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Sample records for interaction studies revealed

  1. Epistatic study reveals two genetic interactions in blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although numerous candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have been performed on blood pressure, a small number of regulating genetic variants having a limited effect have been identified. This phenomenon can partially be explained by possible gene-gene/epistasis interactions that were little investigated so far. Methods We performed a pre-planned two-phase investigation: in phase 1, one hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 65 candidate genes were genotyped in 1,912 French unrelated adults in order to study their two-locus combined effects on blood pressure (BP) levels. In phase 2, the significant epistatic interactions observed in phase 1 were tested in an independent population gathering 1,755 unrelated European adults. Results Among the 9 genetic variants significantly associated with systolic and diastolic BP in phase 1, some may act through altering the corresponding protein levels: SNPs rs5742910 (Padjusted≤0.03) and rs6046 (Padjusted =0.044) in F7 and rs1800469 (Padjusted ≤0.036) in TGFB1; whereas some may be functional through altering the corresponding protein structure: rs1800590 (Padjusted =0.028, SE=0.088) in LPL and rs2228570 (Padjusted ≤9.48×10-4) in VDR. The two epistatic interactions found for systolic and diastolic BP in the discovery phase: VCAM1 (rs1041163) * APOB (rs1367117), and SCGB1A1 (rs3741240) * LPL (rs1800590), were tested in the replication population and we observed significant interactions on DBP. In silico analyses yielded putative functional properties of the SNPs involved in these epistatic interactions trough the alteration of corresponding protein structures. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that different pathways and then different genes may act synergistically in order to modify BP. This could highlight novel pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying hypertension. PMID:23298194

  2. Multitargeting by curcumin as revealed by molecular interaction studies

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Kim, Ji Hye; Patchva, Sridevi; Webb, Lauren J.; Priyadarsini, Indira K.

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), the active ingredient in turmeric (Curcuma longa), is a highly pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, chemopreventive, chemosensitization, and radiosensitization activities. The pleiotropic activities attributed to curcumin come from its complex molecular structure and chemistry, as well as its ability to influence multiple signaling molecules. Curcumin has been shown to bind by multiple forces directly to numerous signaling molecules, such as inflammatory molecules, cell survival proteins, protein kinases, protein reductases, histone acetyltransferase, histone deacetylase, glyoxalase I, xanthine oxidase, proteasome, HIV1 integrase, HIV1 protease, sarco (endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, DNA methyltransferases 1, FtsZ protofilaments, carrier proteins, and metal ions. Curcumin can also bind directly to DNA and RNA. Owing to its β-diketone moiety, curcumin undergoes keto–enol tautomerism that has been reported as a favorable state for direct binding. The functional groups on curcumin found suitable for interaction with other macromolecules include the α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety, carbonyl and enolic groups of the β-diketone moiety, methoxy and phenolic hydroxyl groups, and the phenyl rings. Various biophysical tools have been used to monitor direct interaction of curcumin with other proteins, including absorption, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, competitive ligand binding, Forster type fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), radiolabeling, site-directed mutagenesis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), immunoprecipitation, phage display biopanning, electron microscopy, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS) displacement, and co-localization. Molecular docking, the most commonly employed computational tool for calculating binding affinities and predicting

  3. Structural Studies of a Bacterial Condensin Complex Reveal ATP-Dependent Disruption of Intersubunit Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, J.; Lim, J; Shin, H; Suh, M; Ku, B; Lee, H; Joo, K; Robinson, H; Lee, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Condensins are key mediators of chromosome condensation across organisms. Like other condensins, the bacterial MukBEF condensin complex consists of an SMC family protein dimer containing two ATPase head domains, MukB, and two interacting subunits, MukE and MukF. We report complete structural views of the intersubunit interactions of this condensin along with ensuing studies that reveal a role for the ATPase activity of MukB. MukE and MukF together form an elongated dimeric frame, and MukF's C-terminal winged-helix domains (C-WHDs) bind MukB heads to constitute closed ring-like structures. Surprisingly, one of the two bound C-WHDs is forced to detach upon ATP-mediated engagement of MukB heads. This detachment reaction depends on the linker segment preceding the C-WHD, and mutations on the linker restrict cell growth. Thus ATP-dependent transient disruption of the MukB-MukF interaction, which creates openings in condensin ring structures, is likely to be a critical feature of the functional mechanism of condensins.

  4. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti

  5. Field and laboratory studies reveal interacting effects of stream oxygenation and warming on aquatic ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Durance, Isabelle; Vaughan, Ian P; Ormerod, Steve J

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic ecological responses to climatic warming are complicated by interactions between thermal effects and other environmental stressors such as organic pollution and hypoxia. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated how oxygen limitation can set heat tolerance for some aquatic ectotherms, but only at unrealistic lethal temperatures and without field data to assess whether oxygen shortages might also underlie sublethal warming effects. Here, we test whether oxygen availability affects both lethal and nonlethal impacts of warming on two widespread Eurasian mayflies, Ephemera danica, Müller 1764 and Serratella ignita (Poda 1761). Mayfly nymphs are often a dominant component of the invertebrate assemblage in streams, and play a vital role in aquatic and riparian food webs. In the laboratory, lethal impacts of warming were assessed under three oxygen conditions. In the field, effects of oxygen availability on nonlethal impacts of warming were assessed from mayfly occurrence in 42 293 UK stream samples where water temperature and biochemical oxygen demand were measured. Oxygen limitation affected both lethal and sublethal impacts of warming in each species. Hypoxia lowered lethal limits by 5.5 °C (±2.13) and 8.2 °C (±0.62) for E. danica and S. ignita respectively. Field data confirmed the importance of oxygen limitation in warmer waters; poor oxygenation drastically reduced site occupancy, and reductions were especially pronounced under warm water conditions. Consequently, poor oxygenation lowered optimal stream temperatures for both species. The broad concordance shown here between laboratory results and extensive field data suggests that oxygen limitation not only impairs survival at thermal extremes but also restricts species abundance in the field at temperatures well below upper lethal limits. Stream oxygenation could thus control the vulnerability of aquatic ectotherms to global warming. Improving water oxygenation and reducing pollution can provide

  6. Field and laboratory studies reveal interacting effects of stream oxygenation and warming on aquatic ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Durance, Isabelle; Vaughan, Ian P; Ormerod, Steve J

    2016-05-01

    Aquatic ecological responses to climatic warming are complicated by interactions between thermal effects and other environmental stressors such as organic pollution and hypoxia. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated how oxygen limitation can set heat tolerance for some aquatic ectotherms, but only at unrealistic lethal temperatures and without field data to assess whether oxygen shortages might also underlie sublethal warming effects. Here, we test whether oxygen availability affects both lethal and nonlethal impacts of warming on two widespread Eurasian mayflies, Ephemera danica, Müller 1764 and Serratella ignita (Poda 1761). Mayfly nymphs are often a dominant component of the invertebrate assemblage in streams, and play a vital role in aquatic and riparian food webs. In the laboratory, lethal impacts of warming were assessed under three oxygen conditions. In the field, effects of oxygen availability on nonlethal impacts of warming were assessed from mayfly occurrence in 42 293 UK stream samples where water temperature and biochemical oxygen demand were measured. Oxygen limitation affected both lethal and sublethal impacts of warming in each species. Hypoxia lowered lethal limits by 5.5 °C (±2.13) and 8.2 °C (±0.62) for E. danica and S. ignita respectively. Field data confirmed the importance of oxygen limitation in warmer waters; poor oxygenation drastically reduced site occupancy, and reductions were especially pronounced under warm water conditions. Consequently, poor oxygenation lowered optimal stream temperatures for both species. The broad concordance shown here between laboratory results and extensive field data suggests that oxygen limitation not only impairs survival at thermal extremes but also restricts species abundance in the field at temperatures well below upper lethal limits. Stream oxygenation could thus control the vulnerability of aquatic ectotherms to global warming. Improving water oxygenation and reducing pollution can provide

  7. QM/MM Studies Reveal How Substrate-Substrate and Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Modulate Retaining Glycosyltransferases Catalysis and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Hansel; Mendoza, Fernanda; Lluch, José M; Masgrau, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) catalyze the biosynthesis of glycosidic linkages by transferring a monosaccharide from a nucleotide sugar donor to an acceptor substrate, and they do that with exquisite regio- and stereospecificity. Retaining GTs act with retention of the configuration at the anomeric carbon of the transferred sugar. Their chemical mechanism has been under debate for long as conclusive experimental data to confirm the mechanism have been elusive. In the past years, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations have shed light on the mechanistic discussion. Here, we review the work carried out in our group investigating three of these retaining enzymes (LgtC, α3GalT, and GalNAc-T2). Our results support the controversial front-side attack mechanism as the general mechanism for most retaining GTs. The latest structural data are in agreement with these findings. QM/MM calculations have revealed how enzyme-substrate and substrate-substrate interactions modulate the transfer reaction catalyzed by these enzymes. Moreover, they provide an explanation on why in some cases a strong nucleophilic residue is found on the β-face of the sugar, opening the door to a shift toward a double-displacement mechanism.

  8. A metagenomic study of diet-dependent interaction between gut microbiota and host in infants reveals differences in immune response

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gut microbiota and the host exist in a mutualistic relationship, with the functional composition of the microbiota strongly affecting the health and well-being of the host. Thus, it is important to develop a synthetic approach to study the host transcriptome and the microbiome simultaneously. Early microbial colonization in infants is critically important for directing neonatal intestinal and immune development, and is especially attractive for studying the development of human-commensal interactions. Here we report the results from a simultaneous study of the gut microbiome and host epithelial transcriptome of three-month-old exclusively breast- and formula-fed infants. Results Variation in both host mRNA expression and the microbiome phylogenetic and functional profiles was observed between breast- and formula-fed infants. To examine the interdependent relationship between host epithelial cell gene expression and bacterial metagenomic-based profiles, the host transcriptome and functionally profiled microbiome data were subjected to novel multivariate statistical analyses. Gut microbiota metagenome virulence characteristics concurrently varied with immunity-related gene expression in epithelial cells between the formula-fed and the breast-fed infants. Conclusions Our data provide insight into the integrated responses of the host transcriptome and microbiome to dietary substrates in the early neonatal period. We demonstrate that differences in diet can affect, via gut colonization, host expression of genes associated with the innate immune system. Furthermore, the methodology presented in this study can be adapted to assess other host-commensal and host-pathogen interactions using genomic and transcriptomic data, providing a synthetic genomics-based picture of host-commensal relationships. PMID:22546241

  9. Transcriptome–metabolome wide association study (TMWAS) of maneb and paraquat neurotoxicity reveals network level interactions in toxicologic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Roede, James R.; Uppal, Karan; Park, Youngja; Tran, ViLinh; Jones, Dean P.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of the herbicide paraquat (PQ) and fungicide maneb (MB) has been linked to Parkinson's disease. Previous studies show that this involves an additive toxicity with at least two different mechanisms. However, detailed understanding of mixtures is often difficult to elucidate because of the multiple ways by which toxic agents can interact. In the present study, we used a combination of transcriptomics and metabolomics to investigate mechanisms of toxicity of PQ and MB in a neuroblastoma cell line. Conditions were studied with concentrations of PQ and MB that each individually caused 20% cell death and together caused 50% cell death. Transcriptomic and metabolomic samples were collected at time points prior to significant cell death. Statistical and bioinformatic methods were applied to the resulting 30,869 transcripts and 1358 metabolites. Results showed that MB significantly changed more transcripts and metabolites than PQ, and combined PQ + MB impacted more than MB alone. Transcriptome–metabolome-wide association study (TMWAS) showed that significantly changed transcripts and metabolites mapped to two network substructures, one associating with significant effects of MB and the other included features significantly associated with PQ + MB. The latter contained 4 clusters of genes and associated metabolites, with one containing genes for two cation transporters and a cation transporter regulatory protein also recognized as a pro-apoptotic protein. Other clusters included stress response genes and transporters linked to cytoprotective mechanisms. MB also had a significant network structure linked to cell proliferation. Together, the results show that the toxicologic mechanism of the combined neurotoxicity of PQ and MB involves network level interactions and that TMWAS provides an effective approach to investigate such complex mechanisms.

  10. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  11. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-02-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway.

  12. A Cross-Species Study of PI3K Protein-Protein Interactions Reveals the Direct Interaction of P85 and SHP2

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Yang, Xuemei; Begley, Michael J.; Kulkarni, Meghana; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Turke, Alexa B.; Lauriol, Jessica; Yuan, Min; Qi, Jie; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Hong, Pengyu; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Perrimon, Norbert; Asara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Using a series of immunoprecipitation (IP) – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments and reciprocal BLAST, we conducted a fly-human cross-species comparison of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) interactome in a drosophila S2R+ cell line and several NSCLC and human multiple myeloma cell lines to identify conserved interacting proteins to PI3K, a critical signaling regulator of the AKT pathway. Using H929 human cancer cells and drosophila S2R+ cells, our data revealed an unexpected direct binding of Corkscrew, the drosophila ortholog of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase type II (SHP2) to the Pi3k21B (p60) regulatory subunit of PI3K (p50/p85 human ortholog) but no association with Pi3k92e, the human ortholog of the p110 catalytic subunit. The p85-SHP2 association was validated in human cell lines, and formed a ternary regulatory complex with GRB2-associated-binding protein 2 (GAB2). Validation experiments with knockdown of GAB2 and Far-Western blots proved the direct interaction of SHP2 with p85, independent of adaptor proteins and transfected FLAG-p85 provided evidence that SHP2 binding on p85 occurred on the SH2 domains. A disruption of the SHP2-p85 complex took place after insulin/IGF1 stimulation or imatinib treatment, suggesting that the direct SHP2-p85 interaction was both independent of AKT activation and positively regulates the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:26839216

  13. Have studies of the developmental regulation of behavioral phenotypes revealed the mechanisms of gene-environment interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T. G.

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses the recent convergence of our long-standing knowledge of the regulation of behavioral phenotypes by developmental experience with recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating gene expression. This review supports a particular perspective on the developmental regulation of behavioral phenotypes: That the role of common developmental experiences (e.g. maternal interactions, peer interactions, exposure to a complex environment, etc.) is to fit individuals to the circumstances of their lives within bounds determined by long-standing (evolutionary) mechanisms that have shaped responses to critical and fundamental types of experience via those aspects of gene structure that regulate gene expression. The phenotype of a given species is not absolute for a given genotype but rather variable within bounds that are determined by mechanisms regulated by experience (e.g. epigenetic mechanisms). This phenotypic variation is not necessarily random, or evenly distributed along a continuum of description or measurement, but often highly disjointed, producing distinct, even opposing, phenotypes. The potentiality for these varying phenotypes is itself the product of evolution, the potential for alternative phenotypes itself conveying evolutionary advantage. Examples of such phenotypic variation, resulting from environmental or experiential influences, have a long history of study in neurobiology, and a number of these will be discussed in this review: neurodevelopmental experiences that produce phenotypic variation in visual perception, cognitive function, and emotional behavior. Although other examples will be discussed, particular emphasis will be made on the role of social behavior on neurodevelopment and phenotypic determination. It will be argued that an important purpose of some aspects of social behavior is regulation of neurobehavioral phenotypes by experience via genetic regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22643448

  14. Revealing the interactions between pentagon-octagon-pentagon defect graphene and organic donor/acceptor molecules: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Wei; Liu, Yu-Yu; Xie, Ling-Hai; Shang, Jing-Zhi; Qian, Yan; Yi, Ming-Dong; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wei

    2015-02-21

    Defect engineering and the non-covalent interaction strategy allow for dramatically tuning the optoelectronic features of graphene. Herein, we theoretically investigated the intrinsic mechanism of non-covalent interactions between pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defect graphene (DG) and absorbed molecules, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), perfluoronaphthalene (FNa), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), through geometry, distance, interaction energy, Mulliken charge distribution, terahertz frequency vibration, visualization of the interactions, charge density difference, electronic transition behaviour, band structure and density of state. All the calculations were performed using density functional theory including a dispersion correction (DFT-D). The calculated results indicate that the cyano- (CN) group (electron withdraw group) in TCNQ and F4TCNQ, rather than the F group, gain the electron from DG effectively and exhibit much stronger interactions via wavefunction overlap with DG, leading to a short non-covalent interaction distance, a large interaction energy and a red-shift of out-of-plane terahertz frequency vibration, changing the bands near the Fermi level and enhancing the infrared (IR) light absorption significantly. The enhancement of such IR absorbance offering a broader absorption (from 300 to 1200 nm) will benefit light harvesting in potential applications of solar energy conversion.

  15. Revealing the interactions between pentagon-octagon-pentagon defect graphene and organic donor/acceptor molecules: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Wei; Liu, Yu-Yu; Xie, Ling-Hai; Shang, Jing-Zhi; Qian, Yan; Yi, Ming-Dong; Yu, Ting; Huang, Wei

    2015-02-21

    Defect engineering and the non-covalent interaction strategy allow for dramatically tuning the optoelectronic features of graphene. Herein, we theoretically investigated the intrinsic mechanism of non-covalent interactions between pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defect graphene (DG) and absorbed molecules, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), perfluoronaphthalene (FNa), tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), through geometry, distance, interaction energy, Mulliken charge distribution, terahertz frequency vibration, visualization of the interactions, charge density difference, electronic transition behaviour, band structure and density of state. All the calculations were performed using density functional theory including a dispersion correction (DFT-D). The calculated results indicate that the cyano- (CN) group (electron withdraw group) in TCNQ and F4TCNQ, rather than the F group, gain the electron from DG effectively and exhibit much stronger interactions via wavefunction overlap with DG, leading to a short non-covalent interaction distance, a large interaction energy and a red-shift of out-of-plane terahertz frequency vibration, changing the bands near the Fermi level and enhancing the infrared (IR) light absorption significantly. The enhancement of such IR absorbance offering a broader absorption (from 300 to 1200 nm) will benefit light harvesting in potential applications of solar energy conversion. PMID:25559269

  16. Subcellular Fractionation and Localization Studies Reveal a Direct Interaction of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) with Nucleolin

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Mohamed S.; Nouri, Kazem; Milroy, Lech G.; Moll, Jens M.; Herrmann, Christian; Brunsveld, Luc; Piekorz, Roland P.; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) is a well-known regulator of local translation of its mRNA targets in neurons. However, despite its ubiquitous expression, the role of FMRP remains ill-defined in other cell types. In this study we investigated the subcellular distribution of FMRP and its protein complexes in HeLa cells using confocal imaging as well as detergent-free fractionation and size exclusion protocols. We found FMRP localized exclusively to solid compartments, including cytosolic heavy and light membranes, mitochondria, nuclear membrane and nucleoli. Interestingly, FMRP was associated with nucleolin in both a high molecular weight ribosomal and translation-associated complex (≥6 MDa) in the cytosol, and a low molecular weight complex (∼200 kDa) in the nucleoli. Consistently, we identified two functional nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs) in FMRP that are responsible for a strong nucleolar colocalization of the C-terminus of FMRP with nucleolin, and a direct interaction of the N-terminus of FMRP with the arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain of nucleolin. Taken together, we propose a novel mechanism by which a transient nucleolar localization of FMRP underlies a strong nucleocytoplasmic translocation, most likely in a complex with nucleolin and possibly ribosomes, in order to regulate translation of its target mRNAs. PMID:24658146

  17. Genetic and Physical Interaction Studies Reveal Functional Similarities between ALBINO3 and ALBINO4 in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Trösch, Raphael; Töpel, Mats; Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Jarvis, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ALBINO3 (ALB3) is a well-known component of a thylakoid protein-targeting complex that interacts with the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) and the cpSRP receptor, chloroplast filamentous temperature-sensitive Y (cpFtsY). Its protein-inserting function has been established mainly for light-harvesting complex proteins, which first interact with the unique chloroplast cpSRP43 component and then are delivered to the ALB3 integrase by a GTP-dependent cpSRP-cpFtsY interaction. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a subsequently discovered ALB3 homolog, ALB4, has been proposed to be involved not in light-harvesting complex protein targeting, but instead in the stabilization of the ATP synthase complex. Here, however, we show that ALB3 and ALB4 share significant functional overlap, and that both proteins are required for the efficient insertion of cytochrome f and potentially other subunits of pigment-bearing protein complexes. Genetic and physical interactions between ALB4 and ALB3, and physical interactions between ALB4 and cpSRP, suggest that the two ALB proteins may engage similar sets of interactors for their specific functions. We propose that ALB4 optimizes the insertion of thylakoid proteins by participating in the ALB3-cpSRP pathway for certain substrates (e.g. cytochrome f and the Rieske protein). Although ALB4 has clearly diverged from ALB3 in relation to the partner-recruiting C-terminal domain, our analysis suggests that one putative cpSRP-binding motif has not been entirely lost. PMID:26265777

  18. Association Studies in Populus tomentosa Reveal the Genetic Interactions of Pto-MIR156c and Its Targets in Wood Formation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Mingyang; Wang, Qingshi; Phangthavong, Souksamone; Yang, Xiaohui; Song, Yuepeng; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in many biological processes, but the significance of the interaction between a miRNA and its targets in perennial trees remains largely unknown. Here, we employed transcript profiling and association studies in Populus tomentosa (Pto) to decipher the effect of genetic variation and interactions between Pto-miR156c and its potential targets (Pto-SPL15, Pto-SPL20, and Pto-SPL25) in 435 unrelated individuals from a natural population of P. tomentosa. Single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) based association studies with analysis of the underlying additive and dominant effects identified 69 significant associations (P < 0.01), representing 51 common SNPs (minor allele frequency > 0.05) from Pto-MIR156c and its three potential targets, with six wood and growth traits, revealing their common roles in wood formation. Epistasis analysis uncovered 129 significant SNP-SNP associations with ten traits, indicating the potential genetic interactions of Pto-MIR156c and its three putative targets. Interestingly, expression analysis in stem (phloem, cambium, and xylem) revealed that Pto-miR156c expression showed strong negative correlations with Pto-SPL20 (r = -0.90, P < 0.01) and Pto-SPL25 (r = -0.65, P < 0.01), and a positive correlation with Pto-SPL15 (r = 0.40, P < 0.01), which also indicated the putative interactions of Pto-miR156c and its potential targets and their common roles in wood formation. Thus, our study provided an alternative approach to decipher the interaction between miRNAs and their targets and to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits in trees. PMID:27536313

  19. Association Studies in Populus tomentosa Reveal the Genetic Interactions of Pto-MIR156c and Its Targets in Wood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Mingyang; Wang, Qingshi; Phangthavong, Souksamone; Yang, Xiaohui; Song, Yuepeng; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in many biological processes, but the significance of the interaction between a miRNA and its targets in perennial trees remains largely unknown. Here, we employed transcript profiling and association studies in Populus tomentosa (Pto) to decipher the effect of genetic variation and interactions between Pto-miR156c and its potential targets (Pto-SPL15, Pto-SPL20, and Pto-SPL25) in 435 unrelated individuals from a natural population of P. tomentosa. Single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) based association studies with analysis of the underlying additive and dominant effects identified 69 significant associations (P < 0.01), representing 51 common SNPs (minor allele frequency > 0.05) from Pto-MIR156c and its three potential targets, with six wood and growth traits, revealing their common roles in wood formation. Epistasis analysis uncovered 129 significant SNP-SNP associations with ten traits, indicating the potential genetic interactions of Pto-MIR156c and its three putative targets. Interestingly, expression analysis in stem (phloem, cambium, and xylem) revealed that Pto-miR156c expression showed strong negative correlations with Pto-SPL20 (r = −0.90, P < 0.01) and Pto-SPL25 (r = −0.65, P < 0.01), and a positive correlation with Pto-SPL15 (r = 0.40, P < 0.01), which also indicated the putative interactions of Pto-miR156c and its potential targets and their common roles in wood formation. Thus, our study provided an alternative approach to decipher the interaction between miRNAs and their targets and to dissect the genetic architecture of complex traits in trees. PMID:27536313

  20. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  1. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain.

  2. Electrostatic Interaction between Oxysterol-binding Protein and VAMP-associated Protein A Revealed by NMR and Mutagenesis Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-AMSP) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBPF) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-AMSP, OSBPF, and the complex. Our results show that OSBPF is disordered in the free state, and VAP-AMSP and OSBPF form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  3. Toroidal Interaction and Propeller Chirality of Hexaarylbenzenes. Dynamic Domino Inversion Revealed by Combined Experimental and Theoretical Circular Dichroism Studies.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Tomoyo; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Mori, Tadashi

    2016-03-01

    Hexaarylbenzenes (HABs) have greatly attracted much attention due to their unique propeller-shaped structure and potential application in materials science, such as liquid crystals, molecular capsules/rotors, redox materials, nonlinear optical materials, as well as molecular wires. Less attention has however been paid to their propeller chirality. By introducing small point-chiral group(s) at the periphery of HABs, propeller chirality was effectively induced, provoking strong Cotton effects in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. Temperature and solvent polarity manipulate the dynamics of propeller inversion in solution. As such, whizzing toroids become more substantial in polar solvents and at an elevated temperature, where radial aromatic rings (propeller blades) prefer orthogonal alignment against the central benzene ring (C6 core), maximizing toroidal interactions.

  4. Stimulus-sensitive myoclonus of the baboon Papio papio: pharmacological studies reveal interactions between benzodiazepines and the central cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Rektor, I; Bryere, P; Silva-Barrat, C; Menini, C

    1986-01-01

    The baboon Papio papio develops a nonepileptic myoclonus 20 to 30 min after i.m. benzodiazepine injection. It is characterized by bilateral jerks involving mainly the neck and the trunk, by the absence of any correlative EEG paroxysmal discharge, and by its facilitation during movement or agitation. This myoclonus resembles the intention myoclonus of human patients as seen, for example, after anoxia. We found in experiments on 10 adolescent baboons that atropine alone induced the myoclonus for several hours, that physostigmine completely antagonized the benzodiazepine-induced as well as the atropine-induced myoclonus, and that the peripherally acting cholinergic antagonist, methyl-QNB, and agonist prostigmine had no action on the myoclonus, suggesting that the benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus in this species depends on a strong depression of the central cholinergic system by benzodiazepine. The benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus was mediated by benzodiazepine receptors as it was blocked by the specific benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788, which did not block atropine-induced myoclonus; latency to myoclonus after benzodiazepine was longer than after atropine. These facts suggest that benzodiazepines, by an as yet unknown mechanism, induce a depression of the cholinergic system which in turn leads to the development of myoclonus. Finally, the benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus of the baboon can be considered as a good model for testing drugs that act on the muscarinic cholinergic system and also for testing benzodiazepine-acetylcholine interactions.

  5. Interaction of Di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone and Its Copper Complex with BSA: Effect on Antitumor Activity as Revealed by Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Huang, Tengfei; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Qi, Zhangyang; Li, Changzheng

    2016-04-28

    The drug, di-2-pyridylketone-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (DPPCAH) and its copper complex (DPPCAH-Cu) exhibit significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of their pharmacological interaction with the biological molecule bovine serum albumin (BSA) remains poorly understood. The present study elucidates the interactions between the drug and BSA through MTT assays, spectroscopic methods and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicate that BSA could attenuate effect on the cytotoxicity of DPPCAH, but not DPPCAH-Cu. Data from fluorescence quenching measurements demonstrated that both DPPCAH and DPPCAH-Cu could bind to BSA, with a reversed effect on the environment of tryptophan residues in polarity. CD spectra revealed that the DPPCAH-Cu exerted a slightly stronger effect on the secondary structure of BSA than DPPCAH. The association constant of DPPCAH with BSA was greater than that of DPPCAH-Cu. Docking studies indicated that the binding of DPPCAH to BSA involved a greater number of hydrogen bonds compared to DPPCAH-Cu. The calculated distances between bound ligands and tryptophans in BSA were in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer results. Thus, the binding affinity of the drug (DPPCAH or DPPCAH-Cu) with BSA partially contributes to its antitumor activity; the greater the drug affinity is to BSA, the less is its antitumor activity.

  6. Interaction of Di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone and Its Copper Complex with BSA: Effect on Antitumor Activity as Revealed by Spectroscopic Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Huang, Tengfei; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhou, Sufeng; Qi, Zhangyang; Li, Changzheng

    2016-01-01

    The drug, di-2-pyridylketone-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (DPPCAH) and its copper complex (DPPCAH-Cu) exhibit significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of their pharmacological interaction with the biological molecule bovine serum albumin (BSA) remains poorly understood. The present study elucidates the interactions between the drug and BSA through MTT assays, spectroscopic methods and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicate that BSA could attenuate effect on the cytotoxicity of DPPCAH, but not DPPCAH-Cu. Data from fluorescence quenching measurements demonstrated that both DPPCAH and DPPCAH-Cu could bind to BSA, with a reversed effect on the environment of tryptophan residues in polarity. CD spectra revealed that the DPPCAH-Cu exerted a slightly stronger effect on the secondary structure of BSA than DPPCAH. The association constant of DPPCAH with BSA was greater than that of DPPCAH-Cu. Docking studies indicated that the binding of DPPCAH to BSA involved a greater number of hydrogen bonds compared to DPPCAH-Cu. The calculated distances between bound ligands and tryptophans in BSA were in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer results. Thus, the binding affinity of the drug (DPPCAH or DPPCAH-Cu) with BSA partially contributes to its antitumor activity; the greater the drug affinity is to BSA, the less is its antitumor activity. PMID:27136517

  7. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  8. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  9. Interaction study of a novel Macrobrachium rosenbergii effector caspase with B2 and capsid proteins of M. rosenbergii nodavirus reveals their roles in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Youngcharoen, Supak; Senapin, Saengchan; Lertwimol, Tareerat; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Flegel, Timothy W; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis is an essential immune response to protect invertebrates from virus infected cells. In shrimp, virus infection has been reported to induce apoptosis. Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) was considered to be a disease-resistant host when compared to penaeid shrimps. Caspase-3 was classified as an executioner caspase which played a key role in virus-induced apoptosis. In this study, an effector caspase gene of M. rosenbergii (Mrcasp) was cloned and characterized. The open reading frame (ORF) of Mrcasp was 957 nucleotide encoding 318 amino acid with a deduced molecular mass of 35.87 kDa. RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of Mrcasp in all examined tissues. The phylogenetic tree indicated that Mrcasp was closely related with caspase 3 of shrimp. The functions of the Mrcasp, B2 and capsid proteins of M. rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) were assayed in Sf-9 cells. The results showed that Mrcasp induce apoptotic morphology cells; however, capsid protein of MrNV could inhibit apoptotic cells whereas B2 could neither induce nor inhibit apoptotic cells by DAPI staining. The protein interaction between Mrcasp and viral MrNV structure revealed that Mrcasp did not bind to B2 or capsid protein whereas B2 and capsid proteins could bind directly to each other. This study reported a novel sequence of a full-length Mrcasp and its functional studies indicated that Mrcasp could induce apoptotic cells. Our data is the first report demonstrating the direct protein-protein interaction between capsid protein and B2 protein of MrNV. PMID:25982399

  10. Interaction study of a novel Macrobrachium rosenbergii effector caspase with B2 and capsid proteins of M. rosenbergii nodavirus reveals their roles in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Youngcharoen, Supak; Senapin, Saengchan; Lertwimol, Tareerat; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn; Flegel, Timothy W; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis is an essential immune response to protect invertebrates from virus infected cells. In shrimp, virus infection has been reported to induce apoptosis. Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr) was considered to be a disease-resistant host when compared to penaeid shrimps. Caspase-3 was classified as an executioner caspase which played a key role in virus-induced apoptosis. In this study, an effector caspase gene of M. rosenbergii (Mrcasp) was cloned and characterized. The open reading frame (ORF) of Mrcasp was 957 nucleotide encoding 318 amino acid with a deduced molecular mass of 35.87 kDa. RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of Mrcasp in all examined tissues. The phylogenetic tree indicated that Mrcasp was closely related with caspase 3 of shrimp. The functions of the Mrcasp, B2 and capsid proteins of M. rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) were assayed in Sf-9 cells. The results showed that Mrcasp induce apoptotic morphology cells; however, capsid protein of MrNV could inhibit apoptotic cells whereas B2 could neither induce nor inhibit apoptotic cells by DAPI staining. The protein interaction between Mrcasp and viral MrNV structure revealed that Mrcasp did not bind to B2 or capsid protein whereas B2 and capsid proteins could bind directly to each other. This study reported a novel sequence of a full-length Mrcasp and its functional studies indicated that Mrcasp could induce apoptotic cells. Our data is the first report demonstrating the direct protein-protein interaction between capsid protein and B2 protein of MrNV.

  11. Remote-Stereocontrol in Dienamine Catalysis: Z-Dienamine Preferences and Electrophile-Catalyst Interaction Revealed by NMR and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Hammer, Michael M; Morana, Fabio; Fuchs, Patrick J W; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2016-08-10

    Catalysis with remote-stereocontrol provides special challenges in design and comprehension. One famous example is the dienamine catalysis, for which high ee values are reported despite insufficient shielding of the second double bond. Especially for dienamines with variable Z/E-ratios of the second double bond, no correlations to the ee values are found. Therefore, the structures, thermodynamics, and kinetics of dienamine intermediates in SN-type reactions are investigated. The NMR studies show that the preferred dienamine conformation provides an effective shielding if large electrophiles are used. Calculations at SCS-MP2/CBS-level of theory and experimental data of the dienamine formation show kinetic preference for the Z-isomer of the second double bond and a slow isomerization toward the thermodynamically preferred E-isomer. Modulations of the rate-determining step, by variation of the concentration of the electrophile, allow the conversion of dienamines to be observed. With electrophiles, a faster reaction of Z- than of E-isomers is observed experimentally. Calculations corroborate these results by correlating ee values of three catalysts with the kinetics of the electrophilic attack and reveal the significance of CH-π and stacking interactions in the transition states. Thus, for the first time a comprehensive understanding of the remote stereocontrol in γ-functionalization reactions of dienamines and an explanation to the "Z/E-dilemma" are presented. The combination of bulky catalyst subsystems and large electrophiles provides a shielding of one face and causes different reactivities of E/Z-dienamines in nucleophilic attacks from the other face. Kinetic preferences for the formation of Z-dienamines and their unfavorable thermodynamics support high ee values. PMID:27430865

  12. Remote-Stereocontrol in Dienamine Catalysis: Z-Dienamine Preferences and Electrophile-Catalyst Interaction Revealed by NMR and Computational Studies.

    PubMed

    Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Hammer, Michael M; Morana, Fabio; Fuchs, Patrick J W; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2016-08-10

    Catalysis with remote-stereocontrol provides special challenges in design and comprehension. One famous example is the dienamine catalysis, for which high ee values are reported despite insufficient shielding of the second double bond. Especially for dienamines with variable Z/E-ratios of the second double bond, no correlations to the ee values are found. Therefore, the structures, thermodynamics, and kinetics of dienamine intermediates in SN-type reactions are investigated. The NMR studies show that the preferred dienamine conformation provides an effective shielding if large electrophiles are used. Calculations at SCS-MP2/CBS-level of theory and experimental data of the dienamine formation show kinetic preference for the Z-isomer of the second double bond and a slow isomerization toward the thermodynamically preferred E-isomer. Modulations of the rate-determining step, by variation of the concentration of the electrophile, allow the conversion of dienamines to be observed. With electrophiles, a faster reaction of Z- than of E-isomers is observed experimentally. Calculations corroborate these results by correlating ee values of three catalysts with the kinetics of the electrophilic attack and reveal the significance of CH-π and stacking interactions in the transition states. Thus, for the first time a comprehensive understanding of the remote stereocontrol in γ-functionalization reactions of dienamines and an explanation to the "Z/E-dilemma" are presented. The combination of bulky catalyst subsystems and large electrophiles provides a shielding of one face and causes different reactivities of E/Z-dienamines in nucleophilic attacks from the other face. Kinetic preferences for the formation of Z-dienamines and their unfavorable thermodynamics support high ee values.

  13. Statistical metamodeling for revealing synergistic antimicrobial interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang Chia; Chen, Chia Hsiang; Gau, Vincent; Zhang, Donna D; Liao, Joseph C; Wang, Fei-Yue; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are becoming drug resistant faster than we can develop new antimicrobials. To address this threat in public health, a metamodel antimicrobial cocktail optimization (MACO) scheme is demonstrated for rapid screening of potent antibiotic cocktails using uropathogenic clinical isolates as model systems. With the MACO scheme, only 18 parallel trials were required to determine a potent antimicrobial cocktail out of hundreds of possible combinations. In particular, trimethoprim and gentamicin were identified to work synergistically for inhibiting the bacterial growth. Sensitivity analysis indicated gentamicin functions as a synergist for trimethoprim, and reduces its minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-fold. Validation study also confirmed that the trimethoprim-gentamicin synergistic cocktail effectively inhibited the growths of multiple strains of uropathogenic clinical isolates. With its effectiveness and simplicity, the MACO scheme possesses the potential to serve as a generic platform for identifying synergistic antimicrobial cocktails toward management of bacterial infection in the future. PMID:21124958

  14. Statistical Metamodeling for Revealing Synergistic Antimicrobial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia Hsiang; Gau, Vincent; Zhang, Donna D.; Liao, Joseph C.; Wang, Fei-Yue; Wong, Pak Kin

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are becoming drug resistant faster than we can develop new antimicrobials. To address this threat in public health, a metamodel antimicrobial cocktail optimization (MACO) scheme is demonstrated for rapid screening of potent antibiotic cocktails using uropathogenic clinical isolates as model systems. With the MACO scheme, only 18 parallel trials were required to determine a potent antimicrobial cocktail out of hundreds of possible combinations. In particular, trimethoprim and gentamicin were identified to work synergistically for inhibiting the bacterial growth. Sensitivity analysis indicated gentamicin functions as a synergist for trimethoprim, and reduces its minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-fold. Validation study also confirmed that the trimethoprim-gentamicin synergistic cocktail effectively inhibited the growths of multiple strains of uropathogenic clinical isolates. With its effectiveness and simplicity, the MACO scheme possesses the potential to serve as a generic platform for identifying synergistic antimicrobial cocktails toward management of bacterial infection in the future. PMID:21124958

  15. Correcting for the study bias associated with protein-protein interaction measurements reveals differences between protein degree distributions from different cancer types.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are associated with multiple types of biases partly rooted in technical limitations of the experimental techniques. Another source of bias are the different frequencies with which proteins have been studied for interaction partners. It is generally believed that proteins with a large number of interaction partners tend to be essential, evolutionarily conserved, and involved in disease. It has been repeatedly reported that proteins driving tumor formation have a higher number of PPI partners. However, it has been noticed before that the degree distribution of PPI networks is biased toward disease proteins, which tend to have been studied more often than non-disease proteins. At the same time, for many poorly characterized proteins no interactions have been reported yet. It is unclear to which extent this study bias affects the observation that cancer proteins tend to have more PPI partners. Here, we show that the degree of a protein is a function of the number of times it has been screened for interaction partners. We present a randomization-based method that controls for this bias to decide whether a group of proteins is associated with significantly more PPI partners than the proteomic background. We apply our method to cancer proteins and observe, in contrast to previous studies, no conclusive evidence for a significantly higher degree distribution associated with cancer proteins as compared to non-cancer proteins when we compare them to proteins that have been equally often studied as bait proteins. Comparing proteins from different tumor types, a more complex picture emerges in which proteins of certain cancer classes have significantly more interaction partners while others are associated with a smaller degree. For example, proteins of several hematological cancers tend to be associated with a higher number of interaction partners as expected by chance. Solid tumors, in contrast, are usually associated with a degree

  16. Cephradine antacids interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Arayne, M Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Afzal, M

    2007-07-01

    The present work comprises of interaction studies of cephradine with antacids. Cephradine is included among the first generation cephalosporin, which is active against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria including penicillinase-producing staphylococci. Since the presence of complexing ligand may affect the bioavailability of a drug in blood or tissues, therefore, in order to study the probable interaction of cephradine with antacids all the reaction conditions were simulated to natural environments. Antacids are commonly used in patients complaining of GI irritations. The behavior of cephradine in presence of seven antacids i.e., simethicone, magaldrate, magnesium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium trisilicate, sodium bicarbonate and aluminium hydroxide was studied by using standard dissolution apparatus. Cephradine was monitored both by UV and by high performance liquid chromatography. The results revealed that antacids containing polyvalent cations retarded the in vitro availability of cephradine. Moreover, these studies indicated that cephradine was strongly adsorbed on antacids; magnesium trisilicate and simeco tablets (powdered) exhibited relatively higher adsorption capacities.

  17. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J.; Golovanov, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (SosCat) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of SosCat, while SosCat also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  18. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (Sos(Cat)) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of Sos(Cat), while Sos(Cat) also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos. PMID:27412770

  19. Dynamic studies of H-Ras•GTPγS interactions with nucleotide exchange factor Sos reveal a transient ternary complex formation in solution.

    PubMed

    Vo, Uybach; Vajpai, Navratna; Embrey, Kevin J; Golovanov, Alexander P

    2016-07-14

    The cycling between GDP- and GTP- bound forms of the Ras protein is partly regulated by the binding of Sos. The structural/dynamic behavior of the complex formed between activated Sos and Ras at the point of the functional cycle where the nucleotide exchange is completed has not been described to date. Here we show that solution NMR spectra of H-Ras∙GTPγS mixed with a functional fragment of Sos (Sos(Cat)) at a 2:1 ratio are consistent with the formation of a rather dynamic assembly. H-Ras∙GTPγS binding was in fast exchange on the NMR timescale and retained a significant degree of molecular tumbling independent of Sos(Cat), while Sos(Cat) also tumbled largely independently of H-Ras. Estimates of apparent molecular weight from both NMR data and SEC-MALS revealed that, at most, only one H-Ras∙GTPγS molecule appears stably bound to Sos. The weak transient interaction between Sos and the second H-Ras∙GTPγS may provide a necessary mechanism for complex dissociation upon the completion of the native GDP → GTP exchange reaction, but also explains measurable GTP → GTP exchange activity of Sos routinely observed in in vitro assays that use fluorescently-labelled analogs of GTP. Overall, the data presents the first dynamic snapshot of Ras functional cycle as controlled by Sos.

  20. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the heme regulatory motifs of heme oxygenase-2 are dynamically disordered and exhibit redox-dependent interaction with heme

    DOE PAGES

    Bagai, Ireena; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Sharma, Ajay; Hoffman, Brian M.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-05-05

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes a key step in heme homeostasis: the O₂₋ and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent conversion of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Mammals contain two isoforms of this enzyme, HO2 and HO1, which share the same α-helical fold forming the catalytic core and heme binding site, as well as a membrane spanning helix at their C-termini. However, unlike HO1, HO2 has an additional 30-residue N-terminus as well as two cysteine-proline sequences near the C-terminus that reside in heme regulatory motifs (HRMs).more » While the role of the additional N-terminal residues of HO2 is not yet understood, the HRMs have been proposed to reversibly form a thiol/disulfide redox switch that modulates the affinity of HO2 for ferric heme as a function of cellular redox poise. To further define the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions unique to HO2, we used multiple spectroscopic techniques to characterize these regions of the human HO2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments with HO2 demonstrate that, when the HRMs are in the oxidized state (HO2O), both the extra N-terminal and the C-terminal HRM-containing regions are disordered. However, protein NMR experiments illustrate that, under reducing conditions, the C-terminal region gains some structure as the Cys residues in the HRMs undergo reduction (HO2R) and, in experiments employing a diamagnetic protoporphyrin, suggest a redox-dependent interaction between the core and the HRM domains. Further, electron nuclear double resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies demonstrate that, upon reduction of the HRMs to the sulfhydryl form, a cysteine residue from the HRM region ligates to a ferric heme. Taken together with EPR measurements, which show the appearance of a new low-spin heme signal in reduced HO2, it appears that a cysteine residue(s) in the HRMs directly interacts with a second

  1. Spectroscopic studies reveal that the heme regulatory motifs of heme oxygenase-2 are dynamically disordered and exhibit redox-dependent interaction with heme

    SciTech Connect

    Bagai, Ireena; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Sharma, Ajay; Hoffman, Brian M.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-05-05

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes a key step in heme homeostasis: the O₂₋ and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent conversion of heme to biliverdin, Fe, and CO through a process in which the heme participates both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Mammals contain two isoforms of this enzyme, HO2 and HO1, which share the same α-helical fold forming the catalytic core and heme binding site, as well as a membrane spanning helix at their C-termini. However, unlike HO1, HO2 has an additional 30-residue N-terminus as well as two cysteine-proline sequences near the C-terminus that reside in heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). While the role of the additional N-terminal residues of HO2 is not yet understood, the HRMs have been proposed to reversibly form a thiol/disulfide redox switch that modulates the affinity of HO2 for ferric heme as a function of cellular redox poise. To further define the roles of the N- and C-terminal regions unique to HO2, we used multiple spectroscopic techniques to characterize these regions of the human HO2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments with HO2 demonstrate that, when the HRMs are in the oxidized state (HO2O), both the extra N-terminal and the C-terminal HRM-containing regions are disordered. However, protein NMR experiments illustrate that, under reducing conditions, the C-terminal region gains some structure as the Cys residues in the HRMs undergo reduction (HO2R) and, in experiments employing a diamagnetic protoporphyrin, suggest a redox-dependent interaction between the core and the HRM domains. Further, electron nuclear double resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies demonstrate that, upon reduction of the HRMs to the sulfhydryl form, a cysteine residue from the HRM region ligates to a ferric heme. Taken together with EPR measurements, which show the appearance of a new low-spin heme signal in reduced HO2, it appears that a cysteine residue(s) in the HRMs directly interacts

  2. Bioluminescence to reveal structure and interaction of coastal planktonic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, Mark A.; Blackwell, Shelley M.; Case, James F.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Herren, Christen M.; Orrico, Cristina M.; Terrill, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Ecosystem function will in large part be determined by functional groups present in biological communities. The simplest distinction with respect to functional groups of an ecosystem is the differentiation between primary and secondary producers. A challenge thus far has been to examine these groups simultaneously with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution for observations to be relevant to the scales of change in coastal oceans. This study takes advantage of general differences in the bioluminescence flash kinetics between planktonic dinoflagellates and zooplankton to measure relative abundances of the two groups within the same-time space volume. This novel approach for distinguishing these general classifications using a single sensor is validated using fluorescence data and exclusion experiments. The approach is then applied to data collected from an autonomous underwater vehicle surveying >500 km in Monterey Bay and San Luis Obispo Bay, CA during the summers of 2002-2004. The approach also reveals that identifying trophic interaction between the two planktonic communities may also be possible.

  3. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  4. Genomic Interaction Profiles in Breast Cancer Reveal Altered Chromatin Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Zeitz, Michael J.; Ay, Ferhat; Heidmann, Julia D.; Lerner, Paula L.

    2013-01-01

    Gene transcription can be regulated by remote enhancer regions through chromosome looping either in cis or in trans. Cancer cells are characterized by wholesale changes in long-range gene interactions, but the role that these long-range interactions play in cancer progression and metastasis is not well understood. In this study, we used IGFBP3, a gene involved in breast cancer pathogenesis, as bait in a 4C-seq experiment comparing normal breast cells (HMEC) with two breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, an ER positive cell line, and MDA-MB-231, a triple negative cell line). The IGFBP3 long-range interaction profile was substantially altered in breast cancer. Many interactions seen in normal breast cells are lost and novel interactions appear in cancer lines. We found that in HMEC, the breast carcinoma amplified sequence gene family (BCAS) 1–4 were among the top 10 most significantly enriched regions of interaction with IGFBP3. 3D-FISH analysis indicated that the translocation-prone BCAS genes, which are located on chromosomes 1, 17, and 20, are in close physical proximity with IGFBP3 and each other in normal breast cells. We also found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a gene implicated in tumorigenesis, interacts significantly with IGFBP3 and that this interaction may play a role in their regulation. Breakpoint analysis suggests that when an IGFBP3 interacting region undergoes a translocation an additional interaction detectable by 4C is gained. Overall, our data from multiple lines of evidence suggest an important role for long-range chromosomal interactions in the pathogenesis of cancer. PMID:24019942

  5. Neutron reflection study of the interaction of the eukaryotic pore-forming actinoporin equinatoxin II with lipid membranes reveals intermediate states in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Wacklin, Hanna P; Bremec, Biserka Bakrač; Moulin, Martina; Rojko, Nejc; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, Trevor; Anderluh, Gregor; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin, lyses cell membranes through a mechanism involving the insertion of its N-terminal α-helix into the membrane. EqtII pore formation is dependent on sphingomyelin (SM), although cholesterol (Chol) and membrane microdomains have also been suggested to enhance its activity. We have investigated the mechanism of EqtII binding and insertion by using neutron reflection to determine the structures of EqtII-membrane assemblies in situ. EqtII has several different modes of binding to membranes depending on the lipid composition. In pure dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes, EqtII interacts weakly and reversibly with the lipid head groups in an orientation approximately parallel to the membrane surface. The presence of sphingomyelin (SM) gives rise to a more upright orientation of EqtII, but Chol is required for insertion into the core of the membrane. Cooling the EqtII-lipid assembly below the lipid phase transition temperature leads to deep water penetration and a significant reduction in the extension of the protein outside the membrane, indicating that phase-separation plays a role in EqtII pore-formation. An inactive double-cysteine mutant of EqtII in which the α-helix is covalently tethered to the rest of the protein, interacts only reversibly with all the membranes. Releasing the α-helix in situ by reduction of the disulphide bridge, however, causes the mutant protein to penetrate in DMPC-SM-Chol membranes in a manner identical to that of the wild-type protein. Our results help clarify the early steps in pore formation by EqtII and highlight the valuable information on protein-membrane interactions available from neutron reflection measurements.

  6. Neutron reflection study of the interaction of the eukaryotic pore-forming actinoporin equinatoxin II with lipid membranes reveals intermediate states in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Wacklin, Hanna P; Bremec, Biserka Bakrač; Moulin, Martina; Rojko, Nejc; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, Trevor; Anderluh, Gregor; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin, lyses cell membranes through a mechanism involving the insertion of its N-terminal α-helix into the membrane. EqtII pore formation is dependent on sphingomyelin (SM), although cholesterol (Chol) and membrane microdomains have also been suggested to enhance its activity. We have investigated the mechanism of EqtII binding and insertion by using neutron reflection to determine the structures of EqtII-membrane assemblies in situ. EqtII has several different modes of binding to membranes depending on the lipid composition. In pure dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes, EqtII interacts weakly and reversibly with the lipid head groups in an orientation approximately parallel to the membrane surface. The presence of sphingomyelin (SM) gives rise to a more upright orientation of EqtII, but Chol is required for insertion into the core of the membrane. Cooling the EqtII-lipid assembly below the lipid phase transition temperature leads to deep water penetration and a significant reduction in the extension of the protein outside the membrane, indicating that phase-separation plays a role in EqtII pore-formation. An inactive double-cysteine mutant of EqtII in which the α-helix is covalently tethered to the rest of the protein, interacts only reversibly with all the membranes. Releasing the α-helix in situ by reduction of the disulphide bridge, however, causes the mutant protein to penetrate in DMPC-SM-Chol membranes in a manner identical to that of the wild-type protein. Our results help clarify the early steps in pore formation by EqtII and highlight the valuable information on protein-membrane interactions available from neutron reflection measurements. PMID:26706098

  7. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  8. Revealing Significant Learning Moments with Interactive Whiteboards in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; McPherson, Richard; Sabeti, Farhad Mordy; Flynn, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify when and how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) functioned as a productive tool that impacted student learning in mathematics. Using video data, field notes, and interview transcripts from 1 school year in two optimal case study classrooms, we were able to examine the unique opportunities afforded by the size of…

  9. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2015-06-26

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function. PMID:26197145

  10. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  11. Coupled nucleotide covariations reveal dynamic RNA interaction patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Gultyaev, A P; Franch, T; Gerdes, K

    2000-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved structures in related RNA molecules contain coordinated variations (covariations) of paired nucleotides. Analysis of covariations is a very powerful approach to deduce phylogenetically conserved (i.e., functional) conformations, including tertiary interactions. Here we discuss conserved RNA folding pathways that are revealed by covariation patterns. In such pathways, structural requirements for alternative pairings cause some nucleotides to covary with two different partners. Such "coupled" covariations between three or more nucleotides were found in various types of RNAs. The analysis of coupled covariations can unravel important features of RNA folding dynamics and improve phylogeny reconstruction in some cases. Importantly, it is necessary to distinguish between multiple covariations determined by mutually exclusive structures and those determined by tertiary contacts. PMID:11105748

  12. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  13. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  14. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  15. Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging Reveals in Vivo Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher; Stoneman, Michael; Raicu, Valerica; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce the Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging (FSI) method as a new tool to probe the stoichiometry and stability of protein complexes in biological membranes. The FSI method yields two dimensional membrane concentrations and FRET efficiencies in native plasma membranes. It can be used to characterize the association of membrane proteins: to differentiate between monomers, dimers, or oligomers, to produce binding (association) curves, and to measure the free energies of association in the membrane. We use the FSI method to study the lateral interactions of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily, in plasma membranes, in vivo. The knowledge gained through the use of the new method challenges the current understanding of VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:26787445

  16. Seed Sequence-Matched Controls Reveal Limitations of Small Interfering RNA Knockdown in Functional and Structural Studies of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A-MOBKL1B Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyo-Young; Gu, Meigang; Buehler, Eugen; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a widespread human pathogen causing liver cirrhosis and cancer. Similar to the case for other viruses, HCV depends on host and viral factors to complete its life cycle. We used proteomic and yeast two-hybrid approaches to elucidate host factors involved in HCV nonstructural protein NS5A function and found that MOBKL1B interacts with NS5A. Initial experiments with small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown suggesting a role in HCV replication led us to examine the interaction using biochemical and structural approaches. As revealed by a cocrystal structure of a core MOBKL1B-NS5A peptide complex at 1.95 Å, NS5A binds to a hydrophobic patch on the MOBKL1B surface. Biosensor binding assays identified a highly conserved, 18-amino-acid binding site in domain II of NS5A, which encompasses residues implicated in cyclophilin A (CypA)-dependent HCV RNA replication. However, a CypA-independent HCV variant had reduced replication in MOBKL1B knockdown cells, even though its NS5A does not interact with MOBKL1B. These discordant results prompted more extensive studies of MOBKL1B gene knockdowns, which included additional siRNAs and specifically matched seed sequence siRNA controls. We found that reduced virus replication after treating cells with MOBKL1B siRNA was actually due to off-target inhibition, which indicated that the initial finding of virus replication dependence on the MOBKL1B-NS5A interaction was incorrect. Ultimately, using several approaches, we found no relationship of the MOBKL1B-NS5A interaction to virus replication. These findings collectively serve as a reminder to investigators and scientific reviewers of the pervasive impact of siRNA off-target effects on interpretation of biological data. IMPORTANCE Our study illustrates an underappreciated shortcoming of siRNA gene knockdown technology. We initially identified a cellular protein, MOBKL1B, as a binding partner with the NS5A protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). MOBKL1B si

  17. Fish introductions reveal the temperature dependence of species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Catherine L.; Öhlund, Gunnar; Englund, Göran

    2014-01-01

    A major area of current research is to understand how climate change will impact species interactions and ultimately biodiversity. A variety of environmental conditions are rapidly changing owing to climate warming, and these conditions often affect both the strength and outcome of species interactions. We used fish distributions and replicated fish introductions to investigate environmental conditions influencing the coexistence of two fishes in Swedish lakes: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and pike (Esox lucius). A logistic regression model of brown trout and pike coexistence showed that these species coexist in large lakes (more than 4.5 km2), but not in small, warm lakes (annual air temperature more than 0.9–1.5°C). We then explored how climate change will alter coexistence by substituting climate scenarios for 2091–2100 into our model. The model predicts that brown trout will be extirpated from approximately half of the lakes where they presently coexist with pike and from nearly all 9100 lakes where pike are predicted to invade. Context dependency was critical for understanding pike–brown trout interactions, and, given the widespread occurrence of context-dependent species interactions, this aspect will probably be critical for accurately predicting climate impacts on biodiversity. PMID:24307673

  18. Spectroscopy reveals that ethyl esters interact with proteins in wine.

    PubMed

    Di Gaspero, Mattia; Ruzza, Paolo; Hussain, Rohanah; Vincenzi, Simone; Biondi, Barbara; Gazzola, Diana; Siligardi, Giuliano; Curioni, Andrea

    2017-02-15

    Impairment of wine aroma after vinification is frequently associated to bentonite treatments and this can be the result of protein removal, as recently demonstrated for ethyl esters. To evaluate the existence of an interaction between wine proteins and ethyl esters, the effects induced by these fermentative aroma compounds on the secondary structure and stability of VVTL1, a Thaumatin-like protein purified from wine, was analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The secondary structure of wine VVTL1 was not strongly affected by the presence of selected ethyl esters. In contrast, VVTL1 stability was slightly increased by the addition of ethyl-octanoate, -decanoate and -dodecanoate, but decreased by ethyl-hexanoate. This indicates the existence of an interaction between VVTL1 and at least some aroma compounds produced during fermentation. The data suggest that proteins removal from wine by bentonite can result in indirect removal of at least some aroma compounds associated with them. PMID:27664648

  19. Joint fitting reveals hidden interactions in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Barberis, L; Pasquale, M A; Condat, C A

    2015-01-21

    Tumor growth is often the result of the simultaneous development of two or more cancer cell populations. Crucial to the system evolution are the interactions between these populations. To obtain information about these interactions we apply the recently developed vector universality (VUN) formalism to various instances of competition between tumor populations. The formalism allows us (a) to quantify the growth mechanisms of a HeLa cell colony, describing the phenotype switching responsible for its fast expansion, (b) to reliably reconstruct the evolution of the necrotic and viable fractions in both in vitro and in vivo tumors using data for the time dependences of the total masses alone, and (c) to show how the shedding of cells leading to subspheroid formation is beneficial to both the spheroid and subspheroid populations, suggesting that shedding is a strong positive influence on cancer dissemination.

