupled mode theory (CMT) formalism has been successfully implemented to describe the magnetoelastic interaction as a periodic perturbation in the magphonic crystal. The results of CMT calculations have been verified by more rigorous simulations with the frequency-domain plane-wave method and the time-domain finite-element method. The presented resonant coupling in the magphonic crystal is an active in-space mechanism which spatially transfers energy between propagating spin and acoustic modes, thus creating a propagating magnetoelastic wave. We have shown that CMT analysis of the magnetoelastic coupling is an useful tool to optimize and design a spin wave-acoustic wave transducer based on magphonic crystals. The effect of spin-wave damping has been included to the model to discuss the efficiency of such a device. Our model shows that it is possible to obtain forward conversion of the acoustic wave to the spin wave in case of codirectional coupling and backward conversion in case of contradirectional coupling. That energy transfer may be realized for broadband coupling and for generation of spin waves which are of different wavelength (in particular, shorter) than exciting acoustic waves.

  3. Optical properties of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers: Intermolecular coupling and many-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Caterina; Moldt, Thomas; Gahl, Cornelius; Weinelt, Martin; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    In a joint theoretical and experimental work, the optical properties of azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are studied at different molecular packing densities. Our results, based on density-functional and many-body perturbation theory, as well as on differential reflectance (DR) spectroscopy, shed light on the microscopic mechanisms ruling photo-absorption in these systems. While the optical excitations are intrinsically excitonic in nature, regardless of the molecular concentration, in densely packed SAMs intermolecular coupling and local-field effects are responsible for a sizable weakening of the exciton binding strength. Through a detailed analysis of the character of the electron-hole pairs, we show that distinct excitations involved in the photo-isomerization at low molecular concentrations are dramatically broadened by intermolecular interactions. Spectral shifts in the calculated DR spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results. Our findings represent an important step forward to rationalize the excited-state properties of these complex materials.

  4. Separation and identification of oligonucleotides by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS)

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Renee N.; Kröning, Karolin K.; Caruso, Joseph A.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for the separation and detection of oligonucleotides utilizing hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) is described. Polythymidilic acids of various lengths (10, 15, 20 and 30 nucleotides) were separated under gradient HILIC conditions. Selective detection of oligonucleotides was possible through monitoring m/z 47, corresponding to 31P16O+, using ICPMS. Oxygen was used as a reaction gas in the collision/reaction cell to produce PO+ by reacting with phosphorus in the gas phase, thereby effectively eliminating the interferences for phosphorus normally seen at m/z 31. Limits of detection (LODs) were determined to be 1.69 pmol, 1.21 pmol, 1.0 pmol and 0.55 pmol loaded on column for the 10, 15, 20 and 30-mer, respectively. PMID:20830328

  5. Micellar effects on dediazoniation and on azo coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Pazo-Llorente, Román; Rodriguez-Menacho, M A Carmen; González-Romero, Elisa; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos

    2002-04-01

    The effects of a sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, micellar solution on the coupling rates of two arenediazonium ions, ArN(2)(+), with the hydrophobic 1-naphthylamine, 1NA and N-(1-naphthyl) ethylenediamine, NED, coupling agents and with the hydrophilic Na salt of 2-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid, 2N6S, have been studied. First, we explored the micellar effects on the thermal decomposition of the arenediazonium ions. The observed rate constants are slightly depressed or increased, depending on the nature of ArN(2)(+), compared to those in pure water upon increasing [SDS]. Estimations of the corresponding association constant to the micelle indicate that a significant fraction of the arenediazonium ions are incorporated into the micelles even at low surfactant concentrations. The sulfonate group in 2N6S prevents its incorporation into the micellar aggregate due to the electrostatic barrier imposed by the micelles and, in consequence, the coupling reaction is inhibited. In contrast, when employing the naphthylamine derivatives, the observed rate constant increase rapidly up to a maximum at [SDS]effect exerted by the micelles. The results are discussed in terms of the distribution of reactants between the micellar and aqueous pseudophases, the micellar-induced shift in the pK(a) of the amines, and the concentration/dilution effect exerted by the micelles.