  20. Revealing Transient Interactions between Phosphatidylinositol-specific Phospholipase C and Phosphatidylcholine--Rich Lipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boqian; He, Tao; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Roberts, Mary; Gershenson, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes transiently interact with target membranes. Previous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments showed that Bacillus thuringiensis PI-PLC specifically binds to phosphatidylcholine (PC)-rich membranes and preferentially interacts with unilamellar vesicles that show larger curvature. Mutagenesis studies combined with FCS measurements of binding affinity highlighted the importance of interfacial PI-PLC tyrosines in the PC specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of PI-PLC performed in the presence of a PC membrane indicate these tyrosines are involved in specific cation-pi interactions with choline headgroups. To further understand those transient interactions between PI-PLC and PC-rich vesicles, we monitor single fluorescently labeled PI-PLC proteins as they cycle on and off surface-tethered small unilamellar vesicles using total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy. The residence times on vesicles along with vesicle size information, based on vesicle fluorescence intensity, reveal the time scales of PI-PLC membrane interactions as well as the curvature dependence. The PC specificity and the vesicle curvature dependence of this PI-PLC/membrane interaction provide insight into how the interface modulates protein-membrane interactions. This work was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Science of the National Institutes of Health (R01GM060418).

  1. Quantitative Genetic Interactions Reveal Layers of Biological Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Beltrao, Pedro; Cagney, Gerard; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2010-01-01

    In the past, biomedical research has embraced a reductionist approach, primarily focused on characterizing the individual components that comprise a system of interest. Recent technical developments have significantly increased the size and scope of data describing biological systems. At the same time, advances in the field of systems biology have evoked a broader view of how the underlying components are interconnected. In this essay, we discuss how quantitative genetic interaction mapping has enhanced our view of biological systems, allowing a deeper functional interrogation at different biological scales. PMID:20510918

  2. Shuttle interaction study extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Plans for space shuttle missions as they effect the Space Operation Center (SOC) were examined. Shuttle fleet utilization, traffic analysis, SOC assembly operations, SOC propellant storage, and flight support facilities were studied with cost estimates, and completion schedules included.

  3. Study of Interacting/Merging IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2003-07-01

    A new sample of 1178 faint IRAS galaxies (Byurakan-IRAS Galaxy sample, BIG) has been constructed by means of optical identifications of IRAS point sources from PSC in the region +61° <δ<+90° at high galactic latitudes with a surface of 1487 deg^{2}. Compact galaxies, interacting pairs and groups, mergers, radio, and X-ray sources are among the identified objects. Spectral observations in Byurakan (Armenia), SAO (Russia) and OHP (France) revealed new AGNs and high-luminosity infrared galaxies. 50 optical counterparts are interacting/merging pairs and multiple systems. 15 of them have been observed at SAO 6m telescope with Multi-Pupil Fibre Spectrograph (MPFS) to study their velocity fields and dynamics to reveal physical mergers. These objects are of special interest due to star-formation, nuclear activity and interaction phenomena occuring there, giving possibility to study connections between these phenomena and their interrelationship.

  4. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    PubMed Central

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

  5. Conditional Epistatic Interaction Maps Reveal Global Functional Rewiring of Genome Integrity Pathways in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Beloglazova, Natalia; Bundalovic-Torma, Cedoljub; Phanse, Sadhna; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Lemak, Sofia; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Minic, Zoran; Wagih, Omar; Mosca, Roberto; Aloy, Patrick; Golshani, Ashkan; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew; Yakunin, Alexander F; Babu, Mohan

    2016-01-26

    As antibiotic resistance is increasingly becoming a public health concern, an improved understanding of the bacterial DNA damage response (DDR), which is commonly targeted by antibiotics, could be of tremendous therapeutic value. Although the genetic components of the bacterial DDR have been studied extensively in isolation, how the underlying biological pathways interact functionally remains unclear. Here, we address this by performing systematic, unbiased, quantitative synthetic genetic interaction (GI) screens and uncover widespread changes in the GI network of the entire genomic integrity apparatus of Escherichia coli under standard and DNA-damaging growth conditions. The GI patterns of untreated cultures implicated two previously uncharacterized proteins (YhbQ and YqgF) as nucleases, whereas reorganization of the GI network after DNA damage revealed DDR roles for both annotated and uncharacterized genes. Analyses of pan-bacterial conservation patterns suggest that DDR mechanisms and functional relationships are near universal, highlighting a modular and highly adaptive genomic stress response.

  6. Binding interaction of quercetin-3-beta-galactoside and its synthetic derivatives with SARS-CoV 3CL(pro): structure-activity relationship studies reveal salient pharmacophore features.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Li, Jian; Luo, Cheng; Liu, Hong; Xu, Weijun; Chen, Gang; Liew, Oi Wah; Zhu, Weiliang; Puah, Chum Mok; Shen, Xu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-12-15

    The 3C-like protease (3CL(pro)) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is one of the most promising targets for discovery of drugs against SARS, because of its critical role in the viral life cycle. In this study, a natural compound called quercetin-3-beta-galactoside was identified as an inhibitor of the protease by molecular docking, SPR/FRET-based bioassays, and mutagenesis studies. Both molecular modeling and Q189A mutation revealed that Gln189 plays a key role in the binding. Furthermore, experimental evidence showed that the secondary structure and enzymatic activity of SARS-CoV 3CL(pro) were not affected by the Q189A mutation. With the help of molecular modeling, eight new derivatives of the natural product were designed and synthesized. Bioassay results reveal salient features of the structure-activity relationship of the new compounds: (1) removal of the 7-hydroxy group of the quercetin moiety decreases the bioactivity of the derivatives; (2) acetoxylation of the sugar moiety abolishes inhibitor action; (3) introduction of a large sugar substituent on 7-hydroxy of quercetin can be tolerated; (4) replacement of the galactose moiety with other sugars does not affect inhibitor potency. This study not only reveals a new class of compounds as potential drug leads against the SARS virus, but also provides a solid understanding of the mechanism of inhibition against the target enzyme.

  7. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  8. Thermodynamic studies of saccharide binding to artocarpin, a B-cell mitogen, reveals the extended nature of its interaction with mannotriose [3,6-Di-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-mannose].

    PubMed

    Rani, P G; Bachhawat, K; Misquith, S; Surolia, A

    1999-10-15

    The thermodynamics of binding of various saccharides to artocarpin, from Artocarpus integrifolia seeds, a homotetrameric lectin (M(r) 65, 000) with one binding site per subunit, was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements at 280 and 293 K. The binding enthalpies, DeltaH(b), are the same at both temperatures, and the values range from -10.94 to -47.11 kJ mol(-1). The affinities of artocarpin as obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry are in reasonable agreement with the results obtained by enzyme-linked lectin absorbent essay, which is based on the minimum amount of ligand required to inhibit horseradish peroxidase binding to artocarpin in enzyme-linked lectin absorbent essay (Misquith, S., Rani, P. G., and Surolia, A. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 30393-30401). The interactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-entropy compensation. The order of binding affinity of artocarpin is as follows: mannotriose>Manalpha3Man>GlcNAc(2)Man(3)>MealphaMan>Man>M analpha6Man> Manalpha2Man>MealphaGlc>Glc, i.e. 7>4>2>1.4>1>0.4>0.3>0.24>0.11. The DeltaH for the interaction of Manalpha3Man, Manalpha6Man, and MealphaMan are similar and 20 kJ mol(-1) lower than that of mannotriose. This indicates that, while Manalpha3Man and Manalpha6Man interact with the lectin exclusively through their nonreducing end monosaccharide with the subsites specific for the alpha1,3 and alpha1,6 arms, the mannotriose interacts with the lectin simultaneously through all three of its mannopyranosyl residues. This study thus underscores the distinction in the recognition of this common oligosaccharide motif in comparison with that displayed by other lectins with related specificity.

  9. Cross-Sensory Facilitation Reveals Neural Interactions between Visual and Tactile Motion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Monica; Mazzilli, Giacomo; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2011-01-01

    Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile velocity discrimination thresholds over a wide range of base velocities and conditions. Thresholds for both visual and tactile stimuli showed the characteristic “dipper function,” with the minimum thresholds occurring at a given “pedestal speed.” When visual and tactile coherent stimuli were combined (summation condition) the thresholds for these multisensory stimuli also showed a “dipper function” with the minimum thresholds occurring in a similar range to that for unisensory signals. However, the improvement of multisensory thresholds was weak and not directionally specific, well predicted by the maximum-likelihood estimation model (agreeing with previous research). A different technique (facilitation) did, however, reveal direction-specific enhancement. Adding a non-informative “pedestal” motion stimulus in one sensory modality (vision or touch) selectively lowered thresholds in the other, by the same amount as pedestals in the same modality. Facilitation did not occur for neutral stimuli like sounds (that would also have reduced temporal uncertainty), nor for motion in opposite direction, even in blocked trials where the subjects knew that the motion was in the opposite direction showing that the facilitation was not under subject control. Cross-sensory facilitation is strong evidence for functionally relevant cross-sensory integration at early levels of

  10. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes.

    PubMed

    Shigemizu, Daichi; Aiba, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  11. Revealing Two-State Protein-Protein Interaction of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruchuan; Hu, Dehong; Tan, Xin; Lu, H PETER.

    2006-08-09

    We report a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and polarization study of conformational dynamics of calmodulin (CaM) interacting with a target peptide, C28W of 28 amino-acid oligomer. The C28W peptide represents the essential binding sequence domain of the Ca-ATPase protein interacting with CaM, which is important in cellular signaling for the regulation of energy in metabolism. However, the mechanism of the CaM-C28W recognition complex formation is still unclear. The amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of the CaM was labeled with a fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (F1AsH) that enables our unambiguously probing the CaM N-terminal target-binding domain motions at a millisecond timescale without convolution of the probe-dye random motions. By analyzing the distribution of FRET efficiency between F1AsH labeled CaM and Texas Red labeled C28W and the polarization fluctuation dynamics and distributions of the CaM N-terminal domain, we reveal slow (at sub-second time scale) binding-unbinding motions of the N-terminal domain of the CaM in CaM-C28W complexes, which is a strong evidence of a two-state binding interaction of CaM-mediated cell signaling.

  12. Revealing Two-State Protein-Protein Interactions of Calmodulin by Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ruchuan; Hu, Dehong; Tan, Xin; Lu, H. Peter

    2006-08-01

    We report a single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and polarization study of conformational dynamics of calmodulin (CaM) interacting with a target peptide, C28W of a 28 amino acid oligomer. The C28W peptide represents the essential binding sequence domain of the Ca-ATPase protein interacting with CaM, which is important in cellular signaling for the regulation of energy in metabolism. However, the mechanism of the CaM/C28W recognition complex formation is still unclear. The amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain of the CaM was labeled with a fluorescein-based arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) that enables our unambiguous probing of the CaM N-terminal target-binding domain motions on a millisecond time scale without convolution of the probe-dye random motions. Finally, by analyzing the distribution of FRET efficiency between FlAsH labeled CaM and Texas Red labeled C28W and the polarization fluctuation dynamics and distributions of the CaM N-terminal domain, we reveal binding-unbinding motions of the N-terminal domain of the CaM in CaM/C28W complexes, which is strong evidence of a two-state binding interaction of CaM-mediated cell signaling.

  13. Cys-Gly specific dipeptidase Dug1p from S. cerevisiae binds promiscuously to di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides: Peptide-protein interaction, homology modeling, and activity studies reveal a latent promiscuity in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hardeep; Datt, Manish; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Mittal, Monica; Singh, Appu Kumar; Kumaran, Sangaralingam

    2011-02-01

    Dug1p is a recently identified novel dipeptidase and plays an important role in glutathione (GSH) degradation. To understand the mechanism of its substrate recognition and specificity towards Cys-Gly dipeptides, we characterized the solution properties of Dug1p and studied the thermodynamics of Dug1p-peptide interactions. In addition, we used homology modeling and ligand docking approaches to get structural insights into Dug1p-peptide interaction. Dug1p exists as dimer and the stoichiometry of peptide-Dug1p complex is 2:1 indicating each monomer in the dimer binds to one peptide. Thermodynamic studies indicate that the free energy change for Dug1p-peptide complex formation is similar (▵G(bind) ∼ -7.0 kcal/mol) for a variety of peptides of different composition and length (22 peptides). Three-dimensional model of Dug1p is constructed and docking of peptides to the modeled structure suggests that hydrogen bonding to active site residues (E172, E171, and D137) lock the N-terminal of the peptide into the binding site. Dug1p recognizes peptides in a metal independent manner and peptide binding is not sensitive to salts (dlogK/dlog[salt] ∼ 0) over a range of [NaCl] (0.02-0.5 M), [ZnCl(2)], and [MnCl(2)] (0-0.5 mM). Our results indicate that promiscuity in peptide binding results from the locking of peptide N-terminus into the active site. These observations were supported by our competitive inhibition activity assays. Dug1p activity towards Cys-Gly peptide is significantly reduced (∼ 70%) in the presence of Glu-Cys-Gly. Therefore, Dug1p can recognize a variety of oligopeptides, but has evolved with post-binding screening potential to hydrolyze Cys-Gly peptides selectively.

  14. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  15. Structure of Tetrahymena telomerase reveals previously unknown subunits, functions, and interactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Chan, Henry; Cash, Darian D; Miracco, Edward J; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Upton, Heather E; Cascio, Duilio; O'Brien Johnson, Reid; Collins, Kathleen; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Feigon, Juli

    2015-10-30

    Telomerase helps maintain telomeres by processive synthesis of telomere repeat DNA at their 3'-ends, using an integral telomerase RNA (TER) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). We report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of Tetrahymena telomerase at ~9 angstrom resolution. In addition to seven known holoenzyme proteins, we identify two additional proteins that form a complex (TEB) with single-stranded telomere DNA-binding protein Teb1, paralogous to heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA). The p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is identified as another RPA-related complex, CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1). This study reveals the paths of TER in the TERT-TER-p65 catalytic core and single-stranded DNA exit; extensive subunit interactions of the TERT essential N-terminal domain, p50, and TEB; and other subunit identities and structures, including p19 and p45C crystal structures. Our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into telomerase holoenzyme function.

  16. Lateral and Medial Ventral Occipitotemporal Regions Interact During the Recognition of Images Revealed from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Laar, Teus; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral sections of the ventral visual cortex in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial sections, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, 13 subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM)—a method to characterize network interactions—to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1), the lingual gyrus (LG) in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO). We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape—rather than by a single categorically specialized region—within the ventral visual cortex. PMID:26778997

  17. Elaborate cellulosome architecture of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus revealed by selective screening of cohesin–dockerin interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hamberg, Yuval; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Dassa, Bareket; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Cameron, Kate; Fontes, Carlos M.G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic waste represents a significant and underutilized carbon source for the biofuel industry. Owing to the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to enzymatic degradation, it is necessary to design economical methods of liberating the fermentable sugars required for bioethanol production. One route towards unlocking the potential of cellulosic waste lies in a highly complex class of molecular machines, the cellulosomes. Secreted mainly by anaerobic bacteria, cellulosomes are structurally diverse, cell surface-bound protein assemblies that can contain dozens of catalytic components. The key feature of the cellulosome is its modularity, facilitated by the ultra-high affinity cohesin–dockerin interaction. Due to the enormous number of cohesin and dockerin modules found in a typical cellulolytic organism, a major bottleneck in understanding the biology of cellulosomics is the purification of each cohesin- and dockerin-containing component, prior to analyses of their interaction. As opposed to previous approaches, the present study utilized proteins contained in unpurified whole-cell extracts. This strategy was made possible due to an experimental design that allowed for the relevant proteins to be “purified” via targeted affinity interactions as a function of the binding assay. The approach thus represents a new strategy, appropriate for future medium- to high-throughput screening of whole genomes, to determine the interactions between cohesins and dockerins. We have selected the cellulosome of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus for this work due to its exceptionally complex cellulosome systems and intriguing diversity of its cellulosomal modular components. Containing 41 cohesins and 143 dockerins, A. cellulolyticus has one of the largest number of potential cohesin–dockerin interactions of any organism, and contains unusual and novel cellulosomal features. We have surveyed a representative library of cohesin and dockerin modules spanning the cellulosome

  18. Elaborate cellulosome architecture of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus revealed by selective screening of cohesin-dockerin interactions.

    PubMed

    Hamberg, Yuval; Ruimy-Israeli, Vered; Dassa, Bareket; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael; Cameron, Kate; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Bayer, Edward A; Fried, Daniel B

    2014-01-01

    Cellulosic waste represents a significant and underutilized carbon source for the biofuel industry. Owing to the recalcitrance of crystalline cellulose to enzymatic degradation, it is necessary to design economical methods of liberating the fermentable sugars required for bioethanol production. One route towards unlocking the potential of cellulosic waste lies in a highly complex class of molecular machines, the cellulosomes. Secreted mainly by anaerobic bacteria, cellulosomes are structurally diverse, cell surface-bound protein assemblies that can contain dozens of catalytic components. The key feature of the cellulosome is its modularity, facilitated by the ultra-high affinity cohesin-dockerin interaction. Due to the enormous number of cohesin and dockerin modules found in a typical cellulolytic organism, a major bottleneck in understanding the biology of cellulosomics is the purification of each cohesin- and dockerin-containing component, prior to analyses of their interaction. As opposed to previous approaches, the present study utilized proteins contained in unpurified whole-cell extracts. This strategy was made possible due to an experimental design that allowed for the relevant proteins to be "purified" via targeted affinity interactions as a function of the binding assay. The approach thus represents a new strategy, appropriate for future medium- to high-throughput screening of whole genomes, to determine the interactions between cohesins and dockerins. We have selected the cellulosome of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus for this work due to its exceptionally complex cellulosome systems and intriguing diversity of its cellulosomal modular components. Containing 41 cohesins and 143 dockerins, A. cellulolyticus has one of the largest number of potential cohesin-dockerin interactions of any organism, and contains unusual and novel cellulosomal features. We have surveyed a representative library of cohesin and dockerin modules spanning the cellulosome's total cohesin

  19. Ecoinformatics Can Reveal Yield Gaps Associated with Crop-Pest Interactions: A Proof-of-Concept

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheim, Jay A.; Meisner, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    Farmers and private consultants execute a vast, decentralized data collection effort with each cropping cycle, as they gather pest density data to make real-time pest management decisions. Here we present a proof of concept for an ecoinformatics approach to pest management research, which attempts to harness these data to answer questions about pest-crop interactions. The impact of herbivory by Lygus hesperus on cotton is explored as a case study. Consultant-derived data satisfied a ‘positive control’ test for data quality by clearly resolving the expected negative relationship between L. hesperus density and retention of flower buds. The enhanced statistical power afforded by the large ecoinformatics dataset revealed an early-season window of crop sensitivity, during which L. hesperus densities as low as 1-2 per sample were associated with yield loss. In contrast, during the mid-season insecticide use by farmers was often unnecessary, as cotton compensated fully for moderate L. hesperus densities. Because the dataset emerged from the commercial production setting, it also revealed the limited degree to which farmers were willing to delay crop harvest to provide opportunities for compensatory fruiting. Observational approaches to pest management research have strengths and weaknesses that complement those of traditional, experimental approaches; combining these methods can contribute to enhanced agricultural productivity. PMID:24260408

  20. Tanscriptomic Study of the Soybean-Fusarium virguliforme Interaction Revealed a Novel Ankyrin-Repeat Containing Defense Gene, Expression of Whose during Infection Led to Enhanced Resistance to the Fungal Pathogen in Transgenic Soybean Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ngaki, Micheline N.; Wang, Bing; Sahu, Binod B.; Srivastava, Subodh K.; Farooqi, Mohammad S.; Kambakam, Sekhar; Swaminathan, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium virguliforme causes the serious disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) in soybean. Host resistance to this pathogen is partial and is encoded by a large number of quantitative trait loci, each conditioning small effects. Breeding SDS resistance is therefore challenging and identification of single-gene encoded novel resistance mechanisms is becoming a priority to fight this devastating this fungal pathogen. In this transcriptomic study we identified a few putative soybean defense genes, expression of which is suppressed during F. virguliforme infection. The F. virguliforme infection-suppressed genes were broadly classified into four major classes. The steady state transcript levels of many of these genes were suppressed to undetectable levels immediately following F. virguliforme infection. One of these classes contains two novel genes encoding ankyrin repeat-containing proteins. Expression of one of these genes, GmARP1, during F. virguliforme infection enhances SDS resistance among the transgenic soybean plants. Our data suggest that GmARP1 is a novel defense gene and the pathogen presumably suppress its expression to establish compatible interaction. PMID:27760122

  1. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  2. Water-module interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G.; Wen, L.; Ross, R., Jr.

    Mechanisms by which moisture enters photovoltaic modules and techniques for reducing such interactions are reported. Results from a study of the effectiveness of various module sealants are given. Techniques for measuring the rate and quantity of moisture ingress are discussed. It is shown that scribe lines and porous frit bridging conductors provide preferential paths for moisture ingress and that moisture diffusion by surface/interfacial paths is considerably more rapid than diffusion by bulk paths, which implies that thin-film substrate and supersubstrate modules are much more vulnerable to moist environments than are bulk-encapsulated crystalline-silicon modules. Design approaches that reduce moisture entry are discussed.

  3. Emotional regulatory function of receptor interacting protein 140 revealed in the ventromedial hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Flaisher-Grinberg, S; Tsai, H C; Feng, X; Wei, L N

    2014-08-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP140) is a transcription co-regulator highly expressed in macrophages to regulate inflammatory and metabolic processes. However, its implication in neurological, cognitive and emotional conditions, and the cellular systems relevant to its biological activity within the central nervous system are currently less clear. A transgenic mouse line with macrophage-specific knockdown of RIP140 was generated (MΦRIPKD mice) and brain-region specific RIP140 knockdown efficiency evaluated. Mice were subjected to a battery of tests, designed to evaluate multiple behavioral domains at naïve or following site-specific RIP140 re-expression. Gene expression analysis assessed TNF-α, IL-1β, TGF-1β, IL1-RA and neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression, and in vitro studies examined the effects of macrophage's RIP140 on astrocytes' NPY production. We found that RIP140 expression was dramatically reduced in macrophages within the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) and the cingulate cortex of MΦRIPKD mice. These animals exhibited increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. VMH-targeted RIP140 re-expression in MΦRIPKD mice reversed its depressive- but not its anxiety-like phenotype. Analysis of specific neurochemical changes revealed reduced astrocytic-NPY expression within the hypothalamus of MΦRIPKD mice, and in vitro analysis confirmed that conditioned medium of RIP140-silnenced macrophage culture could no longer stimulate NPY production from astrocytes. The current study revealed an emotional regulatory function of macrophage-derived RIP140 in the VMH, and secondary dysregulation of NPY within hypothalamic astrocyte population, which might be associated with the observed behavioral phenotype of MΦRIPKD mice. This study highlights RIP140 as a novel target for the development of potential therapeutic and intervention strategies for emotional regulation disorders.

  4. Interaction between Albumin and Pluronic F127 Block Copolymer Revealed by Global and Local Physicochemical Profiling.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Maria Victoria; Matei, Iulia; Micutz, Marin; Staicu, Teodora; Precupas, Aurica; Popa, Vlad Tudor; Salifoglou, Athanasios; Ionita, Gabriela

    2016-05-12

    The interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with amphiphilic block copolymer Pluronic F127 has been investigated by several physical methods. Interest in studying this system stems from a broad range of bioactivities involving both macromolecules. Serum albumins constitute a significant class of proteins in the circulatory system, acting as carriers for a wide spectrum of compounds or assemblies. Pluronic block copolymers have revealed their capacity to ferry a variety of biologically active compounds. Circular dichroism, rheological measurements, and differential scanning microcalorimetry (μDSC) were employed to get insight into the interaction betweeen the two macromolecules. The results reveal that Pluronic F127 induces conformational changes to albumin if it is organized in a micellar form, while albumin influences the self-assembly of Pluronic F127 into micelles or gels. F127 micelles, however, induce smaller conformational changes compared to ionic surfactants. The μDSC thermograms obtained for HSA and/or F127 show that HSA shifts the critical micellar temperature (cmt) to lower values, while concurrently the HSA denaturation behavior is influenced by F127, depending on its concentration. Rheological measurements on solutions of F127 17% have shown that a sol-to-gel transition occurs at higher temperatures in the presence of HSA and the resulting gel is weaker. The global profile on HSA/F127 systems was complemented by local information provided by EPR measurements. A series of X-band EPR experiments was performed with spin probes 4-(N,N'-dimethyl-N-hexadecyl)ammonium-2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl iodide (CAT16) and 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA). These spin probes bind to albumin sites and are sensitive to phase transformations in Pluronic block copolymer solutions. For a given F127 concentration, the spin probe binds only to HSA below cmt and migrates to the F127 micelles above cmt. The collective data suggest soft interactions between the

  5. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pt-miR397a and its target genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhui; Chen, Beibei; Yang, Xiaohui; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-06-26

    Recent studies have revealed associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA (miRNA) genes and diseases. However, association studies to decipher the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes remain to be conducted. Here, we investigated the association of growth and wood traits with SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its targets, in 261 individuals from a natural population of Populus tomentosa. Of the 57 SNPs identified in Pt-miR397a, three strongly affect its secondary stability, and SNPs in target sites in Pt-LAC20 and Pt-HSP40 changed the binding affinity of Pt-miR397a. Single-SNP association analysis revealed that SNPs in Pt-miR397a significantly associated with α-cellulose content and stem volume, and SNPs in target genes also associated with growth and wood-property traits. Multi-SNP association analysis with additive and dominant models found that SNPs in six potential target genes associated with at least one trait in common with Pt-miR397a, revealing a possible genetic interaction between Pt-miR397a and its targets. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed epistatic interactions between SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its target genes. Thus, our study indicated that SNPs in Pt-miR397a and six target genes affect wood formation and that association studies can reveal the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes.

  6. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pt-miR397a and its target genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhui; Chen, Beibei; Yang, Xiaohui; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA (miRNA) genes and diseases. However, association studies to decipher the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes remain to be conducted. Here, we investigated the association of growth and wood traits with SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its targets, in 261 individuals from a natural population of Populus tomentosa. Of the 57 SNPs identified in Pt-miR397a, three strongly affect its secondary stability, and SNPs in target sites in Pt-LAC20 and Pt-HSP40 changed the binding affinity of Pt-miR397a. Single-SNP association analysis revealed that SNPs in Pt-miR397a significantly associated with α-cellulose content and stem volume, and SNPs in target genes also associated with growth and wood-property traits. Multi-SNP association analysis with additive and dominant models found that SNPs in six potential target genes associated with at least one trait in common with Pt-miR397a, revealing a possible genetic interaction between Pt-miR397a and its targets. Furthermore, epistasis analysis revealed epistatic interactions between SNPs in Pt-miR397a and its target genes. Thus, our study indicated that SNPs in Pt-miR397a and six target genes affect wood formation and that association studies can reveal the interactions between miRNAs and their target genes. PMID:26115173

  7. Provenance and reconnaissance study of detrital zircons of the Palaeozoic Cape Supergroup in South Africa: revealing the interaction of the Kalahari and Río de la Plata cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourie, Pieter H.; Zimmermann, Udo; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Naidoo, Thanusha; Kobayashi, Katsuro; Kosler, Jan; Nakamura, Eizo; Tait, Jenny; Theron, Johannes N.

    2011-04-01

    In order to facilitate the understanding of the geological evolution of the Kalahari Craton and its relation to South America, the provenance of the first large-scale cratonic cover sequence of the craton, namely the Ordovician to Carboniferous Cape Supergroup was studied through geochemical analyses of the siliciclastics, and age determinations of detrital zircon. The Cape Supergroup comprises mainly quartz-arenites and a Hirnantian tillite in the basal Table Mountain Group, subgreywackes and mudrocks in the overlying Bokkeveld Group, while siltstones, interbedded shales and quartz-arenites are typical for the Witteberg Group at the top of the Cape Supergroup. Palaeocurrent analyses indicate transport of sediment mainly from northerly directions, off the interior of the Kalahari Craton with subordinate transport from a westerly source in the southwestern part of the basin near Cape Town. Geochemical provenance data suggest mainly sources from passive to active continental margin settings. The reconnaissance study of detrital zircons reveals a major contribution of Mesoproterozoic sources throughout the basin, reflecting the dominance of the Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Belt, situated immediately north of the preserved strata of Cape Supergroup, as a source with Archaean-aged zircons being extremely rare. We interpret the Namaqua-Natal Metamorphic Belt to have been a large morphological divide at the time of deposition of the Cape Supergroup that prevented input of detrital zircons from the interior early Archaean Kaapvaal cratonic block of the Kalahari Craton. Neoproterozoic and Cambrian zircons are abundant and reflect the basement geology of the outcrops of Cape strata. Exposures close to Cape Town must have received sediment from a cratonic fragment that was situated off the Kalahari Craton to the west and that has subsequently drifted away. This cratonic fragment predominantly supplied Meso- to Neoproterozoic, and Cambrian-aged zircon grains in addition to minor

  8. Interactive Social Neuroscience to Study Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rolison, Max J.; Naples, Adam J.; McPartland, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate difficulty with social interactions and relationships, but the neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain largely unknown. While social difficulties in ASD are most apparent in the context of interactions with other people, most neuroscience research investigating ASD have provided limited insight into the complex dynamics of these interactions. The development of novel, innovative “interactive social neuroscience” methods to study the brain in contexts with two interacting humans is a necessary advance for ASD research. Studies applying an interactive neuroscience approach to study two brains engaging with one another have revealed significant differences in neural processes during interaction compared to observation in brain regions that are implicated in the neuropathology of ASD. Interactive social neuroscience methods are crucial in clarifying the mechanisms underlying the social and communication deficits that characterize ASD. PMID:25745371

  9. Interactive social neuroscience to study autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Rolison, Max J; Naples, Adam J; McPartland, James C

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate difficulty with social interactions and relationships, but the neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties remain largely unknown. While social difficulties in ASD are most apparent in the context of interactions with other people, most neuroscience research investigating ASD have provided limited insight into the complex dynamics of these interactions. The development of novel, innovative "interactive social neuroscience" methods to study the brain in contexts with two interacting humans is a necessary advance for ASD research. Studies applying an interactive neuroscience approach to study two brains engaging with one another have revealed significant differences in neural processes during interaction compared to observation in brain regions that are implicated in the neuropathology of ASD. Interactive social neuroscience methods are crucial in clarifying the mechanisms underlying the social and communication deficits that characterize ASD.

  10. Interaction between Coronal Mass Ejections: Limited Spatial Extent Revealed by SOHO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Reiner, Mike J.; Makela, Pertti; Yashiro, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    A spectacular CME interaction event was observed on 2013 May 22 by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission as confirmed by the radio signature detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave experiment (WAVES) on board the Wind spacecraft. The interaction event was also associated with an intense solar energetic particle event, typical of such events in solar cycles 23 and 24. Detailed height-time plots of the interacting CMEs at various position angles revealed a surprising result: only a limited spatial extent of the primary CME was affected by the interaction. The speed of the primary CME showed a sharp decline in the position angle range where it interacted with the preceding CME. At these position angles, the speed of the preceding CME increased. At position angles away from the interaction region, the speed of the primary CME remained roughly the same except for the usual drag deceleration. This result has important implications to theories on CME collision: treating the interacting CMEs to be rigid bodies and using the whole mass of the CMEs may not be correct.

  11. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weitao; Nie, Qing; Yi, Tau-Mu; Chou, Ching-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell interactions. PMID

  12. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weitao; Nie, Qing; Yi, Tau-Mu; Chou, Ching-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell interactions. PMID

  13. Interactions of Isophorone Derivatives with DNA: Spectroscopic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Deiana, Marco; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Massin, Julien; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Andraud, Chantal; Samoc, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of three new isophorone derivatives, Isoa Isob and Isoc with salmon testes DNA have been investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. All the studied compounds interact with DNA through intercalative binding mode. The stoichiometry of the isophorone/DNA adducts was found to be 1:1. The fluorescence quenching data revealed a binding interaction with the base pairs of DNA. The CD data indicate that all the investigated isophorones induce DNA modifications. PMID:26069963

  14. Structure of Tetrahymena telomerase reveals previously unknown subunits, functions, and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiansen; Chan, Henry; Cash, Darian D.; Miracco, Edward J.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Upton, Heather E.; Cascio, Duilio; Johnson, Reid O’Brien; Collins, Kathleen; Loo, Joseph A.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Feigon, Juli

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase helps maintain telomeres by processive synthesis of telomere repeat DNA at their 3′-ends, using an integral telomerase RNA (TER) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). We report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of Tetrahymena telomerase at ~9 angstrom resolution. In addition to seven known holoenzyme proteins, we identify two additional proteins that form a complex (TEB) with single-stranded telomere DNA-binding protein Teb1, paralogous to heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA). The p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is identified as another RPA-related complex, CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1). This study reveals the paths of TER in the TERT-TER-p65 catalytic core and single-stranded DNA exit; extensive subunit interactions of the TERT essential N-terminal domain, p50, and TEB; and other subunit identities and structures, including p19 and p45C crystal structures. Our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into telomerase holoenzyme function. PMID:26472759

  15. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  16. Revealing the Interactional Features of Learning and Teaching Moments in Outdoor Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Jane; Bateman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The data considered in this article was generated as part of a doctoral research study entitled: "A sociocultural consideration of child-initiated interaction with teachers in indoor and outdoor spaces" (Waters 2011) where child-initiated, teacher-child interaction in indoor and outdoor spaces were investigated. The purpose of the…

  17. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  18. Space systems environmental interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, M. A.; Huber, Alan C.; McGarity, John O.; Sperry, David J.; Moran, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    Under Task 1, the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) experiment, encompassing most of Amptek's effort in the report period, Amptek has done the following: (1) designed and built the experiment controller; (2) provided an electrostatic analyzer (ESA), two QCM's, and three calorimeters (CAL's); (3) worked with PL/GPSP on testing and integrating PASP Plus into the APEX satellite; and (4) provided ground support equipment for spacecraft integration and mission operation. The controller is comprised of a central processing unit, an array biasing and electrometer unit, an array 1-5 curve measurement unit, a power conversion unit, and interfaces to the 16 array modules, ten PASP Plus instruments (not including the Dosimeter), and the APEX spacecraft. The PASP Plus Controller and the ten other instruments it controls (Sun Sensor, Langmuir Probe, ESA, Transient Pulse Monitor, Electron Emitter, 2 QCM's, 3 CAL's) are described in detail, giving size (dimensions), weight, data rates and outputs, and input power requirements. On Tasks 2 and 3, at a much lower level of effort, Amptek supported PL/GPSP's work on the Charge Hazards and Wake Studies (CHAWS) experiment (O to -5000 V sweep power supply and engineering assistance) and on the Space Wave Interactions with Plasmas Experiment (SWIPE).

  19. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R; Hartnett, Andrew T; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D

    2015-04-14

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  20. Interactions of Sulfate with Other Nutrients As Revealed by H2S Fumigation of Chinese Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Martin; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Prajapati, Dharmendra H.; Parmar, Saroj; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; De Kok, Luit J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur deficiency in plants has severe impacts on both growth and nutrient composition. Fumigation with sub-lethal concentrations of H2S facilitates the supply of reduced sulfur via the leaves while sulfate is depleted from the roots. This restores growth while sulfate levels in the plant tissue remain low. In the present study this system was used to reveal interactions of sulfur with other nutrients in the plant and to ascertain whether these changes are due to the absence or presence of sulfate or rather to changes in growth and organic sulfur. There was a complex reaction of the mineral composition to sulfur deficiency, however, the changes in content of many nutrients were prevented by H2S fumigation. Under sulfur deficiency these nutrients accumulated on a fresh weight basis but were diluted on a dry weight basis, presumably due to a higher dry matter content. The pattern differed, however, between leaves and roots which led to changes in shoot to root partitioning. Only the potassium, molybdenum and zinc contents were strongly linked to the sulfate supply. Potassium was the only nutrient amongst those measured which showed a positive correlation with sulfur content in shoots, highlighting a role as a counter cation for sulfate during xylem loading and vacuolar storage in leaves. This was supported by an accumulation of potassium in roots of the sulfur-deprived plants. Molybdenum and zinc increased substantially under sulfur deficiency, which was only partly prevented by H2S fumigation. While the causes of increased molybdenum under sulfur deficiency have been previously studied, the relation between sulfate and zinc uptake needs further clarification. PMID:27200018

  1. Revealing the hidden networks of interaction in mobile animal groups allows prediction of complex behavioral contagion

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sara Brin; Twomey, Colin R.; Hartnett, Andrew T.; Wu, Hai Shan; Couzin, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Coordination among social animals requires rapid and efficient transfer of information among individuals, which may depend crucially on the underlying structure of the communication network. Establishing the decision-making circuits and networks that give rise to individual behavior has been a central goal of neuroscience. However, the analogous problem of determining the structure of the communication network among organisms that gives rise to coordinated collective behavior, such as is exhibited by schooling fish and flocking birds, has remained almost entirely neglected. Here, we study collective evasion maneuvers, manifested through rapid waves, or cascades, of behavioral change (a ubiquitous behavior among taxa) in schooling fish (Notemigonus crysoleucas). We automatically track the positions and body postures, calculate visual fields of all individuals in schools of ∼150 fish, and determine the functional mapping between socially generated sensory input and motor response during collective evasion. We find that individuals use simple, robust measures to assess behavioral changes in neighbors, and that the resulting networks by which behavior propagates throughout groups are complex, being weighted, directed, and heterogeneous. By studying these interaction networks, we reveal the (complex, fractional) nature of social contagion and establish that individuals with relatively few, but strongly connected, neighbors are both most socially influential and most susceptible to social influence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can predict complex cascades of behavioral change at their moment of initiation, before they actually occur. Consequently, despite the intrinsic stochasticity of individual behavior, establishing the hidden communication networks in large self-organized groups facilitates a quantitative understanding of behavioral contagion. PMID:25825752

  2. Beyond consensus: statistical free energies reveal hidden interactions in the design of a TPR motif.

    PubMed

    Magliery, Thomas J; Regan, Lynne

    2004-10-22

    Consensus design methods have been used successfully to engineer proteins with a particular fold, and moreover to engineer thermostable exemplars of particular folds. Here, we consider how a statistical free energy approach can expand upon current methods of phylogenetic design. As an example, we have analyzed the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif, using multiple sequence alignment to identify the significance of each position in the TPR. The results provide information above and beyond that revealed by consensus design alone, especially at poorly conserved positions. A particularly striking finding is that certain residues, which TPR-peptide co-crystal structures show are in direct contact with the ligand, display a marked hypervariability. This suggests a novel means of identifying ligand-binding sites, and also implies that TPRs generally function as ligand-binding domains. Using perturbation analysis (or statistical coupling analysis), we examined site-site interactions within the TPR motif. Correlated occurrences of amino acid residues at poorly conserved positions explain how TPRs achieve their near-neutral surface charge distributions, and why a TPR designed from straight consensus has an unusually high net charge. Networks of interacting sites revealed that TPRs fall into two unrecognized families with distinct sets of interactions related to the identity of position 7 (Leu or Lys/Arg). Statistical free energy analysis provides a more complete description of "What makes a TPR a TPR?" than consensus alone, and it suggests general approaches to extend and improve the phylogenetic design of proteins.

  3. Compensatory evolution reveals functional interactions between ribosomal proteins S12, L14 and L19.

    PubMed

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Paulander, Wilhelm; Pennhag, Alexandra; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-02-01

    Certain mutations in S12, a ribosomal protein involved in translation elongation rate and translation accuracy, confer resistance to the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Previously we showed in Salmonella typhimurium that the fitness cost, i.e. reduced growth rate, due to the amino acid substitution K42N in S12 could be compensated by at least 35 different mutations located in the ribosomal proteins S4, S5 and L19. Here, we have characterized in vivo the fitness, translation speed and translation accuracy of four different L19 mutants. When separated from the resistance mutation located in S12, the three different compensatory amino acid substitutions in L19 at position 40 (Q40H, Q40L and Q40R) caused a decrease in fitness while the G104A change had no effect on bacterial growth. The rate of protein synthesis was unaffected or increased by the mutations at position 40 and the level of read-through of a UGA nonsense codon was increased in vivo, indicating a loss of translational accuracy. The mutations in L19 increased sensitivity to aminoglycosides active at the A-site, further indicating a perturbation of the decoding step. These phenotypes are similar to those of the classical S4 and S5 ram (ribosomal ambiguity) mutants. By evolving low-fitness L19 mutants by serial passage, we showed that the fitness cost conferred by the L19 mutations could be compensated by additional mutations in the ribosomal protein L19 itself, in S12 and in L14, a protein located close to L19. Our results reveal a novel functional role for the 50 S ribosomal protein L19 during protein synthesis, supporting published structural data suggesting that the interaction of L14 and L19 with 16 S rRNA could influence function of the 30 S subunit. Moreover, our study demonstrates how compensatory fitness-evolution can be used to discover new molecular functions of ribosomal proteins.

  4. Live-cell observation of cytosolic HIV-1 assembly onset reveals RNA-interacting Gag oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Jelle; Baumgärtel, Viola; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ivanchenko, Sergey; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Assembly of the Gag polyprotein into new viral particles in infected cells is a crucial step in the retroviral replication cycle. Currently, little is known about the onset of assembly in the cytosol. In this paper, we analyzed the cytosolic HIV-1 Gag fraction in real time in live cells using advanced fluctuation imaging methods and thereby provide detailed insights into the complex relationship between cytosolic Gag mobility, stoichiometry, and interactions. We show that Gag diffuses as a monomer on the subsecond timescale with severely reduced mobility. Reduction of mobility is associated with basic residues in its nucleocapsid (NC) domain, whereas capsid (CA) and matrix (MA) domains do not contribute significantly. Strikingly, another diffusive Gag species was observed on the seconds timescale that oligomerized in a concentration-dependent manner. Both NC- and CA-mediated interactions strongly assist this process. Our results reveal potential nucleation steps of cytosolic Gag fractions before membrane-assisted Gag assembly. PMID:26283800

  5. Environmental Interactions and Epistasis Are Revealed in the Proteomic Responses to Complex Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Samir, Parimal; Rahul; Slaughter, James C; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Ultimately, the genotype of a cell and its interaction with the environment determine the cell's biochemical state. While the cell's response to a single stimulus has been studied extensively, a conceptual framework to model the effect of multiple environmental stimuli applied concurrently is not as well developed. In this study, we developed the concepts of environmental interactions and epistasis to explain the responses of the S. cerevisiae proteome to simultaneous environmental stimuli. We hypothesize that, as an abstraction, environmental stimuli can be treated as analogous to genetic elements. This would allow modeling of the effects of multiple stimuli using the concepts and tools developed for studying gene interactions. Mirroring gene interactions, our results show that environmental interactions play a critical role in determining the state of the proteome. We show that individual and complex environmental stimuli behave similarly to genetic elements in regulating the cellular responses to stimuli, including the phenomena of dominance and suppression. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of a stimulus on a protein is dominant over other stimuli if the response to the stimulus involves the protein. Using publicly available transcriptomic data, we find that environmental interactions and epistasis regulate transcriptomic responses as well. PMID:26247773

  6. Evolutionarily Conserved Pattern of Interactions in a Protein Revealed by Local Thermal Expansion Properties.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Caro, Jose A; Roche, Julien; Fossat, Martin; Barthe, Philippe; García-Moreno E, Bertrand; Royer, Catherine A; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-07-29

    The way in which the network of intramolecular interactions determines the cooperative folding and conformational dynamics of a protein remains poorly understood. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to examine this problem because it combines the site-specific resolution of the NMR experiments with the local character of pressure perturbations. Here we report on the temperature dependence of the site-specific volumetric properties of various forms of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), including three variants with engineered internal cavities, as measured with high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The strong temperature dependence of pressure-induced unfolding arises from poorly understood differences in thermal expansion between the folded and unfolded states. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the global thermal expansion of the folded proteins and the number of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined by the temperature coefficient of the backbone amide chemical shifts. Comparison of the identity of these strong H-bonds with the co-evolution of pairs of residues in the SNase protein family suggests that the architecture of the interactions detected in the NMR experiments could be linked to a functional aspect of the protein. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the residue-specific volume changes of unfolding yielded residue-specific differences in expansivity and revealed how mutations impact intramolecular interaction patterns. These results show that intramolecular interactions in the folded states of proteins impose constraints against thermal expansion and that, hence, knowledge of site-specific thermal expansivity offers insight into the patterns of strong intramolecular interactions and other local determinants of protein stability, cooperativity, and potentially also of function.

  7. Modularity reveals the tendency of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to interact differently with generalist and specialist plant species in gypsum soils.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Emma; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldán, Antonio; Díaz, Gisela; Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia; Torres, Maria Pilar

    2014-09-01

    Patterns in plant-soil biota interactions could be influenced by the spatial distribution of species due to soil conditions or by the functional traits of species. Gypsum environments usually constitute a mosaic of heterogeneous soils where gypsum and nongypsum soils are imbricated at a local scale. A case study of the interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in gypsum environments can be illustrative of patterns in biotic interactions. We hypothesized that (i) soil characteristics might affect the AMF community and (ii) there are differences between the AMF communities (modules) associated with plants exclusive to gypsum soils (gypsophytes) and those associated with plants that show facultative behavior on gypsum and/or marly-limestone soils (gypsovags). We used indicator species and network analyses to test for differences between the AMF communities harbored in gypsophyte and gypsovag plants. We recorded 46 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to nine genera of Glomeromycota. The indicator species analysis showed two OTUs preferentially associating with gypsum soils and three OTUs preferentially associating with marly-limestone soils. Modularity analysis revealed that soil type can be a major factor shaping AMF communities, and some AMF groups showed a tendency to interact differently with plants that had distinct ecological strategies (gypsophytes and gypsovags). Characterization of ecological networks can be a valuable tool for ascertaining the potential influence of above- and below-ground biotic interactions (plant-AMF) on plant community composition. PMID:24973074

  8. Modularity Reveals the Tendency of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi To Interact Differently with Generalist and Specialist Plant Species in Gypsum Soils

    PubMed Central

    Torrecillas, Emma; del Mar Alguacil, Maria; Roldán, Antonio; Díaz, Gisela; Montesinos-Navarro, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Patterns in plant–soil biota interactions could be influenced by the spatial distribution of species due to soil conditions or by the functional traits of species. Gypsum environments usually constitute a mosaic of heterogeneous soils where gypsum and nongypsum soils are imbricated at a local scale. A case study of the interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in gypsum environments can be illustrative of patterns in biotic interactions. We hypothesized that (i) soil characteristics might affect the AMF community and (ii) there are differences between the AMF communities (modules) associated with plants exclusive to gypsum soils (gypsophytes) and those associated with plants that show facultative behavior on gypsum and/or marly-limestone soils (gypsovags). We used indicator species and network analyses to test for differences between the AMF communities harbored in gypsophyte and gypsovag plants. We recorded 46 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to nine genera of Glomeromycota. The indicator species analysis showed two OTUs preferentially associating with gypsum soils and three OTUs preferentially associating with marly-limestone soils. Modularity analysis revealed that soil type can be a major factor shaping AMF communities, and some AMF groups showed a tendency to interact differently with plants that had distinct ecological strategies (gypsophytes and gypsovags). Characterization of ecological networks can be a valuable tool for ascertaining the potential influence of above- and below-ground biotic interactions (plant-AMF) on plant community composition. PMID:24973074

  9. RNA-Seq reveals virus-virus and virus-plant interactions in nature.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Mari; Nagano, Atsushi J; Honjo, Mie N; Kudoh, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As research on plant viruses has focused mainly on crop diseases, little is known about these viruses in natural environments. To understand the ecology of viruses in natural systems, comprehensive information on virus-virus and virus-host interactions is required. We applied RNA-Seq to plants from a natural population of Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera to simultaneously determine the presence/absence of all sequence-reported viruses, identify novel viruses and quantify the host transcriptome. By introducing the criteria of read number and genome coverage, we detected infections by Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), Cucumber mosaic virus and Brassica yellows virus Active TuMV replication was observed by ultramicroscopy. De novo assembly further identified a novel partitivirus, Arabidopsis halleri partitivirus 1 Interestingly, virus reads reached a maximum level that was equivalent to that of the host's total mRNA, although asymptomatic infection was common. AhgAGO2, a key gene in host defence systems, was upregulated in TuMV-infected plants. Multiple infection was frequent in TuMV-infected leaves, suggesting that TuMV facilitates multiple infection, probably by suppressing host RNA silencing. Revealing hidden plant-virus interactions in nature can enhance our understanding of biological interactions and may have agricultural applications. PMID:27549115

  10. Covalent Label Transfer between Peroxisomal Importomer Components Reveals Export-driven Import Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Moninder S; Lanyon-Hogg, Thomas; Johnston, Katherine A; Warriner, Stuart L; Baker, Alison

    2016-01-29

    Peroxisomes are vital metabolic organelles found in almost all eukaryotic organisms, and they rely exclusively on import of their matrix protein content from the cytosol. In vitro import of proteins into isolated peroxisomal fractions has provided a wealth of knowledge on the import process. However, the common method of protease protection garnered no information on the import of an N-terminally truncated PEX5 (PEX5C) receptor construct or peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase 1 (pMDH1) cargo protein into sunflower peroxisomes because of high degrees of protease susceptibility or resistance, respectively. Here we present a means for analysis of in vitro import through a covalent biotin label transfer and employ this method to the import of PEX5C. Label transfer demonstrates that the PEX5C construct is monomeric under the conditions of the import assay. This technique was capable of identifying the PEX5-PEX14 interaction as the first interaction of the import process through competition experiments. Labeling of the peroxisomal protein import machinery by PEX5C demonstrated that this interaction was independent of added cargo protein, and, strikingly, the interaction between PEX5C and the import machinery was shown to be ATP-dependent. These important mechanistic insights highlight the power of label transfer in studying interactions, rather than proteins, of interest and demonstrate that this technique should be applied to future studies of peroxisomal in vitro import. PMID:26567336

  11. Conditional Genetic Interactions of RTT107, SLX4, and HRQ1 Reveal Dynamic Networks upon DNA Damage in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Grace P.; Aristizabal, Maria J.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Kobor, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a dynamic process that is crucial for protecting the cell from challenges to genome integrity. Although many genome-wide studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified genes that contribute to resistance to DNA-damaging agents, more work is needed to elucidate the changes in genetic interaction networks in response to DNA lesions. Here we used conditional epistatic miniarray profiling to analyze the genetic interaction networks of the DDR genes RTT107, SLX4, and HRQ1 under three DNA-damaging conditions: camptothecin, hydroxyurea, and methyl methanesulfonate. Rtt107 and its interaction partner Slx4 are targets of the checkpoint kinase Mec1, which is central to the DDR-signaling cascades. Hrq1 recently was identified as a novel member of the RecQ helicase family in S. cerevisiae but is still poorly characterized. The conditional genetic networks that we generated revealed functional insights into all three genes and showed that there were varied responses to different DNA damaging agents. We observed that RTT107 had more genetic interactions under camptothecin conditions than SLX4 or HRQ1, suggesting that Rtt107 has an important role in response to this type of DNA lesion. Although RTT107 and SLX4 function together, they also had many distinct genetic interactions. In particular, RTT107 and SLX4 showed contrasting genetic interactions for a few genes, which we validated with independently constructed strains. Interestingly, HRQ1 had a genetic interaction profile that correlated with that of SLX4 and both were enriched for very similar gene ontology terms, suggesting that they function together in the DDR. PMID:24700328

  12. Stabilization of protein crystals by electrostatic interactions as revealed by a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Endo, S; Nagayama, K

    1993-11-20

    We developed a novel algorithm to solve numerically the Poisson-Boltzmann equations under a periodic boundary condition. By employing this algorithm to calculate the electrostatic potentials in two different types of protein crystals, a bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) orthorhombic crystal and a pig-insulin cubic crystal, the energy contributions of the electrostatic interactions to the crystals' stability were evaluated. At a high ionic strength, the condensed state of proteins in the crystal was stabilized electrostatically compared with that isolated in dilute solution because the attractive electrostatic interactions between neighboring protein molecules overcame the repulsive forces that originated from the same net charges of the equivalent protein molecules. On the other hand, at a low ionic strength the electrostatic interactions destabilized the crystalline state of both proteins, although a different dependence on the ionic strength was found between them. Here, the insulin crystal was more stable than the BPTI one because of the higher charge density in the BPTI crystal. In all of the solvent ionic strengths investigated, the attractive electrostatic interactions between charge pairs separated by less than 5 A on the respective protein molecules prominently stabilize the protein crystals. Therefore, two protein molecules in the crystals are oriented to compensate each other for their opposite charges on the surfaces. We also found a specific role for bound phosphate ions in the stabilization of the BPTI crystal, based on comparison of the electrostatic energies of the two crystals with and without the ions. By determining the contribution of each atomic charge in the crystals to the electrostatic energy, it was revealed that several electrostatic pairs specifically contributed to the crystal's stability. On the basis of our numerical calculation results, we propose a new method to design protein molecules that adopt stable crystals by replacing

  13. Hospital study reveals strategies for improving media relations.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P E; Embrey-Wahl, L

    1987-01-01

    A nationwide study revealed that hospital administrators feel inadequate when dealing with the media, and also think the media does not understand the hospital business. Many strategies are available to counter these problems, including some that emphasize issues related to bed size. PMID:3583722

  14. Historical comparisons reveal altered competitive interactions in a guild of crustose coralline algae.

    PubMed

    McCoy, S J; Pfister, C A

    2014-04-01

    As the ocean environment changes over time, a paucity of long-term data sets and historical comparisons limits the exploration of community dynamics over time in natural systems. Here, we used a long-term experimental data set to present evidence for a reversal of competitive dominance within a group of crustose coralline algae (CCA) from the 1980s to present time in the northeast Pacific Ocean. CCA are cosmopolitan species distributed globally, and dominant space holders in intertidal and subtidal systems. Competition experiments showed a markedly lower competitive ability of the previous competitively dominant species and a decreased response of competitive dynamics to grazer presence. Competitive networks obtained from survey data showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed reductions in interaction strengths across the assemblage. We discuss the potential role of environmental change, including ocean acidification, in altered ecological dynamics in this system.