  6. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  7. Proposal for Coherent Coupling of Majorana Zero Modes and Superconducting Qubits Using the 4π Josephson Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Hou, Chang-Yu; Manucharyan, Vladimir E.; Demler, Eugene

    2013-09-01

    We propose to use an ancilla fluxonium qubit to interact with a Majorana qubit hosted by a topological one-dimensional wire. The coupling is obtained using the Majorana qubit-controlled 4π Josephson effect to flux bias the fluxonium qubit. We demonstrate how this coupling can be used to sensitively identify topological superconductivity, to measure the state of the Majorana qubit, to construct 2-qubit operations, and to implement quantum memories with topological protection.

  8. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  9. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, German; Pavon, Diego; Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2008-05-15

    Models with dark energy decaying into dark matter have been proposed in cosmology to solve the coincidence problem. We study the effect of such coupling on the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The interaction changes the rate of evolution of the metric potentials and the growth rate of matter density perturbations and modifies the integrated Sachs-Wolfe component of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, enhancing the effect. Cross correlation of galaxy catalogs with cosmic microwave background maps provides a model-independent test to constrain the interaction. We particularize our analysis for a specific interacting model and show that galaxy catalogs with median redshifts z{sub m}=0.1-0.9 can rule out models with an interaction parameter strength of c{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.1 better than 99.95% confidence level. Values of c{sup 2}{<=}0.01 are compatible with the data and may account for the possible discrepancy between the fraction of dark energy derived from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe 3 yr data and the fraction obtained from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Measuring the fraction of dark energy by these two methods could provide evidence of an interaction.

  10. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling, with focus on the feedback effects

  11. Multiscale Interactions over the Maritime Continent: Feedbacks between Atmospheric Convectively Coupled Kelvin Waves and Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, D.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between atmospheric convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKW), initiated over the Indian Ocean, and the diurnally varying convection over the Maritime Continent are primary interest of this presentation. Mutliscale interactions between local and propagating convection lead to substantial enhancement of the local diurnal cycle over that region. CCKW activity strongly modulates magnitude of the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent, but not its temporal evolution, which maintains characteristics of a diurnal cycle. The impact is such that precipitation is highly increased during convective part of the CCKW and little suppressed during its non-convective part. Timing of the increase in diurnal cycle magnitude strongly depends on the time of the day of the CCKW approach to the Maritime Continent. It is shown that precipitation anomaly associated with CCKW is phase locked with local diurnal cycle of precipitation over the Maritime Continent and that has implications for CCKW ability to propagate across that region. The composite daily-zonal evolution of the precipitation anomaly associated with CCKW is such that it is "in-phase" with local diurnal cycle over Sumatra, Borneo and surrounding seas. This presentation is based on analysis of TRMM precipitation data and newly developed CCKW trajectories database.

  12. Closed-shell ring coupled cluster doubles theory with range separation applied on weak intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Toulouse, Julien; Zhu, Wuming; Savin, Andreas; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2011-08-28

    We explore different variants of the random phase approximation to the correlation energy derived from closed-shell ring-diagram approximations to coupled cluster doubles theory. We implement these variants in range-separated density-functional theory, i.e., by combining the long-range random phase approximations with short-range density-functional approximations. We perform tests on the rare-gas dimers He(2), Ne(2), and Ar(2), and on the weakly interacting molecular complexes of the S22 set of Jurečka et al. [P. Jurečka, J. Šponer, J. Černý, and P. Hobza, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. The two best variants correspond to the ones originally proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [A. Szabo and N. S. Ostlund, J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)]. With range separation, they reach mean absolute errors on the equilibrium interaction energies of the S22 set of about 0.4 kcal/mol, corresponding to mean absolute percentage errors of about 4%, with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set.

  13. Coupling microdialysis with flow-injection chemiluminescence detection for a protein-drug interaction study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Gong, Zhengjun; Zhang, Zhujun

    2006-06-16

    The interaction of metronidazole (MTZ) and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using the coupling system of on-line microdialysis sampling with flow-injection chemiluminescence detection (FI-MD-CL). The interested drug and HSA were mixed in different molar ratios in 0.067 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and incubated at 37 degrees C in a water-bath. Then the microdialysis probe was put into the MTZ-HSA mixed solution and sampled at a perfusion rate of 5 microL min(-1). The microdialysates was determined using flow-injection chemiluminescence. In vitro recovery (R) of MTZ under experimental conditions was approximately 25.2% with a R.S.D. of about 3.2%. The values estimated for the binding constant (K) and the number of the binding sites (n) were found to be 1.50 x 10(3)L mol(-1) and 1.89, respectively. The values of nK obtained using Scatchard analysis and Klotz plot were found to be quite similar. The method provided a reliable and simple technique for the study of drug-protein interaction.