  15. Single-cell genomics reveals organismal interactions in uncultivated marine protists.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hwan Su; Price, Dana C; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Rajah, Veeran D; Sieracki, Michael E; Wilson, William H; Yang, Eun Chan; Duffy, Siobain; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2011-05-01

    Whole-genome shotgun sequence data from three individual cells isolated from seawater, followed by analysis of ribosomal DNA, indicated that the cells represented three divergent clades of picobiliphytes. In contrast with the recent description of this phylum, we found no evidence of plastid DNA nor of nuclear-encoded plastid-targeted proteins, which suggests that these picobiliphytes are heterotrophs. Genome data from one cell were dominated by sequences from a widespread single-stranded DNA virus. This virus was absent from the other two cells, both of which contained non-eukaryote DNA derived from marine Bacteroidetes and large DNA viruses. By using shotgun sequencing of uncultured marine picobiliphytes, we revealed the distinct interactions of individual cells.

  16. Genetic interactions of separase regulatory subunits reveal the diverged Drosophila Cenp-C homolog

    PubMed Central

    Heeger, Sebastian; Leismann, Oliver; Schittenhelm, Ralf; Schraidt, Oliver; Heidmann, Stefan; Lehner, Christian F.

    2005-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic information during mitotic divisions depends on bipolar attachment of sister kinetochores to the mitotic spindle and on complete resolution of sister-chromatid cohesion immediately before the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Separase is thought to be responsible for sister-chromatid separation, but its regulation is not completely understood. Therefore, we have screened for genetic loci that modify the aberrant phenotypes caused by overexpression of the regulatory separase complex subunits Pimples/securin and Three rows in Drosophila. An interacting gene was found to encode a constitutive centromere protein. Characterization of its centromere localization domain revealed the presence of a diverged CENPC motif. While direct evidence for an involvement of this Drosophila Cenp-C homolog in separase activation at centromeres could not be obtained, in vivo imaging clearly demonstrated that it is required for normal attachment of kinetochores to the spindle. PMID:16140985

  17. BOLD coherence reveals segregated functional neural interactions when adapting to distinct torque perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Tunik, Eugene; Schmitt, Paul J.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2007-01-01

    In the natural world, we experience and adapt to multiple extrinsic perturbations. This poses a challenge to neural circuits in discriminating between different context-appropriate responses. Using event-related fMRI, we characterized the neural dynamics involved in this process by randomly delivering a position- or velocity-dependent torque perturbation to subjects’ arms during a target capture task. Each perturbation was color-cued during movement preparation to provide contextual information. Though trajectories differed between perturbations, subjects significantly reduced error under both conditions. This was paralleled by reduced BOLD signal in the right dentate nucleus, the left sensorimotor cortex, and the left intraparietal sulcus. Trials included ‘NoGo’ conditions to dissociate activity related to preparation from execution and adaptation. Subsequent analysis identified perturbation-specific neural processes underlying preparation (‘NoGo’) and adaptation (‘Go’) early and late into learning. Between-perturbation comparisons of BOLD magnitude revealed negligible differences for both preparation and adaptation trials. However, a network-level analysis of BOLD coherence revealed that by late learning, response preparation (‘NoGo’) was attributed to a relative focusing of coherence within cortical and basal ganglia networks in both perturbation conditions, demonstrating a common network interaction for establishing arbitrary visuomotor associations. Conversely, late-learning adaptation (‘Go’) was attributed to a focusing of BOLD coherence between a cortical-basal ganglia network in the viscous condition and between a cortical-cerebellar network in the positional condition. Our findings demonstrate that trial-to-trial acquisition of two distinct adaptive responses is attributed not to anatomically segregated regions, but to differential functional interactions within common sensorimotor circuits. PMID:17202232

  18. Scanning a microhabitat: plant-microbe interactions revealed by confocal laser microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    No plant or cryptogam exists in nature without microorganisms associated with its tissues. Plants as microbial hosts are puzzles of different microhabitats, each of them colonized by specifically adapted microbiomes. The interactions with such microorganisms have drastic effects on the host fitness. Since the last 20 years, the combination of microscopic tools and molecular approaches contributed to new insights into microbe-host interactions. Particularly, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) facilitated the exploration of microbial habitats and allowed the observation of host-associated microorganisms in situ with an unprecedented accuracy. Here I present an overview of the progresses made in the study of the interactions between microorganisms and plants or plant-like organisms, focusing on the role of CLSM for the understanding of their significance. I critically discuss risks of misinterpretation when procedures of CLSM are not properly optimized. I also review approaches for quantitative and statistical analyses of CLSM images, the combination with other molecular and microscopic methods, and suggest the re-evaluation of natural autofluorescence. In this review, technical aspects were coupled with scientific outcomes, to facilitate the readers in identifying possible CLSM applications in their research or to expand their existing potential. The scope of this review is to highlight the importance of confocal microscopy in the study of plant-microbe interactions and also to be an inspiration for integrating microscopy with molecular techniques in future researches of microbial ecology. PMID:24639675

  19. Single-virus tracking approach to reveal the interaction of Dengue virus with autophagy during the early stage of infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Li-Wei; Huang, Yi-Lung; Lee, Jin-Hui; Huang, Long-Ying; Chen, Wei-Jun; Lin, Ya-Hsuan; Chen, Jyun-Yu; Xiang, Rui; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Ping, Yueh-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the major infectious pathogens worldwide. DENV infection is a highly dynamic process. Currently, no antiviral drug is available for treating DENV-induced diseases since little is known regarding how the virus interacts with host cells during infection. Advanced molecular imaging technologies are powerful tools to understand the dynamics of intracellular interactions and molecular trafficking. This study exploited a single-virus particle tracking technology to address whether DENV interacts with autophagy machinery during the early stage of infection. Using confocal microscopy and three-dimensional image analysis, we showed that DENV triggered the formation of green fluorescence protein-fused microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) puncta, and DENV-induced autophagosomes engulfed DENV particles within 15-min postinfection. Moreover, single-virus particle tracking revealed that both DENV particles and autophagosomes traveled together during the viral infection. Finally, in the presence of autophagy suppressor 3-methyladenine, the replication of DENV was inhibited and the location of DENV particles spread in cytoplasma. In contrast, the numbers of newly synthesized DENV were elevated and the co-localization of DENV particles and autophagosomes was detected while the cells were treated with autophagy inducer rapamycin. Taken together, we propose that DENV particles interact with autophagosomes at the early stage of viral infection, which promotes the replication of DENV.

  20. Genetic Interaction Landscape Reveals Critical Requirements for Schizosaccharomyces pombe Brc1 in DNA Damage Response Mutants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Arancha; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J; Russell, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Brc1, which was first identified as a high-copy, allele-specific suppressor of a mutation impairing the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, protects genome integrity during normal DNA replication and when cells are exposed to toxic compounds that stall or collapse replication forks. The C-terminal tandem BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus) domain of fission yeast Brc1 docks with phosphorylated histone H2A (γH2A)-marked chromatin formed by ATR/Rad3 checkpoint kinase at arrested and damaged replication forks; however, how Brc1 functions in relation to other genome protection modules remains unclear. Here, an epistatic mini-array profile reveals critical requirements for Brc1 in mutants that are defective in multiple DNA damage response pathways, including checkpoint signaling by Rad3-Rad26/ATR-ATRIP kinase, DNA repair by Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex, replication fork stabilization by Mrc1/claspin and Swi1-Swi3/Timeless-Tipin, and control of ubiquitin-regulated proteolysis by the COP9 signalosome (CSN). Exogenous genotoxins enhance these negative genetic interactions. Rad52 and RPA foci are increased in CSN-defective cells, and loss of γH2A increases genotoxin sensitivity, indicating a critical role for the γH2A-Brc1 module in stabilizing replication forks in CSN-defective cells. A negative genetic interaction with the Nse6 subunit of Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex indicates that the DNA repair functions of Brc1 and Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex are at least partially independent. Rtt107, the Brc1 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has a very different pattern of genetic interactions, indicating evolutionary divergence of functions and DNA damage responses.

  1. Molecular modeling reveals binding interface of γ-tubulin with GCP4 and interactions with noscapinoids.

    PubMed

    Suri, Charu; Joshi, Harish C; Naik, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-05-01

    The initiation of microtubule assembly within cells is guided by a cone shaped multi-protein complex, γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) containing γ-tubulin and atleast five other γ-tubulin-complex proteins (GCPs), i.e., GCP2, GCP3, GCP4, GCP5, and GCP6. The rim of γTuRC is a ring of γ-tubulin molecules that interacts, via one of its longitudinal interfaces, with GCP2, GCP3, or GCP4 and, via other interface, with α/β-tubulin dimers recruited for the microtubule lattice formation. These interactions however, are not well understood in the absence of crystal structure of functional reconstitution of γTuRC subunits. In this study, we elucidate the atomic interactions between γ-tubulin and GCP4 through computational techniques. We simulated two complexes of γ-tubulin-GCP4 complex (we called dimer1 and dimer2) for 25 ns to obtain a stable complex and calculated the ensemble average of binding free energies of -158.82 and -170.19 kcal/mol for dimer1 and -79.53 and -101.50 kcal/mol for dimer2 using MM-PBSA and MM-GBSA methods, respectively. These highly favourable binding free energy values points to very robust interactions between GCP4 and γ-tubulin. From the results of the free-energy decomposition and the computational alanine scanning calculation, we identified the amino acids crucial for the interaction of γ-tubulin with GCP4, called hotspots. Furthermore, in the endeavour to identify chemical leads that might interact at the interface of γ-tubulin-GCP4 complex; we found a class of compounds based on the plant alkaloid, noscapine that binds with high affinity in a cavity close to γ-tubulin-GCP4 interface compared with previously reported compounds. All noscapinoids displayed stable interaction throughout the simulation, however, most robust interaction was observed for bromo-noscapine followed by noscapine and amino-noscapine. This offers a novel chemical scaffold for γ-tubulin binding drugs near γ-tubulin-GCP4 interface.

  2. Solution structure of the PsIAA4 oligomerization domain reveals interaction modes for transcription factors in early auxin response.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Kovermann, Michael; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Hellmuth, Antje; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Lilie, Hauke; Balbach, Jochen; Abel, Steffen

    2015-05-12

    The plant hormone auxin activates primary response genes by facilitating proteolytic removal of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA)-inducible repressors, which directly bind to transcriptional auxin response factors (ARF). Most AUX/IAA and ARF proteins share highly conserved C-termini mediating homotypic and heterotypic interactions within and between both protein families. The high-resolution NMR structure of C-terminal domains III and IV of the AUX/IAA protein PsIAA4 from pea (Pisum sativum) revealed a globular ubiquitin-like β-grasp fold with homologies to the Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domain. The PB1 domain of wild-type PsIAA4 features two distinct surface patches of oppositely charged amino acid residues, mediating front-to-back multimerization via electrostatic interactions. Mutations of conserved basic or acidic residues on either face suppressed PsIAA4 PB1 homo-oligomerization in vitro and confirmed directional interaction of full-length PsIAA4 in vivo (yeast two-hybrid system). Mixing of oppositely mutated PsIAA4 PB1 monomers enabled NMR mapping of the negatively charged interface of the reconstituted PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer variant, whose stoichiometry (1:1) and equilibrium binding constant (KD ∼ 6.4 μM) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In silico protein-protein docking studies based on NMR and yeast interaction data derived a model of the PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer, which is comparable with other PB1 domain dimers, but indicated considerable differences between the homodimeric interfaces of AUX/IAA and ARF PB1 domains. Our study provides an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants that confer specificity to complex protein-protein interaction circuits between members of the two central families of transcription factors important to the regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:25918389

  3. Solution structure of the PsIAA4 oligomerization domain reveals interaction modes for transcription factors in early auxin response.

    PubMed

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Kovermann, Michael; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Hellmuth, Antje; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Lilie, Hauke; Balbach, Jochen; Abel, Steffen

    2015-05-12

    The plant hormone auxin activates primary response genes by facilitating proteolytic removal of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA)-inducible repressors, which directly bind to transcriptional auxin response factors (ARF). Most AUX/IAA and ARF proteins share highly conserved C-termini mediating homotypic and heterotypic interactions within and between both protein families. The high-resolution NMR structure of C-terminal domains III and IV of the AUX/IAA protein PsIAA4 from pea (Pisum sativum) revealed a globular ubiquitin-like β-grasp fold with homologies to the Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domain. The PB1 domain of wild-type PsIAA4 features two distinct surface patches of oppositely charged amino acid residues, mediating front-to-back multimerization via electrostatic interactions. Mutations of conserved basic or acidic residues on either face suppressed PsIAA4 PB1 homo-oligomerization in vitro and confirmed directional interaction of full-length PsIAA4 in vivo (yeast two-hybrid system). Mixing of oppositely mutated PsIAA4 PB1 monomers enabled NMR mapping of the negatively charged interface of the reconstituted PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer variant, whose stoichiometry (1:1) and equilibrium binding constant (KD ∼ 6.4 μM) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. In silico protein-protein docking studies based on NMR and yeast interaction data derived a model of the PsIAA4 PB1 homodimer, which is comparable with other PB1 domain dimers, but indicated considerable differences between the homodimeric interfaces of AUX/IAA and ARF PB1 domains. Our study provides an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants that confer specificity to complex protein-protein interaction circuits between members of the two central families of transcription factors important to the regulation of auxin-responsive gene expression.

  4. The Fragment Molecular Orbital Method Reveals New Insight into the Chemical Nature of GPCR-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Chudyk, Ewa I; Gleave, Laura; Aldeghi, Matteo; Cherezov, Vadim; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Biggin, Philip C; Bodkin, Mike J

    2016-01-25

    Our interpretation of ligand-protein interactions is often informed by high-resolution structures, which represent the cornerstone of structure-based drug design. However, visual inspection and molecular mechanics approaches cannot explain the full complexity of molecular interactions. Quantum Mechanics approaches are often too computationally expensive, but one method, Fragment Molecular Orbital (FMO), offers an excellent compromise and has the potential to reveal key interactions that would otherwise be hard to detect. To illustrate this, we have applied the FMO method to 18 Class A GPCR-ligand crystal structures, representing different branches of the GPCR genome. Our work reveals key interactions that are often omitted from structure-based descriptions, including hydrophobic interactions, nonclassical hydrogen bonds, and the involvement of backbone atoms. This approach provides a more comprehensive picture of receptor-ligand interactions than is currently used and should prove useful for evaluation of the chemical nature of ligand binding and to support structure-based drug design.

  5. Spectrophotometric studies on the interaction between (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Kalyan Sundar; Sahoo, Bijaya Ketan; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2008-02-01

    Various reported antibacterial activities of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol of green tea prompted us to study its binding with lysozyme. This has been investigated by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and protein-ligand docking. The binding parameters were determined using a modified Stern-Volmer equation. The thermodynamic parameters are indicative of an initial hydrophobic association. The complex is, however, held together predominantly by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding. CD studies do not indicate any significant changes in the secondary structure of lysozyme. Docking studies revealed that specific interactions are observed with residues Trp 62 and Trp 63.

  6. Study of Compton vs. Photoelectric Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J B; Johnson, S C; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-07-09

    We have studied how often incoming photons interact via a Compton interaction and/or a photoelectric interaction as a function of energy and detector material Results are using a 1m{sup 3} detector, and discrete energy photons from 0.1 MeV up to 10 MeV. Essentially all of the lower energy photons interact at least once in a detector of this size. This is not the case at higher energies. Each detector, photon energy combination was simulated with 2000 photons.

  7. Single-cell genome and metatranscriptome sequencing reveal metabolic interactions of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mallory; Nagarajan, Harish; Movahedi, Narjes; Chitsaz, Hamidreza; Zengler, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Microbial interactions have a key role in global geochemical cycles. Although we possess significant knowledge about the general biochemical processes occurring in microbial communities, we are often unable to decipher key functions of individual microorganisms within the environment in part owing to the inability to cultivate or study them in isolation. Here, we circumvent this shortcoming through the use of single-cell genome sequencing and a novel low-input metatranscriptomics protocol to reveal the intricate metabolic capabilities and microbial interactions of an alkane-degrading methanogenic community. This methanogenic consortium oxidizes saturated hydrocarbons under anoxic conditions through a thus-far-uncharacterized biochemical process. The genome sequence of a dominant bacterial member of this community, belonging to the genus Smithella, was sequenced and served as the basis for subsequent analysis through metabolic reconstruction. Metatranscriptomic data generated from less than 500 pg of mRNA highlighted metabolically active genes during anaerobic alkane oxidation in comparison with growth on fatty acids. These data sets suggest that Smithella is not activating hexadecane by fumarate addition. Differential expression assisted in the identification of hypothetical proteins with no known homology that may be involved in hexadecane activation. Additionally, the combination of 16S rDNA sequence and metatranscriptomic data enabled the study of other prevalent organisms within the consortium and their interactions with Smithella, thus yielding a comprehensive characterization of individual constituents at the genome scale during methanogenic alkane oxidation. PMID:24152715

  8. Why study gene-environment interactions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We examine the reasons for investigating gene-environment interactions and address recent reports evaluating interactions between genes and environmental modulators in relation to cardiovascular disease and its common risk factors. RECENT FINDINGS: Studies focusing on smoking, phy...

  9. Interactive Videodisc Case Studies for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Harless, William G.; Zier, Marcia A.; Duncan, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The TIME Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is using interactive videodisc, microprocessor and voice recognition technology to create patient simulations for use in the training of medical students. These interactive case studies embody dramatic, lifelike portrayals of the social and medical conditions of a patient and allow uncued, verbal intervention by the student for independent clinical decisions.

  10. A systems biology approach using metabolomic data reveals genes and pathways interacting to modulate divergent growth in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology enables the identification of gene networks that modulate complex traits. Comprehensive metabolomic analyses provide innovative phenotypes that are intermediate between the initiator of genetic variability, the genome, and raw phenotypes that are influenced by a large number of environmental effects. The present study combines two concepts, systems biology and metabolic analyses, in an approach without prior functional hypothesis in order to dissect genes and molecular pathways that modulate differential growth at the onset of puberty in male cattle. Furthermore, this integrative strategy was applied to specifically explore distinctive gene interactions of non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit G (NCAPG) and myostatin (GDF8), known modulators of pre- and postnatal growth that are only partially understood for their molecular pathways affecting differential body weight. Results Our study successfully established gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. We demonstrated the biological relevance of the created networks by comparison to randomly created networks. Our data showed that GnRH (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone) signaling is associated with divergent growth at the onset of puberty and revealed two highly connected hubs, BTC and DGKH, within the network. Both genes are known to directly interact with the GnRH signaling pathway. Furthermore, a gene interaction network for NCAPG containing 14 densely connected genes revealed novel information concerning the functional role of NCAPG in divergent growth. Conclusions Merging both concepts, systems biology and metabolomic analyses, successfully yielded new insights into gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. Genetic modulation in GnRH signaling was identified as key modifier of differential cattle growth at the onset of puberty. In addition, the benefit of our innovative concept without prior

  11. Insights into antiviral innate immunity revealed by studying hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the interactions of the positive strand RNA virus hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the host have contributed to several discoveries in the field of antiviral innate immunity. These include revealing the antiviral sensing pathways that lead to the induction of type I interferon (IFN) during HCV infection and also the importance of type III IFNs in the antiviral immune response to HCV. These studies on HCV/host interactions have contributed to our overall understanding of viral sensing and viral evasion of the antiviral intracellular innate immune response. In this review, I will highlight how these studies of HCV/host interactions have led to new insights into antiviral innate immunity. Overall, I hope to emphasize that studying antiviral immunity in the context of virus infection is necessary to fully understand antiviral immunity and how it controls the outcome of viral infection. PMID:25819428

  12. Direct interaction between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines in hydrated membranes revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    By using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and curve fitting we have examined temperature dependence and composition dependence of the shape of the carbonyl band in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol model membranes. Membranes were hydrated either in excess water or in excess deuterated water. The studied binary mixtures exhibit different lipid phases at appropriate temperature and amount of cholesterol, among them also the so-called liquid-ordered phase. The results confirm that cholesterol has a significant indirect influence on the carbonyl band through conformational and hydration effects. This influence was interpreted in view of the known temperature composition phase diagrams for inspected binary mixtures. In addition, direct interaction was observed, which could point to the presence of hydrogen bond between cholesterol and carbonyl group. This direct interaction, though weak, might play at least a partial role in the stabilization of cholesterol-rich lipid domains in model and biological membranes. PMID:17662974

  13. Nano-optical imaging of WS e2 waveguide modes revealing light-exciton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Z.; Scott, M. E.; Gosztola, D. J.; Foley, J. J.; Yan, J.; Mandrus, D. G.; Wen, H.; Zhou, P.; Zhang, D. W.; Sun, Y.; Guest, J. R.; Gray, S. K.; Bao, W.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Xu, X.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a nano-optical imaging study of WS e2 thin flakes with scanning near-field optical microscopy (NSOM). The NSOM technique allows us to visualize in real space various waveguide photon modes inside WS e2 . By tuning the excitation laser energy, we are able to map the entire dispersion of these waveguide modes both above and below the A exciton energy of WS e2 . We found that all the modes interact strongly with WS e2 excitons. The outcome of the interaction is that the observed waveguide modes shift to higher momenta right below the A exciton energy. At higher energies, on the other hand, these modes are strongly damped due to adjacent B excitons or band-edge absorptions. The mode-shifting phenomena are consistent with polariton formation in WS e2 .

  14. Theoretical and Numerical Studies of a Vortex - Interaction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, To-Ming

    The problem of vortex-airfoil interaction has received considerable interest in the helicopter industry. This phenomenon has been shown to be a major source of noise, vibration, and structural fatigue in helicopter flight. Since unsteady flow is always associated with vortex shedding and movement of free vortices, the problem of vortex-airfoil interaction also serves as a basic building block in unsteady aerodynamics. A careful study of the vortex-airfoil interaction reveals the major effects of the vortices on the generation of unsteady aerodynamic forces, especially the lift. The present work establishes three different flow models to study the vortex-airfoil interaction problem: a theoretical model, an inviscid flow model, and a viscous flow model. In the first two models, a newly developed aerodynamic force theorem has been successfully applied to identify the contributions to unsteady forces from various vortical systems in the flow field. Through viscous flow analysis, different features of laminar interaction, turbulent attached interaction, and turbulent separated interaction are examined. Along with the study of the vortex-airfoil interaction problem, several new schemes are developed for inviscid and viscous flow solutions. New formulas are derived to determine the trailing edge flow conditions, such as flow velocity and direction, in unsteady inviscid flow. A new iteration scheme that is faster for higher Reynolds number is developed for solving the viscous flow problem.

  15. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  16. Cation-Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting.

    PubMed

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambaşu, George M; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that "count" the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation-anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation-anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4-P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new results leads to

  17. Quantitative interaction mapping reveals an extended UBX domain in ASPL that disrupts functional p97 hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Arumughan, Anup; Roske, Yvette; Barth, Carolin; Forero, Laura Lleras; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Redel, Alexandra; Kostova, Simona; McShane, Erik; Opitz, Robert; Faelber, Katja; Rau, Kirstin; Mielke, Thorsten; Daumke, Oliver; Selbach, Matthias; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Rocks, Oliver; Panáková, Daniela; Heinemann, Udo; Wanker, Erich E.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction mapping is a powerful strategy to elucidate the biological function of protein assemblies and their regulators. Here, we report the generation of a quantitative interaction network, directly linking 14 human proteins to the AAA+ ATPase p97, an essential hexameric protein with multiple cellular functions. We show that the high-affinity interacting protein ASPL efficiently promotes p97 hexamer disassembly, resulting in the formation of stable p97:ASPL heterotetramers. High-resolution structural and biochemical studies indicate that an extended UBX domain (eUBX) in ASPL is critical for p97 hexamer disassembly and facilitates the assembly of p97:ASPL heterotetramers. This spontaneous process is accompanied by a reorientation of the D2 ATPase domain in p97 and a loss of its activity. Finally, we demonstrate that overproduction of ASPL disrupts p97 hexamer function in ERAD and that engineered eUBX polypeptides can induce cell death, providing a rationale for developing anti-cancer polypeptide inhibitors that may target p97 activity. PMID:27762274

  18. PRICKLE1 Interaction with SYNAPSIN I Reveals a Role in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Paemka, Lily; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Sowers, Levi P.; Ehaideb, Salleh N.; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Tao, Hirotaka; Miyagi, Asuka; Ueno, Naoto; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Wu, Shu; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Britt, Jeremiah K.; Wemmie, John A.; Rudd, Danielle S.; Wassink, Thomas; El-Shanti, Hatem; Mefford, Heather C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Manak, J. Robert; Bassuk, Alexander G.

    2013-01-01

    The frequent comorbidity of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) with epilepsy suggests a shared underlying genetic susceptibility; several genes, when mutated, can contribute to both disorders. Recently, PRICKLE1 missense mutations were found to segregate with ASD. However, the mechanism by which mutations in this gene might contribute to ASD is unknown. To elucidate the role of PRICKLE1 in ASDs, we carried out studies in Prickle1+/− mice and Drosophila, yeast, and neuronal cell lines. We show that mice with Prickle1 mutations exhibit ASD-like behaviors. To find proteins that interact with PRICKLE1 in the central nervous system, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human brain cDNA library and isolated a peptide with homology to SYNAPSIN I (SYN1), a protein involved in synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle formation, and regulation of neurotransmitter release. Endogenous Prickle1 and Syn1 co-localize in neurons and physically interact via the SYN1 region mutated in ASD and epilepsy. Finally, a mutation in PRICKLE1 disrupts its ability to increase the size of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest PRICKLE1 mutations contribute to ASD by disrupting the interaction with SYN1 and regulation of synaptic vesicles. PMID:24312498

  19. Revealing the role of catechol moieties in the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2016-08-18

    Catechol (1,2-dihydroxy benzene) moieties are being widely used today in new adhesive technologies. Understanding their mechanism of action is therefore of high importance for developing their applications in materials science. This paper describes a single-molecule study of the interactions between catechol-related amino acid residues and a well-defined titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface. It is the first quantified measurement of the adhesion of these residues with a well-defined TiO2 surface. Single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements with AFM determined the role of different substitutions of the catechol moiety on the aromatic ring in the adhesion to the surface. These results shed light on the nature of interactions between these residues and inorganic metal oxide surfaces. This information is important for the design and fabrication of catechol-based materials such as hydrogels, coatings, and composites. Specifically, the interaction with TiO2 is important for the development of solar cells. PMID:27503417

  20. Process-Based Species Pools Reveal the Hidden Signature of Biotic Interactions Amid the Influence of Temperature Filtering.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Weinstein, Ben G; Borregaard, Michael K; Marske, Katharine A; Martin, Danny R; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parra, Juan L; Rahbek, Carsten; Graham, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    A persistent challenge in ecology is to tease apart the influence of multiple processes acting simultaneously and interacting in complex ways to shape the structure of species assemblages. We implement a heuristic approach that relies on explicitly defining species pools and permits assessment of the relative influence of the main processes thought to shape assemblage structure: environmental filtering, dispersal limitations, and biotic interactions. We illustrate our approach using data on the assemblage composition and geographic distribution of hummingbirds, a comprehensive phylogeny and morphological traits. The implementation of several process-based species pool definitions in null models suggests that temperature-but not precipitation or dispersal limitation-acts as the main regional filter of assemblage structure. Incorporating this environmental filter directly into the definition of assemblage-specific species pools revealed an otherwise hidden pattern of phylogenetic evenness, indicating that biotic interactions might further influence hummingbird assemblage structure. Such hidden patterns of assemblage structure call for a reexamination of a multitude of phylogenetic- and trait-based studies that did not explicitly consider potentially important processes in their definition of the species pool. Our heuristic approach provides a transparent way to explore patterns and refine interpretations of the underlying causes of assemblage structure. PMID:27277404

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions.

  2. Structure of Human Cytomegalovirus UL141 Binding to TRAIL-R2 Reveals Novel, Non-canonical Death Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nemčovičová, Ivana; Benedict, Chris A.; Zajonc, Dirk M.

    2013-01-01

    The TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) death receptors (DRs) of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) can promote apoptosis and regulate antiviral immunity by maintaining immune homeostasis during infection. In turn, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses immunomodulatory proteins that down-regulate cell surface expression of TNFRSF members as well as poliovirus receptor-related proteins in an effort to inhibit host immune effector pathways that would lead to viral clearance. The UL141 glycoprotein of human cytomegalovirus inhibits host defenses by blocking cell surface expression of TRAIL DRs (by retention in ER) and poliovirus receptor CD155, a nectin-like Ig-fold molecule. Here we show that the immunomodulatory function of HCMV UL141 is associated with its ability to bind diverse proteins, while utilizing at least two distinct binding sites to selectively engage TRAIL DRs or CD155. Binding studies revealed high affinity interaction of UL141 with both TRAIL-R2 and CD155 and low affinity binding to TRAIL-R1. We determined the crystal structure of UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 at 2.1 Å resolution, which revealed that UL141 forms a homodimer that engages two TRAIL-R2 monomers 90° apart to form a heterotetrameric complex. Our structural and biochemical data reveal that UL141 utilizes its Ig-domain to facilitate non-canonical death receptor interactions while UL141 partially mimics the binding site of TRAIL on TRAIL-R2, which we found to be distinct from that of CD155. Moreover, UL141 also binds to an additional surface patch on TRAIL-R2 that is distinct from the TRAIL binding site. Therefore, the breadth of UL141-mediated effects indicates that HCMV has evolved sophisticated strategies to evade the immune system by modulating multiple effector pathways. PMID:23555243

  3. A simple engineered platform reveals different modes of tumor-microenvironmental cell interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chentian; Shenk, Elizabeth M; Blaha, Laura C; Ryu, Byungwoo; Alani, Rhoda M; Cabodi, Mario; Wong, Joyce Y

    2016-01-01

    How metastatic cancer lesions survive and grow in secondary locations is not fully understood. There is a growing appreciation for the importance of tumor components, i.e. microenvironmental cells, in this process. Here, we used a simple microfabricated dual cell culture platform with a 500 μm gap to assess interactions between two different metastatic melanoma cell lines (1205Lu isolated from a lung lesion established through a mouse xenograft; and WM852 derived from a stage III metastatic lesion of skin) and microenvironmental cells derived from either skin (fibroblasts), lung (epithelial cells) or liver (hepatocytes). We observed differential bi-directional migration between microenvironmental cells and melanoma, depending on the melanoma cell line. Lung epithelial cells and skin fibroblasts, but not hepatocytes, stimulated higher 1205Lu migration than without microenvironmental cells; in the opposite direction, 1205Lu cells induced hepatocytes to migrate, but had no effect on skin fibroblasts and slightly inhibited lung epithelial cells. In contrast, none of the microenvironments had a significant effect on WM852; in this case, skin fibroblasts and hepatocytes—but not lung epithelial cells—exhibited directed migration toward WM852. These observations reveal significant effects a given microenvironmental cell line has on the two different melanoma lines, as well as how melanoma effects different microenvironmental cell lines. Our simple platform thus has potential to provide complex insights into different strategies used by cancerous cells to survive in and colonize metastatic sites. PMID:26716792

  4. Minimalist Model Systems Reveal Similarities and Differences between Membrane Interaction Modes of MCL1 and BAK*

    PubMed Central

    Landeta, Olatz; Landajuela, Ane; Garcia-Saez, Ana; Basañez, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the BCL2 family are key modulators of apoptosis that establish a complex network of interactions among themselves and with other cellular factors to regulate cell fate. It is well established that mitochondrial membranes are the main locus of action of all BCL2 family proteins, but it is difficult to obtain a precise view of how BCL2 family members operate at the native mitochondrial membrane environment during apoptosis. Here, we used minimalist model systems and multiple fluorescence-based techniques to examine selected membrane activities of MCL1 and BAK under apoptotic-like conditions. We show that three distinct apoptosis-related factors (i.e. the BCL2 homology 3 ligand cBID, the mitochondrion-specific lipid cardiolipin, and membrane geometrical curvature) all promote membrane association of BCL2-like structural folds belonging to both MCL1 and BAK. However, at the same time, the two proteins exhibited distinguishing features in their membrane association modes under apoptotic-like conditions. In addition, scanning fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and FRET measurements revealed that the BCL2-like structural fold of MCL1, but not that of BAK, forms stable heterodimeric complexes with cBID in a manner adjustable by membrane cardiolipin content and curvature degree. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that the mitochondrial membrane environment plays a complex and active role in the mode of action of BCL2 family proteins. PMID:25987560

  5. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  6. Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG

    PubMed Central

    Bögels, Sara; Barr, Dale J.; Garrod, Simon; Kessler, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Humans are especially good at taking another's perspective—representing what others might be thinking or experiencing. This “mentalizing” capacity is apparent in everyday human interactions and conversations. We investigated its neural basis using magnetoencephalography. We focused on whether mentalizing was engaged spontaneously and routinely to understand an utterance's meaning or largely on-demand, to restore “common ground” when expectations were violated. Participants conversed with 1 of 2 confederate speakers and established tacit agreements about objects' names. In a subsequent “test” phase, some of these agreements were violated by either the same or a different speaker. Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex). Theta oscillations (3–7 Hz) were modulated most prominently, and we observed phase coupling between functionally distinct neural circuits. The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated. In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances. PMID:24904076

  7. Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG.

    PubMed

    Bögels, Sara; Barr, Dale J; Garrod, Simon; Kessler, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Humans are especially good at taking another's perspective-representing what others might be thinking or experiencing. This "mentalizing" capacity is apparent in everyday human interactions and conversations. We investigated its neural basis using magnetoencephalography. We focused on whether mentalizing was engaged spontaneously and routinely to understand an utterance's meaning or largely on-demand, to restore "common ground" when expectations were violated. Participants conversed with 1 of 2 confederate speakers and established tacit agreements about objects' names. In a subsequent "test" phase, some of these agreements were violated by either the same or a different speaker. Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex). Theta oscillations (3-7 Hz) were modulated most prominently, and we observed phase coupling between functionally distinct neural circuits. The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated. In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances.

  8. Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG.

    PubMed

    Bögels, Sara; Barr, Dale J; Garrod, Simon; Kessler, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Humans are especially good at taking another's perspective-representing what others might be thinking or experiencing. This "mentalizing" capacity is apparent in everyday human interactions and conversations. We investigated its neural basis using magnetoencephalography. We focused on whether mentalizing was engaged spontaneously and routinely to understand an utterance's meaning or largely on-demand, to restore "common ground" when expectations were violated. Participants conversed with 1 of 2 confederate speakers and established tacit agreements about objects' names. In a subsequent "test" phase, some of these agreements were violated by either the same or a different speaker. Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex). Theta oscillations (3-7 Hz) were modulated most prominently, and we observed phase coupling between functionally distinct neural circuits. The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated. In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances. PMID:24904076

  9. Topological robustness analysis of protein interaction networks reveals key targets for overcoming chemotherapy resistance in glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Hátylas; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Biological networks display high robustness against random failures but are vulnerable to targeted attacks on central nodes. Thus, network topology analysis represents a powerful tool for investigating network susceptibility against targeted node removal. Here, we built protein interaction networks associated with chemoresistance to temozolomide, an alkylating agent used in glioma therapy, and analyzed their modular structure and robustness against intentional attack. These networks showed functional modules related to DNA repair, immunity, apoptosis, cell stress, proliferation and migration. Subsequently, network vulnerability was assessed by means of centrality-based attacks based on the removal of node fractions in descending orders of degree, betweenness, or the product of degree and betweenness. This analysis revealed that removing nodes with high degree and high betweenness was more effective in altering networks’ robustness parameters, suggesting that their corresponding proteins may be particularly relevant to target temozolomide resistance. In silico data was used for validation and confirmed that central nodes are more relevant for altering proliferation rates in temozolomide-resistant glioma cell lines and for predicting survival in glioma patients. Altogether, these results demonstrate how the analysis of network vulnerability to topological attack facilitates target prioritization for overcoming cancer chemoresistance.

  10. Tryptophan fluorescence reveals induced folding of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein upon interaction with partner enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Huansheng; Murphy, Peter W; Langille, Gavin M; Minielly, Sarah J; Murphy, Anne; McMaster, Christopher R; Byers, David M

    2008-11-01

    We have introduced tryptophan as a local fluorescent probe to monitor the conformation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP), a small flexible protein that is unfolded at neutral pH but must undergo reversible conformational change during the synthesis and delivery of bacterial fatty acids. Consistent with known 3D structures of ACP, steady-state fluorescence and quenching experiments indicated that Trp at positions 46, 50, and 72 are buried in the hydrophobic core upon Mg(2+)-induced ACP folding, whereas residues 25 and 45 remain in a hydrophilic environment on the protein surface. Attachment of fatty acids to the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group progressively stabilized the folded conformation of all Trp-substituted ACPs, but longer chains (14:0) were less effective than medium chains (8:0) in shielding Trp from acrylamide quenching in the L46W protein. Interaction with ACP-dependent enzymes LpxA and holo-ACP synthase also caused folding of L46W; fluorescence quenching indicated proximity of Trp-45 in helix II of ACP in LpxA binding. Our results suggest that divalent cations and fatty acylation produce differing environments in the ACP core and also reveal enzyme partner-induced folding of ACP, a key feature of "natively unfolded" proteins.

  11. Electron Microscopy Analysis of a Disaccharide Analog complex Reveals Receptor Interactions of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Spilman, Michael; Meyer, Nancy L.; Lerch, Thomas F.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of macromolecular complexes often feature x-ray structures of complexes with bound ligands. The attachment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is an example that has not proven amenable to crystallography, because the binding of GAG analogs disrupts lattice contacts. The interactions of AAV with GAGs are of interest in mediating the cell specificity of AAV-based gene therapy vectors. Previous electron microscopy led to differing conclusions on the exact binding site and the existence of large ligand-induced conformational changes in the virus. Conformational changes are expected during cell entry, but it has remained unclear whether the electron microscopy provided evidence of their induction by GAG-binding. Taking advantage of automated data collection, careful processing and new methods of structure refinement, the structure of AAV-DJ complexed with sucrose octasulfate is determined by electron microscopy difference map analysis to 4.8 Å resolution. At this higher resolution, individual sulfate groups are discernible, providing a stereochemical validation of map interpretation, and highlighting interactions with two surface arginines that have been implicated in genetic studies. Conformational changes induced by the SOS are modest and limited to the loop most directly interacting with the ligand. While the resolution attainable will depend on sample order and other factors, there are an increasing number of macromolecular complexes that can be studied by cryo-electron microscopy at resolutions beyond 5 Å, for which the approaches used here could be used to characterize the binding of inhibitors and other small molecule effectors when crystallography is not tractable. PMID:24036405

  12. Biomineralized anisotropic gold microplate-macrophage interactions reveal frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon: a novel paclitaxel drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Batuwangala, Madu; Mundra, Ruchir; Mehta, Krunal; Patke, Sanket; Falletta, Ermelinda; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, W N

    2014-08-27

    This study reports a facile biomineralization route for gold microplates (GMPs) synthesis using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a reductant and stabilizing agent. Adding BSA to HAuCl4 solution yields spontaneous versatile anisotropic and partially hollow GMPs upon aging. We hypothesize that the instantaneous protein denaturation at low pH enabled access to serine and threonine hydroxyl, and sulfhydryl groups of BSA, which act as a reductant and stabilizer, respectively. This reaction could be hastened by increasing the temperature well beyond 65 °C. Transmission electron microscopy/X-ray diffraction studies revealed highly crystalline and anisotropic structures (triangle, pentagon, and rectangle). Atomic force microscopy/scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated unique morphology of microplates with a partially void core and BSA mineralized edge structure. RAW 264.7 mice peritoneal macrophage-microplate interaction studies using live cell confocal imaging reveal that cells are capable of selectively internalizing smaller GMPs. Large GMPs are preferentially picked with sharp vertices but cannot be internalized and exhibit frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon. We explored particle phagocytosis as an actin mediated process that recruits phagosome-like acidic organelles, shown by a lysosensor probe technique. The biocompatible GMPs exhibited ∼70% paclitaxel (PCL) loading and sustained release of PCL, showing antitumor activity with the MCF-7 cell line, and could be a novel drug carrier for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Study of physical interaction mefenamic acid - isonicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyun, Yonelian; Nugrahani, Ilma

    2015-09-01

    Solid-solid interaction in the form of physics and chemistry can occur in a combination of active ingredients with the active ingredient or active ingredients with excipients in a pharmaceutical preparation. Physical interactions can be classified into physical interaction system eutectic, peritectic, and molecular compounds based on the phase diagram of a mixture of two-component systems. The physical interaction between mefenamic acid and isonicotinamide not been reported previously. This study aims to examine the type of interaction of mefenamic acid (MA) with isonicotinamide (INA) and its interaction with the isolation methods by solvent drop grinding as the simplest method and easy to do. PXRD data showed the interaction of MA:INA mixture contained no new peaks, so the indicated MA:INA only form of eutectic interaction. There was founded new endothermic peak for DTA data at 149.5°C (SDG-Ethanol) and 148.4°C (SDG-EtAct). The results of infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated a shift in the NH stretch 3367 cm-1 to 3359 cm-1; and 3185 cm-1 to 3178 cm-1.

  14. Microscopic study reveals the singular origins of growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaari, G.; Nowak, A.; Rakocy, K.; Solomon, S.

    2008-04-01

    Anderson [Science 177, 293 (1972)] proposed the concept of complexity in order to describe the emergence and growth of macroscopic collective patterns out of the simple interactions of many microscopic agents. In the physical sciences this paradigm was implemented systematically and confirmed repeatedly by successful confrontation with reality. In the social sciences however, the possibilities to stage experiments to validate it are limited. During the 90's a series of dramatic political and economic events have provided the opportunity to do so. We exploit the resulting empirical evidence to validate a simple agent based alternative to the classical logistic dynamics. The post-liberalization empirical data from Poland confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamics is dominated by singular rare events which insure the resilience and adaptability of the system. We have shown that growth is led by few singular “growth centers" (Fig. 1), that initially developed at a tremendous rate (Fig. 3), followed by a diffusion process to the rest of the country and leading to a positive growth rate uniform across the counties. In addition to the interdisciplinary unifying potential of our generic formal approach, the present work reveals the strong causal ties between the “softer" social conditions and their “hard" economic consequences.

  15. Interaction of epicatechin gallate with phospholipid membranes as revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Sugimoto, Osamu; Ishii, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanji, Ken-ichi; Naito, Akira; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Epicatechin gallate (ECg), a green tea polyphenol, has various physiological effects. Our previous nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) study using solution NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that ECg strongly interacts with the surface of phospholipid bilayers. However, the dynamic behavior of ECg in the phospholipid bilayers has not been clarified, especially the dynamics and molecular arrangement of the galloyl moiety, which supposedly has an important interactive role. In this study, we synthesized [13C]-ECg, in which the carbonyl carbon of the galloyl moiety was labeled by 13C isotope, and analyzed it by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state 31P NMR analysis indicated that ECg changes the gel-to-liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of DMPC bilayers as well as the dynamics and mobility of the phospholipids. In the solid-state 13C NMR analysis under static conditions, the carbonyl carbon signal of the [13C]-ECg exhibited an axially symmetric powder pattern. This indicates that the ECg molecules rotate about an axis tilting at a constant angle to the bilayer normal. The accurate intermolecular-interatomic distance between the labeled carbonyl carbon of [13C]-ECg and the phosphorus of the phospholipid was determined to be 5.3±0.1 Å by 13C-(31)P rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) measurements. These results suggest that the galloyl moiety contributes to increasing the hydrophobicity of catechin molecules, and consequently to high affinity of galloyl-type catechins for phospholipid membranes, as well as to stabilization of catechin molecules in the phospholipid membranes by cation-π interaction between the galloyl ring and quaternary amine of the phospholipid head-group. PMID:21352801

  16. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in situ nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V.; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hovelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in situ study of the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology during dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V) at room temperature and pH range 6-11 using a flow-through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  17. Revealing "flickering" of the interaction strength in pA collisions at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, M.; Frankfurt, L.; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2014-09-01

    Using the high-energy color fluctuation formalism to include inelastic diffractive processes and taking into account the collision geometry and short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei, we assess various manifestations of "flickering" of the parton wave function of a rapid proton in pA interactions focusing at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in soft QCD processes and in the special soft QCD processes accompanying hard processes. We evaluate the number of wounded nucleons, Ncoll—the number of inelastic collisions of projectiles—in these processes and find a nontrivial relation between the hard collision rate and centrality. We study the distribution over Ncoll for a hard trigger selecting configurations in the nucleon with the strength larger or smaller than the average one and argue that the pattern observed in the LHC pA measurements by CMS and ATLAS for jets carrying a large fraction of the proton momentum, xp, is consistent with the expectation that these configurations interact with the strength which is significantly smaller than the average one, a factor of two smaller for xp˜0.5. We also study the leading twist shadowing and the European Muon Collaboration effects for superdense nuclear matter configurations probed in the events with a larger-than-average number of wounded nucleons. We also argue that taking into account energy-momentum conservation does not change the distribution over Ncoll but suppresses hadron production at central rapidities.

  18. A Multiple Interaction Analysis Reveals ADRB3 as a Potential Candidate for Gallbladder Cancer Predisposition via a Complex Interaction with Other Candidate Gene Variations

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Misra, Sanjeev; Kumar, Ashok; Mittal, Balraj

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is the most common and a highly aggressive biliary tract malignancy with a dismal outcome. The pathogenesis of the disease is multifactorial, comprising the combined effect of multiple genetic variations of mild consequence along with numerous dietary and environmental risk factors. Previously, we demonstrated the association of several candidate gene variations with GBC risk. In this study, we aimed to identify the combination of gene variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility of GBC. Here, we performed Multifactor-Dimensionality Reduction (MDR) and Classification and Regression Tree Analysis (CRT) to investigate the gene–gene interactions and the combined effect of 14 SNPs in nine genes (DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634); FAS (rs2234767); FASL (rs763110); DCC (rs2229080, rs4078288, rs7504990, rs714); PSCA (rs2294008, rs2978974); ADRA2A (rs1801253); ADRB1 (rs1800544); ADRB3 (rs4994); CYP17 (rs2486758)) involved in various signaling pathways. Genotyping was accomplished by PCR-RFLP or Taqman allelic discrimination assays. SPSS software version 16.0 and MDR software version 2.0 were used for all the statistical analysis. Single locus investigation demonstrated significant association of DR4 (rs20576, rs6557634), DCC (rs714, rs2229080, rs4078288) and ADRB3 (rs4994) polymorphisms with GBC risk. MDR analysis revealed ADRB3 (rs4994) to be crucial candidate in GBC susceptibility that may act either alone (p < 0.0001, CVC = 10/10) or in combination with DCC (rs714 and rs2229080, p < 0.0001, CVC = 9/10). Our CRT results are in agreement with the above findings. Further, in-silico results of studied SNPs advocated their role in splicing, transcriptional and/or protein coding regulation. Overall, our result suggested complex interactions amongst the studied SNPs and ADRB3 rs4994 as candidate influencing GBC susceptibility. PMID:26602921

  19. How to Study Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Kraševec, Nada; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Naneh, Omar; Flašker, Ajda; Caserman, Simon; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Physical and functional interactions between molecules in living systems are central to all biological processes. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Several powerful methodologies and techniques have been developed to study molecular interactions and thus help elucidate their nature and role in biology as well as potential ways how to interfere with them. All different techniques used in these studies have their strengths and weaknesses and since they are mostly employed in in vitro conditions, a single approach can hardly accurately reproduce interactions that happen under physiological conditions. However, complementary usage of as many as possible available techniques can lead to relatively realistic picture of the biological process. Here we describe several proteomic, biophysical and structural tools that help us understand the nature and mechanism of these interactions. PMID:27640371

  20. Expression Profiling during Arabidopsis/Downy Mildew Interaction Reveals a Highly-Expressed Effector That Attenuates Responses to Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuta; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Furzer, Oliver J.; Ishaque, Naveed; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Fabro, Georgina; Shirasu, Ken; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved strong innate immunity mechanisms, but successful pathogens evade or suppress plant immunity via effectors delivered into the plant cell. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on Arabidopsis thaliana, and a genome sequence is available for isolate Emoy2. Here, we exploit the availability of genome sequences for Hpa and Arabidopsis to measure gene-expression changes in both Hpa and Arabidopsis simultaneously during infection. Using a high-throughput cDNA tag sequencing method, we reveal expression patterns of Hpa predicted effectors and Arabidopsis genes in compatible and incompatible interactions, and promoter elements associated with Hpa genes expressed during infection. By resequencing Hpa isolate Waco9, we found it evades Arabidopsis resistance gene RPP1 through deletion of the cognate recognized effector ATR1. Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes including PR1 were activated not only at early time points in the incompatible interaction but also at late time points in the compatible interaction. By histochemical analysis, we found that Hpa suppresses SA-inducible PR1 expression, specifically in the haustoriated cells into which host-translocated effectors are delivered, but not in non-haustoriated adjacent cells. Finally, we found a highly-expressed Hpa effector candidate that suppresses responsiveness to SA. As this approach can be easily applied to host-pathogen interactions for which both host and pathogen genome sequences are available, this work opens the door towards transcriptome studies in infection biology that should help unravel pathogen infection strategies and the mechanisms by which host defense responses are overcome. PMID:25329884

  1. Protein-Protein Docking and Analysis Reveal That Two Homologous Bacterial Adenylyl Cyclase Toxins Interact with Calmodulin Differently*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Jureller, Justin E.; Warren, Julia T.; Solomaha, Elena; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a eukaryotic calcium sensor that regulates diverse biological activities, consists of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively). CaM serves as the activator of CyaA, a 188-kDa adenylyl cyclase toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, which is the etiologic agent for whooping cough. Upon insertion of the N-terminal adenylyl cyclase domain (ACD) of CyaA to its targeted eukaryotic cells, CaM binds to this domain tightly (∼200 pm affinity). This interaction activates the adenylyl cyclase activity of CyaA, leading to a rise in intracellular cAMP levels to disrupt normal cellular signaling. We recently solved the structure of CyaA-ACD in complex with C-CaM to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic activation. However, the structure of the interface between N-CaM and CyaA, the formation of which contributes a 400-fold increase of binding affinity between CyaA and CaM, remains elusive. Here, we used site-directed mutations and molecular dynamic simulations to generate several working models of CaM-bound CyaA-ACD. The validity of these models was evaluated by disulfide bond cross-linking, point mutations, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Our study reveals that a β-hairpin region (amino acids 259–273) of CyaA-ACD likely makes contacts with the second calcium binding motif of the extended CaM. This mode of interaction differs from the interaction of N-CaM with anthrax edema factor, which binds N-CaM via its helical domain. Thus, two structurally conserved, bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins have evolved to utilize distinct binding surfaces and modes of activation in their interaction with CaM, a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling protein. PMID:18583346

  2. Space Operations Center: Shuttle interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the Space Operation Center (SOC), including constraints that the Shuttle will place upon the SOC design. The study identifies the considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and also identifies the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions.

  3. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  4. Interactions between visual and motor areas during the recognition of plausible actions as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Anastasia; Schnitzler, Alfons; Lange, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown activation of the mirror neuron system (MNS), comprising the temporal, posterior parietal, and sensorimotor areas when observing plausible actions, but far less is known on how these cortical areas interact during the recognition of a plausible action. Here, we recorded neural activity with magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed point-light displays of biologically plausible and scrambled versions of actions. We were interested in modulations of oscillatory activity and, specifically, in coupling of oscillatory activity between visual and motor areas. Both plausible and scrambled actions elicited modulations of θ (5-7 Hz), α (7-13 Hz), β (13-35 Hz), and γ (55-100 Hz) power within visual and motor areas. When comparing between the two actions, we observed sequential and spatially distinct increases of γ (∼65 Hz), β (∼25 Hz), and α (∼11 Hz) power between 0.5 and 1.3 s in parieto-occipital, sensorimotor, and left temporal areas. In addition, significant clusters of γ (∼65 Hz) and α/β (∼15 Hz) power decrease were observed in right temporal and parieto-occipital areas between 1.3 and 2.0 s. We found β-power in sensorimotor areas to be positively correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with parieto-occipital γ and left temporal α-power for the plausible but not for the scrambled condition. These results provide new insights in the neuronal oscillatory activity of the areas involved in the recognition of plausible action movements and their interaction. The power correlations between specific areas underscore the importance of interactions between visual and motor areas of the MNS during the recognition of a plausible action.

  5. Tryptophan probes reveal residue-specific phospholipid interactions of apolipoprotein C-III.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M; Walker, Robert L; He, Yi; Gruschus, James M; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-11-01

    Apolipoproteins are essential human proteins for lipid metabolism. Together with phospholipids, they constitute lipoproteins, nm to μm sized particles responsible for transporting cholesterol and triglycerides throughout the body. To investigate specific protein-lipid interactions, we produced and characterized three single-Trp containing apolipoprotein C-III (ApoCIII) variants (W42 (W54F/W65F), W54 (W42F/W65F), W65 (W42F/W54F)). Upon binding to phospholipid vesicles, wild-type ApoCIII adopts an α-helical conformation (50% helicity) as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy with an approximate apparent partition constant of 3×10(4) M(-1). Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal distinct residue-specific behaviors with W54 experiencing the most hydrophobic environment followed by W42 and W65. Interestingly, time-resolved anisotropy measurements show a converse trend for relative Trp mobility with position 54 being the least immobile. To determine the relative insertion depths of W42, W54, and W65 in the bilayer, fluorescence quenching experiments were performed using three different brominated lipids. W65 had a clear preference for residing near the headgroup while W54 and W42 sample the range of depths ~8-11 Å from the bilayer center. On average, W54 is slightly more embedded than W42. Based on Trp spectral differences between ApoCIII binding to phospholipid vesicles and sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, we suggest that ApoCIII adopts an alternate helical conformation on the bilayer which could have functional implications.

  6. Star-disk interaction in classical T Tauri stars revealed using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Santiago, J.; Crespo-Chacón, I.; Flaccomio, E.; Sciortino, S.; Micela, G.; Reale, F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The extension of the corona of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) is is being widely discussed. The standard model of magnetic configuration of CTTS predicts that coronal magnetic flux tubes connect the stellar atmosphere to the inner region of the disk. However, differential rotation may disrupt these long loops. The results from hydrodynamic modeling of X-ray flares observed in CTTS that confirm the star-disk connection hypothesis are still controversial. Some authors suggest the presence of the accretion disk prevents the stellar corona extending beyond the co-rotation radius, while others are simply not confident with the methods used to derive loop lengths. Aims: We use independent procedures to determine the length of flaring loops in stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster, which has previously been analyzed using hydrodynamic models. Our aim is to disentangle the two scenarios that have been proposed. Methods: We present a different approach for determining the length of flaring loops that is based on the oscillatory nature of the loops after strong flares. We use wavelet tools to reveal oscillations during several flares. The subsequent analysis of these oscillations is based on the physics of coronal seismology. Results: Our results likely confirm the large extension of the corona of CTTS and the hypothesis of star-disk magnetic interaction in at least three CTTS of the Orion Nebula Cluster. Conclusions: Analyzing oscillations in flaring events is a powerful tool to determine the physical characteristics of magnetic loops in coronae in stars other than the Sun. The results presented in this work confirm the star-disk magnetic connection in CTTS.

  7. Revealing strong nanocomposite hydrogels reinforced by cellulose nanocrystals: insight into morphologies and interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-12-26

    Understanding the reinforcement mechanism by dispersing nanoscale particles into a polymer matrix is a critical challenge toward refining control of the composite properties. In this paper, the morphologies and interactions of cellulose nanocrystal/poly(acrylic acid) (CNC/PAA) nanocomposite hydrogels are demystified based on a facile synthetic platform. Two sources of CNCs with different aspect ratios are applied to model the reinforcement process, and the uniaxial tensile measurements indicate that the CNC aspect ratio and the nanocomposite mechanical behaviors are coupled, where the values of aspect ratios and nonpermanent interactions between the fillers and matrix dominate the reinforcement. Dynamic mechanical analysis is performed to examine the nature of the constrained polymer as the semicrystalline fractions, and the results indicate that polymer chain mobility in the vicinity of CNC surfaces is significantly reduced, providing new insight into the origin of the reinforcement mechanism. Rheological analysis and transmission electron microscopy observations show that both stepwise dissociation and polymer chain rearrangements contribute to the viscoelastic behaviors of the nanocomposite hydrogels. The increased modulus of the hydrogels is correlated to the volume of the constrained polymer, where the CNCs impart significant enhancement to the entanglement network. This study of the structure-property relationship deepens the understanding of the filler reinforcement mechanism and provides valuable knowledge for designing high performance nanocomposite hydrogels from cellulose as a raw material.

  8. Retinal orientation and interactions in rhodopsin reveal a two-stage trigger mechanism for activation

    PubMed Central

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A.; Ziliox, Martine; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Vogel, Reiner; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis retinal chromophore is tightly packed within the interior of the visual receptor rhodopsin and isomerizes to the all-trans configuration following absorption of light. The mechanism by which this isomerization event drives the outward rotation of transmembrane helix H6, a hallmark of activated G protein-coupled receptors, is not well established. To address this question, we use solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy to define the orientation and interactions of the retinal chromophore in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Here we show that isomerization of the 11-cis retinal chromophore generates strong steric interactions between its β-ionone ring and transmembrane helices H5 and H6, while deprotonation of its protonated Schiff's base triggers the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues on H6 and within the second extracellular loop. We integrate these observations with previous structural and functional studies to propose a two-stage mechanism for rhodopsin activation. PMID:27585742

  9. Retinal orientation and interactions in rhodopsin reveal a two-stage trigger mechanism for activation.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Pope, Andreyah; Eilers, Markus; Opefi, Chikwado A; Ziliox, Martine; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Zaitseva, Ekaterina; Vogel, Reiner; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2016-01-01

    The 11-cis retinal chromophore is tightly packed within the interior of the visual receptor rhodopsin and isomerizes to the all-trans configuration following absorption of light. The mechanism by which this isomerization event drives the outward rotation of transmembrane helix H6, a hallmark of activated G protein-coupled receptors, is not well established. To address this question, we use solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy to define the orientation and interactions of the retinal chromophore in the active metarhodopsin II intermediate. Here we show that isomerization of the 11-cis retinal chromophore generates strong steric interactions between its β-ionone ring and transmembrane helices H5 and H6, while deprotonation of its protonated Schiff's base triggers the rearrangement of the hydrogen-bonding network involving residues on H6 and within the second extracellular loop. We integrate these observations with previous structural and functional studies to propose a two-stage mechanism for rhodopsin activation. PMID:27585742

  10. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Kumar, Arun; Das, Rudra Nayan; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  11. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Zhao, Ting; Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  12. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  13. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Seile; Bekele, Endashaw

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund's variance, Nei's measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei's standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01), the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144), and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66) are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub-divided populations and

  14. Ethiopian Population Dermatoglyphic Study Reveals Linguistic Stratification of Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund’s variance, Nei’s measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei’s standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01), the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144), and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66) are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub

  15. Ethiopian population dermatoglyphic study reveals linguistic stratification of diversity.

    PubMed

    Yohannes, Seile; Bekele, Endashaw

    2015-01-01

    The manifestation of ethnic, blood type, & gender-wise population variations regarding Dermatoglyphic manifestations are of interest to assess intra-group diversity and differentiation. The present study reports on the analysis of qualitaive and quantitative finger Dermatoglyphic traits of 382 individuals cross-sectionally sampled from an administrative region of Ethiopia, consisting of five ethnic cohorts from the Afro-Asiatic & Nilo-Saharan affiliations. These Dermatoglyphic parameters were then applied in the assessment of diversity & differentiation, including Heterozygosity, Fixation, Panmixia, Wahlund's variance, Nei's measure of genetic diversity, and thumb & finger pattern genotypes, which were inturn used in homology inferences as summarized by a Neighbour-Joining tree constructed from Nei's standard genetic distance. Results revealed significant correlation between Dermatoglyphics & population parameters that were further found to be in concordance with the historical accounts of the ethnic groups. Such inductions as the ancient north-eastern presence and subsequent admixure events of the Oromos (PII= 15.01), the high diversity of the Amharas (H= 0.1978, F= 0.6453, and P= 0.4144), and the Nilo-Saharan origin of the Berta group (PII= 10.66) are evidences to this. The study has further tested the possibility of applying Dermatoglyphics in population genetic & anthropologic research, highlighting on the prospect of developing a method to trace back population origins & ancient movement patterns. Additionally, linguistic clustering was deemed significant for the Ethiopian population, coinciding with recent genome wide studies that have ascertained that linguistic clustering as to being more crucial than the geographical patterning in the Ethiopian context. Finally, Dermatoglyphic markers have been proven to be endowed with a strong potential as non-invasive preliminary tools applicable prior to genetic studies to analyze ethnically sub-divided populations and

  16. Protein Interaction Networks Reveal Novel Autism Risk Genes within GWAS Statistical Noise

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) thus far met limited success in the identification of common risk variants, consistent with the notion that variants with small individual effects cannot be detected individually in single SNP analysis. To further capture disease risk gene information from ASD association studies, we applied a network-based strategy to the Autism Genome Project (AGP) and the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange GWAS datasets, combining family-based association data with Human Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) data. Our analysis showed that autism-associated proteins at higher than conventional levels of significance (P<0.1) directly interact more than random expectation and are involved in a limited number of interconnected biological processes, indicating that they are functionally related. The functionally coherent networks generated by this approach contain ASD-relevant disease biology, as demonstrated by an improved positive predictive value and sensitivity in retrieving known ASD candidate genes relative to the top associated genes from either GWAS, as well as a higher gene overlap between the two ASD datasets. Analysis of the intersection between the networks obtained from the two ASD GWAS and six unrelated disease datasets identified fourteen genes exclusively present in the ASD networks. These are mostly novel genes involved in abnormal nervous system phenotypes in animal models, and in fundamental biological processes previously implicated in ASD, such as axon guidance, cell adhesion or cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our results highlighted novel susceptibility genes previously hidden within GWAS statistical “noise” that warrant further analysis for causal variants. PMID:25409314

  17. Protein interaction networks reveal novel autism risk genes within GWAS statistical noise.

    PubMed

    Correia, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) thus far met limited success in the identification of common risk variants, consistent with the notion that variants with small individual effects cannot be detected individually in single SNP analysis. To further capture disease risk gene information from ASD association studies, we applied a network-based strategy to the Autism Genome Project (AGP) and the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange GWAS datasets, combining family-based association data with Human Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) data. Our analysis showed that autism-associated proteins at higher than conventional levels of significance (P<0.1) directly interact more than random expectation and are involved in a limited number of interconnected biological processes, indicating that they are functionally related. The functionally coherent networks generated by this approach contain ASD-relevant disease biology, as demonstrated by an improved positive predictive value and sensitivity in retrieving known ASD candidate genes relative to the top associated genes from either GWAS, as well as a higher gene overlap between the two ASD datasets. Analysis of the intersection between the networks obtained from the two ASD GWAS and six unrelated disease datasets identified fourteen genes exclusively present in the ASD networks. These are mostly novel genes involved in abnormal nervous system phenotypes in animal models, and in fundamental biological processes previously implicated in ASD, such as axon guidance, cell adhesion or cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our results highlighted novel susceptibility genes previously hidden within GWAS statistical "noise" that warrant further analysis for causal variants.

  18. Flow motifs reveal limitations of the static framework to represent human interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Luis E. C.; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-04-01

    Networks are commonly used to define underlying interaction structures where infections, information, or other quantities may spread. Although the standard approach has been to aggregate all links into a static structure, some studies have shown that the time order in which the links are established may alter the dynamics of spreading. In this paper, we study the impact of the time ordering in the limits of flow on various empirical temporal networks. By using a random walk dynamics, we estimate the flow on links and convert the original undirected network (temporal and static) into a directed flow network. We then introduce the concept of flow motifs and quantify the divergence in the representativity of motifs when using the temporal and static frameworks. We find that the regularity of contacts and persistence of vertices (common in email communication and face-to-face interactions) result on little differences in the limits of flow for both frameworks. On the other hand, in the case of communication within a dating site and of a sexual network, the flow between vertices changes significantly in the temporal framework such that the static approximation poorly represents the structure of contacts. We have also observed that cliques with 3 and 4 vertices containing only low-flow links are more represented than the same cliques with all high-flow links. The representativity of these low-flow cliques is higher in the temporal framework. Our results suggest that the flow between vertices connected in cliques depend on the topological context in which they are placed and in the time sequence in which the links are established. The structure of the clique alone does not completely characterize the potential of flow between the vertices.

  19. Protein interaction networks reveal novel autism risk genes within GWAS statistical noise.

    PubMed

    Correia, Catarina; Oliveira, Guiomar; Vicente, Astrid M

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) thus far met limited success in the identification of common risk variants, consistent with the notion that variants with small individual effects cannot be detected individually in single SNP analysis. To further capture disease risk gene information from ASD association studies, we applied a network-based strategy to the Autism Genome Project (AGP) and the Autism Genetics Resource Exchange GWAS datasets, combining family-based association data with Human Protein-Protein interaction (PPI) data. Our analysis showed that autism-associated proteins at higher than conventional levels of significance (P<0.1) directly interact more than random expectation and are involved in a limited number of interconnected biological processes, indicating that they are functionally related. The functionally coherent networks generated by this approach contain ASD-relevant disease biology, as demonstrated by an improved positive predictive value and sensitivity in retrieving known ASD candidate genes relative to the top associated genes from either GWAS, as well as a higher gene overlap between the two ASD datasets. Analysis of the intersection between the networks obtained from the two ASD GWAS and six unrelated disease datasets identified fourteen genes exclusively present in the ASD networks. These are mostly novel genes involved in abnormal nervous system phenotypes in animal models, and in fundamental biological processes previously implicated in ASD, such as axon guidance, cell adhesion or cytoskeleton organization. Overall, our results highlighted novel susceptibility genes previously hidden within GWAS statistical "noise" that warrant further analysis for causal variants. PMID:25409314

  20. Proteomics Analysis with a Nano Random Forest Approach Reveals Novel Functional Interactions Regulated by SMC Complexes on Mitotic Chromosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shinya; Montaño-Gutierrez, Luis F.; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Ogawa, Hiromi; Toramoto, Iyo; Sato, Nobuko; Morrison, Ciaran G.; Takeda, Shunichi; Hudson, Damien F.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Packaging of DNA into condensed chromosomes during mitosis is essential for the faithful segregation of the genome into daughter nuclei. Although the structure and composition of mitotic chromosomes have been studied for over 30 years, these aspects are yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to compare the proteomes of mitotic chromosomes isolated from cell lines harboring conditional knockouts of members of the condensin (SMC2, CAP-H, CAP-D3), cohesin (Scc1/Rad21), and SMC5/6 (SMC5) complexes. Our analysis revealed that these complexes associate with chromosomes independently of each other, with the SMC5/6 complex showing no significant dependence on any other chromosomal proteins during mitosis. To identify subtle relationships between chromosomal proteins, we employed a nano Random Forest (nanoRF) approach to detect protein complexes and the relationships between them. Our nanoRF results suggested that as few as 113 of 5058 detected chromosomal proteins are functionally linked to chromosome structure and segregation. Furthermore, nanoRF data revealed 23 proteins that were not previously suspected to have functional interactions with complexes playing important roles in mitosis. Subsequent small-interfering-RNA-based validation and localization tracking by green fluorescent protein-tagging highlighted novel candidates that might play significant roles in mitotic progression. PMID:27231315

  1. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  2. Computational studies on intermolecular interactions in solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Weiping

    This thesis presents the results of computational studies of intermolecular interactions in various contexts. We first investigated the relation between solute-solvent intermolecular interactions and local density augmentation in supercritical solvation. The phenomenon of interest is the excess density that exists in the neighborhood of an attractive solute in a supercritical solvent in the vicinity of the critical point. In Chapter 2, we examined the ability of various measures of the strength of solute-solvent interactions, calculated from all-atom potential functions, to correlate the extent of local density augmentation in both experimental and model solvents. The Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) method enables us to calculate phase equilibrium in pure substances and mixtures. It provides a convenient way to test and develop model potentials. In Chapter 3 we present some methodological aspects of such calculations, the issues related to approach to critical points and finite-size effects and applications to simple fluids. Chapter 4 then describes a simplified 2-site potential model for simulating supercritical fluoroform. The GEMC method was used to simulate the vapor-liquid coexistence curve of the model fluid and the dynamic properties were studied by performing NVT molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that despite its simplicity, this model is able to reproduce many important properties of supercritical fluoroform, making it useful in molecular simulations of supercritical solvation. In the above two studies, the intermolecular interactions are described by a sum of pair-wise additive Lennard-Jones + Coulomb terms. The standard Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules (geometric mean rule for well depth and arithmetic mean rule for collision diameter) are commonly applied to account for the unlike pair Lennard-Jones parameters. In Chapter 5, we examined the applicability of the combining rules for modeling alkane-perfluoroalkane interactions. It

  3. An Analysis of CAF-1-interacting Proteins Reveals Dynamic and Direct Interactions with the KU Complex and 14-3-3 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Maarten; Myers, Michael P.; Stillman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    CAF-1 is essential in human cells for the de novo deposition of histones H3 and H4 at the DNA replication fork. Depletion of CAF-1 from various cell lines causes replication fork arrest, activation of the intra-S phase checkpoint, and global defects in chromatin structure. CAF-1 is also involved in coordinating inheritance of states of gene expression and in chromatin assembly following DNA repair. In this study, we generated cell lines expressing RNAi-resistant versions of CAF-1 and showed that the N-terminal 296 amino acids are dispensable for essential CAF-1 function in vivo. N-terminally truncated CAF-1 p150 was deficient in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) binding, reinforcing the existence of two PCNA binding sites in human CAF-1, but the defect in PCNA binding had no effect on the recruitment of CAF-1 to chromatin after DNA damage or to resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Tandem affinity purification of CAF-1-interacting proteins under mild conditions revealed that CAF-1 was directly associated with the KU70/80 complex, part of the DNA-dependent protein kinase, and the phosphoserine/threonine-binding protein 14-3-3 ζ. CAF-1 was a substrate for DNA-dependent protein kinase, and the 14-3-3 interaction in vitro is dependent on DNA-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation. These results highlight that CAF-1 has prominent interactions with the DNA repair machinery but that the N terminus is dispensable for the role of CAF-1 in DNA replication- and repair-coupled chromatin assembly. PMID:21209461

  4. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  5. Interactions between first- and second-order motion revealed by optokinetic nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Harris, L R; Smith, A T

    2000-01-01

    A previous study has suggested that second-order motion is ineffective at driving optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) when presented alone. First- and second-order motion cues interact in creating the perception of motion. Is there an interaction between first- and second-order cues in the control of eye movements? We presented combinations of first- and second-order cues moving in the same or opposite directions and measured the eye movements evoked, to look for a modification of the oculomotor response to first-order motion by simultaneously presented second-order cues. Dynamic random noise was used as a carrier for first- and second-order drifting gratings (13.4 degrees/s; 0.25 cycles/degree; 64 x 48 degrees screen viewed at 28.5 cm). Second-order gratings were defined by spatial modulation of the luminance flicker frequency of noise pixels of constant contrast (50%). A first-order, luminance-defined grating (13.4 degrees/s; 0.25 cycles/degree; variable contrast from 4-50%) was moved in either the same or the opposite direction. Eye movements were recorded by video-oculography from six subjects as they looked straight ahead. The gain (eye velocity/stimulus velocity) of first-order-evoked OKN increased with contrast. The presence of flicker-defined second-order motion in the opposite direction attenuated this OKN below a first-order contrast of 15%, although it had little effect at higher contrasts. When first- and second-order motion were in the same direction, there was an enhancement of the OKN response. We conclude that second-order motion can modify the optokinetic response to simultaneously presented first-order motion. PMID:10638442

  6. A systematic, family-wide investigation reveals that ~30% of mammalian PDZ domains engage in PDZ-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bryan H.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; Karp, Ethan S.; BuKhalid, Raghida; Grantcharova, Viara P.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Summary PDZ domains are independently folded modules that typically mediate protein-protein interactions by binding to the C-termini of their target proteins. In a few instances, however, PDZ domains have been reported to dimerize with other PDZ domains. To investigate this noncanonical binding mode further, we used protein microarrays comprising virtually every mouse PDZ domain to systematically query all possible PDZ-PDZ pairs. We then used fluorescence polarization to retest and quantify novel interactions and co-affinity purification to test biophysically validated interactions in the context of their full-length proteins. Overall, we discovered 37 PDZ-PDZ interactions involving 46 PDZ domains (~30% of all PDZ domains tested), revealing that dimerization is a more frequently used binding mode than was previously appreciated. This suggests that many PDZ domains evolved to form multiprotein complexes by simultaneously interacting with more than one ligand. PMID:21944753

  7. Amygdala responses to Valence and its interaction by arousal revealed by MEG.

    PubMed

    Styliadis, Charalampos; Ioannides, Andreas A; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Papadelis, Christos

    2014-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a crucial role in the processing of emotions. The precise nature of its involvement is however unclear. We hypothesized that ambivalent findings from neuroimaging studies that report amygdala's activity in emotions, are due to distinct functional specificity of amygdala's sub-divisions and specifically to differential reactivity to arousal and valence. The goal of the present study is to characterize the amygdala response to affective stimuli by disentangling the contributions of arousal and valence. Our hypothesis was prompted by recent reports claiming anatomical sub-divisions of amygdala based on cytoarchitecture and the functional maps obtained from diverse behavioral, emotional, and physiological stimulation. We measured magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings from 12 healthy individuals passively exposed to affective stimuli from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) collection using a 2 (Valence levels)× 2 (Arousal levels) design. Source power was estimated using a beamformer technique with the activations referring to the amygdala sub-divisions defined through probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps. Right laterobasal amygdala activity was found to mediate negative valence (elicited by unpleasant stimuli) while left centromedial activity was characterized by an interaction of valence by arousal (arousing pleasant stimuli). We did not find a main effect for amygdala activations in any of its sub-divisions for arousal modulation. To the best of our knowledge, our findings from non-invasive MEG data indicate for the first time, a distinct functional specificity of amygdala anatomical sub-divisions in the emotional processing.

  8. Hadronic Weak Interaction Studies at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons have been a useful probe in many fields of science, as well as an important physical system for study in themselves. Modern neutron sources provide extraordinary opportunities to study a wide variety of physics topics. Among them is a detailed study of the weak interaction. An overview of studies of the hadronic weak (quark-quark) as well as semi-leptonic (quark-lepton) interactions at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is presented. These measurements, done in few-nucleon systems, are finally letting us gain knowledge of the hadronic weak interaction without the contributions from nuclear effects. Forthcoming results from the NPDGamma experiment will, due to the simplicity of the neutron, provide an unambiguous measurement of the long range pion-nucleon weak coupling (often referred to as hπ), which will finally test the theoretical predictions. Results from NPDGamma and future results from the n +3 He experiment will need to be complemented by additional measurements to completely describe the hadronic weak interaction.

  9. NACASETAC BAY: AN INTERACTIVE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interactive case study or "game" was created to provide a "hands on" experience in the application of a weight of evidence approach to sediment assessment. The game proceeds in two phases. In each phase the players work together as a group. A scenario is presented, and the g...

  10. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  11. A Numerical Study of Nonlinear Wave Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, A.; Tissier, M.; Ruessink, G.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear triad interactions redistribute energy among a wave field, which transforms the shape of the incident short waves (f = 0.05 - 2 Hz) and generates energy at infragravity frequencies (f = 0.005-0.05 Hz). Recently, it has been suggested that infragravity energy may dissipate by energy transfers from infragravity frequencies to either the (former) short-wave spectral peak, or through infragravity-infragravity self-interactions that cause the infragravity waves to steepen and to eventually break. To investigate these infragravity dissipation mechanisms, we use the non-hydrostatic SWASH model. In this study, we first validate the model with the high-resolution GLOBEX laboratory data set and then explore the dependence of the energy transfers, with a focus on infragravity frequencies, on beach slope. Consistent with previous studies we find that SWASH is able to reproduce the transformation and corresponding nonlinear energy transfers of shoreward propagating waves to great detail. Bispectral analysis is used to study the coupling between wave frequencies; nonlinear energy transfers are then quantified using the Boussinesq coupling coefficient. To obtain more detailed insight we divide the nonlinear interactions in four categories based on triads including 1) infragravity frequencies only, 2) two infragravity frequencies and one short-wave frequency, 3) one infragravity frequency and two short-wave frequencies and 4) short-wave frequencies only. Preliminary results suggest that interactions are rather weak on gently beach slopes (1:80) and, in the innermost part of the surf zone, are dominated by infragravity-infragravity interactions. On steeper slopes (1:20), interactions are stronger, but entirely dominated by those involving short-wave frequencies only. The dependence of the transfers on offshore wave conditions and beach shape will be explored too. Funded by NWO.

  12. A Study of Multiplicities in Hadronic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada Tristan, Nora Patricia; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2006-02-01

    Using data from the SELEX (Fermilab E781) experiment obtained with a minimum-bias trigger, we study multiplicity and angular distributions of secondary particles produced in interactions in the experimental targets. We observe interactions of {Sigma}{sup -}, proton, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +}, at beam momenta between 250 GeV/c and 650 GeV/c, in copper, polyethylene, graphite, and beryllium targets. We show that the multiplicity and angular distributions for meson and baryon beams at the same momentum are identical. We also show that the mean multiplicity increases with beam momentum, and presents only small variations with the target material.

  13. CD studies on ribonuclease A - oligonucleotides interactions.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Keren-Zur, M; Lapidot, Y

    1977-04-01

    The interaction of ApU, Aps4U, Aps4Up, ApAps4Up and Gps4U with RNase A was studied by CD difference spectroscopy. The use of 4-thiouridine (s4U) containing oligonucleotides enables to distinguish between the interaction of the different components of the ligand with the enzyme. The mode of binding of the oligonucleotides to the enzyme is described. From this mode of binding it is explained why Aps4U, for example, inhibits RNase A, while s4UpA serves as a substrate.

  14. [Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions].

    PubMed

    Nunes, Dulce Maria; Portella, Jean Cristtus; Bianchi e Silva, Laura

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this experience report is to present the Semiotic Studies Lab for Patient Care Interactions (Laboratório de Estudos Semióticos nas Interações de Cuidado - LESIC). The lab was set up at the Nursing School of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil in 2010. It has the purpose of providing didactic and pedagogical updates, based on the Theory developed by the Paris School of Semiotics, that enable the increase of knowledge and interactive/observational skills regarding the nature and mastery of human care.

  15. Systems interaction study of a Westinghouse PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, R.; Hanan, N.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Xue, D.; Bozoki, G.; Fresco, A.; Papazoglou, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents methods and findings of a systems interaction study of Indian Point 3. The study was carried out in support of the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-17 on Systems Interactions. Fault tree methods were employed. Among the study's findings is a single active failure in the low pressure injection function; this discovery led to a plant modification. In addition to providing support to the staff in resolving USI A-17, the project discovered an important new class of failure modes which led the utility to implement a hardware modification. The scope of the project is indicated, key features of the method are highlighted findings are discussed, and comments are offered on the usefulness of this type of, principal study. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Longitudinal analysis of Plantago: Age-by-environment interactions reveal aging

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Deborah A.; Ridley, Caroline E.; Dudycha, Jeffry L.

    2009-01-01

    We know very little about aging (senescence) in natural populations, and even less about plant aging. Demographic aging is identified by an increasing rate of mortality following reproductive maturity. In natural populations, quantifying aging is often confounded because changes in mortality may be influenced by both short- and long-term environmental fluctuations as well as age-dependent changes in performance. Plants can be easily marked and monitored longitudinally in natural populations yet the age-dependent dynamics of mortality are not known. This study was designed to determine whether a plant species, Plantago lanceolata, shows demographic aging in its natural environment. A large, multiple-cohort design was used to separate age-independent and age-dependent processes. Seven years of results show environmental influences on mortality as evidenced by synchronous changes in mortality across four cohorts over time. Age-dependent mortality was found through an age-by-environment interaction when the oldest cohorts had significantly higher mortality relative to the younger cohorts during times of stress. Neither size nor quantity of reproduction could explain this variation in mortality across cohorts. These results demonstrate demographic senescence in a natural population of plants. PMID:19569355

  17. Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V. V.; Chelli, R.; Zhuang, W.; Nuti, F.; Takaoka, Y.; Papini, A. M.; Mukamel, S.; Righini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The inter- and intramolecular interactions of the carbonyl moieties at the polar interface of a phospholipid membrane are probed by using nonlinear femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation spectra separate homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and show a distinct cross-peak pattern controlled by electrostatic interactions. The inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions determine the inhomogeneous character of the optical response. Using molecular dynamics simulation and the nonlinear exciton equations approach, we extract from the spectra short-range structural correlations between carbonyls at the interface. PMID:17881567

  18. Spatiotemporal Molecular Analysis of Cyanobacteria Blooms Reveals Microcystis-Aphanizomenon Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd R.; Beversdorf, Lucas; Chaston, Sheena D.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in cyanobacterial community composition (CCC) within and between eutrophic lakes is not well-described using culture independent molecular methods. We analyzed CCC across twelve locations in four eutrophic lakes and within-lake locations in the Yahara Watershed, WI, on a weekly basis, for 5 months. Taxa were discriminated by length of MspI-digested cpcB/A intergenic spacer gene sequences and identified by comparison to a PCR-based clone library. CCC across all stations was spatially segregated by depth of sampling locations (ANOSIM R = 0.23, p < 0.001). Accordingly, CCC was correlated with thermal stratification, nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, R = 0.2-0.3). Spatial variability in CCC and temporal trends in taxa abundances were rarely correlative between sampling locations in the same lake indicating significant within lake spatiotemporal heterogeneity. Across all stations, a total of 37 bloom events were observed based on distinct increases in phycocyanin. Out of 97 taxa, a single Microcystis, and two different Aphanizomenon taxa were the dominant cyanobacteria detected during bloom events. The Microcystis and Aphanizomenon taxa rarely bloomed together and were significantly anti-correlated with each other at 9 of 12 stations with Pearson R values of -0.6 to -0.9 (p < 0.001). Of all environmental variables measured, nutrients, especially nitrate were significantly greater during periods of Aphanizomenon dominance while the nitrate+nitrite:SRP ratio was lower. This study shows significant spatial variability in CCC within and between lakes structured by depth of the sampling location. Furthermore, our study reveals specific genotypes involved in bloom formation. More in-depth characterization of these genotypes should lead to a better understanding of factors promoting bloom events in these lakes and more reliable bloom prediction models. PMID:24086400

  19. Biomembrane interactions reveal the mechanism of action of surface-immobilized host defense IDR-1010 peptide.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangzheng; Cheng, John T J; Kindrachuk, Jason; Hancock, Robert E W; Straus, Suzana K; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-02-24

    Dissecting the mechanism of action of surface-tethered antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptides is critical to the design of optimized anti-infection coatings on biomedical devices. To address this, we compared the biomembrane interactions of host defense peptide IDR-1010cys (1) in free form, (2) as a soluble polymer conjugate, and (3) with one end tethered to a solid support with model bacterial and mammalian lipid membranes. Our results show that IDR-1010cys in all three distinct forms interacted with bacterial and mammalian lipid vesicles, but the extent of the interactions as monitored by the induction of secondary structure varied. The enhanced interaction of surface-tethered peptides is well correlated with their very good antimicrobial activities. Our results demonstrate that there may be a difference in the mechanism of action of surface-tethered versus free IDR-1010cys.

  20. Protein interaction patterns in different cellular environments are revealed by in-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    In-cell NMR allows obtaining atomic-level information on biological macromolecules in their physiological environment. Soluble proteins may interact with the cellular environment in different ways: either specifically, with their functional partners, or non-specifically, with other cellular components. Such behaviour often causes the disappearance of the NMR signals. Here we show that by introducing mutations on the human protein profilin 1, used here as a test case, the in-cell NMR signals can be recovered. In human cells both specific and non-specific interactions are present, while in bacterial cells only the effect of non-specific interactions is observed. By comparing the NMR signal recovery pattern in human and bacterial cells, the relative contribution of each type of interaction can be assessed. This strategy allows detecting solution in-cell NMR spectra of soluble proteins without altering their fold, thus extending the applicability of in-cell NMR to a wider range of proteins. PMID:26399546

  1. Network synchronization landscape reveals compensatory structures, quantization, and the positive effect of negative interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization, in which individual dynamical units keep in pace with each other in a decentralized fashion, depends both on the dynamical units and on the properties of the interaction network. Yet, the role played by the network has resisted comprehensive characterization within the prevailing paradigm that interactions facilitating pairwise synchronization also facilitate collective synchronization. Here we challenge this paradigm and show that networks with best complete synchronization, least coupling cost, and maximum dynamical robustness, have arbitrary complexity but quantized total interaction strength, which constrains the allowed number of connections. It stems from this characterization that negative interactions as well as link removals can be used to systematically improve and optimize synchronization properties in both directed and undirected networks. These results extend the recently discovered compensatory perturbations in metabolic networks to the realm of oscillator networks and demonstrate why “less can be more” in network synchronization. PMID:20489183

  2. Single molecule studies reveal new mechanisms for microtubule severing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Diaz-Valencia, Juan Daniel; Morelli, Margaret; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David

    2011-03-01

    Microtubule-severing enzymes are hexameric complexes made from monomeric enzyme subunits that remove tubulin dimers from the microtubule lattice. Severing proteins are known to remodel the cytoskeleton during interphase and mitosis, and are required in proper axon morphology and mammalian bone and cartilage development. We have performed the first single molecule imaging to determine where and how severing enzymes act to cut microtubules. We have focused on the original member of the group, katanin, and the newest member, fidgetin to compare their biophysical activities in vitro. We find that, as expected, severing proteins localize to areas of activity. Interestingly, the association is very brief: they do not stay bound nor do they bind cooperatively at active sites. The association duration changes with the nucleotide content, implying that the state in the catalytic cycle dictates binding affinity with the microtubule. We also discovered that, at lower concentrations, both katanin and fidgetin can depolymerize taxol-stabilized microtubules by removing terminal dimers. These studies reveal the physical regulation schemes to control severing activity in cells, and ultimately regulate cytoskeletal architecture. This work is supported by the March of Dimes Grant #5-FY09-46.

  3. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Interactions between Glycosaminoglycans and Langerin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Xinyue; Kao, Chelsea; Zhang, Emily; Li, Quanhong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-08-16

    Langerin, a C-type lectin, is expressed in Langerhans cells. It was reported that langerin binds sulfated glycans, which is an important initial step for its role in blocking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by capturing HIV pathogens and mediating their internalization into Birbeck granules for their elimination. It is fundamentally important to understand these interactions at the molecular level for the design of new highly specific therapeutic agents for HIV. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which allows for the real-time, direct, quantitative analysis of the label-free molecular interactions, has been used successfully for biophysical characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein interactions. In this study, we report kinetics, structural analysis, and the effects of physiological conditions (e.g., pH, salt concentration, and Ca(2+) and Zn(2+)concentrations) on the interactions between GAGs and langerin using SPR. SPR results revealed that langerin binds to heparin with high affinity (KD ∼ 2.4 nM) and the oligosaccharide length required for the interactions is larger than a tetrasaccharide. This heparin/heparan sulfate-binding protein also interacts with other GAGs, including dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates C-E and KS. In addition, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to characterize the structure of sulfated glycans that bound to langerin. PMID:27447199

  4. Genome-wide interaction analysis reveals replicated epistatic effects on brain structure

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Hua, Xue; Toga, Arthur W.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of several genes that affect risk for Alzheimer's disease ignited a worldwide search for Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), common genetic variants that affect the brain. Genome-wide search of all possible SNP-SNP interactions is challenging and rarely attempted, due to the complexity of conducting ∼1011 pairwise statistical tests. However, recent advances in machine learning, e.g., iterative sure independence screening (SIS), make it possible to analyze datasets with vastly more predictors than observations. Using an implementation of the SIS algorithm (called EPISIS), we performed a genome-wide interaction analysis testing all possible SNP-SNP interactions affecting regional brain volumes measured on MRI and mapped using tensor-based morphometry. We identified a significant SNP-SNP interaction between rs1345203 and rs1213205 that explains 1.9% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. We mapped the whole-brain, voxelwise effects of the interaction in the ADNI dataset and separately in an independent replication dataset of healthy twins (QTIM). Each additional loading in the interaction effect was associated with ∼5% greater brain regional brain volume (a protective effect) in both ADNI and QTIM samples. PMID:25264344

  5. Raman Spectroscopy Reveals Direct Chromophore Interactions in the Leu/Gln105 Spectral Tuning Switch of Proteorhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Joel M.; Spudich, Elena N.; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Proteorhodopsins are an extensive family of photoactive membrane proteins found in proteobacteria distributed throughout the world’s oceans which are often classified as green- or blue-absorbing (GPR and BPR, respectively) on the basis of their visible absorption maxima. GPR and BPR have significantly different properties including photocycle lifetimes and wavelength dependence on pH. Previous studies revealed that these different properties are correlated with a single residue, Leu105 in GPR and Gln105 in BPR, although the molecular basis for the different properties of GPR and BPR has not yet been elucidated. We have studied the unexcited states of GPR and BPR using resonance Raman spectroscopy which enhances almost exclusively chromophore vibrations. We find that both spectra are remarkably similar, indicating that the retinylidene structure of GPR and BPR are almost identical. However, the frequency of a band assigned to the retinal C13-methyl-rock vibration is shifted from 1006 cm−1 in GPR to 1012 cm−1 in BPR. A similar shift is observed in the GPR mutant L105Q indicating Leu and Gln residues interact differently with the retinal C13-methyl group. The environment of the Schiff base of GPR and BPR differ as indicated by differences in the H/D induced down-shift of the Schiff base vibration. Residues located in transmembrane helices (D–G) do not contribute to the observed differences in the protein–chromophore interaction between BPR and GPR based on the Raman spectra of chimeras. These results support a model whereby the substitution of the hydrophilic Gln105 in BPR with the smaller hydrophobic Leu105 in GPR directly alters the environment of both the retinal C13 group and the Schiff base. PMID:18717545

  6. Study of metallothionein-quantum dots interactions.

    PubMed

    Tmejova, Katerina; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Krizkova, Sona; Blazkova, Iva; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles have gained increasing interest in medical and in vivo applications. Metallothionein (MT) is well known as a maintainer of metal ions balance in intracellular space. This is due to high affinity of this protein to any reactive species including metals and reactive oxygen species. The purpose of this study was to determine the metallothionein-quantum dots interactions that were investigated by spectral and electrochemical techniques. CuS, CdS, PbS, and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were analysed. The highest intensity was shown for CdTe, than for CdS measured by fluorescence. These results were supported by statistical analysis and considered as significant. Further, these interactions were analysed using gel electrophoresis, where MT aggregates forming after interactions with QDs were detected. Using differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction, QDs and MT were studied. This method allowed us to confirm spectral results and, moreover, to observe the changes in MT structure causing new voltammetric peaks called X and Y, which enhanced with the prolonged time of interaction up to 6 h.

  7. A Trade-Off Study Revealing Nested Timescales of Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Wijnants, M. L.; Cox, R. F. A.; Hasselman, F.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Van Orden, G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates human performance in a cyclic Fitts task at three different scales of observation, either in the presence (difficult condition) or in the absence (easy condition) of a speed–accuracy trade-off. At the fastest scale, the harmonicity of the back and forth movements, which reflects the dissipation of mechanical energy, was measured within the timeframe of single trials. At an intermediate scale, speed and accuracy measures were determined over a trial. The slowest scale pertains to the temporal structure of movement variability, which evolves over multiple trials. In the difficult condition, reliable correlations across each of the measures corroborated a coupling of nested scales of performance. Participants who predominantly emphasized the speed-side of the trade-off (despite the instruction to be both fast and accurate) produced more harmonic movements and clearer 1/f scaling in the produced movement time series, but were less accurate and produced more random variability in the produced movement amplitudes (vice versa for more accurate participants). This implied that speed–accuracy trade-off was accompanied by a trade-off between temporal and spatial streams of 1/f scaling, as confirmed by entropy measures. In the easy condition, however, no trade-offs nor couplings among scales of performance were observed. Together, these results suggest that 1/f scaling is more than just a byproduct of cognition. These findings rather support the claim that interaction-dominant dynamics constitute a coordinative basis for goal-directed behavior. PMID:22654760

  8. Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Giangrande, Scott E.; Jensen, Michael P.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Minghua

    2014-10-27

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during themore » morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. As a result, sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.« less

  9. Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Giangrande, Scott E.; Jensen, Michael P.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Minghua

    2014-10-27

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during the morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. As a result, sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.

  10. A Sialylated Glycan Microarray Reveals Novel Interactions of Modified Sialic Acids with Proteins and Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Lasanajak, Yi; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Tiwari, Vinod K.; Cao, Hongzhi; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Zheng, Haojie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked galactose at the non-reducing end and with an alkylamine-containing fluorophore at the reducing end were sialylated by a one-pot three-enzyme system to generate α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyl glycans with 16 modified sialic acids. The resulting 77 sialyl glycans were purified and quantified, characterized by mass spectrometry, covalently printed on activated slides, and interrogated with a number of key sialic acid-binding proteins and viruses. Sialic acid recognition by the sialic acid-binding lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin-I, which are routinely used for detecting α2–6- and α2–3-linked sialic acids, are affected by sialic acid modifications, and both lectins bind glycans terminating with 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (Kdn) and Kdn derivatives stronger than the derivatives of more common N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Three human parainfluenza viruses bind to glycans terminating with Neu5Ac or Neu5Gc and some of their derivatives but not to Kdn and its derivatives. Influenza A virus also does not bind glycans terminating in Kdn or Kdn derivatives. An especially novel aspect of human influenza A virus binding is its ability to equivalently recognize glycans terminated with either α2–6-linked Neu5Ac9Lt or α2–6-linked Neu5Ac. Our results demonstrate the utility of this sialylated glycan microarray to investigate the biological importance of modified sialic acids in protein-glycan interactions. PMID:21757734

  11. Interaction of Rio1 Kinase with Toyocamycin Reveals a Conformational Switch That Controls Oligomeric State and Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kiburu, Irene N.; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Rio1 kinase is an essential ribosome-processing factor required for proper maturation of 40 S ribosomal subunit. Although its structure is known, several questions regarding its functional remain to be addressed. We report that both Archaeoglobus fulgidus and human Rio1 bind more tightly to an adenosine analog, toyocamycin, than to ATP. Toyocamycin has antibiotic, antiviral and cytotoxic properties, and is known to inhibit ribosome biogenesis, specifically the maturation of 40 S. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of toyocamycin bound to Rio1 at 2.0 Å and demonstrated that toyocamycin binds in the ATP binding pocket of the protein. Despite this, measured steady state kinetics were inconsistent with strict competitive inhibition by toyocamycin. In analyzing this interaction, we discovered that Rio1 is capable of accessing multiple distinct oligomeric states and that toyocamycin may inhibit Rio1 by stabilizing a less catalytically active oligomer. We also present evidence of substrate inhibition by high concentrations of ATP for both archaeal and human Rio1. Oligomeric state studies show both proteins access a higher order oligomeric state in the presence of ATP. The study revealed that autophosphorylation by Rio1 reduces oligomer formation and promotes monomerization, resulting in the most active species. Taken together, these results suggest the activity of Rio1 may be modulated by regulating its oligomerization properties in a conserved mechanism, identifies the first ribosome processing target of toyocamycin and presents the first small molecule inhibitor of Rio1 kinase activity. PMID:22629386

  12. Synchrotron X-ray microscopy reveals early calcium and iron interaction with crocidolite fibers in the lung of exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Kourousias, George; Trevisan, Elisa; Pascotto, Ernesto; Casarsa, Claudia; Ryan, Chris; Lucattelli, Monica; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cavarra, Eleonora; Bartalesi, Barbara; Zweyer, Marina; Cammisuli, Francesca; Melato, Mauro; Borelli, Violetta

    2016-01-22

    Human exposure to asbestos can cause a wide variety of lung diseases that are still a current major health concern, even if asbestos has been banned in many countries. It has been shown in many studies that asbestos fibers, ingested by alveolar macrophages, disrupt lung iron homeostasis by sequestering iron. Calcium can also be deposited on the fibers. The pathways along which iron and above all calcium interact with fibers are still unknown. Our aim was that of investigating if the iron accumulation induced by the inhaled asbestos fibers also involves calcium ions accumulation. Lung sections of asbestos-exposed mice were analyzed using an extremely sensitive procedure available at the synchrotron facilities, that provides morphological and chemical information based on X-ray fluorescence microspectroscopy (μ-XRF). In this study we show that (1) where conventional histochemical procedures revealed only weak deposits of iron and calcium, μ-XRF analysis is able to detect significant deposits of both iron and calcium on the inhaled asbestos fibers; (2) the extent of the deposition of these ions is proportionally directly related and (3) iron and calcium deposition on inhaled asbestos fibers is concomitant with the appearance of inflammatory and hyperplastic reactions. PMID:26602167

  13. Synchrotron X-ray microscopy reveals early calcium and iron interaction with crocidolite fibers in the lung of exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Kourousias, George; Trevisan, Elisa; Pascotto, Ernesto; Casarsa, Claudia; Ryan, Chris; Lucattelli, Monica; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cavarra, Eleonora; Bartalesi, Barbara; Zweyer, Marina; Cammisuli, Francesca; Melato, Mauro; Borelli, Violetta

    2016-01-22

    Human exposure to asbestos can cause a wide variety of lung diseases that are still a current major health concern, even if asbestos has been banned in many countries. It has been shown in many studies that asbestos fibers, ingested by alveolar macrophages, disrupt lung iron homeostasis by sequestering iron. Calcium can also be deposited on the fibers. The pathways along which iron and above all calcium interact with fibers are still unknown. Our aim was that of investigating if the iron accumulation induced by the inhaled asbestos fibers also involves calcium ions accumulation. Lung sections of asbestos-exposed mice were analyzed using an extremely sensitive procedure available at the synchrotron facilities, that provides morphological and chemical information based on X-ray fluorescence microspectroscopy (μ-XRF). In this study we show that (1) where conventional histochemical procedures revealed only weak deposits of iron and calcium, μ-XRF analysis is able to detect significant deposits of both iron and calcium on the inhaled asbestos fibers; (2) the extent of the deposition of these ions is proportionally directly related and (3) iron and calcium deposition on inhaled asbestos fibers is concomitant with the appearance of inflammatory and hyperplastic reactions.

  14. Interaction of Rio1 Kinase with Toyocamycin Reveals a Conformational Switch That Controls Oligomeric State and Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiburu, Irene N.; LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole

    2012-10-10

    Rio1 kinase is an essential ribosome-processing factor required for proper maturation of 40 S ribosomal subunit. Although its structure is known, several questions regarding its functional remain to be addressed. We report that both Archaeoglobus fulgidus and human Rio1 bind more tightly to an adenosine analog, toyocamycin, than to ATP. Toyocamycin has antibiotic, antiviral and cytotoxic properties, and is known to inhibit ribosome biogenesis, specifically the maturation of 40 S. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of toyocamycin bound to Rio1 at 2.0 {angstrom} and demonstrated that toyocamycin binds in the ATP binding pocket of the protein. Despite this, measured steady state kinetics were inconsistent with strict competitive inhibition by toyocamycin. In analyzing this interaction, we discovered that Rio1 is capable of accessing multiple distinct oligomeric states and that toyocamycin may inhibit Rio1 by stabilizing a less catalytically active oligomer. We also present evidence of substrate inhibition by high concentrations of ATP for both archaeal and human Rio1. Oligomeric state studies show both proteins access a higher order oligomeric state in the presence of ATP. The study revealed that autophosphorylation by Rio1 reduces oligomer formation and promotes monomerization, resulting in the most active species. Taken together, these results suggest the activity of Rio1 may be modulated by regulating its oligomerization properties in a conserved mechanism, identifies the first ribosome processing target of toyocamycin and presents the first small molecule inhibitor of Rio1 kinase activity.

  15. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of `Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  16. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems. PMID:27044991

  17. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among Microbial Interactions Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-05-17

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes is a central issue in ecology, and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity researches focus on species richness and abundance but ignore the interactions among different microbial species/populations. However, determining the interactions and their relationships to environmental changes in microbial communities is a grand challenge, primarily due to the lack of information on the network structure among different microbial species/populations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene networks (fEGNs) is developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data from the grassland microbial communities in a long-term FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) experiment. Both fEGNs under elevated CO2 (eCO2) and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed general characteristics of many complex systems such as scale-free, small-world, modular and hierarchical. However, the topological structure of the fEGNs is distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the interactions among different microbial functional groups/populations. In addition, the changes in network structure were significantly correlated with soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant productivity, indicating the potential importance of network interactions in ecosystem functioning. Elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes are fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change.

  18. Chaperones as thermodynamic sensors of drug-target interactions reveal kinase inhibitor specificities in living cells.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Krykbaeva, Irina; Whitesell, Luke; Santagata, Sandro; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael S; Lindquist, Susan

    2013-07-01

    The interaction between the HSP90 chaperone and its client kinases is sensitive to the conformational status of the kinase, and stabilization of the kinase fold by small molecules strongly decreases chaperone interaction. Here we exploit this observation and assay small-molecule binding to kinases in living cells, using chaperones as 'thermodynamic sensors'. The method allows determination of target specificities of both ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors in the kinases' native cellular context in high throughput. We profile target specificities of 30 diverse kinase inhibitors against >300 kinases. Demonstrating the value of the assay, we identify ETV6-NTRK3 as a target of the FDA-approved drug crizotinib (Xalkori). Crizotinib inhibits proliferation of ETV6-NTRK3-dependent tumor cells with nanomolar potency and induces the regression of established tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we show that our approach is applicable to other chaperone and target classes by assaying HSP70/steroid hormone receptor and CDC37/kinase interactions, suggesting that chaperone interactions will have broad application in detecting drug-target interactions in vivo.

  19. Delay-correlation landscape reveals characteristic time delays of brain rhythms and heart interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aijing; Liu, Kang K L; Bartsch, Ronny P; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2016-05-13

    Within the framework of 'Network Physiology', we ask a fundamental question of how modulations in cardiac dynamics emerge from networked brain-heart interactions. We propose a generalized time-delay approach to identify and quantify dynamical interactions between physiologically relevant brain rhythms and the heart rate. We perform empirical analysis of synchronized continuous EEG and ECG recordings from 34 healthy subjects during night-time sleep. For each pair of brain rhythm and heart interaction, we construct a delay-correlation landscape (DCL) that characterizes how individual brain rhythms are coupled to the heart rate, and how modulations in brain and cardiac dynamics are coordinated in time. We uncover characteristic time delays and an ensemble of specific profiles for the probability distribution of time delays that underly brain-heart interactions. These profiles are consistently observed in all subjects, indicating a universal pattern. Tracking the evolution of DCL across different sleep stages, we find that the ensemble of time-delay profiles changes from one physiologic state to another, indicating a strong association with physiologic state and function. The reported observations provide new insights on neurophysiological regulation of cardiac dynamics, with potential for broad clinical applications. The presented approach allows one to simultaneously capture key elements of dynamic interactions, including characteristic time delays and their time evolution, and can be applied to a range of coupled dynamical systems.

  20. Supramolecular Interactions in Secondary Plant Cell Walls: Effect of Lignin Chemical Composition Revealed with the Molecular Theory of Solvation.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Skaf, Munir S; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    Plant biomass recalcitrance, a major obstacle to achieving sustainable production of second generation biofuels, arises mainly from the amorphous cell-wall matrix containing lignin and hemicellulose assembled into a complex supramolecular network that coats the cellulose fibrils. We employed the statistical-mechanical, 3D reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation (or 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation) to reveal the supramolecular interactions in this network and provide molecular-level insight into the effective lignin-lignin and lignin-hemicellulose thermodynamic interactions. We found that such interactions are hydrophobic and entropy-driven, and arise from the expelling of water from the mutual interaction surfaces. The molecular origin of these interactions is carbohydrate-π and π-π stacking forces, whose strengths are dependent on the lignin chemical composition. Methoxy substituents in the phenyl groups of lignin promote substantial entropic stabilization of the ligno-hemicellulosic matrix. Our results provide a detailed molecular view of the fundamental interactions within the secondary plant cell walls that lead to recalcitrance.

  1. Supramolecular Interactions in Secondary Plant Cell Walls: Effect of Lignin Chemical Composition Revealed with the Molecular Theory of Solvation.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Skaf, Munir S; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    Plant biomass recalcitrance, a major obstacle to achieving sustainable production of second generation biofuels, arises mainly from the amorphous cell-wall matrix containing lignin and hemicellulose assembled into a complex supramolecular network that coats the cellulose fibrils. We employed the statistical-mechanical, 3D reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation (or 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation) to reveal the supramolecular interactions in this network and provide molecular-level insight into the effective lignin-lignin and lignin-hemicellulose thermodynamic interactions. We found that such interactions are hydrophobic and entropy-driven, and arise from the expelling of water from the mutual interaction surfaces. The molecular origin of these interactions is carbohydrate-π and π-π stacking forces, whose strengths are dependent on the lignin chemical composition. Methoxy substituents in the phenyl groups of lignin promote substantial entropic stabilization of the ligno-hemicellulosic matrix. Our results provide a detailed molecular view of the fundamental interactions within the secondary plant cell walls that lead to recalcitrance. PMID:26263115

  2. LHC INTERACTION REGION QUADRUPOLE ERROR IMPACT STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IR) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper the authors study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture. The authors investigate different magnet arrangements and error strength. Based on the results they propose and evaluate a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance in a companion paper.

  3. Ghost-in-the-Machine reveals human social signals for human–robot interaction

    PubMed Central

    Loth, Sebastian; Jettka, Katharina; Giuliani, Manuel; de Ruiter, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    We used a new method called “Ghost-in-the-Machine” (GiM) to investigate social interactions with a robotic bartender taking orders for drinks and serving them. Using the GiM paradigm allowed us to identify how human participants recognize the intentions of customers on the basis of the output of the robotic recognizers. Specifically, we measured which recognizer modalities (e.g., speech, the distance to the bar) were relevant at different stages of the interaction. This provided insights into human social behavior necessary for the development of socially competent robots. When initiating the drink-order interaction, the most important recognizers were those based on computer vision. When drink orders were being placed, however, the most important information source was the speech recognition. Interestingly, the participants used only a subset of the available information, focussing only on a few relevant recognizers while ignoring others. This reduced the risk of acting on erroneous sensor data and enabled them to complete service interactions more swiftly than a robot using all available sensor data. We also investigated socially appropriate response strategies. In their responses, the participants preferred to use the same modality as the customer’s requests, e.g., they tended to respond verbally to verbal requests. Also, they added redundancy to their responses, for instance by using echo questions. We argue that incorporating the social strategies discovered with the GiM paradigm in multimodal grammars of human–robot interactions improves the robustness and the ease-of-use of these interactions, and therefore provides a smoother user experience. PMID:26582998

  4. Ghost-in-the-Machine reveals human social signals for human-robot interaction.

    PubMed

    Loth, Sebastian; Jettka, Katharina; Giuliani, Manuel; de Ruiter, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    We used a new method called "Ghost-in-the-Machine" (GiM) to investigate social interactions with a robotic bartender taking orders for drinks and serving them. Using the GiM paradigm allowed us to identify how human participants recognize the intentions of customers on the basis of the output of the robotic recognizers. Specifically, we measured which recognizer modalities (e.g., speech, the distance to the bar) were relevant at different stages of the interaction. This provided insights into human social behavior necessary for the development of socially competent robots. When initiating the drink-order interaction, the most important recognizers were those based on computer vision. When drink orders were being placed, however, the most important information source was the speech recognition. Interestingly, the participants used only a subset of the available information, focussing only on a few relevant recognizers while ignoring others. This reduced the risk of acting on erroneous sensor data and enabled them to complete service interactions more swiftly than a robot using all available sensor data. We also investigated socially appropriate response strategies. In their responses, the participants preferred to use the same modality as the customer's requests, e.g., they tended to respond verbally to verbal requests. Also, they added redundancy to their responses, for instance by using echo questions. We argue that incorporating the social strategies discovered with the GiM paradigm in multimodal grammars of human-robot interactions improves the robustness and the ease-of-use of these interactions, and therefore provides a smoother user experience.

  5. Detailed monitoring of a small but recovering population reveals sublethal effects of disease and unexpected interactions with supplemental feeding.