  14. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Coupled calculation of the airflow interaction with elastic rod of square cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogudalina, S. V.; Fedorova, N. N.; Valger, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical modeling of vibration of an elastic rod mounted normal to external flow and fixed rigidly to a substrate. The simulation is performed with ANSYS software using the technology of bidirectional coupling (2FSI). The hydrodynamic, conjugate and modal analysis have been performed. The structure of the air flow in the vicinity of the model was analyzed. The oscillations of the elastic model were revealed and the stress - strain state was obtained. The natural frequencies of the rod and corresponding vibration shapes are found. To prevent undesired vibrations of elastic structures which can lead to their destruction, the interaction of structures with external air flow must the considered. Related physical processes in which movement of the air has an impact on the behavior of deformable objects (Fluid Structure Interaction, FSI) are a key element in many engineering problems of aviation and civil engineering. Aeroelasticity phenomenon must be considered when creating modern aircraft, designing high-rise and extended buildings.

  16. Antisymmetric Spin-Orbit Coupling Effect on Kondo-Induced Electric Polarization in a Triangular Triple Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Mikito; Matsumoto, Masashige; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2017-05-01

    We study the local antisymmetric spin-orbit (ASO) coupling effect on spin, orbital, and charge degrees of freedom for the Kondo effect in a triangular triple quantum dot (TTQD). Here, one of the three QDs is coupled to a metallic lead through electron tunneling, and a local electric polarization is induced by the Kondo effect. The ASO interaction is introduced in the other two coupled QDs on the opposite side of the lead. Generally, the ASO coupling effect is very weak and not easily detectable, but it essentially causes spin and charge reconfigurations in the TTQD through the Kondo effect. Using an extended Anderson model for the TTQD Kondo system, we elucidate that the ASO coupling gives rise to a considerable reduction of the emergent electric polarization, as a consequence of the parity mixing of molecular orbitals in the triangular loop as well as the spin-up and spin-down coupling of local electrons. The latter leads to a local diamagnetic susceptibility owing to the ASO coupled spins. We also show that the Kondo-induced electric polarization can be controlled by the ASO coupling as well as by the magnetic flux penetrating through the TTQD.

  17. Effective Supergravity from the Weakly Coupled HeteroticString

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, Mary K.

    2005-05-01

    The motivation for Calabi-Yau-like compactifications of the weakly coupled E{sub 8} {circle_times} E{sub 8} heterotic string theory, its particle spectrum and the issue of dilaton stabilization are briefly reviewed. Modular invariant models for hidden sector condensation and supersymmetry breaking are described at the quantum level of the effective field theory. Their phenomenological and cosmological implications, including a possible origin for R-parity, are discussed.

  18. Bending effect on fiber acousto-optic mode coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yan; Luo, Ye

    2005-08-20

    The acousto-optic effect in a bent fiber is studied experimentally and numerically by using the scalar finite-element method. The resulting transmission spectra show that new mode-coupling peaks appear due to the breaking of the mode spatial symmetry. The strength of new peaks increases as the fiber-bending curvature increases with a redshift or blueshift in wavelength, strongly depending on the orientation of fiber bending with respect to the acoustic-wave vibration direction.

  19. Phase controlled swapping effect in electron transport through asymmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogi, Bharat Bhushan; Chand, Shyam; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the role of asymmetry and magnetic flux on electronic transport through various configurations of coupled quantum dot system, by using Non-Equilibrium Green Function formalism. Transport properties (Transmission Probability, Current-Voltage Characteristics and Differential Conductance) of the different configurations of coupled quantum dot system have been studied by self-consistent approach, in the presence of on-dot Coulomb interaction. Fano effect, appearing in Transmission probability, has been explored during transition of the system from series to symmetric parallel configuration and in response to the variation in magnetic flux threading the system. The results show Fano peaks for asymmetric and symmetric parallel configurations. By adjusting the magnetic flux, swapping effect in Fano peaks appears due to the exchange of states, which sustains despite strong Coulomb blockade effect. The transmission probability spectrum shows mirror symmetry whenever the sum of two values of magnetic flux threading the system is 2 π.

  20. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  1. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Examination of the Effects on Gay Couples and Coupling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carl, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic significantly influences attitudes about life and lifestyles. Homosexuals have to give increased consideration to coupling, the nature of coupled relationships, sex and intimacy, and death long before the normal time. Discusses impact of AIDS on the early stages of gay coupling and on the…

  2. Multiple Pairwise Analysis of Non-homologous Centromere Coupling Reveals Preferential Chromosome Size-Dependent Interactions and a Role for Bouquet Formation in Establishing the Interaction Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Rockmill, Beth; Xie, Pingxing; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence of the synaptonemal complex (SC) protein Zip1 is required. The nature and mechanism of coupling have yet to be elucidated. Here we present the first pairwise analysis of centromere coupling in an effort to uncover underlying rules that may exist within these non-homologous interactions. We designed a novel chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based assay to detect all possible interactions between non-homologous yeast centromeres during early meiosis. Using this variant of 3C-qPCR, we found a size-dependent interaction pattern, in which chromosomes assort preferentially with chromosomes of similar sizes, in haploid and diploid spo11 cells, but not in a coupling-defective mutant (spo11 zip1 haploid and diploid yeast). This pattern is also observed in wild-type diploids early in meiosis but disappears as meiosis progresses and homologous chromosomes pair. We found no evidence to support the notion that ancestral centromere homology plays a role in pattern establishment in S. cerevisiae post-genome duplication. Moreover, we found a role for the meiotic bouquet in establishing the size dependence of centromere coupling, as abolishing bouquet (using the bouquet-defective spo11 ndj1 mutant) reduces it. Coupling in spo11 ndj1 rather follows telomere clustering preferences. We propose that a chromosome size preference for centromere coupling helps establish efficient homolog recognition. PMID:27768699

  3. Multiple Pairwise Analysis of Non-homologous Centromere Coupling Reveals Preferential Chromosome Size-Dependent Interactions and a Role for Bouquet Formation in Establishing the Interaction Pattern.

    PubMed

    Lefrançois, Philippe; Rockmill, Beth; Xie, Pingxing; Roeder, G Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2016-10-01

    During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence of the synaptonemal complex (SC) protein Zip1 is required. The nature and mechanism of coupling have yet to be elucidated. Here we present the first pairwise analysis of centromere coupling in an effort to uncover underlying rules that may exist within these non-homologous interactions. We designed a novel chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based assay to detect all possible interactions between non-homologous yeast centromeres during early meiosis. Using this variant of 3C-qPCR, we found a size-dependent interaction pattern, in which chromosomes assort preferentially with chromosomes of similar sizes, in haploid and diploid spo11 cells, but not in a coupling-defective mutant (spo11 zip1 haploid and diploid yeast). This pattern is also observed in wild-type diploids early in meiosis but disappears as meiosis progresses and homologous chromosomes pair. We found no evidence to support the notion that ancestral centromere homology plays a role in pattern establishment in S. cerevisiae post-genome duplication. Moreover, we found a role for the meiotic bouquet in establishing the size dependence of centromere coupling, as abolishing bouquet (using the bouquet-defective spo11 ndj1 mutant) reduces it. Coupling in spo11 ndj1 rather follows telomere clustering preferences. We propose that a chromosome size preference for centromere coupling helps establish efficient homolog recognition.

  4. Inertial effect on spin-orbit coupling and spin transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, B.; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2013-08-01

    We theoretically study the renormalization of inertial effects on the spin dependent transport of conduction electrons in a semiconductor by taking into account the interband mixing on the basis of k→ṡp→ perturbation theory. In our analysis, for the generation of spin current we have used the extended Drude model where the spin-orbit coupling plays an important role. We predict enhancement of the spin current resulting from the renormalized spin-orbit coupling effective in our model in cubic and non-cubic crystals. Attention has been paid to clarify the importance of gauge fields in the spin transport of this inertial system. A theoretical proposition of a perfect spin filter has been done through the Aharonov-Casher like phase corresponding to this inertial system. For a time dependent acceleration, effect of k→ ṡp→ perturbation on the spin current and spin polarization has also been addressed. Furthermore, achievement of a tunable source of polarized spin current through the non uniformity of the inertial spin-orbit coupling strength has also been discussed.