    PubMed

    Tollington, Simon; Greenwood, Andrew; Jones, Carl G; Hoeck, Paquita; Chowrimootoo, Aurélie; Smith, Donal; Richards, Heather; Tatayah, Vikash; Groombridge, Jim J

    2015-07-01

    Infectious diseases are widely recognized to have substantial impact on wildlife populations. These impacts are sometimes exacerbated in small endangered populations, and therefore, the success of conservation reintroductions to aid the recovery of such species can be seriously threatened by outbreaks of infectious disease. Intensive management strategies associated with conservation reintroductions can further compound these negative effects in such populations. Exploring the sublethal effects of disease outbreaks among natural populations is challenging and requires longitudinal, individual life-history data on patterns of reproductive success and other indicators of individual fitness. Long-term monitoring data concerning detailed reproductive information of the reintroduced Mauritius parakeet (Psittacula echo) population collected before, during and after a disease outbreak was investigated. Deleterious effects of an outbreak of beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) were revealed on hatch success, but these effects were remarkably short-lived and disproportionately associated with breeding pairs which took supplemental food. Individual BFDV infection status was not predicted by any genetic, environmental or conservation management factors and was not associated with any of our measures of immune function, perhaps suggesting immunological impairment. Experimental immunostimulation using the PHA (phytohaemagglutinin assay) challenge technique did, however, provoke a significant cellular immune response. We illustrate the resilience of this bottlenecked and once critically endangered, island-endemic species to an epidemic outbreak of BFDV and highlight the value of systematic monitoring in revealing inconspicuous but nonetheless substantial ecological interactions. Our study demonstrates that the emergence of such an infectious disease in a population ordinarily associated with increased susceptibility does not necessarily lead to deleterious impacts on population

  6. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Szumilak, Marta; Merecz, Anna; Strek, Malgorzata; Stanczak, Andrzej; Inglot, Tadeusz W.; Karwowski, Boleslaw T.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr) displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II) activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores. PMID:27657041

  7. A Bird’s Eye View of Discard Reforms: Bird-Borne Cameras Reveal Seabird/Fishery Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Votier, Stephen C.; Bicknell, Anthony; Cox, Samantha L.; Scales, Kylie L.; Patrick, Samantha C.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial capture fisheries produce huge quantities of offal, as well as undersized and unwanted catch in the form of discards. Declines in global catches and legislation to ban discarding will significantly reduce discards, but this subsidy supports a large scavenger community. Understanding the potential impact of declining discards for scavengers should feature in an eco-system based approach to fisheries management, but requires greater knowledge of scavenger/fishery interactions. Here we use bird-borne cameras, in tandem with GPS loggers, to provide a unique view of seabird/fishery interactions. 20,643 digital images (one min−1) from ten bird-borne cameras deployed on central place northern gannets Morus bassanus revealed that all birds photographed fishing vessels. These were large (>15 m) boats, with no small-scale vessels. Virtually all vessels were trawlers, and gannets were almost always accompanied by other scavenging birds. All individuals exhibited an Area-Restricted Search (ARS) during foraging, but only 42% of ARS were associated with fishing vessels, indicating much ‘natural’ foraging. The proportion of ARS behaviours associated with fishing boats were higher for males (81%) than females (30%), although the reasons for this are currently unclear. Our study illustrates that fisheries form a very important component of the prey-landscape for foraging gannets and that a discard ban, such as that proposed under reforms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy, may have a significant impact on gannet behaviour, particularly males. However, a continued reliance on ‘natural’ foraging suggests the ability to switch away from scavenging, but only if there is sufficient food to meet their needs in the absence of a discard subsidy. PMID:23483906

  8. Experimentally reduced root–microbe interactions reveal limited plasticity in functional root traits in Acer and Quercus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Ho; Comas, Louise H.; Callahan, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Interactions between roots and soil microbes are critical components of below-ground ecology. It is essential to quantify the magnitude of root trait variation both among and within species, including variation due to plasticity. In addition to contextualizing the magnitude of plasticity relative to differences between species, studies of plasticity can ascertain if plasticity is predictable and whether an environmental factor elicits changes in traits that are functionally advantageous. Methods To compare functional traits and trait plasticities in fine root tissues with natural and reduced levels of colonization by microbial symbionts, trimmed and surface-sterilized root segments of 2-year-old Acer rubrum and Quercus rubra seedlings were manipulated. Segments were then replanted into satellite pots filled with control or heat-treated soil, both originally derived from a natural forest. Mycorrhizal colonization was near zero in roots grown in heat-treated soil; roots grown in control soil matched the higher colonization levels observed in unmanipulated root samples collected from field locations. Key Results Between-treatment comparisons revealed negligible plasticity for root diameter, branching intensity and nitrogen concentration across both species. Roots from treated soils had decreased tissue density (approx. 10–20 %) and increased specific root length (approx. 10–30 %). In contrast, species differences were significant and greater than treatment effects in traits other than tissue density. Interspecific trait differences were also significant in field samples, which generally resembled greenhouse samples. Conclusions The combination of experimental and field approaches was useful for contextualizing trait plasticity in comparison with inter- and intra-specific trait variation. Findings that root traits are largely species dependent, with the exception of root tissue density, are discussed in the context of current literature on root

  9. Synthetic Cytotoxicity: Digenic Interactions with TEL1/ATM Mutations Reveal Sensitivity to Low Doses of Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuesong; O’Neil, Nigel J.; Moshgabadi, Noushin; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Many tumors contain mutations that confer defects in the DNA-damage response and genome stability. DNA-damaging agents are powerful therapeutic tools that can differentially kill cells with an impaired DNA-damage response. The response to DNA damage is complex and composed of a network of coordinated pathways, often with a degree of redundancy. Tumor-specific somatic mutations in DNA-damage response genes could be exploited by inhibiting the function of a second gene product to increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to a sublethal concentration of a DNA-damaging therapeutic agent, resulting in a class of conditional synthetic lethality we call synthetic cytotoxicity. We used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nonessential gene-deletion collection to screen for synthetic cytotoxic interactions with camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, and a null mutation in TEL1, the S. cerevisiae ortholog of the mammalian tumor-suppressor gene, ATM. We found and validated 14 synthetic cytotoxic interactions that define at least five epistasis groups. One class of synthetic cytotoxic interaction was due to telomere defects. We also found that at least one synthetic cytotoxic interaction was conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have demonstrated that synthetic cytotoxicity could be a useful strategy for expanding the sensitivity of certain tumors to DNA-damaging therapeutics. PMID:24653001

  10. Metabolomics of reef benthic interactions reveals a bioactive lipid involved in coral defence

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark J. A.; Hartmann, Aaron C.; Galtier d'Auriac, Ines; Benler, Sean; Haas, Andreas; Quistad, Steven D.; Lim, Yan Wei; Little, Mark; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Holobionts are assemblages of microbial symbionts and their macrobial host. As extant representatives of some of the oldest macro-organisms, corals and algae are important for understanding how holobionts develop and interact with one another. Using untargeted metabolomics, we show that non-self interactions altered the coral metabolome more than self-interactions (i.e. different or same genus, respectively). Platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF, central inflammatory modulators in mammals, were major lipid components of the coral holobionts. When corals were damaged during competitive interactions with algae, PAF increased along with expression of the gene encoding Lyso-PAF acetyltransferase; the protein responsible for converting Lyso-PAF to PAF. This shows that self and non-self recognition among some of the oldest extant holobionts involve bioactive lipids identical to those in highly derived taxa like humans. This further strengthens the hypothesis that major players of the immune response evolved during the pre-Cambrian. PMID:27122568

  11. New Studies of Acousto-Optic Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph

    1988-06-01

    Acousto-optics is the field of science pertaining to the study of interactions between light and acoustic vibrations in solids, liquids, or gases. In recent years this field has evolved to much more than just the point where acoustics and optics meet. It has become a crossroad for many disciplines and technologies. This diversity in itself makes it a difficult and interesting area of research. In this work some fundamental concepts of acousto -optic interactions are re-examined. New understanding was gained of the process of diffraction of light by a propagating sound column under the condition of changing interaction orientation and changing sound frequency. This new understanding has shown existing treatments of these problems to be incomplete. It is further shown that one such commonly used model yields wrong predictions which stand in violation of the principle of time reversal. A device whose principle of operation is based on the knowledge gained in this study was implemented in a ring laser to induce unidirectional operation. In addition, acousto -optic light deflectors were investigated and new insight to their theory of operation was obtained. New operating configurations for these devices were tested, and future uses and applications are suggested.

  12. Francium Spectroscopy for Weak Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Francium, a radioactive element, is the heaviest alkali. Its atomic and nuclear structure makes it an ideal laboratory to study the weak interaction. Laser trapping and cooling in-line with the superconducting LINAC accelerator at Stony Brook opened the precision study of its atomic structure. I will present our proposal and progress towards weak interaction measurements at TRIUMF, the National Canadian Accelerator in Vancouver. These include the commissioning run of the Francium Trapping Facility, hyperfine anomaly measurements on a chain of Fr isotopes, the nuclear anapole moment through parity non-conserving transitions in the ground state hyperfine manifold. These measurements should shed light on the nucleon-nucleon weak interaction. This work is done by the FrPNC collaboration: S. Aubin College of William and Mary, J. A. Behr TRIUMF, R. Collister U. Manitoba, E. Gomez UASLP, G. Gwinner U. Manitoba, M. R. Pearson TRIUMF, L. A. Orozco UMD, M. Tandecki TRIUMF, J. Zhang UMD Supported by NSF and DOE from the USA; TRIUMF, NRC and NSERC from Canada; and CONACYT from Mexico

  13. Use of Spectroscopic Techniques to Reveal the Nature of the Interactions of Two Sialic Acid Specific Lectins with Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singha, Shuvendu; Dutta, Gopa; Bose, Partha P; Das, Subrata; Bardhan, Munmun; Chatterjee, Bishnu P; Ganguly, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    From UV-vis absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements coupled with circular dichroism (CD) spectral studies, it was revealed that among the two lectins: Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Saraca indica (saracin II), SNA forms stronger binding complex in the ground state with gold nanoparticles (GNPs). From the measurements of Stern-Volmer (SV) constants Ksv, and binding constants K(A) and number of binding sites two important inferences could be drawn. Firstly, the fluorescence quenching is primarily due to static quenching and secondly SNA forms stronger binding with GNPs relative to the other lectin saracin II. Synchronous fluorescence spectral measurements further substantiate this proposition of exhibiting the fully exposed tryptophan residue in case of SNA. It appears that the lectin SNA adopted a relatively looser conformation with the extended polypeptide structures leading to the exposure of the hydrophobic cavities which favoured stronger binding with GNPs. CD measurements demonstrate that gold nanoparticles when interact with the lectins (glycoproteins), no significant distortion in the structural pattern of the later occurs. The unaltered identity in the secondary structural pattern of both SNA and saracin II in presence of gold nanoparticles hints that GNPs may be used as useful drug or drug delivery systems. PMID:27398481

  14. Interaction study between remoxipride and biperiden.

    PubMed

    Yisak, W; Farde, L; von Bahr, C; Nilsson, L B; Fredriksson, G; Ogenstad, S

    1993-01-01

    Twelve healthy male volunteers took part in a double-blind randomised cross-over study composed of three treatment sessions: remoxipride 100 mg; remoxipride 100 mg plus biperiden 4 mg; and biperiden 4 mg. Plasma and urine concentrations of remoxipride and biperiden, plasma prolactin levels, salivary flow and adverse events were recorded to assess pharmacodynamic interactions. Remoxipride and biperiden had no effect on each other's plasma concentrations. Biperiden did not affect the urinary recovery or renal clearance of remoxipride. Prolactin levels were unaffected by biperiden but increased following remoxipride administration. Differences in prolactin Cmax and tmax following remoxipride versus concomitant (remoxipride + biperiden) treatment were not statistically significant. However, a slight but statistically significant (P = 0.04) increase in prolactin AUC was observed after concomitant treatment. No significant differences could be observed between the recorded salivary flow in all the treatment sessions. Single doses of remoxipride and biperiden showed no pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interaction.

  15. The Dynamic Nature of Goals and Message Production as Revealed in a Sequential Analysis of Conflict Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keck, K. Laura; Samp, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    Although message-production theories often assume that goals behave dynamically to direct communication behavior, few studies consider the interconnectedness of goals and behavior throughout interactions. Here, the interrelationship of communication goals and tactics was examined through a sequential analysis of 47 conflict interactions between…

  16. Alluvial Fans on Titan Reveal Atmosphere and Surface Interactions and Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; Ventra, D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Farr, T. G.; Kirk, R. L.; Hayes, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Birch, S.; Liu, Z. Y. C.; Lunine, J. I.; Barnes, J. W.; Le Gall, A. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Paillou, P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial fans, important depositional systems that record how sediment is stored and moved on planetary surfaces, are found on the surface of Titan, a body of significantly different materials and process rates than Earth. As seen by Cassini's Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images at 350 m resolution, fans on Titan are found globally and are variable in size, shape and relationship to adjacent landforms. Their morphologies and SAR characteristics, which reveal roughness, textural patterns and other material properties, show similarities with fans in Death Valley seen by SAR and indicate there are regions of high relative relief locally, in the Ganesa, Xanadu and equatorial mountain belt regions. The Leilah Fluctus fans near Ganesa are ~30 km x 15 km, similar to the largest Death Valley fans, and revealing mountainous topography adjacent to plains. Others have gentle slopes over hundreds of kilometers, as in the high southern latitude lakes regions or the Mezzoramia southern midlatitudes, where a fan system is 200 km x 150 km, similar to the Qarn Alam fan emerging into the Rub al Khali in Oman. Additionally, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes, from relatively coarse (~2 cm or more) to fine, revealing long-term duration and variability in erosion by methane rainfall and transport. Some features have morphologies consistent with proximality to high-relief source areas and highly ephemeral runoff, while others appear to draw larger catchment areas and are perhaps characterized by more prolonged episodes of flow. The presence of many fans indicates the longevity of rainfall and erosion in Titan's surface processes and reveals that sediment transport and the precipitation that drives it are strongly episodic. Alluvial fans join rivers, lakes, eroded mountains, sand dunes and dissolution features in the list of surface morphologies derived from atmospheric and fluvial processes similar to those on Earth, strengthening comparisons between the two planetary

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F. Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O.; Crowley, Susan P.; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D.; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Diverse Repertoire of Genes Involved in Prokaryote-Eukaryote Interactions within the Pseudovibrio Genus.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefano; Fernàndez-Guerra, Antonio; Reen, F Jerry; Glöckner, Frank O; Crowley, Susan P; O'Sullivan, Orla; Cotter, Paul D; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the Pseudovibrio genus have been detected worldwide, mainly as part of bacterial communities associated with marine invertebrates, particularly sponges. This recurrent association has been considered as an indication of a symbiotic relationship between these microbes and their host. Until recently, the availability of only two genomes, belonging to closely related strains, has limited the knowledge on the genomic and physiological features of the genus to a single phylogenetic lineage. Here we present 10 newly sequenced genomes of Pseudovibrio strains isolated from marine sponges from the west coast of Ireland, and including the other two publicly available genomes we performed an extensive comparative genomic analysis. Homogeneity was apparent in terms of both the orthologous genes and the metabolic features shared amongst the 12 strains. At the genomic level, a key physiological difference observed amongst the isolates was the presence only in strain P. axinellae AD2 of genes encoding proteins involved in assimilatory nitrate reduction, which was then proved experimentally. We then focused on studying those systems known to be involved in the interactions with eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This analysis revealed that the genus harbors a large diversity of toxin-like proteins, secretion systems and their potential effectors. Their distribution in the genus was not always consistent with the phylogenetic relationship of the strains. Finally, our analyses identified new genomic islands encoding potential toxin-immunity systems, previously unknown in the genus. Our analyses shed new light on the Pseudovibrio genus, indicating a large diversity of both metabolic features and systems for interacting with the host. The diversity in both distribution and abundance of these systems amongst the strains underlines how metabolically and phylogenetically similar bacteria may use different strategies to interact with the host and find a niche within its

  19. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    The close solid-state structure-property relationships of organic π-aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π-aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here--form and probe molecular dimers--is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions.

  20. Molecular interactions on single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by high-resolution transmission microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Baek, Jinseok; Sato, Yuta; Suenaga, Kazu; Abou-Chahine, Fawzi; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The close solid-state structure–property relationships of organic π−aromatic molecules have attracted interest due to their implications for the design of organic functional materials. In particular, a dimeric structure, that is, a unit consisting of two molecules, is required for precisely evaluating intermolecular interactions. Here, we show that the sidewall of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) represents a unique molecular dimer platform that can be directly visualized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Pyrene is chosen as the π−aromatic molecule; its dimer is covalently linked to the SWNT sidewalls by aryl addition. Reflecting the orientation and separation of the two molecules, the pyrene dimer on the SWNT exhibits characteristic optical and photophysical properties. The methodology discussed here—form and probe molecular dimers—is highly promising for the creation of unique models and provides indispensable and fundamental information regarding molecular interactions. PMID:26173983

  1. Identification of cyclophilin-40 interacting proteins reveals potential cellular function of cyclophilin-40

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miki Susanto; Chu, Feixia; Xie, Jinghang; Wang, Yu; Bhattacharya, Pompeya; Chan, William K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclophilin-40 (CyP40) is part of the immunophilin family and is found in Hsp90-containing protein complexes. We are interested in identifying proteins that interact with CyP40. CyP40 interacting proteins in HeLa cells were identified using the tandem affinity purification approach. Adenovirus (AdCyP40) expressing human CyP40 protein, fused with a streptavidin and a calmodulin binding peptides at the N-terminus, was generated. Proteins were separated on a SDS-PAGE gel after tandem affinity purification. Ten silver-stained protein bands that were enriched in the AdCyP40-infected lysate and the corresponding regions in the control lysate were excised, digested by trypsin and identified by tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Eleven interacting proteins were identified and four of which (RACK1, Ku70, RPS3, and NF45) were expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, bacteria, and MCF-7 cells. We confirmed that these proteins interact with CyP40. We observed that RACK1 suppressed the cobalt chloride-induced, HRE-dependent luciferase activity in MCF-7 cells but not in MCF-7 stable cells expressing about 5% of the cellular CyP40 content. In addition, RACK1 reduced the HIF-1α protein accumulation after cobalt chloride treatment which was not observed when the CyP40 content was down-regulated. Collectively, we conclude that reduction of the HIF-1α protein by RACK1 is CyP40-mediated. PMID:21146485

  2. Atypical Exciton-Phonon Interactions in WS2 and WSe2 Monolayers Revealed by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Del Corro, E; Botello-Méndez, A; Gillet, Y; Elias, A L; Terrones, H; Feng, S; Fantini, C; Rhodes, Daniel; Pradhan, N; Balicas, L; Gonze, X; Charlier, J-C; Terrones, M; Pimenta, M A

    2016-04-13

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for providing information about excitons and exciton-phonon coupling in two-dimensional materials. We present here resonant Raman experiments of single-layered WS2 and WSe2 using more than 25 laser lines. The Raman excitation profiles of both materials show unexpected differences. All Raman features of WS2 monolayers are enhanced by the first-optical excitations (with an asymmetric response for the spin-orbit related XA and XB excitons), whereas Raman bands of WSe2 are not enhanced at XA/B energies. Such an intriguing phenomenon is addressed by DFT calculations and by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation. These two materials are very similar. They prefer the same crystal arrangement, and their electronic structure is akin, with comparable spin-orbit coupling. However, we reveal that WS2 and WSe2 exhibit quite different exciton-phonon interactions. In this sense, we demonstrate that the interaction between XC and XA excitons with phonons explains the different Raman responses of WS2 and WSe2, and the absence of Raman enhancement for the WSe2 modes at XA/B energies. These results reveal unusual exciton-phonon interactions and open new avenues for understanding the two-dimensional materials physics, where weak interactions play a key role coupling different degrees of freedom (spin, optic, and electronic). PMID:26998817

  3. Revealing the role of oxidation state in interaction between nitro/amino-derived particulate matter and blood proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Ping; Bian, Weiwei; Yu, Jingkai; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Surface oxidation states of ultrafine particulate matter can influence the proinflammatory responses and reactive oxygen species levels in tissue. Surface active species of vehicle-emission soot can serve as electron transfer-mediators in mitochondrion. Revealing the role of surface oxidation state in particles-proteins interaction will promote the understanding on metabolism and toxicity. Here, the surface oxidation state was modeled by nitro/amino ligands on nanoparticles, the interaction with blood proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis quantitatively. The nitro shown larger affinity than amino. On the other hand, the affinity to hemoglobin is 103 times larger than that to BSA. Further, molecular docking indicated the difference of binding intensity were mainly determined by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. These will deepen the quantitative understanding of protein-nanoparticles interaction from the perspective of surface chemical state. PMID:27181651

  4. Revealing the role of oxidation state in interaction between nitro/amino-derived particulate matter and blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Ping; Bian, Weiwei; Yu, Jingkai; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Surface oxidation states of ultrafine particulate matter can influence the proinflammatory responses and reactive oxygen species levels in tissue. Surface active species of vehicle-emission soot can serve as electron transfer-mediators in mitochondrion. Revealing the role of surface oxidation state in particles-proteins interaction will promote the understanding on metabolism and toxicity. Here, the surface oxidation state was modeled by nitro/amino ligands on nanoparticles, the interaction with blood proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis quantitatively. The nitro shown larger affinity than amino. On the other hand, the affinity to hemoglobin is 103 times larger than that to BSA. Further, molecular docking indicated the difference of binding intensity were mainly determined by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. These will deepen the quantitative understanding of protein-nanoparticles interaction from the perspective of surface chemical state.

  5. Revealing the role of oxidation state in interaction between nitro/amino-derived particulate matter and blood proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Ping; Bian, Weiwei; Yu, Jingkai; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Surface oxidation states of ultrafine particulate matter can influence the proinflammatory responses and reactive oxygen species levels in tissue. Surface active species of vehicle-emission soot can serve as electron transfer-mediators in mitochondrion. Revealing the role of surface oxidation state in particles-proteins interaction will promote the understanding on metabolism and toxicity. Here, the surface oxidation state was modeled by nitro/amino ligands on nanoparticles, the interaction with blood proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis quantitatively. The nitro shown larger affinity than amino. On the other hand, the affinity to hemoglobin is 10(3) times larger than that to BSA. Further, molecular docking indicated the difference of binding intensity were mainly determined by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. These will deepen the quantitative understanding of protein-nanoparticles interaction from the perspective of surface chemical state. PMID:27181651

  6. Cloning and expression of Drosophila TAFII60 and human TAFII70 reveal conserved interactions with other subunits of TFIID.

    PubMed Central

    Weinzierl, R O; Ruppert, S; Dynlacht, B D; Tanese, N; Tjian, R

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II requires TFIID, a multisubunit complex composed of the TATA binding protein (TBP) and at least seven tightly associated factors (TAFs). Some TAFs act as direct targets or coactivators for promoter-specific activators while others serve as interfaces for TAF-TAF interactions. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression and characterization of Drosophila dTAFII60 and its human homolog, hTAFII70. Recombinant TAFII60/70 binds weakly to TBP and tightly to the largest subunit of TFIID, TAFII250. In the presence of TAFII60/70, TBP and TAFII250, a stable ternary complex is formed. Both the human and Drosophila proteins directly interact with another TFIID subunit, dTAFII40. Our findings reveal that Drosophila TAFII60 and human TAFII70 share a high degree of structural similarity and that their interactions with other subunits of TFIID are conserved. Images PMID:8262073

  7. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  8. Analysis of Hsp90 cochaperone interactions reveals a novel mechanism for TPR protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Chadli, Ahmed; Bruinsma, Elizabeth S; Stensgard, Bridget; Toft, David

    2008-03-01

    The chaperone Hsp90 is required for the appropriate regulation of numerous key signaling molecules, including the progesterone receptor (PR). Many important cochaperones bind Hsp90 through their tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains. Two such proteins, GCUNC45 and FKBP52, assist PR chaperoning and are thought to interact sequentially with PR-Hsp90 complexes. TPR proteins bind to the C-terminal MEEVD sequence of Hsp90, but GCUNC45 has been shown also to bind to a novel site near the N-terminus. We now show that FKBP52 is also able to bind to this site, and that these two cochaperones act competitively, through Hsp90, to modulate PR activity. The N-terminal site involves noncontiguous amino acids within or near the ATP binding pocket of Hsp90. TPR interactions at this site are thus strongly regulated by nucleotide binding and Hsp90 conformation. We propose an expanded model for client chaperoning in which the coordinated use of TPR recognition sites at both N- and C-terminal ends of Hsp90 enhances its ability to coordinate interactions with multiple TPR partners.

  9. GATA4 mutations cause human congenital heart defects and reveal an interaction with TBX5.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vidu; Kathiriya, Irfan S; Barnes, Robert; Schluterman, Marie K; King, Isabelle N; Butler, Cheryl A; Rothrock, Caryn R; Eapen, Reenu S; Hirayama-Yamada, Kayoko; Joo, Kunitaka; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Cohen, Jonathan C; Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-07-24

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common developmental anomaly and are the leading non-infectious cause of mortality in newborns. Only one causative gene, NKX2-5, has been identified through genetic linkage analysis of pedigrees with non-syndromic CHDs. Here, we show that isolated cardiac septal defects in a large pedigree were linked to chromosome 8p22-23. A heterozygous G296S missense mutation of GATA4, a transcription factor essential for heart formation, was found in all available affected family members but not in any control individuals. This mutation resulted in diminished DNA-binding affinity and transcriptional activity of Gata4. Furthermore, the Gata4 mutation abrogated a physical interaction between Gata4 and TBX5, a T-box protein responsible for a subset of syndromic cardiac septal defects. Conversely, interaction of Gata4 and TBX5 was disrupted by specific human TBX5 missense mutations that cause similar cardiac septal defects. In a second family, we identified a frame-shift mutation of GATA4 (E359del) that was transcriptionally inactive and segregated with cardiac septal defects. These results implicate GATA4 as a genetic cause of human cardiac septal defects, perhaps through its interaction with TBX5. PMID:12845333

  10. Revealing Stepwise Mechanisms in Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions: Computational Study of the Reaction between Nitrones and Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Darù, Andrea; Roca-López, David; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2016-01-15

    The mechanism of cycloaddition reactions of nitrones with isocyanates has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The exploration of the potential energy surfaces associated with two reactive channels leading to 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones and 1,4,2-dioxazolidines revealed that the cycloaddition reaction takes place through a concerted mechanism in gas phase and in apolar solvents but a stepwise mechanism in polar solvents. In stepwise mechanisms, the first step of the reaction is a rare case in which the nitrone oxygen acts as a nucleophile by attacking the central carbon atom of the isocyanate (interacting with the π-system of the C═O bond) to give an intermediate. The corresponding transition structure is stabilized by an attractive electrostatic interaction favored in a polar medium. The second step of the reaction is the rate-limiting one in which the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones or 1,4,2-dioxazolidines is decided. Calculations indicate that formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones is favored both kinetically and thermodynamically independently of the solvent, in agreement with experimental observations. Noncovalent interactions (NCI) and topological analysis of the gradient field of electron localization function (ELF) bonding confirmed the observed interactions.

  11. Revealing Stepwise Mechanisms in Dipolar Cycloaddition Reactions: Computational Study of the Reaction between Nitrones and Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Darù, Andrea; Roca-López, David; Tejero, Tomás; Merino, Pedro

    2016-01-15

    The mechanism of cycloaddition reactions of nitrones with isocyanates has been studied using density functional theory (DFT) methods at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The exploration of the potential energy surfaces associated with two reactive channels leading to 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones and 1,4,2-dioxazolidines revealed that the cycloaddition reaction takes place through a concerted mechanism in gas phase and in apolar solvents but a stepwise mechanism in polar solvents. In stepwise mechanisms, the first step of the reaction is a rare case in which the nitrone oxygen acts as a nucleophile by attacking the central carbon atom of the isocyanate (interacting with the π-system of the C═O bond) to give an intermediate. The corresponding transition structure is stabilized by an attractive electrostatic interaction favored in a polar medium. The second step of the reaction is the rate-limiting one in which the formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones or 1,4,2-dioxazolidines is decided. Calculations indicate that formation of 1,2,4-oxadiazolidin-5-ones is favored both kinetically and thermodynamically independently of the solvent, in agreement with experimental observations. Noncovalent interactions (NCI) and topological analysis of the gradient field of electron localization function (ELF) bonding confirmed the observed interactions. PMID:26682934

  12. Kinematics of Interacting ICMEs and Related Forbush Decrease: Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maričić, D.; Vršnak, B.; Dumbović, M.; Žic, T.; Roša, D.; Hržina, D.; Lulić, S.; Romštajn, I.; Bušić, I.; Salamon, K.; Temmer, M.; Rollett, T.; Veronig, A.; Bostanjyan, N.; Chilingarian, A.; Mailyan, B.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mujić, N.

    2014-01-01

    We study heliospheric propagation and some space weather aspects of three Earth-directed interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), successively launched from the active region AR 11158 in the period 13 - 15 February 2011. From the analysis of the ICME kinematics, morphological evolution, and in situ observations, we infer that the three ICMEs interacted on their way to Earth, arriving together at 1 AU as a single interplanetary disturbance. Detailed analysis of the in situ data reveals complex internal structure of the disturbance, where signatures of the three initially independent ICMEs could be recognized. The analysis also reveals compression and heating of the middle ICME, as well as ongoing magnetic reconnection between the leading and the middle ICME. We present evidence showing that the propagation of these two, initially slower ICMEs, was boosted by the fastest, third ICME. Finally, we employ the ground-based cosmic ray observations, to show that this complex disturbance produced a single cosmic ray event, i.e., a simple Forbush decrease (FD). The results presented provide a better understanding of the ICME interactions and reveal effects that should be taken into account in forecasting of the arrival of such compound structures.

  13. Revealing equilibrium and rate constants of weak and fast noncovalent interactions.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Gleb G; Okhonin, Victor; Gorelsky, Serge I; Berezovski, Maxim V

    2011-03-15

    Rate and equilibrium constants of weak noncovalent molecular interactions are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we introduced a homogeneous approach called equilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (ECEEM) to determine k(on), k(off), and K(d) of weak (K(d) > 1 μM) and fast kinetics (relaxation time, τ < 0.1 s) in quasi-equilibrium for multiple unlabeled ligands simultaneously in one microreactor. Conceptually, an equilibrium mixture (EM) of a ligand (L), target (T), and a complex (C) is prepared. The mixture is introduced into the beginning of a capillary reactor with aspect ratio >1000 filled with T. Afterward, differential mobility of L, T, and C along the reactor is induced by an electric field. The combination of differential mobility of reactants and their interactions leads to a change of the EM peak shape. This change is a function of rate constants, so the rate and equilibrium constants can be directly determined from the analysis of the EM peak shape (width and symmetry) and propagation pattern along the reactor. We proved experimentally the use of ECEEM for multiplex determination of kinetic parameters describing weak (3 mM > K(d) > 80 μM) and fast (0.25 s ≥ τ ≥ 0.9 ms) noncovalent interactions between four small molecule drugs (ibuprofen, S-flurbiprofen, salicylic acid and phenylbutazone) and α- and β-cyclodextrins. The affinity of the drugs was significantly higher for β-cyclodextrin than α-cyclodextrin and mostly determined by the rate constant of complex formation.

  14. Bioluminescence assay for estimating the hydrophobic properties of bacteria as revealed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Mafu, A A; Roy, D; Savoie, L; Goulet, J

    1991-01-01

    The luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence method was used to estimate the number of bacteria retained in neutral and amphiphilic gels and those in the eluate to determine the hydrophobic surface properties of bacteria by using hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Good correlations were found between viable counts and ATP content for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fragi, and Listeria monocytogenes. ATP determination was more rapid than viable counts for characterizing the relative hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes. Quantitative estimations of adsorption of L. monocytogenes on octyl-Sepharose indicate that this microorganism is hydrophilic. PMID:1908207

  15. Revealing Long-Range Interconnected Hubs in Human Chromatin Interaction Data Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, R. E.; Arneodo, A.; Jensen, P.; Audit, B.

    2013-09-01

    We use graph theory to analyze chromatin interaction (Hi-C) data in the human genome. We show that a key functional feature of the genome—“master” replication origins—corresponds to DNA loci of maximal network centrality. These loci form a set of interconnected hubs both within chromosomes and between different chromosomes. Our results open the way to a fruitful use of graph theory concepts to decipher DNA structural organization in relation to genome functions such as replication and transcription. This quantitative information should prove useful to discriminate between possible polymer models of nuclear organization.

  16. Spacelab data analysis and interactive control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T. D.; Drake, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    The study consisted of two main tasks, a series of interviews of Spacelab users and a survey of data processing and display equipment. Findings from the user interviews on questions of interactive control, downlink data formats, and Spacelab computer software development are presented. Equipment for quick look processing and display of scientific data in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) was surveyed. Results of this survey effort are discussed in detail, along with recommendations for NASA development of several specific display systems which meet common requirements of many Spacelab experiments.

  17. Study of Laser Interaction with Thin Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-03-06

    For many targets of interest, the thickness is small compared to the conduction length during the engagement. In addition, the laser-material interaction region can be treated as flat. We have studied this regime with our 25 kW solid-state laser. We have demonstrated that airflow can reduce by approximately 40% the energy required to break through a thin target. This reduction is caused by the bulging of the softened material and the tearing and removal of the material by aerodynamic forces. We present elastic modeling which explains these results.

  18. Revealing complex function, process and pathway interactions with high-throughput expression and biological annotation data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitesh Kumar; Ernst, Mathias; Liebscher, Volkmar; Fuellen, Georg; Taher, Leila

    2016-10-20

    The biological relationships both between and within the functions, processes and pathways that operate within complex biological systems are only poorly characterized, making the interpretation of large scale gene expression datasets extremely challenging. Here, we present an approach that integrates gene expression and biological annotation data to identify and describe the interactions between biological functions, processes and pathways that govern a phenotype of interest. The product is a global, interconnected network, not of genes but of functions, processes and pathways, that represents the biological relationships within the system. We validated our approach on two high-throughput expression datasets describing organismal and organ development. Our findings are well supported by the available literature, confirming that developmental processes and apoptosis play key roles in cell differentiation. Furthermore, our results suggest that processes related to pluripotency and lineage commitment, which are known to be critical for development, interact mainly indirectly, through genes implicated in more general biological processes. Moreover, we provide evidence that supports the relevance of cell spatial organization in the developing liver for proper liver function. Our strategy can be viewed as an abstraction that is useful to interpret high-throughput data and devise further experiments.

  19. Small angle neutron scattering contrast variation reveals heterogeneities of interactions in protein gels.

    PubMed

    Banc, A; Charbonneau, C; Dahesh, M; Appavou, M-S; Fu, Z; Morel, M-H; Ramos, L

    2016-06-28

    We propose a quantitative approach to probe the spatial heterogeneities of interactions in macromolecular gels, based on a combination of small angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutrons (SANS) scattering. We investigate the structure of model gluten protein gels and show that the gels display radically different SAXS and SANS profiles when the solvent is (at least partially) deuterated. The detailed analysis of the SANS signal as a function of the solvent deuteration demonstrates heterogeneities of sample deuteration at different length scales. The progressive exchange between the protons (H) of the proteins and the deuteriums (D) of the solvent is inhomogeneous and 60 nm large zones that are enriched in H are evidenced. In addition, at low protein concentration, in the sol state, solvent deuteration induces a liquid/liquid phase separation. Complementary biochemical and structure analyses show that the denser protein phase is more protonated and specifically enriched in glutenin, the polymeric fraction of gluten proteins. These findings suggest that the presence of H-rich zones in gluten gels would arise from the preferential interaction of glutenin polymers through a tight network of non-exchangeable intermolecular hydrogen bonds. PMID:27198847

  20. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  1. Compound-gene interaction mapping reveals distinct roles for Staphylococcus aureus teichoic acids

    PubMed Central

    Santa Maria, John P.; Sadaka, Ama; Moussa, Samir H.; Brown, Stephanie; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Walker, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains two distinct teichoic acid (TA) polymers, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and wall teichoic acid (WTA), which are proposed to play redundant roles in regulating cell division. To gain insight into the underlying biology of S. aureus TAs, we used a small molecule inhibitor to screen a highly saturated transposon library for cellular factors that become essential when WTA is depleted. We constructed an interaction network connecting WTAs with genes involved in LTA synthesis, peptidoglycan synthesis, surface protein display, and D-alanine cell envelope modifications. Although LTAs and WTAs are synthetically lethal, we report that they do not have the same synthetic interactions with other cell envelope genes. For example, D-alanylation, a tailoring modification of both WTAs and LTAs, becomes essential when the former, but not the latter, are removed. Therefore, D-alanine–tailored LTAs are required for survival when WTAs are absent. Examination of terminal phenotoypes led to the unexpected discovery that cells lacking both LTAs and WTAs lose their ability to form Z rings and can no longer divide. We have concluded that the presence of either LTAs or WTAs on the cell surface is required for initiation of S. aureus cell division, but these polymers act as part of distinct cellular networks. PMID:25104751

  2. Cryo-electron microscopy of hepatitis B virions reveals variability in envelope capsid interactions.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan; Antoni, Christoph; Böttcher, Bettina

    2007-09-19

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen causing about 750,000 deaths per year. The virion consists of a nucleocapsid and an envelope formed by lipids, and three integral membrane proteins. Although we have detailed structural insights into the organization of the HBV core, the arrangement of the envelope in virions and its interaction with the nucleocapsid is elusive. Here we show the ultrastructure of hepatitis B virions purified from patient serum. We identified two morphological phenotypes, which appear as compact and gapped particles with nucleocapsids in distinguishable conformations. The overall structures of these nucleocapsids resemble recombinant cores with two alpha-helical spikes per asymmetric unit. At the charged tips the spikes are contacted by defined protrusions of the envelope proteins, probably via electrostatic interactions. The HBV envelope in the two morphotypes is to some extent variable, but the surface proteins follow a general packing scheme with up to three surface protein dimers per asymmetric unit. The variability in the structure of the envelope indicates that the nucleocapsid does not firmly constrain the arrangement of the surface proteins, but provides a general template for the packing.

  3. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods.

  4. Light scattered by model phantom bacteria reveals molecular interactions at their surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghetta, A.; Prosperi, D.; Mantegazza, F.; Panza, L.; Riva, S.; Bellini, T.

    2005-11-01

    Testing molecular interactions is an ubiquitous need in modern biology and molecular medicine. Here, we present a qualitative and quantitative method rooted in the basic properties of the scattering of light, enabling detailed measurement of ligand-receptor interactions occurring on the surface of colloids. The key factor is the use of receptor-coated nanospheres matched in refractive index with water and therefore optically undetectable ("phantom") when not involved in adhesion processes. At the occurrence of ligand binding at the receptor sites, optically unmatched material adsorbs on the nanoparticle surface, giving rise to an increment in their scattering cross section up to a maximum corresponding to saturated binding sites. The analysis of the scattering growth pattern enables extracting the binding affinity. This label-free method has been assessed through the determination of the binding constant of the antibiotic vancomycin with the tripeptide L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala and of the vancomycin dimerization constant. We shed light on the role of chelate effect and molecular hindrance in the activity of this glycopeptide. binding affinity | nanoparticles | vancomycin | ligand-receptor recognition

  5. Cryo-electron microscopy of hepatitis B virions reveals variability in envelope capsid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Stefan; Urban, Stephan; Antoni, Christoph; Böttcher, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major human pathogen causing about 750 000 deaths per year. The virion consists of a nucleocapsid and an envelope formed by lipids, and three integral membrane proteins. Although we have detailed structural insights into the organization of the HBV core, the arrangement of the envelope in virions and its interaction with the nucleocapsid is elusive. Here we show the ultrastructure of hepatitis B virions purified from patient serum. We identified two morphological phenotypes, which appear as compact and gapped particles with nucleocapsids in distinguishable conformations. The overall structures of these nucleocapsids resemble recombinant cores with two α-helical spikes per asymmetric unit. At the charged tips the spikes are contacted by defined protrusions of the envelope proteins, probably via electrostatic interactions. The HBV envelope in the two morphotypes is to some extent variable, but the surface proteins follow a general packing scheme with up to three surface protein dimers per asymmetric unit. The variability in the structure of the envelope indicates that the nucleocapsid does not firmly constrain the arrangement of the surface proteins, but provides a general template for the packing. PMID:17762862

  6. Scanning STED-FCS reveals spatiotemporal heterogeneity of lipid interaction in the plasma membrane of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Ta, Haisen; Schoenle, Andreas; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W.; Eggeling, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of lipids and proteins plays an important role in plasma membrane bioactivity, and much can be learned from their diffusion characteristics. Here we present the combination of super-resolution STED microscopy with scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (scanning STED-FCS, sSTED-FCS) to characterize the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of lipid interactions. sSTED-FCS reveals transient molecular interaction hotspots for a fluorescent sphingolipid analogue. The interaction sites are smaller than 80 nm in diameter and lipids are transiently trapped for several milliseconds in these areas. In comparison, newly developed fluorescent phospholipid and cholesterol analogues with improved phase-partitioning properties show more homogenous diffusion, independent of the preference for liquid-ordered or disordered membrane environments. Our results do not support the presence of nanodomains based on lipid-phase separation in the basal membrane of our cultured nonstimulated cells, and show that alternative interactions are responsible for the strong local trapping of our sphingolipid analogue.

  7. Salts of hexamethylenetetramine with organic acids: Enhanced anomeric interactions with a lowering of molecular symmetry revealed by crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekhar, Sosale; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-02-01

    The hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) framework displays interesting stereoelectronic interactions of the anomeric type. In the highly symmetrical parent system, the nitrogen centres act as both donors and acceptors. Protonation lowers symmetry and also leads to an enhancement of the anomeric interaction around the protonated centre. X-ray diffraction crystal structures of four derivatives of HMT - with succinic, (DL)-malic, phthalic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids - reveal significant trends. (The first three form well-defined salts, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid forming a co-crystalline compound.) Each molecular structure is essentially characterised by a major anomeric interaction involving the protonated centre as acceptor. In two cases (succinic and 4-hydroxybenzoic), secondary protonation leads to a weaker anomeric interaction site that apparently competes with the dominant one. Bond length changes indicate that the anomeric interaction decreases as malic > phthalic > succinic > 4-hydroxybenzoic, which correlates with the degree of proton transfer to the nitrogen centre. Along with other bond length and angle changes, the results offer insight into the applicability of the antiperiplanar lone pair hypothesis (ALPH) in a rigid system.

  8. Eddy-Kuroshio interaction processes revealed by mooring observations off Taiwan and Luzon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Ju; Andres, Magdalena; Jan, Sen; Mensah, Vigan; Sanford, Thomas B.; Lien, Ren-Chieh; Lee, Craig M.

    2015-10-01

    The influence and fate of westward propagating eddies that impinge on the Kuroshio were observed with pressure sensor-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIESs) deployed east of Taiwan and northeast of Luzon. Zero lag correlations between PIES-measured acoustic travel times and satellite-measured sea surface height anomalies (SSHa), which are normally negative, have lower magnitude toward the west, suggesting the eddy-influence is weakened across the Kuroshio. The observational data reveal that impinging eddies lead to seesaw-like SSHa and pycnocline depth changes across the Kuroshio east of Taiwan, whereas analogous responses are not found in the Kuroshio northeast of Luzon. Anticyclones intensify sea surface and pycnocline slopes across the Kuroshio, while cyclones weaken these slopes, particularly east of Taiwan. During the 6 month period of overlap between the two PIES arrays, only one anticyclone affected the pycnocline depth first at the array northeast of Luzon and 21 days later in the downstream Kuroshio east of Taiwan.

  9. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  10. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  11. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-01

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 10(5)-10(7) M(-1)s(-1)), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor's reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors.

  12. Molecular characterization of cancer reveals interactions between ionizing radiation and chemicals on rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Doi, Kazutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Although various mechanisms have been inferred for combinatorial actions of multiple carcinogens, these mechanisms have not been well demonstrated in experimental carcinogenesis models. We evaluated mammary carcinogenesis initiated by combined exposure to various doses of radiation and chemical carcinogens. Female rats at 7 weeks of age were γ-irradiated (0.2-2 Gy) and/or exposed to 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) (20 or 40 mg/kg, single intraperitoneal injection) or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (40 mg/kg/day by gavage for 10 days) and were observed until 50 weeks of age. The incidence of mammary carcinoma increased steadily as a function of radiation dose in the absence of chemicals; mathematical analysis supported an additive increase when radiation was combined with a chemical carcinogen, irrespective of the chemical species and its dose. Hras mutations were characteristic of carcinomas that developed after chemical carcinogen treatments and were overrepresented in carcinomas induced by the combination of radiation and MNU (but not PhIP), indicating an interaction of radiation and MNU at the level of initiation. The expression profiles of seven classifier genes, previously shown to distinguish two classes of rat mammary carcinomas, categorized almost all examined carcinomas that developed after individual or combined treatments with radiation (1 Gy) and chemicals as belonging to a single class; more comprehensive screening using microarrays and a separate test sample set failed to identify differences in gene expression profiles among these carcinomas. These results suggest that a complex, multilevel interaction underlies the combinatorial action of radiation and chemical carcinogens in the experimental model.

  13. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hieu X.; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T. H.

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  14. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome.

  15. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  16. Adipose tissue RNASeq reveals novel gene-nutrient interactions following n-3 PUFA supplementation and evoked inflammation in humans.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Jane F; Xue, Chenyi; Hu, Yu; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P

    2016-04-01

    Dietary consumption of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) may protect against cardiometabolic disease through modulation of systemic and adipose inflammation. However, it is often difficult to detect the subtle effects of n-3 PUFA on inflammatory biomarkers in traditional intervention studies. We aimed to identify novel n-3 PUFA modulated gene expression using unbiased adipose transcriptomics during evoked endotoxemia in a clinical trial of n-3 PUFA supplementation. We analyzed adipose gene expression using RNA sequencing in the fenofibrate and omega-3 fatty acid modulation of endotoxemia (FFAME) trial of healthy individuals at three timepoints: before and after n-3 PUFA supplementation (n=8; 3600mg/day EPA/DHA) for 6weeks compared with placebo (n=6), as well as during a subsequent evoked inflammatory challenge (lipopolysaccharide 0.6ng/kg i.v.). As expected, supplementation with n-3 PUFA vs. placebo alone had only modest effects on adipose tissue gene expression, e.g., increased expression of immediate early response IER2. In contrast, the transcriptomic response to evoked endotoxemia was significantly modified by n-3 PUFA supplementation, with several genes demonstrating significant n-3 PUFA gene-nutrient interactions, e.g., enhanced transcriptional responses in specific immune genes IER5L, HES1, IL1RN, CCL18, IL1RN, IL7R, IL8, CCL3 and others. These data highlight potential mechanisms whereby n-3 PUFA consumption may enhance the immune response to an inflammatory challenge. In conclusion, unbiased transcriptomics during evoked inflammation reveals novel immune modulating functions of n-3 PUFA nutritional intervention in a dynamic pathophysiological setting. PMID:27012629

  17. Dispersion interactions of carbohydrates with condensate aromatic moieties: theoretical study on the CH-π interaction additive properties.

    PubMed

    Kozmon, Stanislav; Matuška, Radek; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Koča, Jaroslav

    2011-08-21

    In this article we present the first systematic study of the additive properties (i.e. degree of additivity) of the carbohydrate-aromatic moiety CH-π dispersion interaction. The additive properties were studied on the β-D-glucopyranose, β-D-mannopyranose and α-L-fucopyranose complexes with the naphthalene molecule by comparing the monodentate (single CH-π) and bidentate (two CH-π) complexes. All model complexes were optimized using the DFT-D approach, at the BP/def2-TZVPP level of theory. The interaction energies were refined using single point calculations at highly correlated ab initio methods at the CCSD(T)/CBS level, calculated as E + (E(CCSD(T))-E(MP2))(Small Basis). Bidentate complexes show very strong interactions in the range from -10.79 up to -7.15 and -8.20 up to -6.14 kcal mol(-1) for the DFT-D and CCSD(T)/CBS level, respectively. These values were compared with the sum of interaction energies of the appropriate monodentate carbohydrate-naphthalene complexes. The comparison reveals that the bidentate complex interaction energy is higher (interaction is weaker) than the sum of monodentate complex interaction energies. Bidentate complex interaction energy corresponds to 2/3 of the sum of the appropriate monodentate complex interaction energies (averaging over all modeled carbohydrate complexes). The observed interaction energies were also compared with the sum of interaction energies of the corresponding previously published carbohydrate-benzene complexes. Also in this case the interaction energy of the bidentate complex was higher (i.e. weaker interaction) than the sum of interaction energies of the corresponding benzene complexes. However, the obtained difference is lower than before, while the bidentate complex interaction energy corresponds to 4/5 of the sum of interaction energy of the benzene complexes, averaged over all structures. The mentioned comparison might aid protein engineering efforts where amino acid residues phenylalanine or

  18. Complete Switchgrass Genetic Maps Reveal Subgenome Collinearity, Preferential Pairing and Multilocus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Miki; Lanzatella, Christina; Saha, Malay C.; Bouton, Joe; Wu, Rongling; Tobias, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy is an important aspect of the evolution of flowering plants. The potential of gene copies to diverge and evolve new functions is influenced by meiotic behavior of chromosomes leading to segregation as a single locus or duplicated loci. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) linkage maps were constructed using a full-sib population of 238 plants and SSR and STS markers to access the degree of preferential pairing and the structure of the tetraploid genome and as a step toward identification of loci underlying biomass feedstock quality and yield. The male and female framework map lengths were 1645 and 1376 cM with 97% of the genome estimated to be within 10 cM of a mapped marker in both maps. Each map coalesced into 18 linkage groups arranged into nine homeologous pairs. Comparative analysis of each homology group to the diploid sorghum genome identified clear syntenic relationships and collinear tracts. The number of markers with PCR amplicons that mapped across subgenomes was significantly fewer than expected, suggesting substantial subgenome divergence, while both the ratio of coupling to repulsion phase linkages and pattern of marker segregation indicated complete or near complete disomic inheritance. The proportion of transmission ratio distorted markers was relatively low, but the male map was more extensively affected by distorted transmission ratios and multilocus interactions, associated with spurious linkages. PMID:20407132

  19. "You produce while I clean up", a strategy revealed by exoproteomics during Synechococcus-Roseobacter interactions.

    PubMed

    Christie-Oleza, Joseph A; Scanlan, David J; Armengaud, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Most of the energy that is introduced into the oceans by photosynthetic primary producers is in the form of organic matter that then sustains the rest of the food web, from micro to macro-organisms. However, it is the interactions between phototrophs and heterotrophs that are vital to maintaining the nutrient balance of marine microbiomes that ultimately feed these higher trophic levels. The primary produced organic matter is mostly remineralized by heterotrophic microorganisms but, because most of the oceanic dissolved organic matter is in the form of biopolymers, and microbial membrane transport systems operate with molecules <0.6 kDa, it must be hydrolyzed outside the cell before a microorganism can acquire it. As a simili of the marine microbiome, we analyzed, using state-of-the-art proteomics, the exoproteomes obtained from synthetic communities combining specific Roseobacter (Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114, and Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL-12) and Synechococcus strains (WH7803 and WH8102). This approach identified the repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by Roseobacter, opening up the black box of heterotrophic transformation/remineralization of biopolymers generated by marine phytoplankton. As well as highlighting interesting exoenzymes this strategy also allowed us to infer clues on the molecular basis of niche partitioning.

  20. Interaction of PACAP with Sonic hedgehog reveals complex regulation of the hedgehog pathway by PKA.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Pawel; Zhujiang, Annie; Youssef, Mary; Waschek, James A

    2013-11-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (cGCPs) and its aberrant activation causes a cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits Shh-driven proliferation of cGCPs and acts as tumor suppressor in murine medulloblastoma. We show that PACAP blocks canonical Shh signaling by a mechanism that involves activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibition of the translocation of the Shh-dependent transcription factor Gli2 into the primary cilium. PKA is shown to play an essential role in inhibiting gene transcription in the absence of Shh, but global PKA activity levels are found to be a poor predictor of the degree of Shh pathway activation. We propose that the core Shh pathway regulates a small compartmentalized pool of PKA in the vicinity of primary cilia. GPCRs that affect global PKA activity levels, such as the PACAP receptor, cooperate with the canonical Shh signal to regulate Gli protein phosphorylation by PKA. This interaction serves to fine-tune the transcriptional and physiological function of the Shh pathway. PMID:23872071

  1. "You produce while I clean up", a strategy revealed by exoproteomics during Synechococcus-Roseobacter interactions.

    PubMed

    Christie-Oleza, Joseph A; Scanlan, David J; Armengaud, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Most of the energy that is introduced into the oceans by photosynthetic primary producers is in the form of organic matter that then sustains the rest of the food web, from micro to macro-organisms. However, it is the interactions between phototrophs and heterotrophs that are vital to maintaining the nutrient balance of marine microbiomes that ultimately feed these higher trophic levels. The primary produced organic matter is mostly remineralized by heterotrophic microorganisms but, because most of the oceanic dissolved organic matter is in the form of biopolymers, and microbial membrane transport systems operate with molecules <0.6 kDa, it must be hydrolyzed outside the cell before a microorganism can acquire it. As a simili of the marine microbiome, we analyzed, using state-of-the-art proteomics, the exoproteomes obtained from synthetic communities combining specific Roseobacter (Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114, and Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL-12) and Synechococcus strains (WH7803 and WH8102). This approach identified the repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by Roseobacter, opening up the black box of heterotrophic transformation/remineralization of biopolymers generated by marine phytoplankton. As well as highlighting interesting exoenzymes this strategy also allowed us to infer clues on the molecular basis of niche partitioning. PMID:25728650

  2. Hybridization between genetically modified Atlantic salmon and wild brown trout reveals novel ecological interactions.

    PubMed

    Oke, Krista B; Westley, Peter A H; Moreau, Darek T R; Fleming, Ian A

    2013-07-22

    Interspecific hybridization is a route for transgenes from genetically modified (GM) animals to invade wild populations, yet the ecological effects and potential risks that may emerge from such hybridization are unknown. Through experimental crosses, we demonstrate transmission of a growth hormone transgene via hybridization between a candidate for commercial aquaculture production, GM Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and closely related wild brown trout (Salmo trutta). Transgenic hybrids were viable and grew more rapidly than transgenic salmon and other non-transgenic crosses in hatchery-like conditions. In stream mesocosms designed to more closely emulate natural conditions, transgenic hybrids appeared to express competitive dominance and suppressed the growth of transgenic and non-transgenic (wild-type) salmon by 82 and 54 per cent, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of environmental impacts of hybridization between a GM animal and a closely related species. These results provide empirical evidence of the first steps towards introgression of foreign transgenes into the genomes of new species and contribute to the growing evidence that transgenic animals have complex and context-specific interactions with wild populations. We suggest that interspecific hybridization be explicitly considered when assessing the environmental consequences should transgenic animals escape to nature.