  5. Role of the Ocean-Atmosphere interactions for the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability in an idealized coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, Quentin; Huck, Thierry; de Verdière, Alain Colin; Arzel, Olivier; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-01

    The role of the ocean-atmosphere interactions in the multidecadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is investigated in an idealized coupled configuration of the MIT General Circulation Model. The flat-bottom ocean, composed of an Atlantic-like small basin, a Pacific-like large basin, and an unblocked Antarctic-like circumpolar channel, is coupled to a global atmospheric model (SPEEDY). In order to better represent the atmospheric dynamics and its interactions with the ocean, three set-ups, with horizontal resolution of about 4°, 2° and 1° (at the equator) in both the ocean and atmosphere models, are compared. They show a linearly increasing North Atlantic Oscillation-like variability. At all resolutions, the AMOC undergoes a spontaneous variability on multidecadal time scales between 30-40 yr, with an additional higher frequency in the highest resolution set-up. The AMOC variability responds to temperature anomalies along the western boundary through the thermal wind relationship. These temperature anomalies result from the propagation of large-scale baroclinic Rossby waves across the small basin. The unstable region responsible for the growth of Rossby waves through baroclinic instability, diagnosed using a temperature variance budget, shifts from the eastern boundary at coarse resolution (4°) to the western boundary at higher resolution (2° and 1°). An earlier study, performed with the same coarse resolution set-up (4°), has shown that the AMOC does not participate to the growth of Rossby waves, but passively reacts to these waves. The AMOC being mainly connected to the western boundary dynamics, its role in setting large scale baroclinic Rossby waves might be different between the coarse resolution set-ups (4°) and the higher resolution set-ups (2° and 1°). The ocean-atmosphere interactions are strongly enhanced in the highest resolution set-up (1°), with the development of a significant correlation of about 0

  6. El Nino-southern oscillation: A coupled response to the greenhouse effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, De-Zheng

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this article to elucidate the link between the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and radiative forcing (of which the greenhouse effect is a major part). A unified theory for the tropical Pacific climate is developed by considering the response of the coupled ocean-atmosphere to a changing radiative forcing. The hypothesis is that both the zonal surface sea temperature (SST) gradients and ENSO are a coupled response to the strong radiative heating or the tropical warmth. Owing to ocean-atmosphere interaction, the stronger the radiative heating, the larger the zonal SST gradients. When the SST gradients exceed a critical value, however, the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the cold-tongue region is too strong for the coupled system to hold steady. Consequently, the coupled system enters an oscillatory state. These coupled dynamics are examined in a simple mathematical model whose behavior is consistent with the hypothesis. With a linear temperature profile throughout the depth of subsurface ocean, the model predicts that both the magnitude and period of the oscillation increase with increases in radiative forcing or the greenhouse effect. The increase in the magnitude of the oscillation largely comes from an enhancement of the magnitude of the cold anomalies, while the increase in the period mostly comes from a prolonged duration of the warm events. With a profile in which the lapse rate decreases with depth, the sensitivity is more moderate. The simplicity of the model prevents a quantitative simulation of the sensitivity of ENSO to increases in the greenhouse effect, but qualitatively the model results support the empirical interpretation of the prolonged duration of the 1990-1995 ENSO event. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  7. How much of the NAO monthly variability is from ocean-atmospheric coupling: results from an interactive ensemble climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xiaoge; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Minghua; Li, Huimin; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    The chaotic atmospheric circulations and the ocean-atmosphere coupling may both cause variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This study uses an interactive ensemble (IE) coupled model to study the contribution of the atmospheric noise and coupling to the monthly variability of the NAO. In the IE model, seven atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) realizations with different initial states are coupled with a single realization of the land, ocean and ice component models. The chaotic noise from the atmosphere at the air-sea interface is therefore reduced. The time variances of monthly NAO index in the ensemble AGCM mean of the IE model is found to be about 20.1 % of that in the SC model. Therefore, more than 79.9 % of the simulated monthly variability of NAO is caused by atmospheric noise. The coupling between sea surface temperature (SST) and NAO is only found in regions south of about 40°N in the North Atlantic Ocean. The IE strategy highlighted the interaction between the NAO and the SST in the region (28°-38°N, 20°W-50°W) to the southeast of the Gulf Stream extension. While the ocean-atmosphere coupling explains <1/5th of the NAO variability in the IE model, it shows slightly larger persistence than the SC model, consistent with the hypothesis of a slower mode of variability from ocean-atmosphere coupling that has larger predictability than the variability driven by the atmosphere.

  8. Interacting residues in an activated state of a G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Hun; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-27

    Ste2p, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the tridecapeptide pheromone alpha-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was used as a model GPCR to investigate the role of specific residues in the resting and activated states of the receptor. Using a series of biological and biochemical analyses of wild-type and site-directed mutant receptors, we identified Asn(205) as a potential interacting partner with the Tyr(266) residue. An N205H/Y266H double mutant showed pH-dependent functional activity, whereas the N205H receptor was non-functional and the Y266H receptor was partially active indicating that the histidine 205 and 266 residues interact in an activated state of the receptor. The introduction of N205K or Y266D mutations into the P258L/S259L constitutively active receptor suppressed the constitutive activity; in contrast, the N205K/Y266D/P258L/S259L quadruple mutant was fully constitutively active, again indicating an interaction between residues at the 205 and 206 positions in the receptor-active state. To further test this interaction, we introduced the N205C/Y266C, F204C/Y266C, and N205C/A265C double mutations into wild-type and P258L/S259L constitutively active receptors. After trypsin digestion, we found that a disulfide-cross-linked product, with the molecular weight expected for a receptor fragment with a cross-link between N205C and Y266C, formed only in the N205C/Y266C constitutively activated receptor. This study represents the first experimental demonstration of an interaction between specific residues in an active state, but not the resting state, of Ste2p. The information gained from this study should contribute to an understanding of the conformational differences between resting and active states in GPCRs.

  9. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta in the interaction picture method for numerically solving the coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongxi; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2010-04-12

    A fourth-order Runge-Kutta in the interaction picture (RK4IP) method is presented for solving the coupled nonlinear Schr odinger equation (CNLSE) that governs the light propagation in optical fibers with randomly varying birefringence. The computational error of RK4IP is caused by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm, better than the split-step approximation limited by the step size. As a result, the step size of RK4IP can have the same order of magnitude as the dispersion length and/or the nonlinear length of the fiber, provided the birefringence effect is small. For communication fibers with random birefringence, the step size of RK4IP can be orders of magnitude larger than the correlation length and the beating length of the fibers, depending on the interaction between linear and nonlinear effects. Our approach can be applied to the fibers having the general form of local birefringence and treat the Kerr nonlinearity without approximation. Our RK4IP results agree well with those obtained from Manakov-PMD approximation, provided the polarization state can be mixed enough on the Poincar e sphere.

  10. Investigating The Role of Atmosphere-Wave Interaction in the Mediterranean Sea using coupled climate model (RegESM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surenkok, Gokce; Utku Turuncoglu, Ufuk

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a coupled regional atmosphere-wave model has been implemented and tested in the Mediterranean Sea to study the effects of surface roughness length in the simulated wind speed and direction of the atmosphere model over the sea. In general, the standalone atmosphere models tend to overestimate the wind speed especially over the sea due to their poor representation of the surface fluxes and roughness length. The designed modelling system (RegESM; Turuncoglu et al., 2013) mainly aims to improve the modelled surface winds by adding two-way interaction between atmosphere and wave models. The used version of the RegESM modelling system is configured to have two model components: (1) WAM spectra wave model (The WAMDI Group, 1987) and (2) ICTP's RegCM4 atmosphere model (Giorgi et al., 2012). The model components are coupled using Earth system Modelling Framework (ESMF; Hill et al., 2004; Collins et al., 2005). In this case, atmosphere model sends surface wind speed components to wave model and retrieves surface roughness length and friction velocity to calculate surface fluxes (Zeng et al., 1998). The current version of the modelling system only represents the interaction between atmosphere and wave components but does not include an ocean component but the ocean component will be included in the future. The designed modelling system is configured for Mediterranean Sea and a set of sensitivity tests are performed to tune the individual model components. In this case, the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric model is set to 50 km and covers whole Mediterranean Basin. In this case, the atmospheric model is forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset (Dee et al., 2011) for 2008-2012 periods. In this configuration, the wave model has higher horizontal resolution (0.125° ) than the atmospheric model and the interpolation between the model components is handled by ESMF. The coupling time step to exchange the fields between the model components is set to one hour