  3. A simple strategy for detecting moving objects during locomotion revealed by animal-robot interactions.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Francisco; Polidoro, Peter; Robie, Alice; Branson, Kristin; Perona, Pietro; Dickinson, Michael H

    2012-07-24

    An important role of visual systems is to detect nearby predators, prey, and potential mates, which may be distinguished in part by their motion. When an animal is at rest, an object moving in any direction may easily be detected by motion-sensitive visual circuits. During locomotion, however, this strategy is compromised because the observer must detect a moving object within the pattern of optic flow created by its own motion through the stationary background. However, objects that move creating back-to-front (regressive) motion may be unambiguously distinguished from stationary objects because forward locomotion creates only front-to-back (progressive) optic flow. Thus, moving animals should exhibit an enhanced sensitivity to regressively moving objects. We explicitly tested this hypothesis by constructing a simple fly-sized robot that was programmed to interact with a real fly. Our measurements indicate that whereas walking female flies freeze in response to a regressively moving object, they ignore a progressively moving one. Regressive motion salience also explains observations of behaviors exhibited by pairs of walking flies. Because the assumptions underlying the regressive motion salience hypothesis are general, we suspect that the behavior we have observed in Drosophila may be widespread among eyed, motile organisms.

  4. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  5. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  6. Mass spectrometry reveals modularity and a complete subunit interaction map of the eukaryotic translation factor eIF3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Sandercock, Alan M; Fraser, Christopher S; Ridlova, Gabriela; Stephens, Elaine; Schenauer, Matthew R; Yokoi-Fong, Theresa; Barsky, Daniel; Leary, Julie A; Hershey, John W; Doudna, Jennifer A; Robinson, Carol V

    2008-11-25

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays an important role in translation initiation, acting as a docking site for several eIFs that assemble on the 40S ribosomal subunit. Here, we use mass spectrometry to probe the subunit interactions within the human eIF3 complex. Our results show that the 13-subunit complex can be maintained intact in the gas phase, enabling us to establish unambiguously its stoichiometry and its overall subunit architecture via tandem mass spectrometry and solution disruption experiments. Dissociation takes place as a function of ionic strength to form three stable modules eIF3(c:d:e:l:k), eIF3(f:h:m), and eIF3(a:b:i:g). These modules are linked by interactions between subunits eIF3b:c and eIF3c:h. We confirmed our interaction map with the homologous yeast eIF3 complex that contains the five core subunits found in the human eIF3 and supplemented our data with results from immunoprecipitation. These results, together with the 27 subcomplexes identified with increasing ionic strength, enable us to define a comprehensive interaction map for this 800-kDa species. Our interaction map allows comparison of free eIF3 with that bound to the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV-IRES) RNA. We also compare our eIF3 interaction map with related complexes, containing evolutionarily conserved protein domains, and reveal the location of subunits containing RNA recognition motifs proximal to the decoding center of the 40S subunit of the ribosome.

  7. Mechanism of densification in silica glass under pressure as revealed by a bottom-up pairwise effective interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.

    2012-04-01

    A new short-range pairwise numerical potential for silica is presented. The potential is derived from a single ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation of molten silica using the force-matching method with the forces being represented numerically by piecewise functions (splines). The AIMD simulation is performed using the Born-Oppenheimer method with the generalized gradient approximation (BLYP) for the XC energy functional. The new effective potential includes a soft-repulsive shoulder to describe the interactions of oxygen ions at short separations. The new potential, despite being short-ranged and derived from single-phase data, exhibits a good transferability to silica crystalline polymorphs and amorphous silica. The importance of the O-O soft-repulsive shoulder interaction on glass densification under cold and shock compressions is assessed from MD simulations of silica glass under room and shock Hugoniot conditions, respectively. Results from these simulations indicate that the appearance of oxygen complexes (primarily pairs) interacting through soft-repulsive shoulder potential occurs at 8-10 GPa, and under cold compression conditions becomes notable at 40 GPa, essentially coinciding with the transition to a Si sixfold coordination state. An analysis of changes in system structure in compressed and shocked states reveals that the O ions interacting through the soft-repulsive shoulder potential in denser states of silica glass may create a mechanical multi-stability under elevated pressures and thus to contribute to the observed anomalous densification.

  8. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  9. Perception-memory interactions reveal a computational strategy for perceptual constancy.

    PubMed

    Olkkonen, Maria; Saarela, Toni P; Allred, Sarah R

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge for the visual system is to extract constant object properties from incoming sensory information. This information is ambiguous because the same sensory signal can arise from many combinations of object properties and viewing conditions and noisy because of the variability in sensory encoding. The competing accounts for perceptual constancy of surface lightness fall into two classes of model: One derives lightness estimates from border contrasts, and another explicitly infers surface reflectance. To test these accounts, we combined a novel psychophysical task with probabilistic implementations of both models. Observers compared the lightness of two stimuli under a memory demand (a delay between the stimuli), a context change (different surround luminance), or both. Memory biased perceived lightness toward the mean of the whole stimulus ensemble. Context change caused the classical simultaneous lightness contrast effect, in which a target appears lighter against a dark surround and darker against a light surround. These effects were not independent: Combined memory load and context change elicited a bias smaller than predicted assuming an independent combination of biases. Both models explain the memory bias as an effect of prior expectations on perception. Both models also produce a context effect, but only the reflectance model correctly describes the magnitude. The reflectance model, finally, captures the memory-context interaction better than the contrast model, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We conclude that (a) lightness perception is more consistent with reflectance inference than contrast coding and (b) adding a memory demand to a perceptual task both renders it more ecologically valid and helps adjudicate between competing models.

  10. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R.; Olsson, Johan D. M.; Weiss, Manfred S.; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M.; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcβ1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  11. A Carboniferous Mite on an Insect Reveals the Antiquity of an Inconspicuous Interaction.

    PubMed

    Robin, Ninon; Béthoux, Olivier; Sidorchuk, Ekaterina; Cui, Yingying; Li, Yingnan; Germain, Damien; King, Andrew; Berenguer, Felisa; Ren, Dong

    2016-05-23

    Symbiosis [1], understood as prolonged interspecific association, is as ancient as the eukaryotic cell [2, 3]. A variety of such associations have been reported in the continental fossil record, albeit sporadically. As for mites, which as a group have been present since the Devonian (ca. 390 mya) [4, 5] and are involved in a tremendous variety of modern-day symbioses, reported associations are limited to a few amber-preserved cases [6-11], with the earliest instance in the Cretaceous (ca. 85 mya) [11]. As a consequence, the antiquity and origin of associations involving small-sized mites and larger animals are poorly understood. Here we report, recovered from the Carboniferous Xiaheyan locality (ca. 320 mya), an oribatid mite located on the thorax of an extinct relative of grasshoppers, crickets, and katydids [12]. The mite was investigated using several methods, including phase-contrast tomography. The detailed morphological data allowed the placement of the mite in a new family within Mixonomata, whose fossil record is thus extended by ca. 250 Ma. Specimen and abundance distribution data derived from the fossil insect sample indicate that specimens from the corresponding excavation site were buried rapidly and were sub-autochthonous, indicating a syn vivo association. Moreover, the mite is located in a sequestered position on the insect. The observed interaction best fits the definition for phoresy, in which the benefit is transport and protection for the mite. This discovery demonstrates that this association, a trait shared by representatives of the most speciose mite taxa, arose very early during mite evolution. PMID:27161503

  12. Stone tools from the ancient Tongan state reveal prehistoric interaction centers in the Central Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Geoffrey R.; Reepmeyer, Christian; Melekiola, Nivaleti; Woodhead, Jon; Dickinson, William R.; Martinsson-Wallin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Tonga was unique in the prehistoric Pacific for developing a maritime state that integrated the archipelago under a centralized authority and for undertaking long-distance economic and political exchanges in the second millennium A.D. To establish the extent of Tonga’s maritime polity, we geochemically analyzed stone tools excavated from the central places of the ruling paramounts, particularly lithic artifacts associated with stone-faced chiefly tombs. The lithic networks of the Tongan state focused on Samoa and Fiji, with one adze sourced to the Society Islands 2,500 km from Tongatapu. To test the hypothesis that nonlocal lithics were especially valued by Tongan elites and were an important source of political capital, we analyzed prestate lithics from Tongatapu and stone artifacts from Samoa. In the Tongan state, 66% of worked stone tools were long-distance imports, indicating that interarchipelago connections intensified with the development of the Tongan polity after A.D. 1200. In contrast, stone tools found in Samoa were from local sources, including tools associated with a monumental structure contemporary with the Tongan state. Network analysis of lithics entering the Tongan state and of the distribution of Samoan adzes in the Pacific identified a centralized polity and the products of specialized lithic workshops, respectively. These results indicate that a significant consequence of social complexity was the establishment of new types of specialized sites in distant geographic areas. Specialized sites were loci of long-distance interaction and formed important centers for the transmission of information, people, and materials in prehistoric Oceania. PMID:25002481

  13. Diverse Roles and Interactions of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Revealed Using Global Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Davidov, Eugene; Gianoulis, Tara A.; Zhong, Guoneng; Rozowsky, Joel; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Gerstein, Mark B.; Snyder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A systems understanding of nuclear organization and events is critical for determining how cells divide, differentiate, and respond to stimuli and for identifying the causes of diseases. Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including gene expression, nuclear organization, centromere function, and chromosomal stability, and mutations in SWI/SNF components have been linked to several types of cancer. To better understand the biological processes in which chromatin remodeling proteins participate, we globally mapped binding regions for several components of the SWI/SNF complex throughout the human genome using ChIP-Seq. SWI/SNF components were found to lie near regulatory elements integral to transcription (e.g. 5′ ends, RNA Polymerases II and III, and enhancers) as well as regions critical for chromosome organization (e.g. CTCF, lamins, and DNA replication origins). Interestingly we also find that certain configurations of SWI/SNF subunits are associated with transcripts that have higher levels of expression, whereas other configurations of SWI/SNF factors are associated with transcripts that have lower levels of expression. To further elucidate the association of SWI/SNF subunits with each other as well as with other nuclear proteins, we also analyzed SWI/SNF immunoprecipitated complexes by mass spectrometry. Individual SWI/SNF factors are associated with their own family members, as well as with cellular constituents such as nuclear matrix proteins, key transcription factors, and centromere components, implying a ubiquitous role in gene regulation and nuclear function. We find an overrepresentation of both SWI/SNF-associated regions and proteins in cell cycle and chromosome organization. Taken together the results from our ChIP and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that SWI/SNF facilitates gene regulation and genome function more broadly and through a greater diversity of interactions

  14. Stone tools from the ancient Tongan state reveal prehistoric interaction centers in the Central Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Geoffrey R.; Reepmeyer, Christian; Melekiola, Nivaleti; Woodhead, Jon; Dickinson, William R.; Martinsson-Wallin, Helene

    2014-07-01

    Tonga was unique in the prehistoric Pacific for developing a maritime state that integrated the archipelago under a centralized authority and for undertaking long-distance economic and political exchanges in the second millennium A.D. To establish the extent of Tonga's maritime polity, we geochemically analyzed stone tools excavated from the central places of the ruling paramounts, particularly lithic artifacts associated with stone-faced chiefly tombs. The lithic networks of the Tongan state focused on Samoa and Fiji, with one adze sourced to the Society Islands 2,500 km from Tongatapu. To test the hypothesis that nonlocal lithics were especially valued by Tongan elites and were an important source of political capital, we analyzed prestate lithics from Tongatapu and stone artifacts from Samoa. In the Tongan state, 66% of worked stone tools were long-distance imports, indicating that interarchipelago connections intensified with the development of the Tongan polity after A.D. 1200. In contrast, stone tools found in Samoa were from local sources, including tools associated with a monumental structure contemporary with the Tongan state. Network analysis of lithics entering the Tongan state and of the distribution of Samoan adzes in the Pacific identified a centralized polity and the products of specialized lithic workshops, respectively. These results indicate that a significant consequence of social complexity was the establishment of new types of specialized sites in distant geographic areas. Specialized sites were loci of long-distance interaction and formed important centers for the transmission of information, people, and materials in prehistoric Oceania.

  15. Stone tools from the ancient Tongan state reveal prehistoric interaction centers in the Central Pacific.

    PubMed

    Clark, Geoffrey R; Reepmeyer, Christian; Melekiola, Nivaleti; Woodhead, Jon; Dickinson, William R; Martinsson-Wallin, Helene

    2014-07-22

    Tonga was unique in the prehistoric Pacific for developing a maritime state that integrated the archipelago under a centralized authority and for undertaking long-distance economic and political exchanges in the second millennium A.D. To establish the extent of Tonga's maritime polity, we geochemically analyzed stone tools excavated from the central places of the ruling paramounts, particularly lithic artifacts associated with stone-faced chiefly tombs. The lithic networks of the Tongan state focused on Samoa and Fiji, with one adze sourced to the Society Islands 2,500 km from Tongatapu. To test the hypothesis that nonlocal lithics were especially valued by Tongan elites and were an important source of political capital, we analyzed prestate lithics from Tongatapu and stone artifacts from Samoa. In the Tongan state, 66% of worked stone tools were long-distance imports, indicating that interarchipelago connections intensified with the development of the Tongan polity after A.D. 1200. In contrast, stone tools found in Samoa were from local sources, including tools associated with a monumental structure contemporary with the Tongan state. Network analysis of lithics entering the Tongan state and of the distribution of Samoan adzes in the Pacific identified a centralized polity and the products of specialized lithic workshops, respectively. These results indicate that a significant consequence of social complexity was the establishment of new types of specialized sites in distant geographic areas. Specialized sites were loci of long-distance interaction and formed important centers for the transmission of information, people, and materials in prehistoric Oceania. PMID:25002481

  16. Diverse roles and interactions of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex revealed using global approaches.

    PubMed

    Euskirchen, Ghia M; Auerbach, Raymond K; Davidov, Eugene; Gianoulis, Tara A; Zhong, Guoneng; Rozowsky, Joel; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Gerstein, Mark B; Snyder, Michael

    2011-03-01

    A systems understanding of nuclear organization and events is critical for determining how cells divide, differentiate, and respond to stimuli and for identifying the causes of diseases. Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF have been implicated in a wide variety of cellular processes including gene expression, nuclear organization, centromere function, and chromosomal stability, and mutations in SWI/SNF components have been linked to several types of cancer. To better understand the biological processes in which chromatin remodeling proteins participate, we globally mapped binding regions for several components of the SWI/SNF complex throughout the human genome using ChIP-Seq. SWI/SNF components were found to lie near regulatory elements integral to transcription (e.g. 5' ends, RNA Polymerases II and III, and enhancers) as well as regions critical for chromosome organization (e.g. CTCF, lamins, and DNA replication origins). Interestingly we also find that certain configurations of SWI/SNF subunits are associated with transcripts that have higher levels of expression, whereas other configurations of SWI/SNF factors are associated with transcripts that have lower levels of expression. To further elucidate the association of SWI/SNF subunits with each other as well as with other nuclear proteins, we also analyzed SWI/SNF immunoprecipitated complexes by mass spectrometry. Individual SWI/SNF factors are associated with their own family members, as well as with cellular constituents such as nuclear matrix proteins, key transcription factors, and centromere components, implying a ubiquitous role in gene regulation and nuclear function. We find an overrepresentation of both SWI/SNF-associated regions and proteins in cell cycle and chromosome organization. Taken together the results from our ChIP and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that SWI/SNF facilitates gene regulation and genome function more broadly and through a greater diversity of interactions than

  17. Structural Sampling of Glycan Interaction Profiles Reveals Mucosal Receptors for Fimbrial Adhesins of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lonardi, Emanuela; Moonens, Kristof; Buts, Lieven; de Boer, Arjen R; Olsson, Johan D M; Weiss, Manfred S; Fabre, Emeline; Guérardel, Yann; Deelder, André M; Oscarson, Stefan; Wuhrer, Manfred; Bouckaert, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Fimbriae are long, proteinaceous adhesion organelles expressed on the bacterial envelope, evolutionarily adapted by Escherichia coli strains for the colonization of epithelial linings. Using glycan arrays of the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), the lectin domains were screened of the fimbrial adhesins F17G and FedF from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and of the FimH adhesin from uropathogenic E. coli. This has led to the discovery of a more specific receptor for F17G, GlcNAcb1,3Gal. No significant differences emerged from the glycan binding profiles of the F17G lectin domains from five different E. coli strains. However, strain-dependent amino acid variations, predominantly towards the positively charged arginine, were indicated by sulfate binding in FedF and F17G crystal structures. For FedF, no significant binders could be observed on the CFG glycan array. Hence, a shotgun array was generated from microvilli scrapings of the distal jejunum of a 3-week old piglet about to be weaned. On this array, the blood group A type 1 hexasaccharide emerged as a receptor for the FedF lectin domain and remarkably also for F18-fimbriated E. coli. F17G was found to selectively recognize glycan species with a terminal GlcNAc, typifying intestinal mucins. In conclusion, F17G and FedF recognize long glycan sequences that could only be identified using the shotgun approach. Interestingly, ETEC strains display a large capacity to adapt their fimbrial adhesins to ecological niches via charge-driven interactions, congruent with binding to thick mucosal surfaces displaying an acidic gradient along the intestinal tract. PMID:24833052

  18. Spacecraft control/flexible structures interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.; Hillard, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    An initial study to begin development of a flight experiment to measure spacecraft control/flexible structure interactions was completed. The approach consisted of developing the equations of motion for a vehicle possessing a flexible solar array, then linearizing about some nominal motion of the craft. A set of solutions is assumed for array deflection using a continuous normal mode method and important parameters are identified. Interrelationships between these parameters, measurement techniques, and input requirements are discussed which assure minimization of special vehicle maneuvers and optimization of data to be obtained during the normal flight sequence. Limited consideration is given to flight data retrieval and processing techniques as correlated with the requirements imposed by the measurement system. Results indicate that inflight measurement of the bending and torsional mode shapes and respective frequencies, and damping ratios, is necessary. Other parameters may be measured from design data.

  19. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  20. [Study on the interaction of doxycycline with human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao-Ying; Chen, Lin; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of doxycycline (DC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by the inner filter effects, displacement experiments and molecular docking methods, based on classic multi-spectroscopy. With fluorescence quenching method at 298 and 310 K, the binding constants Ka, were determined to be 2. 73 X 10(5) and 0. 74X 10(5) L mol-1, respectively, and there was one binding site between DC and HSA, indicating that the binding of DC to HSA was strong, and the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy change, AH and enthropy change, delta S) were calculated to be -83. 55 kJ mol-1 and -176. 31 J mol-1 K-1 via the Vant' Hoff equation, which indicated that the interaction of DC with HSA was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Based on the Föster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the specific binding distance between Trp-214 (acceptor) and DC (donor) was 4. 98 nm, which was similar to the result confirmed by molecular docking. Through displacement experiments, sub-domain IIA of HSA was assigned to possess the high-affinity binding site of DC. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of DC to HSA induced the conformation change of HSA and increased the disclosure of some part of hydrophobic regions that had been buried before. The results of FTIR spectroscopy showed that DC bound to HSA led to the slight unfolding of the polypeptide chain of HSA. Furthermore, the binding details between DC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking methods, which revealed that DC was bound at sub-domain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces and pi-pi interactions. The experimental results provide theoretical basis and reliable data for the study of the interaction between small drug molecule and human serum albumin PMID:25095435

  1. Study of electron-positron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  2. Analysis of Phosphorylation-dependent Protein Interactions of Adhesion and Degranulation Promoting Adaptor Protein (ADAP) Reveals Novel Interaction Partners Required for Chemokine-directed T cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Kuropka, Benno; Witte, Amelie; Sticht, Jana; Waldt, Natalie; Majkut, Paul; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Schraven, Burkhart; Krause, Eberhard; Kliche, Stefanie; Freund, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of T cells leads to distinct changes of their adhesive and migratory properties. Signal propagation from activated receptors to integrins depends on scaffolding proteins such as the adhesion and degranulation promoting adaptor protein (ADAP)(1). Here we have comprehensively investigated the phosphotyrosine interactome of ADAP in T cells and define known and novel interaction partners of functional relevance. While most phosphosites reside in unstructured regions of the protein, thereby defining classical SH2 domain interaction sites for master regulators of T cell signaling such as SLP76, Fyn-kinase, and NCK, other binding events depend on structural context. Interaction proteomics using different ADAP constructs comprising most of the known phosphotyrosine motifs as well as the structured domains confirm that a distinct set of proteins is attracted by pY571 of ADAP, including the ζ-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa (ZAP70). The interaction of ADAP and ZAP70 is inducible upon stimulation either of the T cell receptor (TCR) or by chemokine. NMR spectroscopy reveals that the N-terminal SH2 domains within a ZAP70-tandem-SH2 construct is the major site of interaction with phosphorylated ADAP-hSH3(N) and microscale thermophoresis (MST) indicates an intermediate binding affinity (Kd = 2.3 μm). Interestingly, although T cell receptor dependent events such as T cell/antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugate formation and adhesion are not affected by mutation of Y571, migration of T cells along a chemokine gradient is compromised. Thus, although most phospho-sites in ADAP are linked to T cell receptor related functions we have identified a unique phosphotyrosine that is solely required for chemokine induced T cell behavior.

  3. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aaliya; Bano, Bilqees

    2011-02-01

    Studies on the role of endogenous metabolites such as bilirubin and their interactions with biomolecules have attracted considerable attention over the past several years. In this work, the interaction of bilirubin (BR) with purified goat liver cystatin (LC) was studied using fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. The fluorescence data proved that the fluorescence quenching of liver cystatin by BR was the result of BR-cystatin complex formation. Stern-Volmer analysis of fluorescence quenching data showed the binding constant to be 9.27 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ and the number of binding sites to be close to unity. The conformation of the BR-cystatin complex was found to change upon varying the pH of the complex. The BR-cystatin complex was found to have reduced papain inhibitory activity. Photo-illumination of BR-cystatin complex causes perturbation in the micro-environment of goat liver cystatin as indicated by red-shift. This report summarizes our research efforts to reveal the mechanism of interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

  4. Implementing Japanese Lesson Study in Foreign Countries: Misconceptions Revealed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujii, Toshiakira

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on data gathered during visits to Uganda and Malawi, conducted by the International Math-teacher Professionalization Using Lesson Study (IMPULS) project and the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The author's observations and experiences highlighted misconceptions about lesson study. The paper concludes that…

  5. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  6. Interactivity in the Online Learning Environment: A Study of Users of the North Carolina Virtual Public School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingerham, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies of online learning environments reveal the importance of interaction within the virtual environment. Abrami, Bernard, Bures, Borokhovski, and Tamim (2011) identify and study 3 types of student interactions: student-content, student-teacher, and student-student. This article builds on this classification of interactions as it…

  7. Magma-tectonic interactions at Kilauea volcano revealed by the modeling of geodetic and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, C.; Roman, D. C.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.; Hooper, A. J.; Fukushima, Y.; Cayol, V.

    2013-12-01

    InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) provides high-spatial-resolution measurements of surface deformation with centimeter-scale accuracy. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, volcano-tectonic earthquakes (VTs) occur in conjunction with stronger tectonic earthquakes due to interaction between existing fault structures and magmatic and tectonic processes. In particular, Kilauea's southern flank is sliding seaward along a large crustal detachment fault (décollement), located at the interface between the volcano and the preexisting ocean floor at about 9-12 km depth, that occasionally produces large-magnitude and destructive earthquakes. In contrast, swarms of low-magnitude earthquakes (

  8. Earthquake behavior of the Enriquillo fault zone, Haiti revealed by interactive terrain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Bernardin, T. S.; Oskin, M. E.; Bowles, C. J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Elliott, A. J.; Bishop, M. S.; Gold, R. D.; Morelan, A.; Bawden, G. W.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Mw 7.0 January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake ended 240 years of relative quiescence following earthquakes that destroyed Port-au-Prince in 1751 and 1770. We place the 2010 rupture in the context of past earthquakes and future hazards by using remote analysis of airborne LiDAR to observe the topographic expression of active faulting and develop a new conceptual model for the earthquake behavior of the eastern Enriquillo fault zone (EFZ). In this model, the 2010 event occupies a long-lived segment boundary at a stepover within the EFZ separating fault segments that likely ruptured in 1751 and 1770, explaining both past clustering and the lack of 2010 surface rupture. Immediately following the 2010 earthquake, an airborne LiDAR point cloud containing over 2.7 billion point measurements of surface features was collected by the Rochester Inst. of Technology. To analyze these data, we capitalize on the human capacity to visually identify meaningful patterns embedded in noisy data by conducting interactive visual analysis of the entire 66.8 GB Haiti terrain data in a 4-sided, 800 ft3 immersive virtual-reality environment at the UC Davis KeckCAVES using the software tools LiDAR Viewer (to analyze point cloud data) and Crusta (for 3D surficial geologic mapping on DEM data). We discovered and measured landforms displaced by past surface-rupturing earthquakes and remotely characterized the regional fault geometry. Our analysis of the ~50 km long reach of EFZ spanning the 2010 epicenter indicates that geomorphic evidence of active faulting is clearer east of the epicenter than to the west. West of the epicenter, and in the region of the 2010 rupture, the fault is poorly defined along an embayed, low-relief range front, with little evidence of recent surface rupture. In contrast, landform offsets of 6 to 50 m along the reach of the EFZ east of the epicenter and closest to Port-au-Prince attest to repeated recent surface-rupturing earthquakes here. Specifically, we found and

  9. A unique PDZ domain and arrestin-like fold interaction reveals mechanistic details of endocytic recycling by SNX27-retromer

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, Matthew; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Steinberg, Florian; Mas, Caroline; Ghai, Rajesh; Sessions, Richard B.; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Collins, Brett M.; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer complex is a major regulator of endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of transmembrane cargos that contain a PSD95, Dlg1, zo-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. Here we describe the core interaction in SNX27-retromer assembly and its functional relevance for cargo sorting. Crystal structures and NMR experiments reveal that an exposed β-hairpin in the SNX27 PDZ domain engages a groove in the arrestin-like structure of the vacuolar protein sorting 26A (VPS26A) retromer subunit. The structure establishes how the SNX27 PDZ domain simultaneously binds PDZ-binding motifs and retromer-associated VPS26. Importantly, VPS26A binding increases the affinity of the SNX27 PDZ domain for PDZ- binding motifs by an order of magnitude, revealing cooperativity in cargo selection. With disruption of SNX27 and retromer function linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegenerative disease, our work provides the first step, to our knowledge, in the molecular description of this important sorting complex, and more broadly describes a unique interaction between a PDZ domain and an arrestin-like fold. PMID:25136126

  10. Dynamic Precipitation Recycling Model - Small Timescales Reveal new Land/Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, F.; Kumar, P.

    2005-12-01

    The present work focuses on precipitation recycling, or the contribution of local evapotranspiration to precipitation events. Computations of precipitation recycling using analytical models are generally performed under the assumption of negligible change in moisture storage in the atmospheric column. Because the moisture storage term is non-negligible at smaller time scales, most recycling studies using analytical models are done at monthly or longer time scales. We present a new dynamic precipitation recycling model that incorporates the change in moisture storage. It is derived formally from the conservation of mass equation, and presented in a simple and computationally efficient form. This model allows for recycling analysis at a range of temporal scales, from daily to monthly and longer, unveiling complex relationships between recycling calculated at different scales. At a daily timescale, new links between precipitation recycling and the components of the water budget emerge. Using Reanalysis II (R-II) data, we show that evapotranspiration and the recycling ratio are not monotonically increasing/decreasing functions of precipitation. Furthermore, the daily analysis enables us to study the conditions that modulate recycling in terms of the thermodynamic structure and the humidity of the overlying atmosphere. We will also present an analysis of precipitation recycling from an ecosystem perspective. Recycling calculations are performed on selected ecological regions of the US, each presenting similar long-term climate, vegetation, soil, physiographic and land use characteristics. We focus on the characteristic scales of convection that trigger precipitation. North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data is used, as it provides higher spatial resolution required for this type of analysis. The results from the ecosystem perspective enable us to better understand how the land surface characteristics of a region affect the recycling process. This serves as a first

  11. De-novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of Metschnikowia fructicola reveals differences in gene expression following interaction with Penicillium digitatum and grapefruit peel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The yeast Metschnikowia fructicola is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of several fruits. We performed a transcriptome analysis, using RNA-Seq technology, to examine the response of M. fructicola with citrus fruit and with the postharvest pathogen, Penicillium digitatum. Results More than 26 million sequencing reads were assembled into 9,674 unigenes. Approximately 50% of the unigenes could be annotated based on homology matches in the NCBI database. Based on homology, sequences were annotated with a gene description, gene ontology (GO term), and clustered into functional groups. An analysis of differential expression when the yeast was interacting with the fruit vs. the pathogen revealed more than 250 genes with specific expression responses. In the antagonist-pathogen interaction, genes related to transmembrane, multidrug transport and to amino acid metabolism were induced. In the antagonist-fruit interaction, expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, iron homeostasis, zinc homeostasis, and lipid metabolism were induced. Patterns of gene expression in the two interactions were examined at the individual transcript level by quantitative real-time PCR analysis (RT-qPCR). Conclusion This study provides new insight into the biology of the tritrophic interactions that occur in a biocontrol system such as the use of the yeast, M. fructicola for the control of green mold on citrus caused by P. digitatum. PMID:23496978

  12. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. PMID:27247276

  13. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  14. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  15. Quantitative interaction screen of telomeric repeat-containing RNA reveals novel TERRA regulators.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, Marion; Arnoult, Nausica; Kappei, Dennis; Buchholz, Frank; Decottignies, Anabelle; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Telomeres are actively transcribed into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), which has been implicated in the regulation of telomere length and heterochromatin formation. Here, we applied quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to obtain a high-confidence interactome of TERRA. Using SILAC-labeled nuclear cell lysates in an RNA pull-down experiment and two different salt conditions, we distinguished 115 proteins binding specifically to TERRA out of a large set of background binders. While TERRA binders identified in two previous studies showed little overlap, using quantitative mass spectrometry we obtained many candidates reported in these two studies. To test whether novel candidates found here are involved in TERRA regulation, we performed an esiRNA-based interference analysis for 15 of them. Knockdown of 10 genes encoding candidate proteins significantly affected total cellular levels of TERRA, and RNAi of five candidates perturbed TERRA recruitment to telomeres. Notably, depletion of SRRT/ARS2, involved in miRNA processing, up-regulated both total and telomere-bound TERRA. Conversely, knockdown of MORF4L2, a component of the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex, reduced TERRA levels both globally and for telomere-bound TERRA. We thus identified new proteins involved in the homeostasis and telomeric abundance of TERRA, extending our knowledge of TERRA regulation.

  16. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13325.001 PMID:27247276

  17. Study made of interaction between sound fields and structural vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. H.; Smith, P. W., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Study analyzes structural vibrations and the interactions between them and sound fields. It outlines a conceptual framework to analyze the vibrations of systems and their interactions, incorporating the results of earlier studies and establishing a unified basis for continuing research.

  18. Capture Hi-C reveals novel candidate genes and complex long-range interactions with related autoimmune risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Orozco, Gisela; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Barton, Anne; Wallace, Chris; Fraser, Peter; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been tremendously successful in identifying genetic variants associated with complex diseases. The majority of association signals are intergenic and evidence is accumulating that a high proportion of signals lie in enhancer regions. We use Capture Hi-C to investigate, for the first time, the interactions between associated variants for four autoimmune diseases and their functional targets in B- and T-cell lines. Here we report numerous looping interactions and provide evidence that only a minority of interactions are common to both B- and T-cell lines, suggesting interactions may be highly cell-type specific; some disease-associated SNPs do not interact with the nearest gene but with more compelling candidate genes (for example, FOXO1, AZI2) often situated several megabases away; and finally, regions associated with different autoimmune diseases interact with each other and the same promoter suggesting common autoimmune gene targets (for example, PTPRC, DEXI and ZFP36L1). PMID:26616563

  19. Reverse Chemical Genetics: Comprehensive Fitness Profiling Reveals the Spectrum of Drug Target Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunita; Bergeron, Julien R.; Mellor, Joseph C.; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and prevalence of drug resistance demands streamlined strategies to identify drug resistant variants in a fast, systematic and cost-effective way. Methods commonly used to understand and predict drug resistance rely on limited clinical studies from patients who are refractory to drugs or on laborious evolution experiments with poor coverage of the gene variants. Here, we report an integrative functional variomics methodology combining deep sequencing and a Bayesian statistical model to provide a comprehensive list of drug resistance alleles from complex variant populations. Dihydrofolate reductase, the target of methotrexate chemotherapy drug, was used as a model to identify functional mutant alleles correlated with methotrexate resistance. This systematic approach identified previously reported resistance mutations, as well as novel point mutations that were validated in vivo. Use of this systematic strategy as a routine diagnostics tool widens the scope of successful drug research and development. PMID:27588687

  20. Reverse Chemical Genetics: Comprehensive Fitness Profiling Reveals the Spectrum of Drug Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai H; Sinha, Sunita; Bergeron, Julien R; Mellor, Joseph C; Giaever, Guri; Flaherty, Patrick; Nislow, Corey

    2016-09-01

    The emergence and prevalence of drug resistance demands streamlined strategies to identify drug resistant variants in a fast, systematic and cost-effective way. Methods commonly used to understand and predict drug resistance rely on limited clinical studies from patients who are refractory to drugs or on laborious evolution experiments with poor coverage of the gene variants. Here, we report an integrative functional variomics methodology combining deep sequencing and a Bayesian statistical model to provide a comprehensive list of drug resistance alleles from complex variant populations. Dihydrofolate reductase, the target of methotrexate chemotherapy drug, was used as a model to identify functional mutant alleles correlated with methotrexate resistance. This systematic approach identified previously reported resistance mutations, as well as novel point mutations that were validated in vivo. Use of this systematic strategy as a routine diagnostics tool widens the scope of successful drug research and development. PMID:27588687

  1. Phosphate/Zinc Interaction Analysis in Two Lettuce Varieties Reveals Contrasting Effects on Biomass, Photosynthesis, and Dynamics of Pi Transport

    PubMed Central

    Bouain, Nadia; Kisko, Mushtak; Rouached, Aida; Dauzat, Myriam; Lacombe, Benoit; Belgaroui, Nibras; Ghnaya, Tahar; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre; Abdelly, Chedly

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) and Zinc (Zn) are essential nutrients for normal plant growth. Interaction between these elements has been observed in many crop plants. Despite its agronomic importance, the biological significance and genetic basis of this interaction remain largely unknown. Here we examined the Pi/Zn interaction in two lettuce (Lactuca sativa) varieties, namely, “Paris Island Cos” and “Kordaat.” The effects of variation in Pi and Zn supply were assessed on biomass and photosynthesis for each variety. Paris Island Cos displayed better growth and photosynthesis compared to Kordaat under all the conditions tested. Correlation analysis was performed to determine the interconnectivity between Pi and Zn intracellular contents in both varieties. Paris Island Cos showed a strong negative correlation between the accumulation levels of Pi and Zn in shoots and roots. However, no relation was observed for Kordaat. The increase of Zn concentration in the medium causes a decrease in dynamics of Pi transport in Paris Island Cos, but not in Kordaat plants. Taken together, results revealed a contrasting behavior between the two lettuce varieties in terms of the coregulation of Pi and Zn homeostasis and provided evidence in favor of a genetic basis for the interconnection of these two elements. PMID:25025059

  2. Bimolecular complementation affinity purification (BiCAP) reveals dimer-specific protein interactions for ERBB2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Croucher, David R; Iconomou, Mary; Hastings, Jordan F; Kennedy, Sean P; Han, Jeremy Z R; Shearer, Robert F; McKenna, Jessie; Wan, Adrian; Lau, Joseph; Aparicio, Samuel; Saunders, Darren N

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of multiprotein complexes is a central mechanism of many cell signaling pathways. This process is key to maintaining the spatiotemporal specificity required for an accurate, yet adaptive, response to rapidly changing cellular conditions. We describe a technique for the specific isolation and downstream proteomic characterization of any two interacting proteins, to the exclusion of their individual moieties and competing binding partners. We termed the approach bimolecular complementation affinity purification (BiCAP) because it combines the use of conformation-specific nanobodies with a protein-fragment complementation assay with affinity purification. Using BiCAP, we characterized the specific interactome of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family member ERBB2 when in the form of a homodimer or when in the form of a heterodimer with either EGFR or ERBB3. We identified dimer-specific interaction patterns for key adaptor proteins and identified a number of previously unknown interacting partners. Functional analysis for one of these newly identified partners revealed a noncanonical mechanism of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation that is specific to the ERBB2:ERBB3 heterodimer and acts through the adaptor protein FAM59A in breast cancer cells. PMID:27405979

  3. Developmental palaeontology of Reptilia as revealed by histological studies.

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Klein, Nicole; Sander, P Martin

    2010-06-01

    Among the fossilized ontogenetic series known for tetrapods, only more basal groups like temnospondyl amphibians have been used extensively in developmental studies, whereas reptilian and synapsid data have been largely neglected so far. However, before such ontogenetic series can be subject to study, the relative age and affiliation of putative specimens within a series has to be verified. Bone histology has a long-standing tradition as being a source of palaeobiological and growth history data in fossil amniotes and indeed, the analysis of bone microstructures still remains the most important and most reliable tool for determining the absolute ontogenetic age of fossil vertebrates. It is also the only direct way to reconstruct life histories and growth strategies for extinct animals. Herein the record of bone histology among Reptilia and its application to elucidate and expand fossilized ontogenies as a source of developmental data are reviewed.

  4. Recent advances in maize nuclear proteomic studies reveal histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is highly dynamic and complex, containing different types of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and a wide range of proteins. Novel proteomic applications have led to a better overall determination of nucleus protein content. Although nuclear plant proteomics is only at the initial phase, several studies have been reported and are summarized in this review using different plants species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover. These include the description of the total nuclear or phospho-proteome (i.e., Arabidopsis, cowpea, onion), or the analysis of the differential nuclear proteome under different growth environments (i.e., Arabidopsis, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover). However, only few reports exist on the analysis of the maize nuclear proteome or its changes under various conditions. This review will present recent data on the study of the nuclear maize proteome, including the analysis of changes in posttranslational modifications in histone proteins. PMID:23248634

  5. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  6. TROL-FNR interaction reveals alternative pathways of electron partitioning in photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Lea; Carić, Dejana; Cesar, Vera; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Kveder, Marina; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ is accomplished by the flavo enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR). FNR is recruited to thylakoid membranes via integral membrane thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL. We address the fate of electrons downstream of photosystem I when TROL is absent. We have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study free radical formation and electron partitioning in TROL-depleted chloroplasts. DMPO was used to detect superoxide anion (O2.−) formation, while the generation of other free radicals was monitored by Tiron. Chloroplasts from trol plants pre-acclimated to different light conditions consistently exhibited diminished O2.− accumulation. Generation of other radical forms was elevated in trol chloroplasts in all tested conditions, except for the plants pre-acclimated to high-light. Remarkably, dark- and growth light-acclimated trol chloroplasts were resilient to O2.− generation induced by methyl-viologen. We propose that the dynamic binding and release of FNR from TROL can control the flow of photosynthetic electrons prior to activation of the pseudo-cyclic electron transfer pathway. PMID:26041075

  7. Insights into autophagosome maturation revealed by the structures of ATG5 with its interacting partners

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hoe; Hong, Seung Beom; Lee, Jae Keun; Han, Sisu; Roh, Kyung-Hye; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Yoon Ki; Choi, Eui-Ju; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulky catabolic process that responds to nutrient homeostasis and extracellular stress signals and is a conserved mechanism in all eukaryotes. When autophagy is induced, cellular components are sequestered within an autophagosome and finally degraded by subsequent fusion with a lysosome. During this process, the ATG12–ATG5 conjugate requires 2 different binding partners, ATG16L1 for autophagosome elongation and TECPR1 for lysosomal fusion. In our current study, we describe the crystal structures of human ATG5 in complex with an N-terminal domain of ATG16L1 as well as an internal AIR domain of TECPR1. Both binding partners exhibit a similar α-helical structure containing a conserved binding motif termed AFIM. Furthermore, we characterize the critical role of the C-terminal unstructured region of the AIR domain of TECPR1. These findings are further confirmed by biochemical and cell biological analyses. These results provide new insights into the molecular details of the autophagosome maturation process, from its elongation to its fusion with a lysosome. PMID:25951193

  8. Synergistic interaction between ankle and knee during hopping revealed through induced acceleration analysis.

    PubMed

    João, Filipa; Veloso, António; Cabral, Sílvia; Moniz-Pereira, Vera; Kepple, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The forces produced by the muscles can deliver energy to a target segment they are not attached to, by transferring this energy throughout the other segments in the chain. This is a synergistic way of functioning, which allows muscles to accelerate or decelerate segments in order to reach the target one. The purpose of this study was to characterize the contribution of each lower extremity joint to the vertical acceleration of the body's center of mass during a hopping exercise. To accomplish this, an induced acceleration analysis was performed using a model with eight segments. The results indicate that the strategies produced during a hopping exercise rely on the synergy between the knee and ankle joints, with most of the vertical acceleration being produced by the knee extensors, while the ankle plantar flexors act as stabilizers of the foot. This synergy between the ankle and the knee is perhaps a mechanism that allows the transfer of power from the knee muscles to the ground, and we believe that in this particular task the net action of the foot and ankle moments is to produce a stable foot with little overall acceleration.

  9. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  10. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Osnat; Cohen, Yifat; Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus.

  11. Spectroscopic Study on the Interaction of 4-dimethylaminochalcones with Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomečková, V.; Revická, M.; Sassen, A.; Veliká, B.; Stupák, M.; Perjési, P.

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic properties of 4'-dimethylaminochalcone ( 1a) and its cyclic analogs 2a-4a have been studied in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (i.e., egg yolk lecithin and dipalmitoylpho sphatidylcholine), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lipoprotein particles (i.e., bovine serum albumin plus egg yolk lecithin). The spectral results showed that compounds 1a-4a formed hydrophobic interactions with the phospholipids, lipoproteins, and BSA at the polar/nonpolar interface. Compounds 3a and 4a exhibited the strongest hydrophobic interactions of all of the compounds tested towards the phospholipids. Compound 2a gave the best fluorescent fluorophore indicating interactions with the lipids, lipoproteins, and proteins. Fluorescent microscopic imaging of breast cancer cells treated with compounds 1a-4a revealed that they could be used to stain all of the cellular components and destroy the nuclear structure. Compounds 1a-4a were found to be concentrated predominantly on the surfaces of the liposomes and lipoproteins.

  12. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  13. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Keaton, Jacob M; Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rich, Stephen S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10-6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  14. Studies of Ancient Lice Reveal Unsuspected Past Migrations of Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Drali, Rezak; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Yesilyurt, Gonca; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Lice are among the oldest parasites of humans representing an excellent marker of the evolution and migration of our species over time. Here, we analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) developed in this study the mitochondrial DNA of seven ancient head louse eggs found on hair remains recovered from two sites in Israel: 1) five nits dating from Chalcolithic period (4,000 bc) were found in the Cave of the Treasure located at Nahal Mishmar, in the Judean Desert and 2) two nits dating from Early Islamic Period (ad 650–810) were found in Nahal Omer in the Arava Valley (between Dead Sea and Red Sea). Our results suggest that these eggs belonged to people originating from west Africa based on identification of the louse mitochondrial sub-clade specific to that region. PMID:26078317

  15. Multiple parton interaction studies at DØ

    DOE PAGES

    Lincoln, D.

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present the results of studies of multiparton interactions done by the DØ collaboration using the Fermilab Tevatron at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. We also present three analyses, involving three distinct final signatures: (a) a photon with at least 3 jets ( γ + 3jets), (b) a photon with a bottom or charm quark tagged jet and at least 2 other jets ( γ + b/c + 2jets), and (c) two J/ ψ mesons. The fraction of photon + jet events initiated by double parton scattering is about 20%, while the fraction for events inmore » which two J/ ψ mesons were produced is 30 ± 10. While the two measurements are statistically compatible, the difference might indicate differences in the quark and gluon distribution within a nucleon. Finally, this speculation originates from the fact that photon + jet events are created by collisions with quarks in the initial states, while J/ ψ events are produced preferentially by a gluonic initial state.« less

  16. Interaction study between enoxacin and fluvoxamine.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Toshiki; Fukasawa, Takashi; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Aoshima, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Akihito; Tateishi, Tomonori; Inoue, Yoshimasa; Otani, Koichi

    2005-06-01

    Authors examined a possible interaction between enoxacin, an inhibitor of cytochrome P4501A2, and fluvoxamine (FLV), a substrate for this enzyme. Ten healthy male volunteers received enoxacin 200 mg/d or placebo for 11 days in a double-blind randomized crossover manner, and on the eighth day they received a single oral 50-mg dose of FLV. Blood samplings and pharmacodynamic evaluation were conducted up to 72 hours after FLV dosing. Plasma concentrations of FLV and its active metabolite fluvoxamino acid (FLA) were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Enoxacin significantly increased the plasma concentrations at 2 hours (placebo versus enoxacin, mean+/-SD: 4.4+/-2.4 vs 7.0+/-4.1 ng/mL, P<0.05) and 3 hours (7.4+/-2.7 vs 11.2+/-3.8 ng/mL, P<0.01) and the Cmax (10.2+/-2.9 vs 11.6+/-4.0 ng/mL, P<0.05) of FLV. Plasma concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters of FLA were not affected by enoxacin. Enoxacin significantly (P<0.05) increased the scores of the Stanford Sleepiness Scale from 0.5 to 4 hours, suggesting that enoxacin increased the sleepiness produced by FLV. The present study suggests that enoxacin slightly inhibits the metabolism of FLV, and enoxacin should be combined with FLV with caution.

  17. Crystallization force--a density functional theory concept for revealing intermolecular interactions and molecular packing in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Tonglei; Ayers, Paul W; Liu, Shubin; Swadley, Matthew J; Aubrey-Medendorp, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Organic molecules are prone to polymorphic formation in the solid state due to the rich diversity of functional groups that results in comparable intermolecular interactions, which can be greatly affected by the selection of solvent and other crystallization conditions. Intermolecular interactions are typically weak forces, such as van der Waals and stronger short-range ones including hydrogen bonding, that are believed to determine the packing of organic molecules during the crystal-growth process. A different packing of the same molecules leads to the formation of a new crystal structure. To disclose the underlying causes that drive the molecule to have various packing motifs in the solid state, an electronic concept or function within the framework of conceptual density functional theory has been developed, namely, crystallization force. The concept aims to describe the local change in electronic structure as a result of the self-assembly process of crystallization and may likely quantify the locality of intermolecular interactions that directs the molecular packing in a crystal. To assess the applicability of the concept, 5-methyl-2-[(2-nitrophenyl)amino]-3-thiophenecarbonitrile, so-called ROY, which is known to have the largest number of solved polymorphs, has been examined. Electronic calculations were conducted on the seven available crystal structures as well as on the single molecule. The electronic structures were analyzed and crystallization force values were obtained. The results indicate that the crystallization forces are able to reveal intermolecular interactions in the crystals, in particular, the close contacts that are formed between molecules. Strong correlations exist between the total crystallization force and lattice energy of a crystal structure, further suggesting the underlying connection between the crystallization force and molecular packing.

  18. Toxin Diversity Revealed by a Transcriptomic Study of Ornithoctonus huwena

    PubMed Central

    He, Quanze; Liu, Jinyan; Luo, Ji; Zhu, Li; Lu, Shanshan; Huang, Pengfei; Chen, Xinyi; Zeng, Xiongzhi; Liang, Songping

    2014-01-01

    Spider venom comprises a mixture of compounds with diverse biological activities, which are used to capture prey and defend against predators. The peptide components bind a broad range of cellular targets with high affinity and selectivity, and appear to have remarkable structural diversity. Although spider venoms have been intensively investigated over the past few decades, venomic strategies to date have generally focused on high-abundance peptides. In addition, the lack of complete spider genomes or representative cDNA libraries has presented significant limitations for researchers interested in molecular diversity and understanding the genetic mechanisms of toxin evolution. In the present study, second-generation sequencing technologies, combined with proteomic analysis, were applied to determine the diverse peptide toxins in venom of the Chinese bird spider Ornithoctonus huwena. In total, 626 toxin precursor sequences were retrieved from transcriptomic data. All toxin precursors clustered into 16 gene superfamilies, which included six novel superfamilies and six novel cysteine patterns. A surprisingly high number of hypermutations and fragment insertions/deletions were detected, which accounted for the majority of toxin gene sequences with low-level expression. These mutations contribute to the formation of diverse cysteine patterns and highly variable isoforms. Furthermore, intraspecific venom variability, in combination with variable transcripts and peptide processing, contributes to the hypervariability of toxins in venoms, and associated rapid and adaptive evolution of toxins for prey capture and defense. PMID:24949878

  19. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  20. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  1. Analysis of a summary network of co-infection in humans reveals that parasites interact most via shared resources.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Emily C; Pedersen, Amy B; Fenton, Andy; Petchey, Owen L

    2014-05-01

    Simultaneous infection by multiple parasite species (viruses, bacteria, helminths, protozoa or fungi) is commonplace. Most reports show co-infected humans to have worse health than those with single infections. However, we have little understanding of how co-infecting parasites interact within human hosts. We used data from over 300 published studies to construct a network that offers the first broad indications of how groups of co-infecting parasites tend to interact. The network had three levels comprising parasites, the resources they consume and the immune responses they elicit, connected by potential, observed and experimentally proved links. Pairs of parasite species had most potential to interact indirectly through shared resources, rather than through immune responses or other parasites. In addition, the network comprised 10 tightly knit groups, eight of which were associated with particular body parts, and seven of which were dominated by parasite-resource links. Reported co-infection in humans is therefore structured by physical location within the body, with bottom-up, resource-mediated processes most often influencing how, where and which co-infecting parasites interact. The many indirect interactions show how treating an infection could affect other infections in co-infected patients, but the compartmentalized structure of the network will limit how far these indirect effects are likely to spread.

  2. Global analysis of Arabidopsis/downy mildew interactions reveals prevalence of incomplete resistance and rapid evolution of pathogen recognition.

    PubMed

    Krasileva, Ksenia V; Zheng, Connie; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Goritschnig, Sandra; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Staskawicz, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana and its native obligate oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) represent a model system to study evolution of natural variation in a host/pathogen interaction. Both Arabidopsis and Hpa genomes are sequenced and collections of different sub-species are available. We analyzed ∼400 interactions between different Arabidopsis accessions and five strains of Hpa. We examined the pathogen's overall ability to reproduce on a given host, and performed detailed cytological staining to assay for pathogen growth and hypersensitive cell death response in the host. We demonstrate that intermediate levels of resistance are prevalent among Arabidopsis populations and correlate strongly with host developmental stage. In addition to looking at plant responses to challenge by whole pathogen inoculations, we investigated the Arabidopsis resistance attributed to recognition of the individual Hpa effectors, ATR1 and ATR13. Our results suggest that recognition of these effectors is evolutionarily dynamic and does not form a single clade in overall Arabidopsis phylogeny for either effector. Furthermore, we show that the ultimate outcome of the interactions can be modified by the pathogen, despite a defined gene-for-gene resistance in the host. These data indicate that the outcome of disease and disease resistance depends on genome-for-genome interactions between the host and its pathogen, rather than single gene pairs as thought previously. PMID:22194907

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Interaction between a Plant Virus and Its Vector Insect Reveals New Functions of Hemipteran Cuticular Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Gray, Stewart; Huo, Yan; Li, Li; Wei, Taiyun; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-08-01

    Numerous viruses can be transmitted by their corresponding vector insects; however, the molecular mechanisms enabling virus transmission by vector insects have been poorly understood, especially the identity of vector components interacting with the virus. Here, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to study proteomic interactions of a plant virus (Rice stripe virus, RSV, genus Tenuivirus) with its vector insect, small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Sixty-six proteins of L. striatellus that interacted with the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV were identified. A virus-insect interaction network, constructed for pc3 and 29 protein homologs of Drosophila melanogaster, suggested that nine proteins might directly interact with pc3. Of the 66 proteins, five (atlasin, a novel cuticular protein, jagunal, NAC domain protein, and vitellogenin) were most likely to be involved in viral movement, replication, and transovarial transmission. This work also provides evidence that the novel cuticular protein, CPR1, from L. striatellus is essential for RSV transmission by its vector insect. CPR1 binds the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV both in vivo and in vitro and colocalizes with RSV in the hemocytes of L. striatellus. Knockdown of CPR1 transcription using RNA interference resulted in a decrease in the concentration of RSV in the hemolymph, salivary glands and in viral transmission efficiency. These data suggest that CPR1 binds RSV in the insect and stabilizes the viral concentration in the hemolymph, perhaps to protect the virus or to help move the virus to the salivary tissues. Our studies provide direct experimental evidence that viruses can use existing vector proteins to aid their survival in the hemolymph. Identifying these putative vector molecules should lead to a better understanding of the interactions between viruses and vector insects. PMID:26091699

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Interaction between a Plant Virus and Its Vector Insect Reveals New Functions of Hemipteran Cuticular Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenwen; Gray, Stewart; Huo, Yan; Li, Li; Wei, Taiyun; Wang, Xifeng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous viruses can be transmitted by their corresponding vector insects; however, the molecular mechanisms enabling virus transmission by vector insects have been poorly understood, especially the identity of vector components interacting with the virus. Here, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to study proteomic interactions of a plant virus (Rice stripe virus, RSV, genus Tenuivirus) with its vector insect, small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus). Sixty-six proteins of L. striatellus that interacted with the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV were identified. A virus–insect interaction network, constructed for pc3 and 29 protein homologs of Drosophila melanogaster, suggested that nine proteins might directly interact with pc3. Of the 66 proteins, five (atlasin, a novel cuticular protein, jagunal, NAC domain protein, and vitellogenin) were most likely to be involved in viral movement, replication, and transovarial transmission. This work also provides evidence that the novel cuticular protein, CPR1, from L. striatellus is essential for RSV transmission by its vector insect. CPR1 binds the nucleocapsid protein (pc3) of RSV both in vivo and in vitro and colocalizes with RSV in the hemocytes of L. striatellus. Knockdown of CPR1 transcription using RNA interference resulted in a decrease in the concentration of RSV in the hemolymph, salivary glands and in viral transmission efficiency. These data suggest that CPR1 binds RSV in the insect and stabilizes the viral concentration in the hemolymph, perhaps to protect the virus or to help move the virus to the salivary tissues. Our studies provide direct experimental evidence that viruses can use existing vector proteins to aid their survival in the hemolymph. Identifying these putative vector molecules should lead to a better understanding of the interactions between viruses and vector insects. PMID:26091699

  5. Different foraging preferences of hummingbirds on artificial and natural flowers reveal mechanisms structuring plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Maglianesi, María A; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Schleuning, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    In plant-pollinator networks, the floral morphology of food plants is an important determinant of the interaction niche of pollinators. Studies on foraging preferences of pollinators combining experimental and observational approaches may help to understand the mechanisms behind patterns of interactions and niche partitioning within pollinator communities. In this study, we tested whether morphological floral traits were associated with foraging preferences of hummingbirds for artificial and natural flower types in Costa Rica. We performed field experiments with artificial feeders, differing in length and curvature of flower types, to quantify the hummingbirds' interaction niche under unlimited nectar resources. To quantify the interaction niche under real-world conditions of limited nectar resources, we measured foraging preferences of hummingbirds for a total of 34 plant species. Artificial feeders were visited by Eupherusa nigriventris and Phaethornis guy in the pre-montane forest, and Lampornis calolaemus in the lower montane forest. Under experimental conditions, all three hummingbird species overlapped their interaction niches and showed a preference for the short artificial flower type over the long-straight and the long-curved flower types. Under natural conditions, the two co-occurring hummingbird species preferred to feed on plant species with floral traits corresponding to their bill morphology. The short-billed hummingbird E. nigriventris preferred to feed on short and straight flowers, whereas the long- and curved-billed P. guy preferred long and curved natural flowers. The medium-size billed species L. calolaemus preferred to feed on flowers of medium length and did not show preferences for plant species with specific corolla curvature. Our results show that floral morphological traits constrain access by short-billed hummingbird species to nectar resources. Morphological constraints, therefore, represent one important mechanism structuring trophic

  6. Different foraging preferences of hummingbirds on artificial and natural flowers reveal mechanisms structuring plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Maglianesi, María A; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Schleuning, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    In plant-pollinator networks, the floral morphology of food plants is an important determinant of the interaction niche of pollinators. Studies on foraging preferences of pollinators combining experimental and observational approaches may help to understand the mechanisms behind patterns of interactions and niche partitioning within pollinator communities. In this study, we tested whether morphological floral traits were associated with foraging preferences of hummingbirds for artificial and natural flower types in Costa Rica. We performed field experiments with artificial feeders, differing in length and curvature of flower types, to quantify the hummingbirds' interaction niche under unlimited nectar resources. To quantify the interaction niche under real-world conditions of limited nectar resources, we measured foraging preferences of hummingbirds for a total of 34 plant species. Artificial feeders were visited by Eupherusa nigriventris and Phaethornis guy in the pre-montane forest, and Lampornis calolaemus in the lower montane forest. Under experimental conditions, all three hummingbird species overlapped their interaction niches and showed a preference for the short artificial flower type over the long-straight and the long-curved flower types. Under natural conditions, the two co-occurring hummingbird species preferred to feed on plant species with floral traits corresponding to their bill morphology. The short-billed hummingbird E. nigriventris preferred to feed on short and straight flowers, whereas the long- and curved-billed P. guy preferred long and curved natural flowers. The medium-size billed species L. calolaemus preferred to feed on flowers of medium length and did not show preferences for plant species with specific corolla curvature. Our results show that floral morphological traits constrain access by short-billed hummingbird species to nectar resources. Morphological constraints, therefore, represent one important mechanism structuring trophic

  7. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-12-09

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone.