  11. Novel application of fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis to resolve the interaction between the G-quadruplex aptamer and thrombin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Gu, Yaqin; Liu, Li; Wang, Cheli; Wang, Jianpeng; Ding, Shumin; Li, Jinping; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2017-08-01

    The dynamic binding status between the thrombin and its G-quadruplex aptamers and the stability of its interaction partners were probed using our previously established fluorescence-coupled capillary electrophoresis method. A 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer was chosen as a model to study its binding affinity with the thrombin ligand. First, the effects of the cations on the formation of G-quadruplex from unstructured 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer were examined. Second, the rapid binding kinetics between the thrombin and 6-carboxyfluorescein labeled G-quadruplex aptamer was measured. Third, the stability of G-quadruplex aptamer-thrombin complex was also examined in the presence of the interfering species. Remarkably, it was found that the complementary strand of 29-nucleic acid thrombin binding aptamer could compete with G-quadruplex aptamer and thus disassociated the G-quadruplex structure into an unstructured aptamer. These data suggest that our in-house established fluorescence-coupled capillary electrophoresis assay could be applied to binding studies of the G-quadruplex aptamers, thrombin, and their ligands, while overcoming the complicated and costly approaches currently available. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. On the multiscale nature of soil moisture-temperature couplings: the role of seasonality, causation and non-linear feedbacks in land-atmosphere interactions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molini, A.; Casagrande, E.; Mueller, B.

    2013-12-01

    Land-Atmosphere (L-A) interactions, their strength and directionality, are one of the main sources of uncertainty in current climate modeling, with strong implications on the accurate assessment of future climate variability and climate change impacts. Beside from the scarcity of direct observations, major uncertainties derive from the inherent complexity and nonlinearity of these interactions, and from their multi-scale character. Statistical analysis of L-A couplings is traditionally based on linear correlation methods and metrics. However, these approaches are not designed to detect causal connections or non-linear couplings and they poorly perform in presence of non-stationarities. Additionally these methods assess L-A couplings essentially in the time domain, despite the fact that L-A dynamical drivers can act simultaneously over a wide range of different space and time scales. This talk explores the multi-scale nature of L-A interactions, through the example of soil moisture-temperature couplings and soil-moisture memory effects. In several regions of the world, soil moisture can have a dampening effect on temperature due to evaporative cooling. By using spectral decomposition techniques and both newly developed satellite based products and re-analysis, we analyze the contribution of different time scales to the build-up of global soil moisture-temperature coupling hot spots, addressing at the same time the role of seasonality, causation and non-linear feedbacks in land-atmosphere interactions. Finally we focus on the role of fine (sub-monthly) time scales and their interplay with the seasonal scales.

  13. Effective pairing interactions with isospin density dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Margueron, J.; Sagawa, H.; Hagino, K.

    2008-05-15

    We perform Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations for semi-magic calcium, nickel, tin, and lead isotopes and N=20,28,50, and 82 isotones using density-dependent pairing interactions recently derived from a microscopic nucleon-nucleon interaction. These interactions have an isovector component so that the pairing gaps in symmetric and neutron matter are reproduced. Our calculations well account for the experimental data for the neutron number dependence of binding energy, two-neutron separation energy, and odd-even mass staggering of these isotopes. This result suggests that by introducing the isovector term in the pairing interaction, one can construct a global effective pairing interaction that is applicable to nuclei in a wide range of the nuclear chart. It is also shown with the local density approximation that the pairing field deduced from the pairing gaps in infinite matter reproduces qualitatively well the pairing field for finite nuclei obtained with the HFB method.