  8. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02504.001 PMID:25487987

  9. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors.

    PubMed

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-19

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  10. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  11. Interaction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. alpha. -factor with phospholipid vesicles as revealed by proton and phosphorus NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Jelicks, L.A.; Broido, M.S.; Becker, J.M.; Naider, F.R. )

    1989-05-16

    Proton and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR) studies of the interaction between a tridecapeptide pheromone, the {alpha}-factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and sonicated lipid vesicles are reported. {sup 31}P NMR studies demonstrate that there is interaction of the peptide with the phosphorus headgroups, and quasielastic light scattering (QLS) studies indicate that lipid vesicles increase in size upon addition of peptide. Previous solution (aqueous and DMSO) studies from this laboratory indicate that {alpha}-factor is highly flexible with only one long-lived identifiable structural feature, a type II {beta}-turn spanning the central portion of the peptide. Two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) studies demonstrate a marked ordering of the peptide upon interaction with lipid, suggesting a compact N-terminus, in addition to a stabilized {beta}-turn. In contrast to these results in both solution and lipid environment, Wakamatsu et al. proposed a lipid environment conformation, on the basis of one-dimensional transferred NOE studies in D{sub 2}O, which does not include the {beta}-turn.

  12. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  13. IF-combined smRNA FISH reveals interaction of MCPIP1 protein with IER3 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, Jakub; Wawro, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MCPIP1 and IER3 are recently described proteins essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. IER3 is involved in the regulation of apoptosis and differentiation and has been shown lately to protect activated T cells and macrophages from apoptosis. MCPIP1 is an RNase critical for controlling inflammation-related mRNAs. MCPIP1 interacts with and degrades a set of stem-loop-containing mRNAs (including IL-6). Our results demonstrate the involvement of MCPIP1 in the regulation of IER3 mRNA levels. A dual luciferase assay revealed that over-expression of MCPIP1 resulted in a decrease of luciferase activity in the samples co-transfected with constructs containing luciferase CDS attached to IER3 3′UTR. We identified a stem-loop structure similar to that described to be important for destabilization of the IL-6 mRNA by MCPIP1. Examination of IER3 3′UTR sequence, structure and evolutionary conservation revealed that the identified stem-loop is buried within a bigger element. Deletion of this fragment abolished the regulation of IER3 3′UTR-containing transcript by MCPIP1. Finally, using immunofluorescence-combined single-molecule RNA FISH we have shown that the MCPIP1 protein co-localizes with IER3 mRNA. By this method we also proved that the presence of the wild-type NYN/PIN-like domain of MCPIP1 correlated with the decreased level of IER3 mRNA. RNA immunoprecipitation further confirmed the interaction of MCPIP1 with IER3 transcripts in vivo. PMID:27256408

  14. Meta-analysis reveals complex marine biological responses to the interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ben P; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan; Moore, Pippa J

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification and warming are considered two of the greatest threats to marine biodiversity, yet the combined effect of these stressors on marine organisms remains largely unclear. Using a meta-analytical approach, we assessed the biological responses of marine organisms to the effects of ocean acidification and warming in isolation and combination. As expected biological responses varied across taxonomic groups, life-history stages, and trophic levels, but importantly, combining stressors generally exhibited a stronger biological (either positive or negative) effect. Using a subset of orthogonal studies, we show that four of five of the biological responses measured (calcification, photosynthesis, reproduction, and survival, but not growth) interacted synergistically when warming and acidification were combined. The observed synergisms between interacting stressors suggest that care must be made in making inferences from single-stressor studies. Our findings clearly have implications for the development of adaptive management strategies particularly given that the frequency of stressors interacting in marine systems will be likely to intensify in the future. There is now an urgent need to move toward more robust, holistic, and ecologically realistic climate change experiments that incorporate interactions. Without them accurate predictions about the likely deleterious impacts to marine biodiversity and ecosystem functioning over the next century will not be possible. PMID:23610641

  15. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  16. Bathymetry data reveal glaciers vulnerable to ice-ocean interaction in Uummannaq and Vaigat glacial fjords, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Fenty, I.; Xu, Y.; Cai, C.; Velicogna, I.; Cofaigh, C. Ó.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Weinrebe, W.; Catania, G.; Duncan, D.

    2016-03-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers play a critical role in controlling Greenland's ice sheet mass balance. Their frontal margins interact vigorously with the ocean, but our understanding of this interaction is limited, in part, by a lack of bathymetry data. Here we present a multibeam echo sounding survey of 14 glacial fjords in the Uummannaq and Vaigat fjords, west Greenland, which extends from the continental shelf to the glacier fronts. The data reveal valleys with shallow sills, overdeepenings (>1300 m) from glacial erosion, and seafloor depths 100-1000 m deeper than in existing charts. Where fjords are deep enough, we detect the pervasive presence of warm, salty Atlantic Water (AW) (>2.5°C) with high melt potential, but we also find numerous glaciers grounded on shallow (<200 m) sills, standing in cold (<1°C) waters in otherwise deep fjords, i.e., with reduced melt potential. Bathymetric observations extending to the glacier fronts are critical to understand the glacier evolution.

  17. Identification of ORC1/CDC6-interacting factors in Trypanosoma brucei reveals critical features of origin recognition complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Marcello, Lucio; Farr, Helen; Gadelha, Catarina; Burchmore, Richard; Barry, J David; Bell, Stephen D; McCulloch, Richard

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication initiates by formation of a pre-replication complex on sequences termed origins. In eukaryotes, the pre-replication complex is composed of the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC), Cdc6 and the MCM replicative helicase in conjunction with Cdt1. Eukaryotic ORC is considered to be composed of six subunits, named Orc1-6, and monomeric Cdc6 is closely related in sequence to Orc1. However, ORC has been little explored in protists, and only a single ORC protein, related to both Orc1 and Cdc6, has been shown to act in DNA replication in Trypanosoma brucei. Here we identify three highly diverged putative T. brucei ORC components that interact with ORC1/CDC6 and contribute to cell division. Two of these factors are so diverged that we cannot determine if they are eukaryotic ORC subunit orthologues, or are parasite-specific replication factors. The other we show to be a highly diverged Orc4 orthologue, demonstrating that this is one of the most widely conserved ORC subunits in protists and revealing it to be a key element of eukaryotic ORC architecture. Additionally, we have examined interactions amongst the T. brucei MCM subunits and show that this has the conventional eukaryotic heterohexameric structure, suggesting that divergence in the T. brucei replication machinery is limited to the earliest steps in origin licensing.

  18. Structure of Spike Count Correlations Reveals Functional Interactions between Neurons in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Area 8a of Behaving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Matthew L.; Pieper, Florian; Sachs, Adam; Joober, Ridha; Martinez-Trujillo, Julio C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons within the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) are clustered in microcolumns according to their visuospatial tuning. One issue that remains poorly investigated is how this anatomical arrangement influences functional interactions between neurons during behavior. To investigate this question we implanted 4 mm×4 mm multielectrode arrays in two macaques' dlPFC area 8a and measured spike count correlations (rsc) between responses of simultaneously recorded neurons when animals maintained stationary gaze. Positive and negative rsc were significantly higher than predicted by chance across a wide range of inter-neuron distances (from 0.4 to 4 mm). Positive rsc were stronger between neurons with receptive fields (RFs) separated by ≤90° of angular distance and progressively decreased as a function of inter-neuron physical distance. Negative rsc were stronger between neurons with RFs separated by >90° and increased as a function of inter-neuron distance. Our results show that short- and long-range functional interactions between dlPFC neurons depend on the physical distance between them and the relationship between their visuospatial tuning preferences. Neurons with similar visuospatial tuning show positive rsc that decay with inter-neuron distance, suggestive of excitatory interactions within and between adjacent microcolumns. Neurons with dissimilar tuning from spatially segregated microcolumns show negative rsc that increase with inter-neuron distance, suggestive of inhibitory interactions. This pattern of results shows that functional interactions between prefrontal neurons closely follow the pattern of connectivity reported in anatomical studies. Such interactions may be important for the role of the prefrontal cortex in the allocation of attention to targets in the presence of competing distracters. PMID:23630595

  19. A New Algorithm for Integrated Analysis of miRNA-mRNA Interactions Based on Individual Classification Reveals Insights into Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Nikolai; Stephan, Carsten; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Jung, Klaus; Preissner, Robert; Meyer, Hellmuth-A.

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. It has been proposed that miRNAs play an important role in cancer development and progression. Their ability to affect multiple gene pathways by targeting various mRNAs makes them an interesting class of regulators. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed an algorithm, Classification based Analysis of Paired Expression data of RNA (CAPE RNA), which is capable of identifying altered miRNA-mRNA regulation between tissues samples that assigns interaction states to each sample without preexisting stratification of groups. The distribution of the assigned interaction states compared to given experimental groups is used to assess the quality of a predicted interaction. We demonstrate the applicability of our approach by analyzing urothelial carcinoma and normal bladder tissue samples derived from 24 patients. Using our approach, normal and tumor tissue samples as well as different stages of tumor progression were successfully stratified. Also, our results suggest interesting differentially regulated miRNA-mRNA interactions associated with bladder tumor progression. Conclusions/Significance The need for tools that allow an integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression data has been addressed. With this study, we provide an algorithm that emphasizes on the distribution of samples to rank differentially regulated miRNA-mRNA interactions. This is a new point of view compared to current approaches. From bootstrapping analysis, our ranking yields features that build strong classifiers. Further analysis reveals genes identified as differentially regulated by miRNAs to be enriched in cancer pathways, thus suggesting biologically interesting interactions. PMID:23717626

  20. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Wright, Gavin J.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC), and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further

  1. A low-altitude satellite interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienkowski, G. K.; Holman, J. M. L.; Mc Kinley, R. R.; Siskind, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    Two computer programs calculate interaction effects of high speed spacecraft on the environment at altitudes from 90 km to 150 km. EXT program determines fluid field in bodies of arbitrary geometries in transient flow regime. INT program uses EXT output and measures flow conditions inside spacecraft body.

  2. Space Shuttle interactive meteorological data system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. T.; Fox, R. J.; Benson, J. M.; Rueden, J. P.; Oehlkers, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Although focused toward the operational meteorological support review and definition of an operational meteorological interactive data display systems (MIDDS) requirements for the Space Meteorology Support Group at NASA/Johnson Space Center, the total operational meteorological support requirements and a systems concept for the MIDDS network integration of NASA and Air Force elements to support the National Space Transportation System are also addressed.

  3. Equilibrium-fluctuation-analysis of single liposome binding events reveals how cholesterol and Ca2+ modulate glycosphingolipid trans-interactions.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Angelika; Bally, Marta; Höök, Fredrik; Larson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions (CCIs) are of central importance for several biological processes. However, the ultra-weak nature of CCIs generates difficulties in studying this interaction, thus only little is known about CCIs. Here we present a highly sensitive equilibrium-fluctuation-analysis of single liposome binding events to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy that allows us to determine apparent kinetic rate constants of CCIs. The liposomes and SLBs both contained natural Le(x) glycosphingolipids (Galβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), which were employed to mimic cell-cell contacts. The kinetic parameters of the self-interaction between Le(x)-containing liposomes and SLBs were measured and found to be modulated by bivalent cations. Even more interestingly, upon addition of cholesterol, the strength of the CCIs increases, suggesting that this interaction is strongly influenced by a cholesterol-dependent presentation and/or spatial organization of glycosphingolipids in cell membranes. PMID:23486243

  4. Mixture models and wavelet transforms reveal high confidence RNA-protein interaction sites in MOV10 PAR-CLIP data.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Cem; Schlumpf, Tommy; Sawarkar, Ritwick; Comoglio, Federico; Paro, Renato

    2012-11-01

    The Photo-Activatable Ribonucleoside-enhanced CrossLinking and ImmunoPrecipitation (PAR-CLIP) method was recently developed for global identification of RNAs interacting with proteins. The strength of this versatile method results from induction of specific T to C transitions at sites of interaction. However, current analytical tools do not distinguish between non-experimentally and experimentally induced transitions. Furthermore, geometric properties at potential binding sites are not taken into account. To surmount these shortcomings, we developed a two-step algorithm consisting of a non-parametric two-component mixture model and a wavelet-based peak calling procedure. Our algorithm can reduce the number of false positives up to 24% thereby identifying high confidence interaction sites. We successfully employed this approach in conjunction with a modified PAR-CLIP protocol to study the functional role of nuclear Moloney leukemia virus 10, a putative RNA helicase interacting with Argonaute2 and Polycomb. Our method, available as the R package wavClusteR, is generally applicable to any substitution-based inference problem in genomics. PMID:22844102

  5. Promoting Speaking Proficiency through Motivation and Interaction: The Study Abroad and Classroom Learning Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how motivation and interaction shape the speaking proficiency of study abroad (SA) and classroom or at home (AH) language learners. The author administered a motivation questionnaire, language contact profile, and pretest and posttest simulated oral proficiency interview. The data reveal that SA and AH students had similar…

  6. Structural studies of SSB interaction with RecO.

    PubMed

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of recombination protein RecO with single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding protein (SSB) is essential for DNA damage repair and restart of stalled replication (Cox, Crit Rev Biochem Mol Biol 42(1):41-63, 2007). To understand mechanism of this interaction and its role in DNA repair, we deciphered a high-resolution structure of RecO complex with C-terminal tail of SSB (SSB-Ct). The structure revealed a key role of hydrophobic interactions between two proteins and suggests the mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA during homologous recombination and strand annealing. PMID:22976180

  7. Ionosphere/microwave beam interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. E.; Duncan, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The microwave beam of the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) is predicted to interact with the ionosphere producing thermal runaway up to an altitude of about 100 kilometers at a power density threshold of 12 mW/cm sq (within a factor of two). The operation of the SPS at two frequencies, 2450 and 5800 MHz, is compared. The ionosphere interaction is less at the higher frequency, but the tropospheric problem scattering from heavy rain and hail is worse at the higher frequency. Microwave signals from communication satellites were observed to scintillate, but there is some concern that the uplink pilot signal may be distorted by the SPS heated ionosphere. The microwave scintillations are only observed in the tropics in the early evenings near the equinoxes. Results indicate that large phase errors in the uplink pilot signal can be reduced.

  8. QCM-D study of nanoparticle interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xu, Shengming; Liu, Qingxia; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-07-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) has been proven to be a powerful research tool to investigate in situ interactions between nanoparticles and different functionalized surfaces in liquids. QCM-D can also be used to quantitatively determine adsorption kinetics of polymers, DNA and proteins from solutions on various substrate surfaces while providing insights into conformations of adsorbed molecules. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview on various important applications of QCM-D, focusing on deposition of nanoparticles and attachment-detachment of nanoparticles on model membranes in complex fluid systems. We will first describe the working principle of QCM-D and DLVO theory pertinent to understanding nanoparticle deposition phenomena. The interactions between different nanoparticles and functionalized surfaces for different application areas are then critically reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of QCM-D in other important fields are proposed and knowledge gaps are identified. PMID:26546115

  9. NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Till

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between biological macromolecules or of macromolecules with low-molecular-weight ligands is a central paradigm in the understanding of function in biological systems. It is also the major goal in pharmaceutical research to find and optimize ligands that modulate the function of biological macromolecules. Both technological advances and new methods in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have led to the development of several tools by which the interaction of proteins or DNA and low molecular weight-ligands can be characterized at an atomic level. Information can be gained quickly and easily with ligand-based techniques. These need only small amounts of nonisotope labeled, and thus readily available target macromolecules. As the focus is on the signals stemming only from the ligand, no further NMR information regarding the target is needed. Techniques based on the observation of isotopically labeled biological macromolecules open the possibility to observe interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, DNA or other proteins. With these techniques, the structure of high-molecular-weight complexes can be determined. Here, the resonance signals of the macromolecule must be identified beforehand, which can be time consuming but with the benefit of obtaining more information with respect to the target ligand complex.

  10. Lead levels in Eurasian otters decline with time and reveal interactions between sources, prevailing weather, and stream chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Elizabeth A; Simpson, Victor R; Nicholls, Abigail E L; Slater, Frederick M

    2011-03-01

    The uptake of contaminants by biota varies spatially and temporally due to a complex range of interacting environmental variables, but such complexities are typically disregarded in studies of temporal change. Here, we use linear modeling to explore spatial and temporal variation in bone Pb levels measured in samples taken from 329 Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) found dead in southwest England. Between 1992 and 2004 Pb levels in otters fell by 73%, following UK legislative control of Pb emissions implemented since the mid 1980s. Spatial variation in bone Pb was positively correlated with modeled Pb emissions and stream sediment Pb, which interacted negatively with wind-speed and sediment Ca, respectively. Opportunistic collection of samples from wildlife mortalities provided a valuable opportunity for monitoring environmental contamination, interpretation of which was aided by spatially explicit analysis of environmental variables.

  11. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of fungi interactions.

    PubMed

    Sempere, F; Santamarina, M P

    2011-03-01

    The application of the cryo-scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy for the study of the interactions at different environmental conditions between Penicillium oxalicum and Fusarium verticillioides is described. A dual microculture was developed for the light microscopy analysis of the interaction. The microscope and macroscopic examinations were compared. Analysis of Petri plates revealed that F. verticillioides was a competitor for space and nutrients while P. oxalicum was a mycoparasite under the microscopic observations.

  12. Modeling of the dorsal gradient across species reveals interaction between embryo morphology and Toll signaling pathway during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Priscilla; Chahda, Juan Sebastian; Koslen, Hannah R; Chiel, Hillel J; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko

    2014-08-01

    Morphogenetic gradients are essential to allocate cell fates in embryos of varying sizes within and across closely related species. We previously showed that the maternal NF-κB/Dorsal (Dl) gradient has acquired different shapes in Drosophila species, which result in unequally scaled germ layers along the dorso-ventral axis and the repositioning of the neuroectodermal borders. Here we combined experimentation and mathematical modeling to investigate which factors might have contributed to the fast evolutionary changes of this gradient. To this end, we modified a previously developed model that employs differential equations of the main biochemical interactions of the Toll (Tl) signaling pathway, which regulates Dl nuclear transport. The original model simulations fit well the D. melanogaster wild type, but not mutant conditions. To broaden the applicability of this model and probe evolutionary changes in gradient distributions, we adjusted a set of 19 independent parameters to reproduce three quantified experimental conditions (i.e. Dl levels lowered, nuclear size and density increased or decreased). We next searched for the most relevant parameters that reproduce the species-specific Dl gradients. We show that adjusting parameters relative to morphological traits (i.e. embryo diameter, nuclear size and density) alone is not sufficient to reproduce the species Dl gradients. Since components of the Tl pathway simulated by the model are fast-evolving, we next asked which parameters related to Tl would most effectively reproduce these gradients and identified a particular subset. A sensitivity analysis reveals the existence of nonlinear interactions between the two fast-evolving traits tested above, namely the embryonic morphological changes and Tl pathway components. Our modeling further suggests that distinct Dl gradient shapes observed in closely related melanogaster sub-group lineages may be caused by similar sequence modifications in Tl pathway components, which

  13. Differential Interaction Kinetics of a Bipolar Structure-Specific Endonuclease with DNA Flaps Revealed by Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rezgui, Rachid; Lestini, Roxane; Kühn, Joëlle; Fave, Xenia; McLeod, Lauren; Myllykallio, Hannu; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Bouzigues, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) on 5′ and 3′-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5′ or 3′ extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases. PMID:25412080

  14. Modeling of the Dorsal Gradient across Species Reveals Interaction between Embryo Morphology and Toll Signaling Pathway during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Koslen, Hannah R.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenetic gradients are essential to allocate cell fates in embryos of varying sizes within and across closely related species. We previously showed that the maternal NF-κB/Dorsal (Dl) gradient has acquired different shapes in Drosophila species, which result in unequally scaled germ layers along the dorso-ventral axis and the repositioning of the neuroectodermal borders. Here we combined experimentation and mathematical modeling to investigate which factors might have contributed to the fast evolutionary changes of this gradient. To this end, we modified a previously developed model that employs differential equations of the main biochemical interactions of the Toll (Tl) signaling pathway, which regulates Dl nuclear transport. The original model simulations fit well the D. melanogaster wild type, but not mutant conditions. To broaden the applicability of this model and probe evolutionary changes in gradient distributions, we adjusted a set of 19 independent parameters to reproduce three quantified experimental conditions (i.e. Dl levels lowered, nuclear size and density increased or decreased). We next searched for the most relevant parameters that reproduce the species-specific Dl gradients. We show that adjusting parameters relative to morphological traits (i.e. embryo diameter, nuclear size and density) alone is not sufficient to reproduce the species Dl gradients. Since components of the Tl pathway simulated by the model are fast-evolving, we next asked which parameters related to Tl would most effectively reproduce these gradients and identified a particular subset. A sensitivity analysis reveals the existence of nonlinear interactions between the two fast-evolving traits tested above, namely the embryonic morphological changes and Tl pathway components. Our modeling further suggests that distinct Dl gradient shapes observed in closely related melanogaster sub-group lineages may be caused by similar sequence modifications in Tl pathway components, which

  15. A novel immuno-competitive capture mass spectrometry strategy for protein-protein interaction profiling reveals that LATS kinases regulate HCV replication through NS5A phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meistermann, Hélène; Gao, Junjun; Golling, Sabrina; Lamerz, Jens; Le Pogam, Sophie; Tzouros, Manuel; Sankabathula, Sailaja; Gruenbaum, Lore; Nájera, Isabel; Langen, Hanno; Klumpp, Klaus; Augustin, Angélique

    2014-11-01

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is essential to fully characterize the biological function of a protein and improve our understanding of diseases. Affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) using selective antibodies against a target protein has been commonly applied to study protein complexes. However, one major limitation is a lack of specificity as a substantial part of the proposed binders is due to nonspecific interactions. Here, we describe an innovative immuno-competitive capture mass spectrometry (ICC-MS) method to allow systematic investigation of protein-protein interactions. ICC-MS markedly increases the specificity of classical immunoprecipitation (IP) by introducing a competition step between free and capturing antibody prior to IP. Instead of comparing only one experimental sample with a control, the methodology generates a 12-concentration antibody competition profile. Label-free quantitation followed by a robust statistical analysis of the data is then used to extract the cellular interactome of a protein of interest and to filter out background proteins. We applied this new approach to specifically map the interactome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) in a cellular HCV replication system and uncovered eight new NS5A-interacting protein candidates along with two previously validated binding partners. Follow-up biological validation experiments revealed that large tumor suppressor homolog 1 and 2 (LATS1 and LATS2, respectively), two closely related human protein kinases, are novel host kinases responsible for NS5A phosphorylation at a highly conserved position required for optimal HCV genome replication. These results are the first illustration of the value of ICC-MS for the analysis of endogenous protein complexes to identify biologically relevant protein-protein interactions with high specificity.

  16. Microfluidic Devices for Studying Biomolecular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Wilbur W.; Garcia, Carlos d.; Henry, Charles S.

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for monitoring biomolecular interactions have been invented. These devices are basically highly miniaturized liquid-chromatography columns. They are intended to be prototypes of miniature analytical devices of the laboratory on a chip type that could be fabricated rapidly and inexpensively and that, because of their small sizes, would yield analytical results from very small amounts of expensive analytes (typically, proteins). Other advantages to be gained by this scaling down of liquid-chromatography columns may include increases in resolution and speed, decreases in the consumption of reagents, and the possibility of performing multiple simultaneous and highly integrated analyses by use of multiple devices of this type, each possibly containing multiple parallel analytical microchannels. The principle of operation is the same as that of a macroscopic liquid-chromatography column: The column is a channel packed with particles, upon which are immobilized molecules of the protein of interest (or one of the proteins of interest if there are more than one). Starting at a known time, a solution or suspension containing molecules of the protein or other substance of interest is pumped into the channel at its inlet. The liquid emerging from the outlet of the channel is monitored to detect the molecules of the dissolved or suspended substance(s). The time that it takes these molecules to flow from the inlet to the outlet is a measure of the degree of interaction between the immobilized and the dissolved or suspended molecules. Depending on the precise natures of the molecules, this measure can be used for diverse purposes: examples include screening for solution conditions that favor crystallization of proteins, screening for interactions between drugs and proteins, and determining the functions of biomolecules.

  17. Genome Wide Analysis Reveals Zic3 Interaction with Distal Regulatory Elements of Stage Specific Developmental Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vibhor; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G.; Orlov, Yuriy; Ravishankar, Ashwini; Prabhakar, Shyam; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Korzh, Vladimir; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2013-01-01

    Zic3 regulates early embryonic patterning in vertebrates. Loss of Zic3 function is known to disrupt gastrulation, left-right patterning, and neurogenesis. However, molecular events downstream of this transcription factor are poorly characterized. Here we use the zebrafish as a model to study the developmental role of Zic3 in vivo, by applying a combination of two powerful genomics approaches – ChIP-seq and microarray. Besides confirming direct regulation of previously implicated Zic3 targets of the Nodal and canonical Wnt pathways, analysis of gastrula stage embryos uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes, among which were members of the non-canonical Wnt pathway and the neural pre-pattern genes. A similar analysis in zic3-expressing cells obtained by FACS at segmentation stage revealed a dramatic shift in Zic3 binding site locations and identified an entirely distinct set of target genes associated with later developmental functions such as neural development. We demonstrate cis-regulation of several of these target genes by Zic3 using in vivo enhancer assay. Analysis of Zic3 binding sites revealed a distribution biased towards distal intergenic regions, indicative of a long distance regulatory mechanism; some of these binding sites are highly conserved during evolution and act as functional enhancers. This demonstrated that Zic3 regulation of developmental genes is achieved predominantly through long distance regulatory mechanism and revealed that developmental transitions could be accompanied by dramatic changes in regulatory landscape. PMID:24204288

  18. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SCHEME STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    In a companion paper the authors showed that the performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In this situation, the dynamic aperture can be increased through local multipole correctors. Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. They compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required dynamic aperture performance.

  19. Hydrogen-bond cooperative effects in small cyclic water clusters as revealed by the interacting quantum atoms approach.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Chávez-Calvillo, Rodrigo; García-Revilla, Marco; Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Christiansen, Ove; Francisco, Evelio; Martín Pendás, Angel; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás

    2013-10-11

    The cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters (H2 O)n (n=3-6) have been studied by using the partition of the electronic energy in accordance with the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach. The IQA energy splitting is complemented by a topological analysis of the electron density (ρ(r)) compliant with the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) and the calculation of electrostatic interactions by using one- and two-electron integrals, thereby avoiding convergence issues inherent to a multipolar expansion. The results show that the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters arise from a compromise between: 1) the deformation energy (i.e., the energy necessary to modify the electron density and the configuration of the nuclei of the isolated water molecules to those within the water clusters), and 2) the interaction energy (Eint ) of these contorted molecules in (H2 O)n . Whereas the magnitude of both deformation and interaction energies is enhanced as water molecules are added to the system, the augmentation of the latter becomes dominant when the size of the cluster is increased. In addition, the electrostatic, classic, and exchange components of Eint for a pair of water molecules in the cluster (H2 O)n-1 become more attractive when a new H2 O unit is incorporated to generate the system (H2 O)n with the last-mentioned contribution being consistently the most important part of Eint throughout the hydrogen bonds under consideration. This is opposed to the traditional view, which regards hydrogen bonding in water as an electrostatically driven interaction. Overall, the trends of the delocalization indices, δ(Ω,Ω'), the QTAIM atomic charges, the topology of ρ(r), and the IQA results altogether show how polarization, charge transfer, electrostatics, and covalency contribute to the cooperative effects of hydrogen bonding in small water clusters. It is our hope that the analysis presented in this paper could

  20. Functional Interactions of the HHCC Domain of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase Revealed by Nonoverlapping Complementation and Zinc-Dependent Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Leon, Oscar; Greenfield, Norma J.; Roth, Monica J.

    1999-01-01

    The retroviral integrase (IN) is required for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome. The N terminus of IN contains an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved among all retroviruses. To study the function of the HHCC domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus IN, the first N-terminal 105 residues were expressed independently. This HHCC domain protein is found to complement a completely nonoverlapping construct lacking the HHCC domain for strand transfer, 3′ processing and coordinated disintegration reactions, revealing trans interactions among IN domains. The HHCC domain protein binds zinc at a 1:1 ratio and changes its conformation upon binding to zinc. The presence of zinc within the HHCC domain stimulates selective integration processes. Zinc promotes the dimerization of the HHCC domain and protects it from N-ethylmaleimide modification. These studies dissect and define the requirement for the HHCC domain, the exact function of which remains unknown. PMID:9971758

  1. Theoretical Study of Interaction between Photons and Single Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting

    . In the three-level system, the exact solution for the driving pulse shows Markovian approximation applies for relatively slow pulses, while non-Markovian dynamics is essential for rapid operation near the cut-off frequency of the waveguide. Secondly, we investigate the dynamic evolution of a single two-level system embedded in the one-dimensional waveguide. It is well known that if the transition frequency of the two-level system is below the cut-off frequency of the one-dimensional waveguide, the spontaneous emission decay will be totally inhibited. However, we find that even the transition frequency is set above the cut-off frequency, the decay is partly suppressed due to the existence of an exciton bound state. When the transition frequency is tuned to the edge of the cut-off frequency, the decay rate is remarkably enhanced. And the Rabi oscillation appears between the discrete bound state and a resonance with finite lifetime. The Non-Markovian spontaneous emission near the band edge reveals the strong coupling between the atom and the continuum. The trapped polariton makes the optical system behave like a cavity without mirror. And the individual quantum dot has shown to be potential to serve as the deterministic single-photon source. Another limit of spin-photon interaction is the weak interaction regime, which often occurs in optical detection of single spins. The interaction between a single spin and a probe device is extremely weak, making measurement difficult. The measurement thus is weak. But disturbance caused by the measurement is also weak. In the weak interaction region, correlations of sequential or continuous weak measurement reveal faithfully dynamics of a single spin. We study the weak measurement of a single spin by a continuouswave light, which is based on the weak Faraday rotation effect. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Interactions of benzotriazole UV stabilizers with human serum albumin: Atomic insights revealed by biosensors, spectroscopies and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Wang, Haifei; Ding, Keke; Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Chunlong

    2016-02-01

    Benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) belong to one prominent group of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers and are widely used in various plastics materials. Their large production volumes, frequent detections in the environment and potential toxicities have raised increasing public concern. BZTs can be transported in vivo by transport proteins in plasma and the binding association to transport proteins may serve as a significant parameter to evaluate the bioaccumulative potential. We utilized a novel HSA biosensor, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy to detect the dynamic interactions of six BZTs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, UV-P, and BZT) with human serum albumin (HSA), and characterized the corresponding structure-activity relationships (SAR) by molecular dynamics simulations. All test BZTs potently bind at Sudlow site I of HSA with a binding constant of 10(4) L/mol at 298 K. Minor changes in the moieties of BZTs affect their interactions with HSA and differently induce conformations of HSA. Their binding reduced electrochemical impedance spectra and α-helix content of HSA, caused slight red-shifted emission, and changed fluorescence lifetime components of HSA in a concentration-dependent mode. UV-327 and UV-329 form hydrogen bonds with HSA, while UV-329, UV-P and BZT bind HSA with more favorable electrostatic interactions. Our in vitro and in silico study offered a significant framework toward the understanding of risk assessment of BZTs and provides guide for future design of environmental benign BZTs-related materials.

  3. Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of Prdm5 Reveal Interactions with Insulator Binding Proteins in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Carrara, Matteo; Francavilla, Chiara; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Olsen, Jesper Velgaard; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    PRDM proteins belong to the SET domain protein family, which is involved in the regulation of gene expression. Although few PRDM members possess histone methyltransferase activity, the molecular mechanisms by which the other members exert transcriptional regulation remain to be delineated. In this study, we find that Prdm5 is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and exploit this cellular system to characterize molecular functions of Prdm5. By combining proteomics and next-generation sequencing technologies, we identify Prdm5 interaction partners and genomic occupancy. We demonstrate that although Prdm5 is dispensable for mES cell maintenance, it directly targets genomic regions involved in early embryonic development and affects the expression of a subset of developmental regulators during cell differentiation. Importantly, Prdm5 interacts with Ctcf, cohesin, and TFIIIC and cooccupies genomic loci. In summary, our data indicate how Prdm5 modulates transcription by interacting with factors involved in genome organization in mouse embryonic stem cells. PMID:24043305

  4. Interactions of benzotriazole UV stabilizers with human serum albumin: Atomic insights revealed by biosensors, spectroscopies and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shulin; Wang, Haifei; Ding, Keke; Wang, Jiaying; Pan, Liumeng; Lu, Yanli; Liu, Qingjun; Zhang, Chunlong

    2016-02-01

    Benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZTs) belong to one prominent group of ultraviolet (UV) stabilizers and are widely used in various plastics materials. Their large production volumes, frequent detections in the environment and potential toxicities have raised increasing public concern. BZTs can be transported in vivo by transport proteins in plasma and the binding association to transport proteins may serve as a significant parameter to evaluate the bioaccumulative potential. We utilized a novel HSA biosensor, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy to detect the dynamic interactions of six BZTs (UV-326, UV-327, UV-328, UV-329, UV-P, and BZT) with human serum albumin (HSA), and characterized the corresponding structure-activity relationships (SAR) by molecular dynamics simulations. All test BZTs potently bind at Sudlow site I of HSA with a binding constant of 10(4) L/mol at 298 K. Minor changes in the moieties of BZTs affect their interactions with HSA and differently induce conformations of HSA. Their binding reduced electrochemical impedance spectra and α-helix content of HSA, caused slight red-shifted emission, and changed fluorescence lifetime components of HSA in a concentration-dependent mode. UV-327 and UV-329 form hydrogen bonds with HSA, while UV-329, UV-P and BZT bind HSA with more favorable electrostatic interactions. Our in vitro and in silico study offered a significant framework toward the understanding of risk assessment of BZTs and provides guide for future design of environmental benign BZTs-related materials. PMID:26454115

  5. Molecular characterization of S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles reveals their regulatory roles in parasite-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lihui; Liu, Juntao; Dao, Jinwei; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Gu, Huiming; Liu, Jinming; Feng, Xingang; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Secreted extracellular vesicles play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Increased knowledge of schistosome extracellular vesicles could provide insights into schistosome-host interactions and enable the development of novel intervention strategies to inhibit parasitic processes and lessen disease transmission. Here, we describe biochemical characterization of Schistosoma japonicum exosome-like vesicles (S. japonicum EVs). A total of 403 proteins were identified in S. japonicum EVs, and bioinformatics analyses indicated that these proteins were mainly involved in binding, catalytic activity, and translation regulatory activity. Next, we characterized the population of small RNAs associated with S. japonicum EVs. Further studies demonstrated that mammalian cells could internalize S. japonicum EVs and transfer their cargo miRNAs to recipient cells. Additionally, we found that a specific miRNA, likely originating from a final host, ocu-miR-191–5p, is also associated with S. japonicum EVs. Overall, our findings demonstrate that S. japonicum EVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis via a mechanism involving the transfer of their cargo miRNAs to hosts. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of schistosome-host interactions. PMID:27172881

  6. RNA synthesis by the brome mosaic virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in human cells reveals requirements for de novo initiation and protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Subba-Reddy, Chennareddy V; Tragesser, Brady; Xu, Zhili; Stein, Barry; Ranjith-Kumar, C T; Kao, C Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a model positive-strand RNA virus whose replication has been studied in a number of surrogate hosts. In transiently transfected human cells, the BMV polymerase 2a activated signaling by the innate immune receptor RIG-I, which recognizes de novo-initiated non-self-RNAs. Active-site mutations in 2a abolished RIG-I activation, and coexpression of the BMV 1a protein stimulated 2a activity. Mutations previously shown to abolish 1a and 2a interaction prevented the 1a-dependent enhancement of 2a activity. New insights into 1a-2a interaction include the findings that helicase active site of 1a is required to enhance 2a polymerase activity and that negatively charged amino acid residues between positions 110 and 120 of 2a contribute to interaction with the 1a helicase-like domain but not to the intrinsic polymerase activity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that the BMV 1a and 2a colocalized to perinuclear region in human cells. However, no perinuclear spherule-like structures were detected in human cells by immunoelectron microscopy. Sequencing of the RNAs coimmunoprecipitated with RIG-I revealed that the 2a-synthesized short RNAs are derived from the message used to translate 2a. That is, 2a exhibits a strong cis preference for BMV RNA2. Strikingly, the 2a RNA products had initiation sequences (5'-GUAAA-3') identical to those from the 5' sequence of the BMV genomic RNA2 and RNA3. These results show that the BMV 2a polymerase does not require other BMV proteins to initiate RNA synthesis but that the 1a helicase domain, and likely helicase activity, can affect RNA synthesis by 2a.

  7. The structure of the BfrB-Bfd complex reveals protein-protein interactions enabling iron release from bacterioferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Rivera, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage, or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis. PMID:22812654

  8. The Structure of the BfrB-Bfd Complex Reveals Protein-Protein Interactions Enabling Iron Release from Bacterioferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Battaile, Kevin P; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2012-09-11

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis.

  9. An autoinhibited conformation of LGN reveals a distinct interaction mode between GoLoco motifs and TPR motifs.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhu; Zhu, Jinwei; Shang, Yuan; Wei, Zhiyi; Jia, Min; Xia, Caihao; Wen, Wenyu; Wang, Wenning; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-06-01

    LGN plays essential roles in asymmetric cell divisions via its N-terminal TPR-motif-mediated binding to mInsc and NuMA. This scaffolding activity requires the release of the autoinhibited conformation of LGN by binding of Gα(i) to its C-terminal GoLoco (GL) motifs. The interaction between the GL and TPR motifs of LGN represents a distinct GL/target binding mode with an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that two consecutive GL motifs of LGN form a minimal TPR-motif-binding unit. GL12 and GL34 bind to TPR0-3 and TPR4-7, respectively. The crystal structure of a truncated LGN reveals that GL34 forms a pair of parallel α helices and binds to the concave surface of TPR4-7, thereby preventing LGN from binding to other targets. Importantly, the GLs bind to TPR motifs with a mode distinct from that observed in the GL/Gα(i)·GDP complexes. Our results also indicate that multiple and orphan GL motif proteins likely respond to G proteins with distinct mechanisms.

  10. Quantitative Genome-Wide Genetic Interaction Screens Reveal Global Epistatic Relationships of Protein Complexes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwani; Stewart, Geordie; Samanfar, Bahram; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Wagih, Omar; Vlasblom, James; Phanse, Sadhna; Lad, Krunal; Yeou Hsiung Yu, Angela; Graham, Christopher; Jin, Ke; Brown, Eric; Golshani, Ashkan; Kim, Philip; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack; Houry, Walid A.; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI) screens can provide insights into the biological role(s) of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among γ-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems. PMID:24586182

  11. Pseudorevertants of a Semliki Forest Virus Fusion-Blocking Mutation Reveal a Critical Interchain Interaction in the Core Trimer▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Besanceney, Christen; Song, Yifan; Kielian, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) is an enveloped alphavirus that infects cells by a low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the viral E1 protein. E1 inserts into target membranes and refolds to a hairpin-like homotrimer containing a central core trimer and an outer layer composed of domain III and the juxtamembrane stem region. The key residues involved in mediating E1 trimerization are not well understood. We recently showed that aspartate 188 in the interface of the core trimer plays a critical role. Substitution with lysine (D188K) blocks formation of the core trimer and E1 trimerization and strongly inhibits virus fusion and infection. Here, we have isolated and characterized revertants that rescued the fusion and growth defects of D188K. These revertants included pseudorevertants containing acidic or polar neutral residues at E1 position 188 and a second-site revertant containing an E1 K176T mutation. Computational analysis using multiconformation continuum electrostatics revealed an important interaction bridging D188 of one chain with K176 of the adjacent chain in the core trimer. E1 K176 is completely conserved among the alphaviruses, and mutations of K176 to threonine (K176T) or isoleucine (K176I) produced similar fusion phenotypes as D188 mutants. Together, our data support a model in which a ring of three salt bridges formed by D188 and K176 stabilize the core trimer, a key intermediate of the alphavirus fusion protein. PMID:20826687

  12. The effect of ethanol on oral cocaine pharmacokinetics reveals an unrecognized class of ethanol-mediated drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Robert B; Laizure, S Casey

    2010-02-01

    Ethanol decreases the clearance of cocaine by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cocaine to benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester by carboxylesterases, and there is a large body of literature describing this interaction as it relates to the abuse of cocaine. In this study, we describe the effect of intravenous ethanol on the pharmacokinetics of cocaine after intravenous and oral administration in the dog. The intent is to determine the effect ethanol has on metabolic hydrolysis using cocaine metabolism as a surrogate marker of carboxylesterase activity. Five dogs were administered intravenous cocaine alone, intravenous cocaine after ethanol, oral cocaine alone, and oral cocaine after ethanol on separate study days. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Cocaine had poor systemic bioavailability with an area under the plasma concentration-time curve that was approximately 4-fold higher after intravenous than after oral administration. The coadministration of ethanol and cocaine resulted in a 23% decrease in the clearance of intravenous cocaine and a 300% increase in the bioavailability of oral cocaine. Cocaine behaves as a high extraction drug, which undergoes first-pass metabolism in the intestines and liver that is profoundly inhibited by ethanol. We infer from these results that ethanol could inhibit the hydrolysis of other drug compounds subject to hydrolysis by carboxylesterases. Indeed, there are numerous commonly prescribed drugs with significant carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism such as enalapril, lovastatin, irinotecan, clopidogrel, prasugrel, methylphenidate, meperidine, and oseltamivir that may interact with ethanol. The clinical significance of the interaction of ethanol with specific drugs subject to carboxylesterase hydrolysis is not well recognized and has not been adequately studied. PMID:19920055

  13. MuRF1-dependent regulation of systemic carbohydrate metabolism as revealed from transgenic mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Hirner, Stephanie; Krohne, Christian; Schuster, Alexander; Hoffmann, Sigrid; Witt, Stephanie; Erber, Ralf; Sticht, Carsten; Gasch, Alexander; Labeit, Siegfried; Labeit, Dittmar

    2008-06-13

    Under various pathophysiological muscle-wasting conditions, such as diabetes and starvation, a family of ubiquitin ligases, including muscle-specific RING-finger protein 1 (MuRF1), are induced to target muscle proteins for degradation via ubiquitination. We have generated transgenic mouse lines over-expressing MuRF1 in a skeletal muscle-specific fashion (MuRF1-TG mice) in an attempt to identify the in vivo targets of MuRF1. MuRF1-TG lines were viable, had normal fertility and normal muscle weights at eight weeks of age. Comparison of quadriceps from MuRF1-TG and wild type mice did not reveal elevated multi-ubiquitination of myosin as observed in human patients with muscle wasting. Instead, MuRF1-TG mice expressed lower levels of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial key enzyme in charge of glycolysis, and of its regulator PDK2. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid interaction studies demonstrated the interaction of MuRF1 with PDH, PDK2, PDK4, PKM2 (all participating in glycolysis) and with phosphorylase beta (PYGM) and glycogenin (both regulating glycogen metabolism). Consistent with the idea that MuRF1 may regulate carbohydrate metabolism, MuRF1-TG mice had twofold elevated insulin blood levels and lower hepatic glycogen contents. To further examine MuRF1's role for systemic carbohydrate regulation, we performed glucose tolerance tests (GTT) in wild type and MuRF1-TG mice. During GTT, MuRF1-TG mice developed striking hyperinsulinaemia and hepatic glycogen stores, that were depleted at basal levels, became rapidly replenished. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MuRF1 expression in skeletal muscle re-directs glycogen synthesis to the liver and stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion, thereby providing a regulatory feedback loop that connects skeletal muscle metabolism with the liver and the pancreas during metabolic stress. PMID:18468620

  14. Physiologically-Relevant Modes of Membrane Interactions by the Human Antimicrobial Peptide, LL-37, Revealed by SFG Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Bei; Soblosky, Lauren; Nguyen, Khoi; Geng, Junqing; Yu, Xinglong; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2013-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could become the next generation antibiotic compounds which can overcome bacterial resistance by disrupting cell membranes and it is essential to determine the factors underlying its mechanism of action. Although high-resolution NMR and other biological studies have provided valuable insights, it has been a major challenge to follow the AMP-membrane interactions at physiologically-relevant low peptide concentrations. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to overcome this major limitation by performing Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic experiments on lipid bilayers containing an AMP, LL-37. Our results demonstrate the power of SFG to study non-linear helical peptides and also infer that lipid-peptide interaction and the peptide orientation depend on the lipid membrane composition. The observed SFG signal changes capture the aggregating process of LL-37 on membrane. In addition, our SFG results on cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers indicate the inhibition effect of cholesterol on peptide-induced membrane permeation process.

  15. Students' Peer Interactions within a Cohort and in Host Countries during a Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup-Anger, Jody E.; Aragones, Aileen

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative case study, we explored students' peer interactions within their cohort and in the host countries during a short-term study abroad. Framed by Bronfenbrenner's (1993) ecological systems theory, findings revealed that students spent considerable energy reflecting on interactions with peers. The students considered…

  16. Surface studies of metals after interaction with hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, David Samuel

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to characterize surfaces of metals after interaction with hydrogen isotopes. Iron, which does not readily bond with hydrogen, and palladium, which strongly bonds with hydrogen, were studied. Observations of surfaces are used to determine the nature of their metamorphosis due to such exposures. An experimental study of pure iron foil (99.99%) exposed to a hot, dense hydrogen and argon gas mixture in a ballistic compressor yielded evidence for new structural and compositional changes of the metal due to the exposure. Atomic force microscope (AFM) studies demonstrated surfaces to be highly uneven, where height variations were often 2 mum for many micron-sized regions scanned. An iron foil exposed to argon gases alone revealed unique dendritic patterns but negligible height variations for micron-size scans. A cold rolled single crystal palladium cathode was electrolyzed in a solution of Dsb2O and 15% Hsb2SOsb4 by volume for 12 minutes. The cathode bent toward the anode during electrolysis. Examination of both concave and convex surfaces using the scanning electron microscope (SEM), scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and AFM revealed rimmed craters with faceted crystals inside and multi-textured surfaces. Also pairs of cold rolled polycrystalline palladium cathodes underwent electrolysis for six minutes or less, in Dsb2O and Hsb2O solutions, each solution containing 15% Hsb2SOsb4, by volume. Surface morphologies of the heavy water electrolyzed samples revealed asperities, craters, and nodules, and evidence of recrystallization and crystal planes. After 1.5 years, new AFM studies of the same Pd surfaces exposed to heavy water electrolyte exhibited loose, nanometer-sized particles. However, the surfaces of Pd cathodes exposed to light water electrolyte remained nearly identical to morphologies of foils not electrolyzed, and did not change with time. No surface asperities or loose grains were observed on the latter. Secondary ion mass

  17. Study of volcano/ice interactions gains momentum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Mary G.; Smellie, John L.; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Gulick, Virginia C.; Jakobsson, Sveinn P.; Skilling, Ian P.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of recent volcanic eruptions in Iceland and detailed studies of sub-glacially erupted deposits and the interaction of lava and pyroclastic flows with snow and ice have provided important new data that should lead to significant advances in the understanding of volcano/ice interaction on Earth and Mars. A conference on this subject, the first of its kind, recently brought together geologists, geophysicists, glaciologists, and planetary scientists studying various aspects of volcano-ice interaction.

  18. The unique architecture and function of cellulose-interacting proteins in oomycetes revealed by genomic and structural analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oomycetes are fungal-like microorganisms evolutionary distinct from true fungi, belonging to the Stramenopile lineage and comprising major plant pathogens. Both oomycetes and fungi express proteins able to interact with cellulose, a major component of plant and oomycete cell walls, through the presence of carbohydrate-binding module belonging to the family 1 (CBM1). Fungal CBM1-containing proteins were implicated in cellulose degradation whereas in oomycetes, the Cellulose Binding Elicitor Lectin (CBEL), a well-characterized CBM1-protein from Phytophthora parasitica, was implicated in cell wall integrity, adhesion to cellulosic substrates and induction of plant immunity. Results To extend our knowledge on CBM1-containing proteins in oomycetes, we have conducted a comprehensive analysis on 60 fungi and 7 oomycetes genomes leading to the identification of 518 CBM1-containing proteins. In plant-interacting microorganisms, the larger number of CBM1-protein coding genes is expressed by necrotroph and hemibiotrophic pathogens, whereas a strong reduction of these genes is observed in symbionts and biotrophs. In fungi, more than 70% of CBM1-containing proteins correspond to enzymatic proteins in which CBM1 is associated with a catalytic unit involved in cellulose degradation. In oomycetes more than 90% of proteins are similar to CBEL in which CBM1 is associated with a non-catalytic PAN/Apple domain, known to interact with specific carbohydrates or proteins. Distinct Stramenopile genomes like diatoms and brown algae are devoid of CBM1 coding genes. A CBM1-PAN/Apple association 3D structural modeling was built allowing the identification of amino acid residues interacting with cellulose and suggesting the putative interaction of the PAN/Apple domain with another type of glucan. By Surface Plasmon Resonance experiments, we showed that CBEL binds to glycoproteins through galactose or N-acetyl-galactosamine motifs. Conclusions This study provides insight into the

  19. Bdellovibrio predation in the presence of decoys: Three-way bacterial interactions revealed by mathematical and experimental analyses.

    PubMed

    Hobley, Laura; King, John R; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2006-10-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small, gram-negative, motile bacterium that preys upon other gram-negative bacteria, including several known human pathogens. Its predation efficiency is usually studied in pure cultures containing solely B. bacteriovorus and a suitable prey. However, in natural environments, as well as in any possible biomedical uses as an antimicrobial, Bdellovibrio is predatory in the presence of diverse decoys, including live nonsusceptible bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and cell debris. Here we gathered and mathematically modeled data from three-member cultures containing predator, prey, and nonsusceptible bacterial decoys. Specifically, we studied the rate of predation of planktonic late-log-phase Escherichia coli S17-1 prey by B. bacteriovorus HD100, both in the presence and in the absence of Bacillus subtilis nonsporulating strain 671, which acted as a live bacterial decoy. Interestingly, we found that although addition of the live Bacillus decoy did decrease the rate of Bdellovibrio predation in liquid cultures, this addition also resulted in a partially compensatory enhancement of the availability of prey for predation. This effect resulted in a higher final yield of Bdellovibrio than would be predicted for a simple inert decoy. Our mathematical model accounts for both negative and positive effects of predator-prey-decoy interactions in the closed batch environment. In addition, it informs considerations for predator dosing in any future therapeutic applications and sheds some light on considerations for modeling the massively complex interactions of real mixed bacterial populations in nature.

  20. Fluorescence Studies of Protein Crystallization Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.; Smith, Lori; Forsythe, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating protein-protein interactions in under- and over-saturated crystallization solution conditions using fluorescence methods. The use of fluorescence requires fluorescent derivatives where the probe does not markedly affect the crystal packing. A number of chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) derivatives have been prepared, with the probes covalently attached to one of two different sites on the protein molecule; the side chain carboxyl of ASP 101, within the active site cleft, and the N-terminal amine. The ASP 101 derivatives crystallize while the N-terminal amine derivatives do not. However, the N-terminal amine is part of the contact region between adjacent 43 helix chains, and blocking this site does would not interfere with formation of these structures in solution. Preliminary FRET data have been obtained at pH 4.6, 0.1M NaAc buffer, at 5 and 7% NaCl, 4 C, using the N-terminal bound pyrene acetic acid (PAA, Ex 340 nm, Em 376 nm) and ASP 101 bound Lucifer Yellow (LY, Ex 425 nm, Em 525 nm) probe combination. The corresponding Csat values are 0.471 and 0.362 mg/ml (approximately 3.3 and approximately 2.5 x 10 (exp 5) M respectively), and all experiments were carried out at approximately Csat or lower total protein concentration. The data at both salt concentrations show a consistent trend of decreasing fluorescence yield of the donor species (PAA) with increasing total protein concentration. This decrease is apparently more pronounced at 7% NaCl, consistent with the expected increased intermolecular interactions at higher salt concentrations (reflected in the lower solubility). The estimated average distance between protein molecules at 5 x 10 (exp 6) M is approximately 70 nm, well beyond the range where any FRET can be expected. The calculated RO, where 50% of the donor energy is transferred to the acceptor, for the PAA-CEWL * LY-CEWL system is 3.28 nm, based upon a PAA-CEWL quantum efficiency of 0.41.

  1. Interactions among Online Learners: A Quantitative Interdisciplinary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Pawan; Jain, Sachin; Jain, Smita

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns the design and development of online instruction and specifically targets interaction and communication between online learners. Facilitating appropriate and meaningful interactions in designing instruction is a major goal for anyone developing a course, especially an online class. The data for this study came from the online…

  2. Multiple Analytical Approaches Reveal Distinct Gene-Environment Interactions in Smokers and Non Smokers in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ihsan, Rakhshan; Chauhan, Pradeep Singh; Mishra, Ashwani Kumar; Yadav, Dhirendra Singh; Kaushal, Mishi; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Zomawia, Eric; Verma, Yogesh; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2011-01-01

    Complex disease such as cancer results from interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studying these factors singularly cannot explain the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of the disease. Multi-analytical approach, including logistic regression (LR), classification and regression tree (CART) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), was applied in 188 lung cancer cases and 290 controls to explore high order interactions among xenobiotic metabolizing genes and environmental risk factors. Smoking was identified as the predominant risk factor by all three analytical approaches. Individually, CYP1A1*2A polymorphism was significantly associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.69;95%CI = 1.11–2.59,p = 0.01), whereas EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His conferred reduced risk (OR = 0.40;95%CI = 0.25–0.65,p<0.001 and OR = 0.51;95%CI = 0.33–0.78,p = 0.002 respectively). In smokers, EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphisms reduced the risk of lung cancer, whereas CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2C and GSTP1 Ile105Val imparted increased risk in non-smokers only. While exploring non-linear interactions through CART analysis, smokers carrying the combination of EPHX1 113TC (Tyr/His), SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg) or AA (His/His) and GSTM1 null genotypes showed the highest risk for lung cancer (OR = 3.73;95%CI = 1.33–10.55,p = 0.006), whereas combined effect of CYP1A1*2A 6235CC or TC, SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg) and betel quid chewing showed maximum risk in non-smokers (OR = 2.93;95%CI = 1.15–7.51,p = 0.01). MDR analysis identified two distinct predictor models for the risk of lung cancer in smokers (tobacco chewing, EPHX1 Tyr113His, and SULT1A1 Arg213His) and non-smokers (CYP1A1*2A, GSTP1 Ile105Val and SULT1A1 Arg213His) with testing balance accuracy (TBA) of 0.6436 and 0.6677 respectively. Interaction entropy interpretations of MDR results showed non-additive interactions of tobacco chewing

  3. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiaxing; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression in various biological processes. However, the interactions between miRNAs and their targets are largely unknown in plants. As a powerful tool for identification of variation associated with traits, association genetics provides another strategy for exploration of interactions between miRNAs and their targets. Here, we conducted expression analysis and association mapping to evaluate the interaction between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16 in Populus tomentosa. By examining the expression patterns of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, we identified a significant, negative correlation between their expression levels, indicating that Pto-miR160a may affect the expression of Pto-ARF16. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in this study, one common SNP in the pre-miRNA region of Pto-miR160a altered its predicted secondary structure while another common SNP in the predicted miRNA target site changed the binding affinity of Pto-miR160a. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed low LD levels of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, indicating that they are suitable for candidate gene-based association analysis. Single SNP-based association analysis identified 19 SNPs (false discovery rate Q < 0.05) in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with three phenotypic traits. Epistasis analysis further identified 36 SNP-SNP interactions between SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and SNPs in Pto-ARF16, reflecting the possible genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16. Taking these results together, our study identified SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with tree growth and wood properties, providing SNPs with potential applications in marker-assisted breeding and evidence for the genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16. PMID:26732268

  4. Association genetics in Populus reveals the interactions between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiaxing; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of gene expression in various biological processes. However, the interactions between miRNAs and their targets are largely unknown in plants. As a powerful tool for identification of variation associated with traits, association genetics provides another strategy for exploration of interactions between miRNAs and their targets. Here, we conducted expression analysis and association mapping to evaluate the interaction between Pto-miR160a and its target Pto-ARF16 in Populus tomentosa. By examining the expression patterns of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, we identified a significant, negative correlation between their expression levels, indicating that Pto-miR160a may affect the expression of Pto-ARF16. Among the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in this study, one common SNP in the pre-miRNA region of Pto-miR160a altered its predicted secondary structure while another common SNP in the predicted miRNA target site changed the binding affinity of Pto-miR160a. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed low LD levels of Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16, indicating that they are suitable for candidate gene-based association analysis. Single SNP-based association analysis identified 19 SNPs (false discovery rate Q < 0.05) in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with three phenotypic traits. Epistasis analysis further identified 36 SNP-SNP interactions between SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and SNPs in Pto-ARF16, reflecting the possible genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16. Taking these results together, our study identified SNPs in Pto-MIR160a and Pto-ARF16 associated with tree growth and wood properties, providing SNPs with potential applications in marker-assisted breeding and evidence for the genetic interaction of Pto-miR160a and Pto-ARF16.

  5. Interaction studies of Epirubicin with DNA using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charak, Sonika; Jangir, Deepak K.; Tyagi, Gunjan; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2011-08-01

    Epirubicin (EPR) is an anticancer chemotherapeutic drug which exerts its cytotoxic effect by inhibiting DNA synthesis and DNA replication. We report the structural and conformational effect of EPR binding on DNA duplex under physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy were used to determine the binding mode and binding constant of EPR with DNA. The effect of EPR-DNA complexation on stability and secondary structure of DNA was studied. FTIR measurements showed that EPR-DNA interaction occurs through guanine and cytosine bases. External binding of EPR with DNA was observed through phosphate backbone. UV-visible measurements revealed the intercalative mode of binding of EPR with DNA. The binding constant was estimated to be K = 3.4 × 10 4 which is indicative of moderate binding between EPR and DNA helix. FTIR and CD studies suggested partial transition from B-conformation of DNA to A-conformation of DNA after EPR binding to DNA duplex.

  6. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  7. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  8. Differential expression and interaction specificity of the heterotrimeric G-protein family in Brassica nigra reveal their developmental- and condition-specific roles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roshan; Arya, Gulab C; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprised of α, β and γ subunits, are important signal transducers across phyla. The G-proteins are well characterized in the model plants Arabidopsis and rice, and their inventories are possible from a few other plant species; however, information about the roles played by G-proteins in regulating various growth and developmental traits particularly from polyploid crops is still awaited. In this study, we have isolated one Gα (BniB.Gα1), three Gβ (BniB.Gβ1-BniB.Gβ3) and four Gγ (BniB.Gγ1-BniB.Gγ4) coding sequences from the paleopolyploid Brassica nigra, a major condiment crop of the Brassicaceae family. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that whole-genome triplication events in the Brassica lineage had proportionally increased the inventory of the Gβ subunit, but not of the Gα and Gγ subunits in B. nigra. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that members of the G-protein subunit genes have distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns and were differentially altered in response to various stress and phytohormone treatments, thereby suggesting differential transcriptional regulation of G-protein genes in B. nigra. Interestingly, specific members of G-protein subunits were co-expressed across plant developmental stages, and in response to different elicitor treatments. Yeast-based interaction screens further predicted that the B. nigra G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, although showing a high degree of interaction specificity between different G-protein subunits. Our data on physical interactions coupled with the co-expression pattern of the multiple G-protein subunit genes suggested that tissue- and condition-specific functional combinations of Gαβγ heterotrimers may exist in paleopolyploid B. nigra, to control diverse growth and development processes. PMID:25231958

  9. Behavioural and neurophysiological markers reveal differential sensitivity to homeostatic interactions between centrally and peripherally applied passive stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gatica Tossi, M A; Stude, P; Schwenkreis, P; Tegenthoff, M; Dinse, H R

    2013-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective tool for inducing functional plastic changes in the brain. rTMS can also potentiate the effects of other interventions such as tactile coactivation, a form of repetitive stimulation, when both are applied simultaneously. In this study, we investigated the interaction of these techniques in affecting tactile acuity and cortical excitability, measured with somatosensory evoked potentials after paired median nerve stimulation. We first applied a session of 5-Hz rTMS, followed by a session of tactile repetitive stimulation, consisting of intermittent high-frequency tactile stimulation (iHFS) to a group of 15 healthy volunteers ("rTMS + iHFS" group). In a second group ("rTMS w/o iHFS"), rTMS was applied without iHFS, with a third assessment performed after a similar wait period. In the rTMS w/o iHFS group, the 5-Hz rTMS induced an increase in cortical excitability that continued to build for at least 25 min after stimulation, with the effect on excitability after the wait period being inversely correlated to the baseline state. In the rTMS + iHFS group, the second intervention prevented the continued increase in excitability after rTMS. In contrast to the effect on cortical excitability, rTMS produced an improvement in tactile acuity that remained stable until the last assessment, independent of the presence or absence of iHFS. Our results show that these methods can interact homeostatically when used consecutively, and suggest that different measures of cortical plasticity are differentially susceptible to homeostatic interactions.

  10. Site-directed mutations reveal long-range compensatory interactions in the Adh gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Parsch, John; Tanda, Soichi; Stephan, Wolfgang

    1997-01-01

    Long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of mRNA molecules have been suggested to play a role in the initiation of translation and the regulation of gene expression. To identify such interactions and to study their molecular evolution, we used phylogenetic analysis to generate a model of mRNA higher-order structure in the Adh transcript of Drosophila melanogaster. This model predicts long-range, tertiary contacts between a region of the protein-encoding sequence just downstream of the start codon and a conserved sequence in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR). To further examine the proposed structure, site-directed mutations were generated in vitro in a cloned D. melanogaster Adh gene, and the mutant constructs were introduced into the Drosophila germ line through P-element mediated transformation. Transformants were spectrophotometrically assayed for alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that transformants containing a silent mutation near the start of the protein-encoding sequence show an ≈15% reduction in alcohol dehydrogenase activity relative to wild-type transformants. This activity can be restored to wild-type levels by a second, compensatory mutation in the 3′ UTR. These observations are consistent with a higher-order structure model that includes long-range interactions between the 5′ and 3′ ends of the Adh mRNA. However, our results do not fit the classical compensatory substitution model because the second mutation by itself (in the 3′ UTR) did not show a measurable reduction in gene expression. PMID:9023359

  11. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex. PMID:22243137

  12. Complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups as revealed by mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Tomasz; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava V; Perkova, Maria A; Bednarek, Jarosław; Woźniak, Marcin

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation was examined by the control region sequencing (HVS I and HVS II) and RFLP analysis of haplogroup-diagnostic coding region sites in 570 individuals from four regional populations of Poles and two Russian groups from northwestern part of the country. Additionally, sequences of complete mitochondrial genomes representing K1a1b1a subclade in Polish and Polish Roma populations have been determined. Haplogroup frequency patterns revealed in Poles and Russians are similar to those characteristic of other Europeans. However, there are several features of Slavic mtDNA pools seen on the level of regional populations which are helpful in the understanding of complex interactions of the Eastern and Western Slavic populations with other European groups. One of the most important is the presence of subhaplogroups U5b1b1, D5, Z1 and U8a with simultaneous scarcity of haplogroup K in populations of northwestern Russia suggesting the participation of Finno-Ugrian tribes in the formation of mtDNA pools of Russians from this region. The results of genetic structure analyses suggest that Russians from Velikii Novgorod area (northwestern Russia) and Poles from Suwalszczyzna (northeastern Poland) differ from all remaining Polish and Russian samples. Simultaneously, northwestern Russians and northeastern Poles bear some similarities to Baltic (Latvians) and Finno-Ugrian groups (Estonians) of northeastern Europe, especially on the level of U5 haplogroup frequencies. The occurrence of K1a1b1a subcluster in Poles and Polish Roma is one of the first direct proofs of the presence of Ashkenazi-specific mtDNA lineages in non-Jewish European populations.

  13. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex.

  14. Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and transport thresholds revealed by a multitracer hillslope irrigation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, C. Rhett; Du, Enhao; Klaus, Julian; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bitew, Menberu; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-08-12

    Interactions among hydraulic conductivity distributions, subsurface topography, and lateral flow are poorly understood. We applied 407 mm of water and a suite of tracers over 51 h to a 12 by 16.5 m forested hillslope segment to determine interflow thresholds, preferential pathway pore velocities, large-scale conductivities, the time series of event water fractions, and the fate of dissolved nutrients. The 12% hillslope featured loamy sand A and E horizons overlying a sandy clay loam Bt at 1.25 m average depth. Interflow measured from two drains within an interception trench commenced after 131 and 208 mm of irrigation. Cumulative interflow equaledmore » 49% of applied water. Conservative tracer differences between the collection drains indicated differences in flow paths and storages within the plot. Event water fractions rose steadily throughout irrigation, peaking at 50% sixteen h after irrigation ceased. Data implied that tightly held water exchanged with event water throughout the experiment and a substantial portion of preevent water was released from the argillic layer. Surface-applied dye tracers bypassed the matrix, with peak concentrations measured shortly after flow commencement, indicating preferential network conductivities of 864–2240 mm/h, yet no macropore flow was observed. Near steady-state flow conditions indicated average conductivities of 460 mm/h and 2.5 mm/h for topsoils and the Bt horizon, respectively. Low ammonium and phosphorus concentrations in the interflow suggested rapid uptake or sorption, while higher nitrate concentrations suggested more conservative transport. Lastly, these results reveal how hydraulic conductivity variation and subsurface topographic complexity explain otherwise paradoxical solute and flow behaviors.« less

  15. Multiple capsid-stabilizing interactions revealed in a high-resolution structure of an emerging picornavirus causing neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Shabih; Westerhuis, Brenda M; Domanska, Ausra; Koning, Roman I; Matadeen, Rishi; Koster, Abraham J; Bakker, Arjen Q; Beaumont, Tim; Wolthers, Katja C; Butcher, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    The poorly studied picornavirus, human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) causes neonatal sepsis with no therapies available. Our 4.3-Å resolution structure of HPeV3 on its own and at 15 Å resolution in complex with human monoclonal antibody Fabs demonstrates the expected picornavirus capsid structure with three distinct features. First, 25% of the HPeV3 RNA genome in 60 sites is highly ordered as confirmed by asymmetric reconstruction, and interacts with conserved regions of the capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Second, the VP0 N terminus stabilizes the capsid inner surface, in contrast to other picornaviruses where on expulsion as VP4, it forms an RNA translocation channel. Last, VP1's hydrophobic pocket, the binding site for the antipicornaviral drug, pleconaril, is blocked and thus inappropriate for antiviral development. Together, these results suggest a direction for development of neutralizing antibodies, antiviral drugs based on targeting the RNA-protein interactions and dissection of virus assembly on the basis of RNA nucleation. PMID:27435188

  16. PDGF-A interactions with fibronectin reveal a critical role for heparan sulfate in directed cell migration during Xenopus gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin M.; Mitsi, Maria; Nugent, Matthew A.; Symes, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling is essential for processes involving cell motility and differentiation during embryonic development in a wide variety of organisms including the mouse, frog, zebrafish, and sea urchin. In early Xenopus laevis embryos, PDGF-AA provides guidance cues for the migration of anterior mesendoderm cells as they move across a fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix. The long form of PDGF-A includes a positively charged carboxyl-terminal retention motif that can interact with the extracellular matrix and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). In this study we demonstrate that PDGF-AA binds directly to fibronectin and that this association is greatly enhanced by heparin. The PDGF-AA-fibronectin binding occurs across a broad range of pHs (5.5–9), which is significant because the PDGF-guided migration of Xenopus mesendoderm cells occurs under basic extracellular conditions (pH 8.4). We further demonstrate that endogenous HSPG's are required for the PDGF-AA-guided mesendoderm movement, suggesting an in vivo role for HSPGs in mediating the interaction between PDGF-AA and fibronectin. PMID:19966216

  17. Multiple capsid-stabilizing interactions revealed in a high-resolution structure of an emerging picornavirus causing neonatal sepsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Shabih; Westerhuis, Brenda M.; Domanska, Ausra; Koning, Roman I.; Matadeen, Rishi; Koster, Abraham J.; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Beaumont, Tim; Wolthers, Katja C.; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2016-07-01

    The poorly studied picornavirus, human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) causes neonatal sepsis with no therapies available. Our 4.3-Å resolution structure of HPeV3 on its own and at 15 Å resolution in complex with human monoclonal antibody Fabs demonstrates the expected picornavirus capsid structure with three distinct features. First, 25% of the HPeV3 RNA genome in 60 sites is highly ordered as confirmed by asymmetric reconstruction, and interacts with conserved regions of the capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Second, the VP0 N terminus stabilizes the capsid inner surface, in contrast to other picornaviruses where on expulsion as VP4, it forms an RNA translocation channel. Last, VP1's hydrophobic pocket, the binding site for the antipicornaviral drug, pleconaril, is blocked and thus inappropriate for antiviral development. Together, these results suggest a direction for development of neutralizing antibodies, antiviral drugs based on targeting the RNA-protein interactions and dissection of virus assembly on the basis of RNA nucleation.

  18. Multiple capsid-stabilizing interactions revealed in a high-resolution structure of an emerging picornavirus causing neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Shabih; Westerhuis, Brenda M.; Domanska, Ausra; Koning, Roman I.; Matadeen, Rishi; Koster, Abraham J.; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Beaumont, Tim; Wolthers, Katja C.; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The poorly studied picornavirus, human parechovirus 3 (HPeV3) causes neonatal sepsis with no therapies available. Our 4.3-Å resolution structure of HPeV3 on its own and at 15 Å resolution in complex with human monoclonal antibody Fabs demonstrates the expected picornavirus capsid structure with three distinct features. First, 25% of the HPeV3 RNA genome in 60 sites is highly ordered as confirmed by asymmetric reconstruction, and interacts with conserved regions of the capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Second, the VP0 N terminus stabilizes the capsid inner surface, in contrast to other picornaviruses where on expulsion as VP4, it forms an RNA translocation channel. Last, VP1's hydrophobic pocket, the binding site for the antipicornaviral drug, pleconaril, is blocked and thus inappropriate for antiviral development. Together, these results suggest a direction for development of neutralizing antibodies, antiviral drugs based on targeting the RNA–protein interactions and dissection of virus assembly on the basis of RNA nucleation. PMID:27435188

  19. Transcription profile of soybean-root-knot nematode interaction reveals a key role of phythormones in the resistance reaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root-knot nematodes (RKN– Meloidogyne genus) present extensive challenges to soybean crop. The soybean line (PI 595099) is known to be resistant against specific strains and races of nematode species, thus its differential gene expression analysis can lead to a comprehensive gene expression profiling in the incompatible soybean-RKN interaction. Even though many disease resistance genes have been studied, little has been reported about phytohormone crosstalk on modulation of ROS signaling during soybean-RKN interaction. Results Using 454 technology to explore the common aspects of resistance reaction during both parasitism and resistance phases it was verified that hormone, carbohydrate metabolism and stress related genes were consistently expressed at high levels in infected roots as compared to mock control. Most noteworthy genes include those encoding glycosyltransferases, peroxidases, auxin-responsive proteins and gibberellin-regulated genes. Our data analysis suggests the key role of glycosyltransferases, auxins and components of gibberellin signal transduction, biosynthesis and deactivation pathways in the resistance reaction and their participation in jasmonate signaling and redox homeostasis in mediating aspects of plant growth and responses to biotic stress. Conclusions Based on this study we suggest a reasonable model regarding to the complex mechanisms of crosstalk between plant hormones, mainly gibberellins and auxins, which can be crucial to modulate the levels of ROS in the resistance reaction to nematode invasion. The model also includes recent findings concerning to the participation of DELLA-like proteins and ROS signaling controlling plant immune or stress responses. Furthermore, this study provides a dataset of potential candidate genes involved in both nematode parasitism and resistance, which can be tested further for their role in this biological process using functional genomics approaches. PMID:23663436

  20. Resolving the infection process reveals striking differences in the contribution of environment, genetics and phylogeny to host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection processes consist of a sequence of steps, each critical for the interaction between host and parasite. Studies of host-parasite interactions rarely take into account the fact that different steps might be influenced by different factors and might, therefore, make different contributions to shaping coevolution. We designed a new method using the Daphnia magna - Pasteuria ramosa system, one of the rare examples where coevolution has been documented, in order to resolve the steps of the infection and analyse the factors that influence each of them. Results Using the transparent Daphnia hosts and fluorescently-labelled spores of the bacterium P. ramosa, we identified a sequence of infection steps: encounter between parasite and host; activation of parasite dormant spores; attachment of spores to the host; and parasite proliferation inside the host. The chances of encounter had been shown to depend on host genotype and environment. We tested the role of genetic and environmental factors in the newly described activation and attachment steps. Hosts of different genotypes, gender and species were all able to activate endospores of all parasite clones tested in different environments; suggesting that the activation cue is phylogenetically conserved. We next established that parasite attachment occurs onto the host oesophagus independently of host species, gender and environmental conditions. In contrast to spore activation, attachment depended strongly on the combination of host and parasite genotypes. Conclusions Our results show that different steps are influenced by different factors. Host-type-independent spore activation suggests that this step can be ruled out as a major factor in Daphnia-Pasteuria coevolution. On the other hand, we show that the attachment step is crucial for the pronounced genetic specificities of this system. We suggest that this one step can explain host population structure and could be a key force behind coevolutionary

  1. Integrated Omics and Computational Glycobiology Reveal Structural Basis for Influenza A Virus Glycan Microheterogeneity and Host Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kshitij; Klein, Joshua A.; White, Mitchell R.; Grant, Oliver C.; Leymarie, Nancy; Woods, Robert J.; Zaia, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Despite sustained biomedical research effort, influenza A virus remains an imminent threat to the world population and a major healthcare burden. The challenge in developing vaccines against influenza is the ability of the virus to mutate rapidly in response to selective immune pressure. Hemagglutinin is the predominant surface glycoprotein and the primary determinant of antigenicity, virulence and zoonotic potential. Mutations leading to changes in the number of HA glycosylation sites are often reported. Such genetic sequencing studies predict at best the disruption or creation of sequons for N-linked glycosylation; they do not reflect actual phenotypic changes in HA structure. Therefore, combined analysis of glycan micro and macro-heterogeneity and bioassays will better define the relationships among glycosylation, viral bioactivity and evolution. We present a study that integrates proteomics, glycomics and glycoproteomics of HA before and after adaptation to innate immune system pressure. We combined this information with glycan array and immune lectin binding data to correlate the phenotypic changes with biological activity. Underprocessed glycoforms predominated at the glycosylation sites found to be involved in viral evolution in response to selection pressures and interactions with innate immune-lectins. To understand the structural basis for site-specific glycan microheterogeneity at these sites, we performed structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that the presence of immature, high-mannose type glycans at a particular site correlated with reduced accessibility to glycan remodeling enzymes. Further, the high mannose glycans at sites implicated in immune lectin recognition were predicted to be capable of forming trimeric interactions with the immune-lectin surfactant protein-D. PMID:26984886

  2. A Diary Study of Implicit Self-esteem, Interpersonal Interactions and Alcohol Consumption in College Students

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Tracy; Tennen, Howard; Armeli, Stephen; Todd, Michael; Mohr, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    A 30-day daily diary study examined the relations among implicit self-esteem, interpersonal interactions, and alcohol consumption in college students. Multilevel analyses revealed that students with low implicit self-esteem drank more on days when they experienced more negative interpersonal interactions. In contrast, students with high implicit self-esteem drank more on days when they experienced more positive interpersonal interactions. Spending time with people who were drinking mediated both the low implicit self-esteem by negative interpersonal events interaction and the high implicit self-esteem by positive interpersonal events interaction. These findings suggest that people with low implicit self-esteem may unintentionally drink as a way to regulate unfulfilled needs for acceptance. On the other hand, people with high implicit self-esteem may drink as a way to enhance positive interpersonal experiences. PMID:20161219

  3. Naturally processed HLA class II peptides reveal highly conserved immunogenic flanking region sequence preferences that reflect antigen processing rather than peptide-MHC interactions.

    PubMed

    Godkin, A J; Smith, K J; Willis, A; Tejada-Simon, M V; Zhang, J; Elliott, T; Hill, A V

    2001-06-01

    MHC class II heterodimers bind peptides 12-20 aa in length. The peptide flanking residues (PFRs) of these ligands extend from a central binding core consisting of nine amino acids. Increasing evidence suggests that the PFRs can alter the immunogenicity of T cell epitopes. We have previously noted that eluted peptide pool sequence data derived from an MHC class II Ag reflect patterns of enrichment not only in the core binding region but also in the PFRS: We sought to distinguish whether these enrichments reflect cellular processes or direct MHC-peptide interactions. Using the multiple sclerosis-associated allele HLA-DR2, pool sequence data from naturally processed ligands were compared with the patterns of enrichment obtained by binding semicombinatorial peptide libraries to empty HLA-DR2 molecules. Naturally processed ligands revealed patterns of enrichment reflecting both the binding motif of HLA-DR2 (position (P)1, aliphatic; P4, bulky hydrophobic; and P6, polar) as well as the nonbound flanking regions, including acidic residues at the N terminus and basic residues at the C terminus. These PFR enrichments were independent of MHC-peptide interactions. Further studies revealed similar patterns in nine other HLA alleles, with the C-terminal basic residues being as highly conserved as the previously described N-terminal prolines of MHC class II ligands. There is evidence that addition of C-terminal basic PFRs to known peptide epitopes is able to enhance both processing as well as T cell activation. Recognition of these allele-transcending patterns in the PFRs may prove useful in epitope identification and vaccine design.

  4. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  5. Ocean dynamics studies. [of current-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Both the theoretical and experimental investigations into current-wave interactions are discussed. The following three problems were studied: (1) the dispersive relation of a random gravity-capillary wave field; (2) the changes of the statistical properties of surface waves under the influence of currents; and (3) the interaction of capillary-gravity with the nonuniform currents. Wave current interaction was measured and the feasibility of using such measurements for remote sensing of surface currents was considered. A laser probe was developed to measure the surface statistics, and the possibility of using current-wave interaction as a means of current measurement was demonstrated.

  6. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  7. Using Facebook Data to Analyze Learner Interaction during Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Although study abroad is viewed as an ideal environment for interaction in the target language, research in this area has relied mostly upon self-reported data, which pose challenges regarding recall bias and participant commitment. This article shows how Facebook data can be used to analyze naturally occurring learner interactions during study…

  8. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the "Marketing"…

  9. Conceptual Approaches to the Study of Small Group Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    Noting that social interaction theory has long been characterized by a plethora of divergent research studies in search of an organizing paradigm, and that a common failing of most social interaction research has been its focus on process or change in relationships, the first part of this paper specifies the major limiting, or boundary, conditions…

  10. Teacher Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigated the process of adopting and integrating interactive whiteboards into the daily practice of teachers and compared the findings to relevant theoretical models. Participants were drawn from a small international school in Damascus, Syria, where interactive whiteboards were introduced for the first time. The findings…

  11. A computational analysis of protein interactions in metabolic networks reveals novel enzyme pairs potentially involved in metabolic channeling.

    PubMed

    Huthmacher, Carola; Gille, Christoph; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2008-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions are operative at almost every level of cell structure and function as, for example, formation of sub-cellular organelles, packaging of chromatin, muscle contraction, signal transduction, and regulation of gene expression. Public databases of reported protein-protein interactions comprise hundreds of thousands interactions, and this number is steadily growing. Elucidating the implications of protein-protein interactions for the regulation of the underlying cellular or extra-cellular reaction network remains a great challenge for computational biochemistry. In this work, we have undertaken a systematic and comprehensive computational analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions in the metabolic networks of the model organisms Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We grouped all enzyme pairs according to the topological distance that the catalyzed reactions have in the metabolic network and performed a statistical analysis of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within these groups. We found a higher frequency of reported enzyme-enzyme interactions within the group of enzymes catalyzing reactions that are adjacent in the network, i.e. sharing at least one metabolite. As some of these interacting enzymes have already been implicated in metabolic channeling our analysis may provide a useful screening for candidates of this phenomenon. To check for a possible regulatory role of interactions between enzymes catalyzing non-neighboring reactions, we determined potentially regulatory enzymes using connectivity in the network and absolute change of Gibbs free energy. Indeed a higher portion of reported interactions pertain to such potentially regulatory enzymes.

  12. [Differential gene expression in incompatible interaction between Lilium regale Wilson and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii revealed by combined SSH and microarray analysis].

    PubMed

    Rao, J; Liu, D; Zhang, N; He, H; Ge, F; Chen, C

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by a soilborne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii, is the major disease of lily (Lilium L.). In order to isolate the genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to F. oxysporum in L. regale Wilson, a cDNA library was constructed with L. regale root during F. oxysporum infection using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), and a total of 585 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles in the incompatible interaction between L. regale and F. oxysporum were revealed by oligonucleotide microarray analysis of 585 unique ESTs comparison to the compatible interaction between a susceptible Lilium Oriental Hybrid 'Siberia' and F. oxysporum. The result of expression profile analysis indicated that the genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs), antioxidative stress enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins as well as a large number of unknown genes were involved in early defense response of L. regale to F. oxysporum infection. Moreover, the following quantitative reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) analysis confirmed reliability of the oligonucleotide microarray data. In the present study, isolation of differentially expressed genes in L. regale during response to F. oxysporum helped to uncover the molecular mechanism associated with the resistance of L. regale against F. oxysporum.

  13. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-11-26

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs.

  14. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  15. Analyses of dynein heavy chain mutations reveal complex interactions between dynein motor domains and cellular dynein functions.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R; Razafsky, David S; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D; King, Stephen J

    2012-08-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies.

  16. Evf2 lncRNA/BRG1/DLX1 interactions reveal RNA-dependent inhibition of chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Cajigas, Ivelisse; Leib, David E; Cochrane, Jesse; Luo, Hao; Swyter, Kelsey R; Chen, Sean; Clark, Brian S; Thompson, James; Yates, John R; Kingston, Robert E; Kohtz, Jhumku D

    2015-08-01

    Transcription-regulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have the potential to control the site-specific expression of thousands of target genes. Previously, we showed that Evf2, the first described ultraconserved lncRNA, increases the association of transcriptional activators (DLX homeodomain proteins) with key DNA enhancers but represses gene expression. In this report, mass spectrometry shows that the Evf2-DLX1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) contains the SWI/SNF-related chromatin remodelers Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1, SMARCA4) and Brahma-associated factor (BAF170, SMARCC2) in the developing mouse forebrain. Evf2 RNA colocalizes with BRG1 in nuclear clouds and increases BRG1 association with key DNA regulatory enhancers in the developing forebrain. While BRG1 directly interacts with DLX1 and Evf2 through distinct binding sites, Evf2 directly inhibits BRG1 ATPase and chromatin remodeling activities. In vitro studies show that both RNA-BRG1 binding and RNA inhibition of BRG1 ATPase/remodeling activity are promiscuous, suggesting that context is a crucial factor in RNA-dependent chromatin remodeling inhibition. Together, these experiments support a model in which RNAs convert an active enhancer to a repressed enhancer by directly inhibiting chromatin remodeling activity, and address the apparent paradox of RNA-mediated stabilization of transcriptional activators at enhancers with a repressive outcome. The importance of BRG1/RNA and BRG1/homeodomain interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders is underscored by the finding that mutations in Coffin-Siris syndrome, a human intellectual disability disorder, localize to the BRG1 RNA-binding and DLX1-binding domains.

  17. AFM force spectroscopy reveals how subtle structural differences affect the interaction strength between Candida albicans and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Figdor, Carl G; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-11-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common cause of mycotic infections in immunocompromised hosts. Little is known about the initial interactions between Candida and immune cell receptors, such as the C-type lectin dendritic cell-specific intracellular cell adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), because a detailed characterization at the structural level is lacking. DC-SIGN recognizes specific Candida-associated molecular patterns, that is, mannan structures present in the cell wall of Candida. The molecular recognition mechanism is however poorly understood. We postulated that small differences in mannan-branching may result in considerable differences in the binding affinity. Here, we exploit atomic force microscope-based dynamic force spectroscopy with single Candida cells to gain better insight in the carbohydrate recognition capacity of DC-SIGN. We demonstrate that slight differences in the N-mannan structure of Candida, that is, the absence or presence of a phosphomannan side chain, results in differences in the recognition by DC-SIGN as follows: (i) it contributes to the compliance of the outer cell wall of Candida, and (ii) its presence results in a higher binding energy of 1.6 kB T. The single-bond affinity of tetrameric DC-SIGN for wild-type C. albicans is ~10.7 kB T and a dissociation constant kD of 23 μM, which is relatively strong compared with other carbohydrate-protein interactions described in the literature. In conclusion, this study shows that DC-SIGN specifically recognizes mannan patterns on C. albicans with high affinity. Knowledge on the binding pocket of DC-SIGN and its pathogenic ligands will lead to a better understanding of how fungal-associated carbohydrate structures are recognized by receptors of the immune system and can ultimately contribute to the development of new anti-fungal drugs.

  18. Interactions between auditory 'what' and 'where' pathways revealed by enhanced near-threshold discrimination of frequency and position.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Eric; Spierer, Lucas; Clarke, Stephanie; Murray, Micah M

    2008-03-01

    Partially segregated neuronal pathways ("what" and "where" pathways, respectively) are thought to mediate sound recognition and localization. Less studied are interactions between these pathways. In two experiments, we investigated whether near-threshold pitch discrimination sensitivity (d') is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant position differences and likewise whether near-threshold position discrimination sensitivity is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant pitch differences. Each experiment followed a 2 x 2 within-subjects design regarding changes/no change in the task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimulus dimensions. In Experiment 1, subjects discriminated between 750 Hz and 752 Hz pure tones, and d' for this near-threshold pitch change significantly increased by a factor of 1.09 when accompanied by a task-irrelevant position change of 65 micros interaural time difference (ITD). No response bias was induced by the task-irrelevant position change. In Experiment 2, subjects discriminated between 385 micros and 431 micros ITDs, and d' for this near-threshold position change significantly increased by a factor of 0.73 when accompanied by task-irrelevant pitch changes (6 Hz). In contrast to Experiment 1, task-irrelevant pitch changes induced a response criterion bias toward responding that the two stimuli differed. The collective results are indicative of facilitative interactions between "what" and "where" pathways. By demonstrating how these pathways may cooperate under impoverished listening conditions, our results bear implications for possible neuro-rehabilitation strategies. We discuss our results in terms of the dual-pathway model of auditory processing. PMID:18191423

  19. Continuous flow atomic force microscopy imaging reveals fluidity and time-dependent interactions of antimicrobial dendrimer with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Zielińska, Paulina; Wacklin, Hanna Pauliina; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Cárdenas, Marité

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, an amphiphilic peptide dendrimer with potential applications against multi-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus was synthesized and studied on model cell membranes. The combination of quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy imaging during continuous flow allowed for in situ monitoring of the very initial interaction processes and membrane transformations on longer time scales. We used three different membrane compositions of low and high melting temperature phospholipids to vary the membrane properties from a single fluid phase to a pure gel phase, while crossing the phase coexistence boundaries at room temperature. The interaction mechanism of the dendrimer was found to be time-dependent and to vary remarkably with the fluidity and coexistence of liquid-solid phases in the membrane. Spherical micelle-like dendrimer-lipid aggregates were formed in the fluid-phase bilayer and led to partial solubilization of the membrane, while in gel-phase membranes, the dendrimers caused areas of local depressions followed by redeposition of flexible lipid patches. Domain coexistence led to a sequence of events initiated by the formation of a ribbon-like network and followed by membrane solubilization via spherical aggregates from the edges of bilayer patches. Our results show that the dendrimer molecules were able to destroy the membrane integrity through different mechanisms depending on the lipid phase and morphology and shed light on their antimicrobial activity. These findings could have an impact on the efficacy of the dendrimers since lipid membranes in certain bacteria have transition temperatures very close to the host body temperature.

  20. Evf2 lncRNA/BRG1/DLX1 interactions reveal RNA-dependent inhibition of chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cajigas, Ivelisse; Leib, David E.; Cochrane, Jesse; Luo, Hao; Swyter, Kelsey R.; Chen, Sean; Clark, Brian S.; Thompson, James; Yates, John R.; Kingston, Robert E.; Kohtz, Jhumku D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription-regulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have the potential to control the site-specific expression of thousands of target genes. Previously, we showed that Evf2, the first described ultraconserved lncRNA, increases the association of transcriptional activators (DLX homeodomain proteins) with key DNA enhancers but represses gene expression. In this report, mass spectrometry shows that the Evf2-DLX1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) contains the SWI/SNF-related chromatin remodelers Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1, SMARCA4) and Brahma-associated factor (BAF170, SMARCC2) in the developing mouse forebrain. Evf2 RNA colocalizes with BRG1 in nuclear clouds and increases BRG1 association with key DNA regulatory enhancers in the developing forebrain. While BRG1 directly interacts with DLX1 and Evf2 through distinct binding sites, Evf2 directly inhibits BRG1 ATPase and chromatin remodeling activities. In vitro studies show that both RNA-BRG1 binding and RNA inhibition of BRG1 ATPase/remodeling activity are promiscuous, suggesting that context is a crucial factor in RNA-dependent chromatin remodeling inhibition. Together, these experiments support a model in which RNAs convert an active enhancer to a repressed enhancer by directly inhibiting chromatin remodeling activity, and address the apparent paradox of RNA-mediated stabilization of transcriptional activators at enhancers with a repressive outcome. The importance of BRG1/RNA and BRG1/homeodomain interactions in neurodevelopmental disorders is underscored by the finding that mutations in Coffin–Siris syndrome, a human intellectual disability disorder, localize to the BRG1 RNA-binding and DLX1-binding domains. PMID:26138476

  1. The Deflection of the Two Interacting Coronal Mass Ejections of 2010 May 23-24 as Revealed by Combined in Situ Measurements and Heliospheric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Davies, J. A.; Möstl, C.; Davis, C. J.; Roussev, I. I.; Temmer, M.

    2012-11-01

    In 2010 May 23-24, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the launch of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were subsequently tracked by the SECCHI suite on board STEREO. Using the COR2 coronagraphs and the heliospheric imagers (HIs), the initial direction of both CMEs is determined to be slightly west of the Sun-Earth line. We derive the CME kinematics, including the evolution of the CME expansion until 0.4 AU. We find that, during the interaction, the second CME decelerates from a speed above 500 km s-1 to 380 km s-1, the speed of the leading edge of the first CME. STEREO observes a complex structure composed of two different bright tracks in HI2-A but only one bright track in HI2-B. In situ measurements from Wind show an "isolated" interplanetary CME, with the geometry of a flux rope preceded by a shock. Measurements in the sheath are consistent with draping around the transient. By combining remote-sensing and in situ measurements, we determine that this event shows a clear instance of deflection of two CMEs after their collision, and we estimate the deflection of the first CME to be about 10° toward the Sun-Earth line. The arrival time, arrival speed, and radius at Earth of the first CME are best predicted from remote-sensing observations taken before the collision of the CMEs. Due to the over-expansion of the CME after the collision, there are few, if any, signs of interaction in in situ measurements. This study illustrates that complex interactions during the Sun-to-Earth propagation may not be revealed by in situ measurements alone.

  2. Aurora-C Interactions with Survivin and INCENP Reveal Shared and Distinct Features Compared with Aurora-B Chromosome Passenger Protein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Sasai, Kaori; Katayama, Hiroshi; Hawke, David H.; Sen, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Aurora-C, a member of the Aurora kinase family that can complement Aurora-B function in mitosis is either moderately expressed or repressed in most adult somatic tissues but is active in early embryonic development and expressed at elevated levels in multiple human cancers. Aurora-C overexpression reportedly plays a role in tumorigenic transformation. We performed detailed characterization of Aurora-C interactions with members of the Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC), Survivin and Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) in reference to known Aurora-B interactions to understand the functional significance of Aurora-C overexpression in human cancer cells. The results revealed that silencing of Aurora-C or -B individually does not affect localization of the other kinase and the two kinases exist predominantly in independent complexes in vivo. Presence of Aurora-C and -B in molecular complexes of varying as well as overlapping sizes and co-existence in INCENP overexpressing cells indicated oligomerization of ternary complexes under different physiological conditions in vivo. Furthermore, Aurora-C and -B stabilized INCENP through interaction with and phosphorylation of the IN box domain while Aurora-C was activated following Survivin phosphorylation on Serine 20. Phosphorylation of Survivin residue Serine 20 by Aurora-C and –B appears important for proper chromosome segregation. Taken together, our study suggests that Aurora-C, expressed at low levels in somatic cells, functions as a catalytic component of the CPC together with Aurora-B through mitosis. Elevated expression of Aurora-C in cancer cells alters the structural and functional characteristics of the Aurora-B-CPC leading to chromosomal instability. PMID:27332895

  3. A microcalorimetric study of molecular interactions between immunoglobulin G and hydrophobic charge-induction ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Dong; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-04-22

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) with 4-mercaptoethyl-pyridine (MEP) as the ligand is a novel technology for antibody purification. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to evaluate the molecular interactions between MEP ligand and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Three types of IgG molecules including human IgG (hIgG), bovine IgG (bIgG) and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated with human serum albumins (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the comparison. The thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC were compared with the adsorption data. The results indicated that MEP binding to protein at neutral pH was entropy driven and induced by multimodal molecular interactions that was dominated by hydrophobic forces. The interactions between MEP and IgGs were stronger than that of albumins, which resulted in high binding affinity of IgGs. Moreover, the effects of pH and salt addition on MEP-hIgG binding were studied. The change of enthalpy increased obviously with the decrease of pH, which revealed that the electrostatic forces dominated the MEP-hIgG interactions at acidic condition and caused typical charge-induced elution of HCIC. Salt addition influenced both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. With the increase of salt concentration, the hydrophobic interactions decreased first and then increased, while the electrostatic interactions showed the opposite trend. This resulted in trade-off between the multimodal interactions, which caused the salt-tolerant property of MEP resin. In general, ITC studies revealed the molecular mechanism of three critical characteristics of HCIC, multimodal interactions, pH-dependent and salt-tolerant properties.

  4. A microcalorimetric study of molecular interactions between immunoglobulin G and hydrophobic charge-induction ligand.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Ming; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Dong; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-04-22

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) with 4-mercaptoethyl-pyridine (MEP) as the ligand is a novel technology for antibody purification. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to evaluate the molecular interactions between MEP ligand and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Three types of IgG molecules including human IgG (hIgG), bovine IgG (bIgG) and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated with human serum albumins (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the comparison. The thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC were compared with the adsorption data. The results indicated that MEP binding to protein at neutral pH was entropy driven and induced by multimodal molecular interactions that was dominated by hydrophobic forces. The interactions between MEP and IgGs were stronger than that of albumins, which resulted in high binding affinity of IgGs. Moreover, the effects of pH and salt addition on MEP-hIgG binding were studied. The change of enthalpy increased obviously with the decrease of pH, which revealed that the electrostatic forces dominated the MEP-hIgG interactions at acidic condition and caused typical charge-induced elution of HCIC. Salt addition influenced both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. With the increase of salt concentration, the hydrophobic interactions decreased first and then increased, while the electrostatic interactions showed the opposite trend. This resulted in trade-off between the multimodal interactions, which caused the salt-tolerant property of MEP resin. In general, ITC studies revealed the molecular mechanism of three critical characteristics of HCIC, multimodal interactions, pH-dependent and salt-tolerant properties. PMID:27017449

  5. Rit Mutants Confirm Role of MEK/ERK Signaling in Neuronal Differentiation and Reveal Novel Par6 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Jennifer L.; Shi, Geng-Xian; Erdogan, Eda; Fields, Alan P.; Andres, Douglas A.

    2007-01-01

    Rit is a novel member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins that regulates signaling pathways controlling cellular fate determination. Constitutively activated mutants of Rit induce terminal differentiation of pheochromocytoma (PC6) cells resulting in a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype characterized by the development of highly-branched neurites. Rit signaling has been found to activate several downstream pathways including MEK/ERK, p38 MAPK, Ral-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), and Rit associates with the Par6 cell polarity machinery. In this study, a series of Rit effector loop mutants was generated to test the importance of these cellular targets to Rit-mediated neuronal differentiation. We find that Rit-mediated neuritogenesis is dependent upon MEK/ERK MAP kinase signaling but independent of RalGEF activation. In addition, in vivo binding studies identified a novel mechanism of Par6 interaction, suggesting that the cell polarity machinery may serve to spatially restrict Rit signaling. PMID:17976838

  6. Protein Thermal Conductivity Measured in the Solid State Reveals Anharmonic Interactions of Vibrations in a Fractal Structure.

    PubMed

    Foley, Brian M; Gorham, Caroline S; Duda, John C; Cheaito, Ramez; Szwejkowski, Chester J; Constantin, Costel; Kaehr, Bryan; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2014-04-01

    Energy processes and vibrations in biological macromolecules such as proteins ultimately dictate biological, chemical, and physical functions in living materials. These energetic vibrations in the ribbon-like motifs of proteins interact on self-similar structures and fractal-like objects over a range of length scales of the protein (a few angstroms to the size of the protein itself, a few nanometers). In fact, the fractal geometries of protein molecules create a complex network of vibrations; therefore, proteins represent an ideal material system to study the underlying mechanisms driving vibrational thermal transport in a dense, fractal network. However, experimental studies of thermal energy transport in proteins have been limited to dispersive protein suspensions, which limits the knowledge that can be extracted about how vibrational energy is transferred in a pure protein solid. We overcome this by synthesizing solid, water-insoluble protein films for thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance. We measure the thermal conductivity of bovine serum albumin and myoglobin solid films over a range of temperatures from 77 to 296 K. These temperature trends indicate that anharmonic coupling of vibrations in the protein is contributing to thermal conductivity. This first-ever observation of anharmonic-like trends in the thermal conductivity of a fully dense protein forms the basis of validation of seminal theories of vibrational energy-transfer processes in fractal objects.

  7. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique.

  8. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-15

    To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized π electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-π type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

  9. Ab Initio Study of Molecular Interactions in Cellulose Iα

    SciTech Connect

    Devarajan, Ajitha; Markutsya, Serjiy; Lamm, Monica H.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.; Baluyut, John Y.; Kholod, Yana; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2013-08-12

    Biomass recalcitrance, the resistance of cellulosic biomass to degradation, is due in part to the stability of the hydrogen bond network and stacking forces between the polysaccharide chains in cellulose microfibers. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method at the correlated Møller–Plesset second order perturbation level of theory was used on a model of the crystalline cellulose Iα core with a total of 144 glucose units. These computations show that the intersheet chain interactions are stronger than the intrasheet chain interactions for the crystalline structure, while they are more similar to each other for a relaxed structure. An FMO chain pair interaction energy decomposition analysis for both the crystal and relaxed structures reveals an intricate interplay between electrostatic, dispersion, charge transfer, and exchange repulsion effects. The role of the primary alcohol groups in stabilizing the interchain hydrogen bond network in the inner sheet of the crystal and relaxed structures of cellulose Iα, where edge effects are absent, was analyzed. The maximum attractive intrasheet interaction is observed for the GT-TG residue pair with one intrasheet hydrogen bond, suggesting that the relative orientation of the residues is as important as the hydrogen bond network in strengthening the interaction between the residues.

  10. Characteristics of the interaction of azulene with water and hydrogen sulfide: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Peña-Gallego, Angeles

    2008-08-28

    A computational study was carried out for studying the characteristics of the interaction between azulene and water or hydrogen sulfide. In azulene...water complex the water molecule is located with both hydrogen atoms pointing toward the aromatic cloud but displaced to the five-membered ring. Hydrogen sulfide adopts a similar arrangement but located roughly over the central C-C bond of azulene. Calculations show that hydrogen sulfide interacts with azulene more strongly (-4.19 kcal/mol) than water (-3.76 kcal/mol), although this is only revealed at the highest levels of calculation. The nature of the interaction is electrostatic and dispersive in the same percentage for water cluster, whereas for hydrogen sulfide dispersion is the dominant contribution. Clusters containing two water molecules are controlled by the possibility of establishing an O-H...O hydrogen bond. As a consequence, the most stable structure corresponds to the interaction between a water dimer and azulene, with an interaction energy amounting to -11.77 kcal/mol. Hydrogen sulfide interaction is stronger with azulene than with itself, so structures with S-H...S contact and others, where H(2)S only interacts with azulene, present similar interaction energies (-8.02 kcal/mol for the most stable one).

  11. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  12. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs. PMID:26444829

  13. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs. PMID:26444829

  14. Improvements in Markov State Model Construction Reveal Many Non-Native Interactions in the Folding of NTL9

    PubMed Central

    Schwantes, Christian R.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-01-01

    Markov State Models (MSMs) provide an automated framework to investigate the dynamical properties of high-dimensional molecular simulations. These models can provide a human-comprehensible picture of the underlying process, and have been successfully used to study protein folding, protein aggregation, protein ligand binding, and other biophysical systems. The MSM requires the construction of a discrete state-space such that two points are in the same state if they can interconvert rapidly. In the following, we suggest an improved method, which utilizes second order Independent Components Analysis (also known as time-structure based Independent Components Analysis, or tICA), to construct the state-space. We apply this method to simulations of NTL9 (provided by Lindorff-Larsen et al. Science 2011), and show that the MSM is an improvement over previously built models using conventional distance metrics. Additionally, the resulting model provides insight into the role of non-native contacts by revealing many slow timescales associated with compact, non-native states. PMID:23750122

  15. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Ram K; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G F; Groot, Steven P C; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding. PMID:26648948

  16. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Ram K; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G F; Groot, Steven P C; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding.

  17. Towards phonon photonics: scattering-type near-field optical microscopy reveals phonon-enhanced near-field interaction.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, Rainer

    2004-08-01

    Diffraction limits the spatial resolution in classical microscopy or the dimensions of optical circuits to about half the illumination wavelength. Scanning near-field microscopy can overcome this limitation by exploiting the evanescent near fields existing close to any illuminated object. We use a scattering-type near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM) that uses the illuminated metal tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) to act as scattering near-field probe. The presented images are direct evidence that the s-SNOM enables optical imaging at a spatial resolution on a 10nm scale, independent of the wavelength used (lambda=633 nm and 10 microm). Operating the microscope at specific mid-infrared frequencies we found a tip-induced phonon-polariton resonance on flat polar crystals such as SiC and Si3N4. Being a spectral fingerprint of any polar material such phonon-enhanced near-field interaction has enormous applicability in nondestructive, material-specific infrared microscopy at nanoscale resolution. The potential of s-SNOM to study eigenfields of surface polaritons in nanostructures opens the door to the development of phonon photonics-a proposed infrared nanotechnology that uses localized or propagating surface phonon polaritons for probing, manipulating and guiding infrared light in nanoscale devices, analogous to plasmon photonics.

  18. Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis of Seed Germination and Seedling Vigor in Brassica rapa Reveals QTL Hotspots and Epistatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Basnet, Ram K.; Duwal, Anita; Tiwari, Dev N.; Xiao, Dong; Monakhos, Sokrat; Bucher, Johan; Visser, Richard G. F.; Groot, Steven P. C.; Bonnema, Guusje; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of seed germination and seedling vigor is largely unknown in Brassica species. We performed a study to evaluate the genetic basis of these important traits in a B. rapa doubled haploid population from a cross of a yellow-seeded oil-type yellow sarson and a black-seeded vegetable-type pak choi. We identified 26 QTL regions across all 10 linkage groups for traits related to seed weight, seed germination and seedling vigor under non-stress and salt stress conditions illustrating the polygenic nature of these traits. QTLs for multiple traits co-localized and we identified eight hotspots for quantitative trait loci (QTL) of seed weight, seed germination, and root and shoot lengths. A QTL hotspot for seed germination on A02 mapped at the B. rapa Flowering Locus C (BrFLC2). Another hotspot on A05 with salt stress specific QTLs co-located with the B. rapa Fatty acid desaturase 2 (BrFAD2) locus. Epistatic interactions were observed between QTL hotspots for seed germination on A02 and A10 and with a salt tolerance QTL on A05. These results contribute to the understanding of the genetics of seed quality and seeding vigor in B. rapa and can offer tools for Brassica breeding. PMID:26648948

  19. The Transcriptome of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) with Phytophthora infestans Revealed by DeepSAGE Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gyetvai, Gabor; Sønderkær, Mads; Göbel, Ulrike; Basekow, Rico; Ballvora, Agim; Imhoff, Maren; Kersten, Birgit; Nielsen, Kåre-Lehman; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). Understanding the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility to late blight is therefore highly relevant for developing resistant cultivars, either by marker-assissted selection or by transgenic approaches. Specific P. infestans races having the Avr1 effector gene trigger a hypersensitive resistance response in potato plants carrying the R1 resistance gene (incompatible interaction) and cause disease in plants lacking R1 (compatible interaction). The transcriptomes of the compatible and incompatible interaction were captured by DeepSAGE analysis of 44 biological samples comprising five genotypes, differing only by the presence or absence of the R1 transgene, three infection time points and three biological replicates. 30.859 unique 21 base pair sequence tags were obtained, one third of which did not match any known potato transcript sequence. Two third of the tags were expressed at low frequency (<10 tag counts/million). 20.470 unitags matched to approximately twelve thousand potato transcribed genes. Tag frequencies were compared between compatible and incompatible interactions over the infection time course and between compatible and incompatible genotypes. Transcriptional changes were more numerous in compatible than in incompatible interactions. In contrast to incompatible interactions, transcriptional changes in the compatible interaction were observed predominantly for multigene families encoding defense response genes and genes functional in photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. Numerous transcriptional differences were also observed between near isogenic genotypes prior to infection with P. infestans. Our DeepSAGE transcriptome analysis uncovered novel candidate genes for plant host pathogen interactions, examples of which are discussed with respect to possible function. PMID:22328937

  20. Characterization of the nuclear export signal of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Rex reveals that nuclear export is mediated by position-variable hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, F J; Beeche, A A; Hunter, J J; Chin, D J; Hope, T J

    1996-01-01

    We previously determined that amino acids 64 to 120 of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Rex can restore the function of an effector domain mutant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Rev (T. J. Hope, B. L. Bond, D. McDonald, N. P. Klein, and T. G. Parslow, J. Virol. 65:6001-6007, 1991). In this report, we (i) identify and characterize a position-independent 17-amino-acid region of HTLV-1 Rex that fully complements HIV-1 Rev effector domain mutants and (ii) show that this 17-amino-acid region and specific hydrophobic substitutions can serve as nuclear export signals. Mutagenesis studies revealed that four leucines within the minimal region were essential for function. Alignment of the minimal Rex region with the HIV-1 Rev effector domain suggested that the position of some of the conserved leucines is flexible. We found two of the leucines could each occupy one of two positions within the context of the full-length HTLV-1 Rex protein and maintain function. The idea of flexibility within the Rex effector domain was confirmed and extended by identifying functional substitutions by screening a library of effector domain mutants in which the two regions of flexibility were randomized. Secondly, the functional roles of the minimal Rex effector domain and hydrophobic substitutions were independently confirmed by demonstrating that these effector domains could serve as nuclear export signals when conjugated with bovine serum albumin. Nuclear export of the wild-type Rex conjugates was temperature dependent and sensitive to wheat germ agglutinin and was blocked by a 20-fold excess of unlabeled conjugates. Together, these studies reveal that position-variable hydrophobic interactions within the HTLV-1 Rex effector domain mediate nuclear export function. PMID:8756672

  1. Environmental confounding in gene-environment interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2013-07-01

    We show that, in the presence of uncontrolled environmental confounding, joint tests for the presence of a main genetic effect and gene-environment interaction will be biased if the genetic and environmental factors are correlated, even if there is no effect of either the genetic factor or the environmental factor on the disease. When environmental confounding is ignored, such tests will in fact reject the joint null of no genetic effect with a probability that tends to 1 as the sample size increases. This problem with the joint test vanishes und